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Publication numberUS3041915 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 3, 1962
Filing dateJun 4, 1958
Priority dateJul 27, 1957
Publication numberUS 3041915 A, US 3041915A, US-A-3041915, US3041915 A, US3041915A
InventorsRyffel Kaspar
Original AssigneeInventa A G Fur Forschung & Pa
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Process for the manufacture of net-like structures from synthetic fibers
US 3041915 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 3, 1962 K. RYFFEL 3,

PROCESS FOR THE. MANUFACTURE OF NET-LIKE STRUCTURES FROM SYNTHETIC FIBERS Filed June 4, 1958 5 mlllllllll INVENTOR.

KASPAR RYFFEL MESTERN 8 MEST'ERN United States Patent PRGCESS FOR THE MANUFACTURE OF NET-LIKE Synthetic fibers, particularly those of polyesters, polyacrylonitrile, polyvinylchloride and polyamides, usually have a circular diameter and a smooth surface. They thereby ditfer principally from natural fibers such as wool, cotton and silk, which have a rough, scaly surface structure.

Synthetic fibers of a diameter of 0.05 mm. often are referred to as wires and are as such particularly suited for the manufacture of fish nets and other net-like structures on account of their high tear-resistance and practically unlimited fungus resistance.

However, the smooth surface of synthetic fibers and the therewith connected small specific surface is disadvantageous for the production of net-like structures. Furthermore, wires having a diameter of approximately 0.5 mm. or more are difiicult to knit because of their rigidity.

It has been suggested to alter the surface of synthetic fibers chemically, mechanically or by application of a surface preparation (U.S. Patent 2,823,576). However, it has been found that, aside from the difliculties of treating the wires, these processes inflict damage to the material and that the rigidity thereby is not overcome.

According to Italian Patent 571,338, knitted structures can be manufactured from polycaprolactam wires which are quenched in oily liquids immediately after leaving the spinning jet. The slide resistance of the loops is effected by a heat treatment under tension.

It has now been found that net-like structures having knots resistant to sliding can be manufactured from synthetic fibers of non-circular cross-section, particularly of angular cross-section.

The production of synthetic fibers having a non-circular cross-section, e.g. a ribbon or star-shaped diameter, as such is known. Such fibers presumably impart to the textile products made therefrom a soft touch and also increased bulk or covering power.

The object of the present invention, therefore, is not a method for the preparation of fibers having a non-circular cross-section, but it is a manufacture of net like, knotted structures from non-circular synthetic fibers. It has been found that among wires having non-circular cross-sections those having a triangular shape are particularly suited for the manufacture of net-like structures having knots resistant to sliding. The employment of ribbon-shaped synthetic wire leads to results not quite as good with regard to the slide resistance and to the tightness of the knots.

In general, it is not necessary to fix the knots by means of a special heat treatment when non-circular synthetic fibers are used. This is particularly true when the synthetic fibers are extruded from polycaprolactam melts,

containing low molecular constituents, through suitably shaped spinning jets into oily liquids. As oily liquids, high-boiling fractions of the petroleum distillation having low volatility may be used, e.g., parafiin oil.

When thick wires are knotted into nets, i.e. wires Whose circular diameter superimposed on their actual crosssection is more than 1 mm., it is advantageous to improve the slide-resistance of the knots by a heat treatment. Such fixing treatment of the knots is executed best by pulling the net-like structure under tension through a heated bath of a liquid which is not a solvent for the synthetic fiber. It is also possible to fix the knots by pulling ice the net, preferably also under tension, along a heated surface.

Nets made according to the present invention are highly suited for use as fish nets.

The accompanying drawing illustrates several profiles and a flowsheet of the heat-setting step.

In the drawing,

FIG. 1 is a monofilament of triangular cross section which may be used for producing a net according to the instant invention.

FIG. 2 is a monofilament of rectangular cross section which can be used for the same purpose.

FIG. 3 shows a knot tied from a triangular thread.

FIG. 4 shows the same knot in loosened condition indicatin g the strands with greater clarity.

FIG. 5 is a diagrammatical side view of a heat-setting device.

FIG. 6 shows a diagrammatical view of a net.

In FIGURE 5, the points 3 and 4 show the knots as illustrated in FIGS. 3 and 4, respectively.

Referring to FIG. 6, the net 4, corresponding to FIG. 4, enters the device over rollers 5, 6 and 7, revolving at the same speed; 8, 9 and 10 are rollers, also rotating at the same speed but faster than rollers 5, 6 and 7. The envelopes 11 contain the heating elements 12.

The present invention will now be further illustrated by means of the following examples. However, it should be understood that these are given merely by way of explanation, not of limitation and that many changes may be made in the details without departing from the spirit of the present invention.

Example 1 A net is made in a known manner from a polycaprolactam fiber whose cross-section of 0.052 rnm. has; the shape of an equilateral triangle. The net is spread in such a manner that the knots are exposed for 5 minutes to a tension of 1 kg. The tightness of the knot thereafter is 2.8 kg., the resistance to sliding is 0.81 kg. If the net during stretching is simultaneously subjected to a heat treatment so that the knots are exposed to a temperature of C. for 5 minutes under tension, the slide resistance is 1.65 kg.

If the cross-section of the polycaprolactam Wire is rectangular instead of triangular, i.e. if the wire is a ribbon of the dimensions 0.5 x 0.1 mm., the tightness of the unfixed knot is 2.8 kg, whereas the slide resistance of the unfixed knot is 0.64 kg. and that of the fixed knot is 1.08 kg.

The corresponding values for a circular polycaprolactam fiber of approximately the same cross-section, i.e. a diameter of 0.25 mm. are as follows:

The tightness of the knot is 1.79 kg. The slide resistance of the unfixed knot is 0.48 kg. The slide resistance for the fixed knot is 0.75 kg.

Example 2 The method is the same as described in Example 1 except that polycaprolactam fibers having a cross-section of 0.126 mm. are used. In nets made from triangular wires, the tightness of the knot is 4.5 kg, the slide resistance of the unfixed knot after stretching for 5 minutes at a tension of 2.5 kg. per knot at room temperature is 1.30 kg.

If ribbons of a cross-section of 0.6 x 0.2 mm. are used, the corresponding values are 3.9 kg. for the tightness of the knots, 1.07 kg. for the slide resistance of the unfixed knots and 1.83 kg. for the slide resistance of the fixed knots. If a circular wire of approximately the same cross-section is used, i.e., of a diameter of 0.43 mm., the tightness of the knot is 3.2 kg, the slide resistance of the unfixed knot is 0.80 kg, that of the fixed knot :is 1.34 kg.

What I claim is:

l. A process for the manufacture of net-like structures 3 having tight and slide-resistant knots, made of polycaprolactarrrfibers-containing low-molecularconstituents and having angular cross section, which comprises extruding said po lyoaprolactam into fibers and quenching them into an oily 1iquid,*=knotting the fibers into a net,-andtsubjecting the net to a tension of approximately 1 kg. for approximate1y5minutes.

12. A process for the manufacture of'net-iike structures having tight ands1ide-resistantknots, made of polycaprolactam fibers containing-low-moiecular constituents and having angular cross section, which comprises extruding said polycaproiactam i-nto fibers and quenching them into an oi1y=iiquidgknotting the fibers intoa; net, and subjecting the net to a tension of approximately 1kg. for approximately 5 minutesat approximately 130 C.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2130948 *Apr 9, 1937Sep 20, 1938Du PontSynthetic fiber
US2536312 *Feb 12, 1948Jan 2, 1951Saether OivinFishing line
US2614288 *Mar 28, 1947Oct 21, 1952Chavannes Synthetic Fibres IncApparatus and method for producing thermoplastic fibers
US2637893 *Mar 12, 1949May 12, 1953Shaw GilbertArtificial filament
US2744306 *Apr 18, 1952May 8, 1956Linen Thread Company LtdNovel machine for treating netting
US2792617 *Feb 2, 1953May 21, 1957Linen Thread Company LtdProcess of heat setting thermoplastic net in rope form and product produced thereby
US2823576 *Mar 2, 1953Feb 18, 1958Drummondville Cotton Company LMethod of making slip-free fish netting
US2829027 *Dec 28, 1953Apr 1, 1958Eastman Kodak CoDry spinning process for making y-shaped filaments
US2846289 *Dec 17, 1956Aug 5, 1958Ici LtdHigh luster polyamide filaments and process for producing them
US2891270 *Oct 25, 1955Jun 23, 1959Adolph ReiterAbrasive wet mop
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3317366 *May 18, 1962May 2, 1967Beaunit CorpWoven polyester carpet backing and tufted carpet incorporating the same
US3369317 *Apr 20, 1965Feb 20, 1968Brownell & Company IncSynthetic fishnet construction
US3378420 *Dec 2, 1965Apr 16, 1968Richard E. DickinsonProcess for making well screen
US3988048 *Sep 23, 1974Oct 26, 1976Murray James MDish stabilizers
US4055941 *Dec 9, 1976Nov 1, 1977E. I. Du Pont De Nemours And CompanyIntegrated string
US4288977 *Apr 10, 1980Sep 15, 1981E. I. Du Pont De Nemours And CompanyProcess for making integrated racket strings from monofilaments
US4651620 *Nov 14, 1984Mar 24, 1987Richard Percival FearnleyMethod and apparatus for making mesh structure
US5698294 *Oct 11, 1996Dec 16, 1997Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Sterilization wrap material
US5698481 *Oct 24, 1996Dec 16, 1997Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Sterilization wrap material
US6357164 *Apr 14, 1998Mar 19, 2002Ottr Ultra-Low-Drag, Ltd.Cell design for a trawl system and methods
US6374531Oct 11, 1996Apr 23, 2002Ottr Ultra-Low Drag, Ltd.Trawl system cell design and methods
US6434879Feb 10, 1999Aug 20, 2002Otter Ultra-Low-Drag, Ltd.Bi-directional, manufacturable, lift-generating mesh bar
US6732468Nov 3, 2001May 11, 2004Otter Ultra-Low-Drag, Ltd.Cell design for a trawl system and methods
US20020053157 *Dec 29, 2001May 9, 2002Sherif SafwatTrawl system cell design and methods
US20040200120 *Mar 16, 2004Oct 14, 2004Sherif SafwatCell design for a trawl system and methods
US20060272196 *Jun 21, 2006Dec 7, 2006Sherif SafwatCell design for a trawl system and methods
EP1609357A2 *Apr 14, 1998Dec 28, 2005OTTER Ultra-Low-Drag, Ltd.Improved cell design for a trawl system and methods
EP1609357A3 *Apr 14, 1998Apr 12, 2006OTTER Ultra-Low-Drag, Ltd.Improved cell design for a trawl system and methods
WO1997013407A1 *Oct 11, 1996Apr 17, 1997Ocean Trawl Technology Research Co., Inc.Trawl system cell design and methods
WO1998046070A1 *Apr 14, 1998Oct 22, 1998Martrawl, Inc.Improved cell design for a trawl system and methods
Classifications
U.S. Classification87/12, 428/397, 43/7, 289/1.2, 264/DIG.810, 264/178.00F
International ClassificationD04G1/00
Cooperative ClassificationY10S264/81, D04G1/00
European ClassificationD04G1/00