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Publication numberUS3038704 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 12, 1962
Filing dateSep 21, 1959
Priority dateSep 21, 1959
Publication numberUS 3038704 A, US 3038704A, US-A-3038704, US3038704 A, US3038704A
InventorsCook Howard F
Original AssigneeChallenge Cook Bros Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Transit mixer
US 3038704 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

H. F. COOK TRANSIT MIXER June 12,1962

3 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Sept. 21, 1959 HC-DWQED E 600% A 7 TO/PNEYS.

June 12, 1962 coo I 3,038,704

TRANSIT MIXER Filed Sept. 21, 1959 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 lk mqeo E 600/6 IN V EN TOR.

June 12, 1962 H.- F. COOK 3038,704-

TRANSIT MIXER Filed Sept. 21, 1959 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 [EL-W Han men E 00K IN V EN TOR.

atent 3,033,704 Patented June 12, 1962 ice 3,038,704 TRANSIT MIXER Howard F. Cook, Pasadena, Calif., assignor, by mesne assignments, to Challenge-Cook Bros. Incorporated, La Mirada, Calif., a corporation of California Filed Sept. 21, 1959, Ser. No. 841,161

6 Claims. (Cl. 259-160) This invention relates to a transit mixer, and more particularly to a forward discharging transit mixer mounted on a semi-trailer and arranged for simplified, controlled discharge of concrete or other aggregate materials.

Transit mixers are well known in the construction trades, and generally consist of a mixer drum mounted on a truck, with means for rotating the drum While in transit. The rig is used for transportation of materials from a mixing plant to job locations, with the mixing of the materials being continued from the time the truck is first loaded, while it is in transit, and until the final discharge of the transported materials at the job locations.

The rotatable mixer drum in the standard mixer, although adequate in size for many construction projects, is nevertheless restricted in dimensions because it is mounted on a truck and must be conformed to the size limitations of the truck and also frequently to highway maximum axle load regulations. A substantially larger single load capacity is often desirable, particularly when the job is large and the mixing plant is a substantial distance away from the job location, in which case asingle haul is generally more advantageous than multiple hauls of the same quantity of aggregate materials.

It will be recognized that most transit mixers are ar-- ranged for rearward loading and rearward discharge of the mixed materials. However, forward loading and discharge, if satisfactorily arranged, has many advantages over rearward loading and discharge. For instance, when the loading and discharge is rearward, the rig must be backed into loading position, and also into discharge posi-- tion, often in a restricted driving area, with impaired rearward vision and consequent loss of time, whereas, a for-f ward loading and discharge will permit rapid and exact approach to the loading and discharge points, and in the case of discharge, will allow accurate control of the discharge means by the driver, whose view of the discharge point and discharge means is unimpaired.

It is an object ofthe present invention to provide a forward loading and discharge transit mixer mounted .On a combination semi-trailer, truck-tractor rig capable of hauling large quantities of aggregate materials such as concrete and mixing them in transit.

It is a further object of this invention to provide a forward loading and discharging transit mixer of aggregate materials which may be quickly and easily directed by the driver-operator to loading position and to discharging posithe truck-tractor unit when cargo discharge is to be ac complished.

With these and other objects in view, the invention consists of the construction, arrangement and combination of the various parts of the device whereby the objects contemplated are attained, as hereinafter set forth, pointed out in the appended claims, and illustrated in the accompanying drawings.

In the drawings:

FIGURE 1 is a side elevational view with the semitrailer in extended position, as in transit.

FIGURE 2 is -a side elevational view showing the semitrailer and the truck-tractor unit in jackknifed position, ready for the discharge of materials.

FIGURE 3 is a top plan view of the semi-trailer and the truck-tractor unit in the same position as in FIG- URE 2.

FIGURE 4 is a view similar to FIGURE 1, but showing an alternative form of draw-up means and an alternative form of semi-trailer rear wheel assembly.

FIGURE 5 is a side elevational view of the alternative forms shown in FIGURE 4, but in jackknifed position.

FIGURE 6 is an enlarged cross-sectional view taken on the line 66 of FIGURE 4.

FIGURE 7 is a diagrammatic plan view illustrating drive means for rotating the drum and for the alternative form of draw-up shown in FIGURE 4.

A truck-tractor unit 10 having a driver-operator cab 11 is equipped with a standard lower fifth-wheel assembly 12 mounted adjacent the rear end thereof.

Mounted on said lower fifth-wheel assembly 12 is an upper fifth-wheel assembly 20, hereinafter described in greater detail, which is operatively connected, in the manner hereinafter described, to a semi-trailer having a body frame 41 and a rear-wheel assembly 42.

A pair of stanchions 43 are mounted forwardly on said body frame 41, and each of said stanchions supports a roller 44, rotatably mounted thereon.

A power unit 50 is mounted rearwardly on said body frame 41.

Operatively connected to said power unit 50, in the manner shown in FIGURE 7 and as hereinafter described in detail, is a mixer drum 60. Said drum 60 has a bearing shaft 61, which is rotatably mounted in said power unit on bearing assembly 62, and serves as a rearward support for said drum 60. Mounted forwardly on said drum 60 is an annular ring 63 which serves as a bearing surface for rollers 44. Because said drum 60 is rotatably mounted at one end by the bearing shaft 61 and the hearing assembly 62, and because said annular ring 63, mounted forwardly on drum 60, rests on rotatably mounted rollers 44, the drum 60 is free to turn on its longitudinal axis in either direction.

Drum 60 has a closed end 64, at the center of which the bearing shaft 61 is mounted along the longitudinal axis of said drum 60. Drum 60 also has an open end 65. Mounted in said open end 65 is a standard loading and discharge assembly 70, which comprises an offset loading funnel 71 and a discharge chute 72 swivelly mounted on a cup 73 of said assembly 70, said assembly being supported on said stanchions 43 by any suitable means, such as support means 7 4.

Power unit 50 may comprise an internal combustion engine or other power source 51, not shown in detail, a fuel tank 52, a first transmission 53 operatively connected with said engine 51, and drive means between said first transmission 53 and said drum 60, which latter may consist of a drive shaft 54, a first sprocket wheel mounted on said drive shaft 54, a sprocket chain 56 operatively mounted on said first sprocket wheel 55 and also operatively mounted on a second sprocket wheel 57, which in turn is mounted on the closed end 64 of drum 60.

It will be recognized that other forms of power source for propelling drum may be provided, no specific limitation to a power source separate from the power source of truck-tractor unit 10, or to an internal combus-' I flat plate 21, rotatably mounted on a flat plate 22 of the lower fifth-wheel assembly 12 in any suitable manner, such as the conventional pin arrangement 23best shown in FIGURE 6.

Rigidly mounted on said fiat plate 21 by any suitable means, as by welding, which is indicated at 24 in FIGURE 6, is a glove frame 25 in which the body frame 41 of semitrailer 40 is slidably mounted.

When the simplified form of upper fifth-wheel assembly shown in FIGURES l and 2 is utilized, suitable stops (not shown) are provided at the forward end 26 of body frame 41 to prevent disengagement of body frame 41 from upper fifth-wheel assembly 20 when semi-trailer 40 is in the extended position shown in FIGURE 1, and in such form the operation of the rig is as follows:

In transit from the mixing plant to the job location, the semi-trailer 40 is in the extended position shown in FIG- URE l, with the upper fifth-wheel assembly 20 in position adjacent the forward end 26 of frame 41. Upon arrival at the job location, in preparation for forward discharge of the aggregate material cargo, the truck-tractor unit is headed close to the discharge point, whereupon rearwheel assembly 42 of the semi-trailer 40 is suitably braked, and the truck-tractor unit 10 is backed toward the semitrailer 40 and jackknifed until the rig assumes the position shown in FIGURES 2 and 3, whereupon chute 72 is moved from its transit position shown in FIGURE 1 to its discharge position shown in FIGURE 2, and discharge of cargo is then undertaken.

An alternative form of upper fifth-wheel assembly, coupled with means for drawing the semi-trailer 40 into closer proximity to the truck-tractor unit 10 in an overriding position when cargo is about to be discharged, is illustrated in FIGURES 4 and 5, and in some detail in FIGURES 6 and 7. In said alternative form a cable or roller chain 30 is attached at one end thereof to the plate 21 of upper fifth-wheel assembly by any suitable means, such as lug 31, rigidly mounted on said plate 21, as by welding, shown at 32 in FIGURE 6. Chain is then passed around idler sprocket 32, which is rotatably mounted on frame 41 adjacent the forward end 26 thereof. Said idler sprocket may be mounted on rotating shaft 32a. Chain 30 is then brought rearwardly and passed around powered drive sprocket 33, rotatably mounted on frame 41 adjacent the place on said frame 41 at which power unit 50 is mounted. Finally, chain 30 is attached at its other end to plate 21 of upper fifth-wheel assembly 20, again by any suitable means such as lug 34, rigidly mounted on said plate 21.

As illustrated in FIGURE 7, powered drive sprocket 33 may be mounted on rotating shaft 33a. Sprocket 35 may also be mounted on said shaft 33a and sprocket 35 may be operatively connected by chain 36 and sprocket and shaft 37 to gear box 38, which is controlled by gear shift 38a, and thus operatively connected to a second transmission 39, also forming part of power source 50.

In operation of said alternative form of fifth-wheel assembly and means for drawing the semi-trailer 40 into closer proximity to truck-tractor unit 10 in an overriding position, the rig in transit is in the position shown in FIG- URE 4, with the semi-trailer 40 extended from the trucktractor unit 10. Upon arrival at the job location and in preparation for discharge of the cargo, the truck-tractor unit 10 is headed toward the discharge point and brought into close proximity thereto. Thereupon, the gear shift 38a is operated to cause powered drive sprocket 33 to rotate under power and move chain 30 so as to draw semi-trailer 40 forward by sliding frame 41 in glove frame 25. Meanwhile truck-tractor unit ltl is jackknifed, until the rig assumes the position shown in FIGURE 5, whereupon gear shift 3Sa is moved to neutral position, removing power drive from chain 30. Discharge of the cargo is then accomplished by the movement of chute 72 in the manner hereinabove described. When unloading is accomplished, gear shift 38a is placed in reverse position, and the operation described above is reversed to return 4 the semi-trailer to the extended position shown in FIG- URE 4.

Another alternative feature is the unique semi-trailer rear-wheel assembly shown in FIGURES 4 and 5, which permits the semi-trailer body frame 41 to be hauled at a substantially rearwardly declining angle, thus accomplishing the lowering of the center of gravity of the drum 6% and semi-trailer 40 in transit, and also bringing the open end 65 of the drum 60 to a lower level when the rig is in discharge position, thus aiding in the cargo discharge. In this form of the invention, the rear-wheel assembly 42 comprises a pair of relatively short support members mounted on frame 41 of semi-trailer 49 adjacent the rear thereof and extending downwardly therefrom, with a shaft 81 mounted thereon and spanning the distance therebetween. Pivotally mounted on said shaft 81 adjacent the ends thereof are truck members 82, supporting, at opposite ends thereof, forward axle 83 and rear axle 84. A pair of wheels 85 is mounted on forward axle 83, and another pair of wheels 86 is mounted on rear axle 84. An air or hydraulic ram 87 is supported on power unit 50 and connected to a power source by suitable connection (not shown). Mounted on frame 41 adjacent the rear thereof and extending upwardly therefrom is a stanchion 88, supporting a roller or pulley 89, over which a chain or cable 90 is disposed. Cable 99 is operatively connected at one end thereof to ram 87, and at the other end thereof to rear axle 84 by any suitable means, such as lug 91.

When the rig having this alternative feature is in transit, frame 41 assumes the declining angle shown in FIGURE 4, and ram 87 is extended, thereby permitting the semitrailer 40 to ride on all four rear wheels, as illustrated in said FIGURE 4. As the rig is brought into the discharge position shown in FIGURE 5, however, ram 87 is activated to pull on cable 90 and thus cause rear wheels 86, mounted on rear axle 84, to be lifted clear of the ground, and causing trucks 82 to pivot on shaft 81. In this manner the rear end of frame 41 is lifted to a substantially level position, as illustrated in FIGURE 5, and consequently open end 65 of drum 60 is lowered to a position closer to the cargo discharge point.

Although the invention has been described herein in what is conceived to be the most practical and preferred embodiment thereof, it is recognized that departures may be made therefrom within the scope of the invention, and particularly with regard to the draw-up means and rear wheel assembly, and the invention is not to be limited to the details disclosed herein, but is to be accorded the full scope of the claims so as to embrace any and all equivalent structures and devices.

I claim:

1. A transit mixer comprising: a truck-tractor unit having a lower fifth wheel assembly; an upper fifth-wheel assembly mounted on said lower fifth-wheel assembly; a glove frame mounted on said upper fifth wheel assembly; a semi-trailer having a body frame member slidably mouned in said glove frame; a first sprocket rotatably mounted forwardly on the body frame of said semi-trailer; a second sprocket rotatably mounted rearwardly on the body frame of said semi-trailer; a roller chain having ends anchored at one end thereof on said upper fifth-wheel assembly, disposed around said sprockets, and anchored at the other end thereof to said upper fifth-wheel assembly; a power source operatively connected to said second sprocket for movement of said roller chain in either direction; and a mixer drum rotatably mounted on said semi-trailer, operatively connected to said power source for rotation, and having one end thereof open for the receipt and discharge of cargo, said open end being disposed forwardly on said semi-trailer.

2. A transit mixer comprising: a truck-tractor unit; a semi-tnailer unit having a forward and a rear end, and having a body frame member slidably attached to said truck-tractor unit at the forward end of said semi-trailer unit; chain and sprocket means for selectively moving said body -frame member forward, backward, and in jackknifed position relative to said truck-trailer unit; and a power-operated mixer drum rotatably mounted on said semi-trailer, having one end thereof open for the receipt and discharge of cargo, said open end being disposed forwardly on said semi-trailer.

3. A transit mixer as defined in claim 2, including a Wheel truck assembly pivotally mounted on said semitrailer unit adjacent the rear end of said semi-trailer unit; forward and rear axles mounted on said wheel truck assembly; wheels mounted on said axles; and means for elevating said rear axle so as to clear its wheels of ground contact, and so as to lift the rear end of the body frame member of said semi-trailer so that said semi-trailer will assume a substantially level position.

4. A transit mixer as defined in claim 3, wherein said means for elevating said rear axle comprises a power actuated ram; and a cable operatively connected to said ram at one end of said cable and connected to said rear axle at the other end of said cable.

5. A transit mixer comprising: a truck-tractor unit; a semi-trailer unit having a forward and a rear end, and having a body frame member slidably attached to said truck-tractor unit at the forward end of said semi-trailer unit; chain and sprocket means for selectively moving said body frame member forward, backward, and in jackknifed position relative to said truck-trailer unit; means mounted on said body frame member for arresting the backward movement of said body frame member relative to said truck-tractor unit; and a power-operated mixer dr-um rotatably mounted on said semi-trailer, having one end thereof open for the receipt and discharge of cargo, said open end being disposed forwardly on said semi-trailer.

6. A transit mixer comprising: a truck-tractor unit having a lower fifth-wheel assembly; an upper fifth-wheel assembly rotatably mounted on said lower fifth-wheel assembly; a glove frame mounted on said upper fifthwheel assembly; a semi-trailer having a body frame member slidably mounted in said glove frame for longitudinal movement of said semi-trailer relative to said trucktractor unit; stops. mounted on said body frame member at the forward end thereof so as to arrest the rearward sliding movement of said body frame member in said glove frame; chain and sprocket means for sliding said semi-trailer body frame member forward and backward in said glove frame so as to position said truck-tractor unit and said semi-tractor for jackkni-fing at any selected position along said semi-trailer body frame member; and a power-operated mixer drum rotatably mounted on said semi-trailer, and having one end thereof open for the receipt and discharge of cargo, said open end being disposed adjacent the forward end of said semi-trailer body frame member.

References Cited in the tile of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS D. 181,998 Prichard Jan. 28, 1958 1,213,407 Pfahler Jan. 23, 1917 2,553,959 Cook et a1. May 22, 1951 2,657,939 Beebe Nov. 3, 1953 2,712,856 MacPhee July 12, 1955 2,721,406 Gardner Oct. 25, 1955 2,823,814 Schonrock Feb. 18, 1958 2,859,949 Willard Nov. 11, 1958 2,868,398 Anderson et al. Jan. 13, 1959

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1213407 *Mar 20, 1916Jan 23, 1917Soame E PfahlerConcrete mixer and conveyer.
US2553959 *Jul 23, 1947May 22, 1951Cook Bros Equipment CoFifth wheel construction
US2557939 *May 27, 1949Jun 26, 1951Alfred CampsDevice for filling a plurality of bags with a predetermined quantity of potatoes or the like
US2712856 *May 10, 1954Jul 12, 1955Macphee John HRetractable drive wheel lift and hanger
US2721405 *Jan 28, 1954Oct 25, 1955Wade Gardner AdrylRoller for land grading machine
US2823814 *Nov 3, 1955Feb 18, 1958Schonrock Edwin AOverload release for refuse compactor
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3131913 *Mar 1, 1962May 5, 1964Challenge Cook Bros IncTiltable transit mixer
US3136533 *Dec 1, 1960Jun 9, 1964London Concrete Machinery Co LTrailer body
US3191963 *Jan 13, 1964Jun 29, 1965Challenge Cook Bros IncRetractable axle for vehicle load distribution
US3209850 *Feb 26, 1963Oct 5, 1965Gen Dynamics CorpTrailer having longitudinally adjustable and driven rear wheels
US4058343 *Jan 25, 1977Nov 15, 1977Maxon Industries, Inc.Concrete transporting and placing vehicle with laterally shiftable body
US4159180 *Feb 21, 1978Jun 26, 1979Halliburton CompanyGround fed blender
US4195856 *Mar 1, 1978Apr 1, 1980Oshkosh Truck CorporationHigh lift tag axle load transfer system
US4243328 *Jul 16, 1979Jan 6, 1981Challenge-Cook Bros. IncorporatedTrailer transit mixer
US4340309 *Jun 25, 1980Jul 20, 1982Challenge-Cook Bros., IncorporatedTrailer transit mixer
US4350358 *May 8, 1978Sep 21, 1982Ferris Tom EAuxiliary load-carrying apparatus
US4421331 *Sep 2, 1982Dec 20, 1983Ferris Tom EAuxiliary load-carrying apparatus
US5884998 *Oct 2, 1996Mar 23, 1999Maxim TrucksFront discharge transit mixer
US5954429 *Nov 13, 1998Sep 21, 1999Silbernagel; Fred J.Front discharge transit mixer with movable rear drum mount
US6062716 *Nov 16, 1998May 16, 2000Tic United Corp.Front-end discharge concrete mixer truck
US6123444 *Jan 11, 1999Sep 26, 2000Maxim TrucksFront discharge transit mixer with weight system for determining amount of material discharged
US6152457 *Nov 13, 1998Nov 28, 2000Maxim TrucksFront discharge transit mixer
US7101075May 27, 2005Sep 5, 2006Silbernagel Fred JMethod of changing the weight distribution loading on a front discharge transit mixer
EP0022676A1 *Jul 15, 1980Jan 21, 1981Challenge-Cook Bros, IncorporatedA trailer assembly for use with a truck
Classifications
U.S. Classification366/26, 280/401, 298/7, 280/402, 280/407.1, 298/17.00S, 280/149.2, 280/81.1, 280/407, 298/14, 280/43.19
International ClassificationB60P3/16, B28C5/00, B28C5/42
Cooperative ClassificationB28C5/4203, B60P3/16
European ClassificationB60P3/16, B28C5/42A