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Publication numberUS3038624 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 12, 1962
Filing dateSep 18, 1956
Priority dateSep 22, 1955
Also published asDE1043847B
Publication numberUS 3038624 A, US 3038624A, US-A-3038624, US3038624 A, US3038624A
InventorsWieckmann Gerhard
Original AssigneeHuber Karl
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Container closure
US 3038624 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June l2, 1962 G. WIECKMANN CONTAINER CLOSURE Filed Sept. 18, 1956 United States Patent O 3,038,624 CONTAINER CLOSURE Gerhard Wieckmann, Ohrngen, Wurttemberg, Germany, assignor to Karl Huber, Blechwarenfabrik, Ohrmgen, Wurttemherg, Germany, a firm of Germany Filed Sept. 18, 1956, Ser. No. 610,475

Claims priority, application Germany Sept. Z2, 1955 3 Claims. (Cl. 21S-41) The present invention relates to improvements in closures for bottles, glasses, and similar containers.

Prior to this invention it has been known to provide the caps for bottles, glasses and the like with resilient inserts, such as washers or rings, for increasing the sealing action thereof. Such inserts were generally provided if the cap itself did not provide a sealing action, that is, in those cases in which the cap consisted of hard or rigid materials such as metals, glass, synthetic resin or the like. This had the disadvantage that the closure had to consist of two parts which had to be manufactured independent-ly of each other.

It is now an object of the present invention to provide a cap or closure which fulfills all the purposes of a twopart closure but only consists of a single element, and which is adapted to accomplish an adequate sealing action even though the cap itself may not be applied for that purpose.

It has also been known prior to this invention to make such caps or closures of resilient synthetic materials and to provide them on their inside with a funnel-like projection or skirt which forms a unitary portion of the cap and Ihas a wall strength of gradually increasing thickness from the bottom of the cap. This projection was made of a size so as to extend into the mouth of the bottle to be closed, and its outer surface abutted at least partly on Ithe inside of the bottle neck. Such a cap could seal the inside of the container safely only if the outer diameter of the funnel-like insert corresponded at least within a certain area to the inner diameter of the opening of the bottle neck. The pressure from the inside of the bottle would then expand the pluglike projection so that the latter would cling tothe inside of the bottle neck. vIf there were any minor deviations in size, a proper sealing action could not be attained. Either the diameter of lthe projection was `smaller than that of the inner wall of the container near its mouth, `in which case the projection would not -seal at all, or -the diameter of the projection within a certain area was slightly larger than that of the inner wall of the mouth of the container, in which case folds would form which likewise prevented a proper sealing action.

It is another object of the invention to` provide a cap or closure which` will overcome the above-mentioned disadvantages of the known closures, and a feature of the invention for accomplishing the foregoing objects consists in making the maximum diameter of the funnellike projection or skirt of a size larger than the maximum inner diameter of the container to be sealed, for example, of the neck opening of a bottle.

Further objects, features, and advantages of the present invention will appear lfrom the following detailed description thereof, particularly when read with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which- FIG. 1 shows a cross section through a crown-seal bottle which is sealed by a cap according to the present invention; while FIG. 2 shows a cross section through a bottle with a screw-threaded neck which is closed and sealed by a cap according to the invention.

Referring to FIG. 1 of the drawings, the bottom 1 of a cap 2 is provided with a funnel-like projection or skirt 3,

Ffice the diameter of which gradually increases in the direction away from -bottom 1, while the wall thickness thereof gradually decreases in the same direction. The outer diameter d of skirt 3 within the `area of the bottom 1 of the cap is therefore smaller than the outer diameter D of the skirt at the end opposite to bottom 1. When the cap is not applied to a bottle, this outer 4diameter D of skirt 3 as indicated in dotted lines in FIG. 1, is larger than the maximum inner diameter of the bottle neck.

FIG. 2, illustrates =a screw cap 4 with a funnel-like skirt 3 of a shape similar to skirt 3 in FIG. 1.

If a cap of this type is either pressed or screwed upon a bottle or similar container, the :funnel-like skirt 3 or 3 will be deformed and turned inside out to an extent depending upon the diameter of the opening of the respective bottle to be sealed. I'f the diameter of the bottle opening is langer than the diameter d, the inner surface of skirt 3 will cling -to the inner wall of the bottle mouth, as shown in FIG. l. If, however, the diameter of the bottle opening is smaller than the diameter d of the skirt, the inner surface thereof will engage with the upper end surface of the bottle, as shown in FIG. 2.

While the caps with separate sealing means have previously been made of hard material in order to prevent the cap, for example, a screw `ca from becoming deformed by the strong pressure of the sealing element upon the edge of the bottle neck, the caps according to the present invention may be made either of resilient or pliable material. Consequently, the cost of production of such caps will be considerably lower than that of the known types of bottle caps, and bursting, breaking, or splitting of the caps as easily occurred on those made of synthetic resins will be safely avoided. As shown in the drawings, an annular air chamber will be formed be- .tween the bottom and the funnel-like skirt of the cap or between the bottom and the edge of the neck of a bottle or similar container when applied thereon. This air chamber serves as an air Acushion and will increase the sealing action.

If skirt 3 is deformed in the manner as shown in FIG. l so that the inner surface of the skirt clings to the inside of the bottle mouth, the sealing -action will be increased by the inclination of the skirt to return to its normal or `starting position. Because of its expansion, no folds or creases will form on the skirt within the area of its sealing surface.

Even though my invention has been illustrated and described with reference to the preferred embodiments thereof, I wish to have it understood that it is in no way limited to the details of such embodiments, but is capable of numerous modifications within the scope of the appended claims.

Having now fully described my invention, what I claim is:

l. In combination, a container having a circular outlet portion of given outer diameter with an annular end face and an inner face of given diameters, and a closure member being made of resiliently yielding material and including la central body portion surrounded by a rim portion adapted to engage the outside face of said outlet portion, a -skirt portion projecting from 'the inner surface of said central body portion, the diameter of said skirt portion increasing so as to flare `outwardly and its wall thickness decreasing toward the free edge thereof, the ou-ter diameter of said skirt portion at its root being smaller Ithan the given inner diameter of said outlet portion, and the inner diameter of said skirt portion at its free edge being larger than the inner diameter of said outlet portion, said closure member being positioned in said outlet portion of said container with its skirt portion being at least partly turned inside out, abutting with a surface area of its originally inner face under sealing pressure against at least one of said faces of said outlet portion of said container.

2. The combination as claimed in claim 1, said skirt portion engaging With a surface area of its originally inner face under sealing pressure at least said annular end face of said outlet portion of said container.

3. The combination as claimed in claim 1, said skirt portion engaging with `a surface area of its originally inner face under sealing pressure at least said inner face of said outlet portion of said container.

References Cited in the le of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,266,270 Roth Dec. 16, 1941 4. FOREIGN PATENTS 1,030,600 lFrance Mar. 18, 1953 1,060,557 France Nov. 18, 1953 1,093,979 France Dec. 1, 1954 64,034 France May 11, 1955 (1st addition of No. 1,064,521) 64,824 France July 6, 1955 (1st addition of No. 1,092,430) 788,148 Great Britain Dec. 23, 1957 OTHER REFERENCES Shackleton abstract of application Serial Number 743,- 769, published November 22, 1949, in O.G. vol. 628, page 1201.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2266270 *Oct 20, 1938Dec 16, 1941Adam G RothClosure means
FR64034E * Title not available
FR64824E * Title not available
FR1030600A * Title not available
FR1060557A * Title not available
FR1064521A * Title not available
FR1092430A * Title not available
FR1093979A * Title not available
GB788148A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3405830 *May 5, 1966Oct 15, 1968Kouichi HayashidaBottle-stopper
US3455500 *Jan 3, 1967Jul 15, 1969Phillips Petroleum CoContainer and cover
US3780897 *Feb 8, 1971Dec 25, 1973V WassilieffStoppers
US4016996 *Jun 22, 1976Apr 12, 1977Albert Obrist AgContainer with screw cap and seal
US4090631 *Jan 31, 1977May 23, 1978Jean GrussenScrew-type bottle cap having improved sealing properties
US4200196 *Oct 23, 1978Apr 29, 1980Bashour Joseph EBottle top closure
US4210251 *May 16, 1978Jul 1, 1980Jean GrussenOne piece molded screw-type bottle cap
US4253581 *Jan 12, 1979Mar 3, 1981Albert Obrist AgContainer with screw cap
US4623070 *Jan 29, 1985Nov 18, 1986Shibazaki Seisakusho Ltd.Closure cap
US4708255 *Dec 12, 1985Nov 24, 1987Tri-Tech Systems International Inc.Closure cap with a linerless seal and a method for forming such closure and seal
US4793506 *Jun 10, 1987Dec 27, 1988Tri-Tech Systems International Inc.Closure cap with a seal and method of and apparatus for forming such closure and seal
US4811857 *Jun 17, 1987Mar 14, 1989Tri-Tech Systems International Inc.Closure system and method of forming and using same
US4823967 *Jun 17, 1987Apr 25, 1989Tri-Tech Systems International Inc.Closure for container and method for forming the closure
US4856667 *Jun 17, 1987Aug 15, 1989Tri-Tech Systems International Inc.Container and cap
US4872304 *Jun 10, 1987Oct 10, 1989Tri-Tech Systems International Inc.Closure cap with a seal and method of and apparatus for forming such closure and seal
US4886947 *Jun 17, 1987Dec 12, 1989Tri-Tech Systems International, Inc.Closure system and method of forming and using same
US4925617 *Jun 10, 1987May 15, 1990Tri-Tech Systems International, Inc.Method of forming a closure cap with a seal
US5100009 *Aug 15, 1989Mar 31, 1992Tri-Tech Systems International Inc.Closure and access systems for containers and methods of manufacture and use
US5158195 *Aug 8, 1989Oct 27, 1992Tri-Tech Systems International, Inc.Closure cap with a seal and method of and apparatus for forming such closure and seal
US5423444 *Jun 15, 1989Jun 13, 1995Mk Plastics Pty Ltd.Linerless closure for carbonated beverage container
US5638972 *Apr 21, 1994Jun 17, 1997Druitt; Rodney MalcolmLinerless closure for carbonated beverage container
US5836464 *Jul 23, 1997Nov 17, 1998Closures And Packaging Services LimitedClosure for beverage container
US5853096 *Nov 25, 1996Dec 29, 1998Bartur; Maya H.For a container for gas/liquid mixtures
US5891380 *Mar 3, 1994Apr 6, 1999Zapata Innovative Closures, Inc.Tamper evident caps and methods
US6062408 *Apr 9, 1997May 16, 2000Dtl Technology Limited PartnershipStretch blow molding from a preform, an intermediate article defining the container with the mouth being threaded; heat setting the intermediate article including the entire container while still in the mold
US6082569 *Sep 10, 1998Jul 4, 2000Closures And Packaging Services LimitedLinerless closure for carbonated beverage container
US6126886 *Apr 1, 1998Oct 3, 2000Dtl Technology Limited PartnershipWide mouth hot fill container
US6237791Jul 14, 1999May 29, 2001Dtl Technology Limited PartnershipWide mouth hot fill container
US6325228Sep 2, 1999Dec 4, 2001Closures And Packaging Services LimitedLinerless closure for carbonated beverage container
US6527132Jul 3, 1998Mar 4, 2003Closures And Packaging Services LimitedClosure with extended seal member
US6805252Nov 6, 2001Oct 19, 2004Closures And Packaging Services LimitedContainer and linerless closure combination
US6991123Feb 6, 2003Jan 31, 2006Closures And Packaging Services LimitedClosure with extended seal member
US7431877Oct 4, 2004Oct 7, 2008Closures And Packaging Services LimitedLinerless closure for carbonated beverage container
US8308008Dec 26, 2007Nov 13, 2012Abbott LaboratoriesContainer
US8469223Aug 3, 2009Jun 25, 2013Abbott LaboratoriesStrength container
US8511499Apr 8, 2011Aug 20, 2013Abbott LaboratoriesContainer
US8627981Jun 5, 2009Jan 14, 2014Abbott LaboratoriesContainer
WO2008083141A2 *Dec 26, 2007Jul 10, 2008Abbott LabContainer
Classifications
U.S. Classification215/320, 215/DIG.100, 215/344
International ClassificationB65D41/04, B65D41/18
Cooperative ClassificationY10S215/01, B65D41/0428, B65D41/185, B65D41/0414
European ClassificationB65D41/18B, B65D41/04B2, B65D41/04B1