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Publication numberUS3039784 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 19, 1962
Filing dateJan 27, 1961
Priority dateJan 27, 1961
Publication numberUS 3039784 A, US 3039784A, US-A-3039784, US3039784 A, US3039784A
InventorsMike B Davis
Original AssigneeMike B Davis
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Skate seat coaster
US 3039784 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 19, 1962 M. B. DAVIS 3,039,784

SKATE SEAT coAsTER Filed Jan. 27, 1961 IN VEN TOR.

rraeA/Y United States Patent O 3,'339JS4 SKATE SEAT CASLR Mike B. Davis, United States Army (22 Shepherd Road, Malvern, Pa.) Filed Jan. 217, 1961, der. No.`85,37 6 Claims. (Cl. 28h-37.62)

This invention relates to a skate seat coaster, and has for an object to provide an improved coaster adapted to cooperate with practically any existing conventional Itype of skate, whether a roller skate or an ice skate, whether the skate is adjustable in length or fixed in length, and whether the skate has either conventional type foot securing means at either end (either clamps or straps).

A further object of this invention is to provide a skate seat coaster on which a person of any age, Whether a small child, an adolescent or an adult, can seat himself and coast down a slight incline or, on a level surface, may hand propel himself along the ground by pushing with his hands against the ground.

A further object of this invention is to provide a skate seat coaster consisting of a few inexpensive parts which may be commercialized either in assembled form or in knock-down form suitable for easy assembly, and when assembled, available to have any type of skate attached to the bottom thereof for providing a rolling support thereto.

Still a further object of this invention is to provide a skate seat coaster on which a person may seat himself and coast along, maintaining his balance on the coaster and steering, if necessary, by shifting his balance.

Still a further object of this invention is to provide a skate seat coaster arranged to cooperate with a skate secured under a seat end thereof, with a foot rest secured at an end extended forwardly of the rest seat end to as sist in balancing oneself on the seat end over the supporting skate.

In brief, this invention comprises a skate seat coaster made up of a longitudinal supporting bar having a seat secured at one end thereof with preferably an adjacent inclined back rest extending over the end, with the end of the longitudinal bar arranged to receive and cooperate with a skate detachably secured thereon, and a transverse foot rest securable to the opposite end of the longitudinal bar.

With the above and related objects in view, this invention consists in the details of construction and combination of parts, as will be more fully understood from the following description, when read in conjunction with the accompanying drawing, in which:

l is an elevational view of the skate seat coaster of this invention.

FIG. 2 is a top plan view on line 2 2 of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a transverse sectional view on line 3 3 of FlG. l.

FIG. 4 is an elevational view of a fragment of the skate attaching end of the longitudinal supporting bar, with a sectional fragmentary view or" the inclined back rest and back rest supporting wedge attached thereto, but before the seat has been attached thereto.

The skate seat coaster'ltb of this invention comprises a longitudinal supporting bar 12. Adjacent one end 14 there is attachably secured a seat 16 securable thereto by stud screws 18 extending through appropriately located apertures 20, so that, if desired, the skate seat coaster may be commercialized and delivered in unassembled form, ready for assembly by the ultimate user thereof.

Between the rear edge of the seat 16 and the adjacent edge 14 of the longitudinal supporting bar 12, there is attachably secured a back rest 22 inclined at a substan- 3,939,784 Patented June 19, i962 ICC tial angle thereto, approximately 45 more or less, and additionally supported and secured by a supporting wedge 24 secured to said longitudinal supporting bar 12 and slightly spaced from the adjacent end 14. The opposite corners of the edges of the adjacent end 14 are beveled as at 26 so that the adjacent end 14 of the longitudinal supporting bar 12 may lit snugly on the heel supporting end 2S of a conventional skate 30, here shown as being a longitudinally extendible roller skate, the beveled edges 26 being intended to lit within and possibly abut against the skate heel back 32.

The skate heel end securing means of the skate 30 in this case consists of straps 34 and 36 securable together by a buckle 33 and, as shown, the straps 34 and 36 extend into opposite notches 40 in the adjacent end 14 of longitudinal supporting bar 12 between the adjacent end 14 and the back rest supporting wedge 24.

Obviously, the supporting means of a skate, in various styles or sizes of straps, and the particular manner of attaching the straps, is only intended as one suitable Way of mounting the straps therearound, for the straps may obviously be wound around under the skate as shown, through the notches, around the heel back 32 and over the adjacent end 14 as desired and needed, suffciently to use up the length of the strap and make it tight at that end. The other end of the skate 30 has, in this case, conventional toe securing clamps 39 which are tightened in the conventional manner by the usual skate key against the opposite side edges 42 of the longitudinal supporting bar 12 (in this case, the skate 30 being long enough when extended at its full length, for the clamps 39 to extend beyond the forward edge of the seat 16).

In some cases, the skate may be non-extendible or may be too short to extend beyond the forward end of the seat 16. To provide for such shorter skate, the bottom of the seat 16 is notched as at 44, thus permitting access of the toe securing clamps 39 to the opposite edges 42 of the longitudinal supporting bar 12.

Obviously, when a non-adjustable skate is utilized, and it is not long enough to extend beyond the forward end of the seat 16, the notch 44 will be suitably located, and due to its being available in unassembled condition, the user could add a suitably located notch 44 to fit a particular length of skate, if necessary.

Some skates come with straps at both ends. In such case, the straps can obviously be wound around the bar 12, either forwardly of the seat rest 16 or through the notch, if necessary, so as to secure the forward or toe end of the skate thereto. Similarly, if clamps 39 are used at both ends of the skate, the clamp 39 at the rear end will be attached to the edges 42 of the longitudinal supporting bar 12 at the notches 40.

As shown, the seat 16 may be slightly Wedge-shaped to assist the person occupying the same in leaning back on the inclined back rest and better balance himself thereon and, as brought out in FIG. 3, the seat 16 may also be provided with a padding 46 and a covering 48 for the comfort of the user.

in addition, a transverse foot rest 50 may be similarly secured at the forward end opposite from the end adjacent to which the seat is securable and the skate is securable, to assist the user in a balancing thereon, although, in the absence of the foot rest, the user could obviously rest his feet crossed over against the forward end of the longitudinal supporting bar 12.

in operation, the skate seat coaster 10 may be delivered in unassembled position and be assembled by the user, putting the stud screws 18 through the appropriate openings 20 in the various parts, as illustrated. Then, he may utilize any convenient skate 3d and attach it thereto by the conventional heel and toe attaching means of the skate, as illustrated.

Thereafter, to utilize the skate seat coaster, he will sit on the slightly inclined seat 16 against the inclined back rest 22, preferably on an inclined and smooth surface such as a sidewalk on a hill, and coast down the hill, balancing himself by crossing his feet over the longitudinal supporting bar 12, or putting his feet against the foot rest 50, if the same is mounted thereon. Due to the inclination of the back rest 22, the center of gravity of the user remains substantially over the seat 16 and the user can steer himself, within limits, by leaning toward one side or the other just as in conventional ice or roller skating.

lf he wishes to propel himself over a iiat surface, he om do so by using his hands against the surface 52 on which the skate is supported, preferably using heavy gloves on his hands to protect the same, or possibly holding propelling blocks in his hand-one special form of hand propelling means suitable for this purpose being such as is shown in U.S. Patent 1,510,585 of October 7, 1924. Obviously, any other suitable type of hand propelling means may be utilized.

Although this invention has been described in considerable detail, such description is intended as being illustrative rather than limiting, since the invention may be variously embodied, and the scope of the invention is to be determined as claimed.

Having thus set forth and disclosed the nature of this invention,-what is claimed is:

1. A skate seat coaster for use with a conventional skate having heel end securing means and toe end securing means; said coaster comprising a longitudinal supporting bar, a seat attached to and extending transversely thereto adjacent one end thereof, said adjacent end of said bar extending beyond said seat, and cooperating means on said adjacent end of said bar for receiving skate heel end securing means therein with the toe end of the skate securing means extending forwardly, the toe end securing means of the skate being secured to said longitudinal supporting bar, said cooperating means for securing said heel end securing means comprising notches extending into opposite sides of said adjacent end of said longitudinal supporting bar.

2. A skate seat coaster for use with a conventional skate having heel end securing means and toe end securing means; said coaster comprising a longitudinal supporting bar, a seat attached to and extending transversely thereto adjacent one end thereof, said adjacent end of said bar extending beyond said seat, and cooperating means on said adjacent end of said bar for receiving skate heel end securing means therein with the toe end of the skate securing means extending forwardly, the toe end securing means of the skate being secured to said longitudinal supporting bar, and a notch extending across the bottom of said seat adjacent the forward end providing access of the skate toe end securing means to the opposite edges of said longitudinal supporting bar.

3. In combination, a skate seat coaster comprising a longitudinal supporting bar, a seat and inclined back rest securable thereon adjacent one end, and a skate having heel end securing means and toe end securing means, said CAD skate being detachably securable to the bottom of said longitudinal bar beneath said seat and inclined back, and means on said adjacent end of said longitudinal bar cooperating with the heel back and heel end securing means of said skate for detachablyk securing the heel end of said skate thereto, said cooperating means comprising opposite notches on said adjacent end of said longitudinal supporting bar to receive the skate heel end securing means therethrough, and oppositely beveled edges of said adjacent end of said longitudinal bar to fit said adjacent end in the heel portion of said skate.

4. in the combination of claim 3, the skate toe end securing means being attachable to said longitudinal supporting bar adjacent the forward edge of said seat thereon.

5. ln combination, a skate seat coaster comprising a longitudinal supporting bar, a seat and inclined back rest securable thereon adjacent one end, and a skate having heel end securing means and toe end securing means, said skate being detachably securable to the bottom of said longitudinal bar beneath said seat and inclined back, and means on said adjacent end of said longitudinal bar cooperating with the heel back and heel end securing means of said skate for detachably securing the heel end of said skate thereto, the skate toe end securing means being attachable to said longitudinal supporting bar adjacent the forward edge of said seat thereon, the bottom of said seat being recessed adjacent its forward edge to provide access of the skate toe end securing means to said longitudinal transverse bar.

6. ln combination, a skate seat coaster comprising a longitudinal supporting bar, a seat and inclined back rest securable thereon adjacent one end, and a skate having heel end securing means and toe end securing means, said skate being detachably securable to the bottom of said longitudinal bar beneath said seat and inclined back, and means on said adjacent end of said longitudinal bar cooperating with the heel back and heel end securing means of said skate for detachably securing the heel end of said skate thereto, said cooperating means comprising opposite notches on said adjacent end of said longitudinal supporting bar to receive the skate heel end securing means therethrough, and oppositely beveled edges of said adjacent end of said longitudinal bar to nt said adjacent end in the heel portion of said skate, the skate toe end securing means being attachable to said longitudinal supporting bar adjacent the forward edge of saidv seat thereon, the skate heel end securing means comprising straps extended about the notched adjacent end of said longitudinal sup- Y porting bar and about the skate heel back, the skate toe end securing means comprising clamps attached to opposite sides of said longitudinal supporting bar.

References Cited in the tile of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1052722 *Feb 26, 1912Feb 11, 1913Rose A HegelCoasting device.
US1247801 *Apr 5, 1917Nov 27, 1917Emory S EggeRiding attachment for roller-skates.
US1510585 *Jan 10, 1923Oct 7, 1924Bailey Thomas AustinHand propelling means for scooters
US1550985 *Apr 9, 1923Aug 25, 1925P T HarmonRoller skate and the like
US1609462 *Jan 6, 1926Dec 7, 1926Chapman Frank F BChild's vehicle
FR558674A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4120508 *Mar 30, 1977Oct 17, 1978John Steven BrownWheeled skateboards
US4120510 *Mar 30, 1977Oct 17, 1978John S. BrownWheeled skateboards
US4336952 *Jan 22, 1980Jun 29, 1982Arnold RochmanVehicle with a balancing plane
US4359231 *Jun 23, 1980Nov 16, 1982Mulcahy Kevin MSteering mechanism for three-wheeled vehicles
US4384731 *Oct 20, 1980May 24, 1983Webb Ronald JReclinable skateboard
US4516758 *Jan 10, 1983May 14, 1985Coble Gary LDiffuser system for annealing furnace
US4761013 *Mar 30, 1987Aug 2, 1988The Board Of Governors Of Ryerson Polytechnical InstituteUser propelled vehicle
US5927732 *Sep 25, 1997Jul 27, 1999Snyder; Ronald M.All terrain riding sled
US20040248703 *Aug 23, 2001Dec 9, 2004Heger Francois MarcMethod for travelling or sliding types of sport device, in additon to sport installation for carrying out said method
Classifications
U.S. Classification280/87.42, 280/11.19
International ClassificationA63C17/28, A63C17/01
Cooperative ClassificationA63C17/01, A63C17/015, A63C17/28
European ClassificationA63C17/01H2, A63C17/01, A63C17/28