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Publication numberUS3042015 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 3, 1962
Filing dateJun 20, 1957
Priority dateJun 20, 1957
Publication numberUS 3042015 A, US 3042015A, US-A-3042015, US3042015 A, US3042015A
InventorsAdolphe C Peterson
Original AssigneeAdolphe C Peterson
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
High or low compression injection fuel system
US 3042015 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y 1962 A. c. PETERSON 3,042,015

HIGH OR LOW COMPRESSION INJECTION FUEL SYSTEM Filed June 20, 1957 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 July 3, 1962 A. c. PETERSON 3,042,015

HIGH OR LOW COMPRESSION INJECTION FUEL SYSTEM Filed June 20, 1957 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 HIGH OR LOW COMPRESSION INJECTION FUEL SYSTEM July 3, 1962 A. c. PETERSON 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed June 20,

d. E /z United States Patent 3,042,015 HIGH 0R LOW COMPRESSION INJECTION FUEL SYSTEM Adolphe C. Peterson, 4623 Bruce Ave. S., Minneapolis, Minn. Filed June 20, 1957, Ser. No. 667,013 13 Claims. (Cl. 123-119) My invention relates to fuel injection means for use either with high compression engines such as Diesel engines, or low compression engines such as four cycle inducted fuel mixture engines, and it is therefore designated as-High or Low Compression Injection System.

The principal objects of my.invent-ion are to provide a means for fuel injection to individual combustion units, which means shall be relatively simple in construction, and relatively efficient as an accurate fuel distributing system, and which at the same time shall be relatively economical in manufacture and maintenance. A chief object of my invention, is to provide a fuel system which shall not have the extremely fine and very sensitive channels or passages in its construction, which are difficult to manufacture in such accuracy that the manufacture is costly and sometimes, in the smaller engines, nearly impossible of attainment. Such means commonly depends on very finely measured means to procure an accurate division of fuel between combustion units, and my means dispenses with the means usually employed to secure such accurate division of fuel as is desired, and substitutes therefor, a system which necessitates only a single nozzle or atomizing element for delivery of fuel to the system and the additional means for the distribution of the fuel has no means Which requires such very high degree of accuracy although the system does require a more moderate degree of accuracy in construction. An object is to provide a system which provides for forcible injection of fuel either to intake valve passages of an engine or directly to engine cylinders or combustion chambers in a manner which will somewhat increase the power of an engine, as well as provide a desired degree of accuracy of fuel distribution. An object is to provide a system which may provide this relatively low cost system either for engines with high compression automatic ignition engines, such as diesel type engines, or for en gines of relatively low compression such as the customary four cycle spark ignition type of engine, especially such as used in automobiles, trucks and busses, or for the smaller type industrial engines. In general the object is improvement of such means for use with reciprocating piston type engines, and also for multiple combustion chamber or multiple injection turbine type engines.

The principal devices and combinations of devices comprising my invention, are as hereinafter described and as defined in the accompanying claims. In the accompanying drawings, which illustrate my invention in several forms, like characters refer to like parts in so far as practicable. Referring to the drawings:

FIGURE 1 is a view chiefly in vertical section and partly in side elevation, of an eight cylinder V type four cycle engine such as ordinarily used for carabureted air type combustion, the section being on the lines 11 of FIGURES 2 and 4, some parts broken away, notably the upper end of one cylinder block.

FIGURE 2 is a view partly in end elevation looking from the leftward end of FIGURE 1, and partly in vertical section on the lines 22 of FIGURES 1 and 4, the section showing chiefly the chief elements of the fuel injection inducing means.

FIGURE 3 is a detail view in vertical section on the 'ice lines 33 of FIGURES 1 and 4, to show chiefly one intake valve and cylinder and the association of the fuel passage or nozzle with it, this being illustrative of the form of each of the eight intake valve and cylinder unit of the engine.

FIGURE 4 is a detail, chiefly diagrammatic illustration, to show the relation of the so-called conduit circuit to the intake valve chambers or passages thereto, this section being on the lines 44 of FIGURES 1 and 2, this view being on a scale approximately one-half the scale of FIGURES 1, 2, 3,

FIGURES 5, 6, 7, are views of a modified form, FIG- URE 5 being a vertical section on the line 5-5 of FIG- URE 6, FIGURE 6 being a horizontal section on the line 66,of FIGURE 5, each of these views being in part side elevation or in part full plan view, respectively.

Referring first to FIGURES 1, 2, 3, 4, the eight cylinder, four cycle, internal combustion engine there shown, with my injection system applied thereto, has crank case 1, crank shaft 2, engine pistons 3, connectingrods 4 (two only shown in dotted lines) engine cylinders 5 (eight in number as are also the engine pistons 3), spark plugs 6, intake valves 7 with springs 8 and seated on inlet ports 9, exhaust valves 10 with springs 11 (these shown only diagrammatically as used with exhaust ports as customary but not shown) cam shafts 12 having earns 13 and driven at one-half crank shaft speed through gears 14 and gears 15 by crank shaft 2 only one of such cam shafts and its drive being in full the other being similar, air manifold 16, throttle valve -17 having lever 18 and any link means 19 by which the throttle is actuated on its axis. The parts as designated are as usually used in a four cycle eight cylinder V type engine of the reciprocating piston type, the crank shaft being only diagrammatically shown by its ends, it being understood that the crank shaft is as such crank shafts usually are constructed in such eight cylinder V type engines, which have two cylinder, blocks with its pistons actuating one crank shaft, as the crank shaft 2.

With the parts as above specifically designated there are incorporated the elements of my injection system, and this comprises a centrifugal air blower or pump means 20 having vanes 21 on one side of the disk and vanes 22 on the opposite side, a vertical shaft 23 to which the centrifugal blower or pump means 20 is affixed by any key means 24 or otherwise, a pair of bevel gears 25 by which the pump means 20 is driven at a speed preferably substantially higher than the speed of the crank shaft 2 and is driven by crank shaft 2, a diffusion chamber 26, a diffusion chamber 27, a conduit circuit 28, and a plural number of relatively small passages or conduits, there being at least one such passage 29 to each intake passage 30 of the cylinders 5.

The small passages 29 are in the nature of nozzles but are relatively large since they do not discharge liquid fuel only and each should be as short as possible, and each discharges fluid borne fuel to one of the intake passages 30, each of the latter delivering air plus the received fuel through the associated intake port 9 as controlled by its associated valve 7, the latter being actuated for opening of the ports 9, by the cam shaft 12 associated once for each two rotations of the crank shaft 2 as in four cycle engines customarily.

The conduit circuit 28 is in circuit with the blower 20 in such manner that fluid from one end 28a of the conduit circuit is discharged by means of the passage 31 and the port 32 (of somewhat restricted size or flow capacity) to the annular intake port 33 of the blower vanes 22, and so that fluid is discharged from the diffusion chamber 26 to the other end 28b of the conduit circuit 28, and so that fluid as discharged from the diffustion chamber 27 through the small port 34 to the diffusion passage 26a for mixture with fluid therein, and so that atmospheric air inducted by atmospheric air intake port 35 is injected by the blower vanes 21 to the diffusion passage 26a, and so that fuel discharged and somewhat atomixed as discharged from nozzle 36 is mixed in the port 34 with the fluid flowing therethrough (or in the diifusion passage 26a). This circuit of the conduit circuit 28 with the blower or pump 20 by means of the two blower sections the vanes 21 and the vanes 22 procures not only an injection of additional air continuously, as received from atmosphere, to the conduit circuit 28, but also procures a forced continuous moving flow of fluid from the one end of the conduit circuit to the other end of the conduit circuit, so that by this induced flow, the fluid in the. conduit circuit is forced into a very rapidly circulating movement about the circuit which includes not only the part thereof designated as 28, 28a, 28!), but also the passages in association with the blower unit 20, so that as this continuous circulation is effected, there is also simultaneously and continuously an induction and injection of additional atmospheric air into the fluid flowing in that circuit, and there is also a continuous injection of atomized or sprayed fuel from the fuel nozzle 36 which latter receives fuel continuously from the fuel pipe 37 as the latter receives it from the liquid or other fuel pump 38. The fuel pump 38 has plungers or other means 39 actuated by eccentric rods 40 or other means by the shaft 23. The fuel pump 38 has a by-pass 41 from its discharge manifold 42 which may discharge fuel back to the fuel supply or intake manifold 43 which receives fuel from the fuel supply pipe 44, and this by-passing of fuel is controlled by a by-pass needle valve 45 normally seated in port 46 and moved to open the port 46 by pressure responsive piston or member 47 attached to needle valve 45, according to the pressure of air in the pressure chamber 48 from pipe 49 and thereby from the engine air intake manifold 16, the pressure responsive piston 47 being on its other side subject to atmospheric pressure of air by means of port 50 to atmosphere. The piston 47 is normally yieldably seated by the coil spring 51 which has such pressure on the piston 47 that its movement may be in accordance with the pressure or vacuum existing in the air intake manifold 16, to which atmospheric air may enter by intake 52, as controlled, however, by throttle valve 17.

The by-pass control means, as above described, effects a diminishment or increase of fuel flow to nozzle 36 and thus to the fluid in the conduit circuit and flovw'ng thereto, proportioned according to the vacuum or pressure in intake manifold 16 and thus in accordance or in proportion to the flow of atmospheric air into the intake manifold 16 and that is in accordance with the control of the throttle 17, manually or otherwise.

The ports (not shown) controlled by exhaust valves discharge combustion products to the exhaust manifold 53, as in four cycle engines.

The general operation of the device described is now explained. The engine crank shaft 2 is first given initial rotation by any means as generally used with such engines, and when so rotating the fuel pump 38 will pump fuel, as gasoline or kerosene or any other suitablefuel which is fluid, from any supply not shown, by the pipe 44, and the rotation of the shaft 23 drives the blower 20 with its vanes 21 and 22 at a substantially high speed, so that atmospheric air is inducted by port 35 and discharged to diffusion chamber 26, and so that air or fluid in the conduit circuit 28 is withdrawn therefrom and passed by the blower vanes 22 to the diffusion chamber 27. Simultaneously air is inducted by the reciprocating engine pistons 3 from the intake manifold 16, passing through the intake passages 30 in eight individual streams, as the valves 7 are periodically and cyclically opened. Fuel is continuously discharged from nozzle 36 and mixed with the air flowing in passage 34 and in passage 26a, so that a mixture of air and fuel is continuously formed and passed through the end 2812 of conduit circuit 28 and through conduit circuit 28 to its end 28a for readmixture with new air and fuel entering the circuit. This rotation of the air and fuel mixture is very rapid as the blower speed is such and the passages are so restricted in their flow capacity that such rapid circulation is obtained, and this rapid rotation or circulation results in a very thorough admixture of the air and fuel so that the mixture is very uniform in fuel and air proportions, so that the fuel is well atomixed and disseminated, and this mixture, even in characteristics passes along each of the ejection passages 29 in its circulation and therefore at each such ejection passage a quantity of the mixture passes to the air in the intake or inlet passage 30 of each engine cylinder 5 and that quantity is substantially equal in quantity and bears an equal quantity of fuel to each passage 29 during each cycle of operation of the inlet valves 7.

Each charge to an engine cylinder 5 is ignited, as in four cycle engines, and the rotation of the crank shaft 2 reaches a normal speed, and with such speed the rapid circulation of the fuel-air mixture in conduit circuit 28 continues, air and fuel being continuously added to maintain the mixture quality and proportion. The vanes 21 are so proportioned with relation to vanes 22 that a slightly higher compression pressure is attained by the vanes 21 than by the vanes 22, so that continually there is induction of air to replenish the air supply in the circuit. At the same time the vanes 22 have such a relation to the passages in the circuit that there is continuous movement of the fluid mixture from the end 28a to the end 28b of the circuit, in such manner as to procure rapid circulation. This rapid circulation is such as to ensure that the fuel is continually carried in the air stream and not deposited or accumulated at any particular location of the circuit. The port 32 is sufliciently restricted so that a minimum or sufiicient pressure is maintained in the circuit 28 and so that this pressure is substantially the same at all locations of the circuit, thus procuring an even flow of the mixture through each of the ejection passages 29.

The blower means and its speed and all passages must be so proportioned in any construction, according to its size and the power characteristics of the associated engine, so that the circulation and even distribution, as above defined, will be secured. The circulation means for the conduit circuit should be so proportioned that there will be a considerable number of rotations of fluid in the circuit during each cycle of combustion in the engine cylinders 5, it being noted that generally speaking, the more rapid the circulation in the conduit circuit, the more thorough and evenly will be the distribution of fuel in the mixture and thus to the engine cylinders. There may, in any construction, be any or a slight variation in the flow capacity of the ejection passages, as will facilitate the maintenance of equality of distribution of fuel but such variation is not contemplated to be necessary if the rapidity of circulation of fuel mixture is sufficiently high.

Referring now to the modified form shown in FIG- URES 5, 6, 7, this is in general similar to the first form shown, but differs espectially in that the fuel mixture from the conduit circuit 28 is ejected directly into the engine cylinders 5, and differs also in that the engine is a two cycle, three cylinder engine, associated with the device, and that the air induction and circulation means is limited to one blower vane means which performs the functions of both the vanes 21 and 22 in the first form.

The engine cylinders 5 have in their heads, fuel mixture inlet valves designated 54, these being somewhat different since they do not admit the. main air supply but only the fuel mixture supply. The valves 54 control flow from the fuel mixture chamber 55 and this receives fuel mixture by passages 29, these being supplied as in the first form by the conduit circuit 28, there being two passages 29, one on each side of the fuel mixture chamber 55, that is there are two passages 29 for each mixture chamber 55, all receiving the mixture from the conduit circuit 28. The conduit circuit 28 is formed in the engine cylinder head 56 and by pipe 57 mixture passes to the annular intake chamber or port 58 and this also receives atmospheric air by passage or port 59 from atmospheric air as controlled by manually adjustable valve 60. This intake chamber 58 also receives fuel from the fuel nozzle 36 which receives fuel as pumped through pipe 37 from the fuel pump 61 which may be of any type, vane, gear or plunger, and has the by-pass fuel regulation by bypass 41, which in this form is controlled manually by the hand valve 62, for fuel regulation.

The mixture or fluid drawn from intake chamber 58 by the vanes 22a passes therefrom by way of pipe 63 to the opposite end of the conduit circuit 28. The rotor blower hearing vanes 22:: is rotated by a radial inward flow turbine 64 which is on shaft 23a which drives also thereby the air charging blower 65 of centrifugal type, the latter inducting air through port 66 and passing it by pipe 67 to the cylinder inlet ports 68, as in two cycle engines, generally. The cylinder exhaust ports 69 pass exhaust gases at some pressure through exhaust manifold 70 to the annular chamber 71 where it passes by nozzles or guide blades 72 to the turbine 64 to drive that turbine. The shaft 23a may at start be driven by electric motor 73 by current supplied by any source.

The mixture inlet valves are actuated by cam shaft 12a and that is driven by gears 14a and 15a b-y crank shaft 2. The port 32 somewhat restricts flow from the one end of the conduit circuit, and there is always some induction of air by way of the port 59, so that, as in the first form, there is continuously induction of air to the circuit, and also rapid circulation of air in the conduit circuit to maintain equality of mixture and stability of the mixture. In this form the fuel mixture admission is timed by valves 54 and their actuation to be according to the timing as diagrammatically shown in FIGURE 7, where the chord between radii a and b is the expansion period, that between radii b and c is the air charging and exhaust period, and that between radii c and d is the fuel mixtures injection period from the fuel mixture chamher and the conduit circuit, this period being immediately after the air charging period, that is before there is more than a moderate compression in the engine cylinder.

It should be noted that the form shown in FIGURES 5, 6, may be used for higher compression engines by use of any other form of compressor for the induction to the conduit circuit of air, and that then the mixture admission may 'be at any higher pressure point of the cycle as at maximum compression in the cylinder. The form of induction as in either form may be used in the other form, interchangeably, according to the construction. The direct injection form may be used in diesel engines, the air pumping means being also a high pressure means of any kind. The compression means shown is representative of any form of air compression means.

In the first form described, since that is in association with a four cycle engine, the air pressure in the conduit circuit 28 may be only say five to ten pounds since the air in the manifold is usually no higher than atmospheric pressure and at lesser pressures in less than near maximum loads. In the second form described, FIGURES 5, 6, the fuel distribution is described as occurring immediately after closing of exhaust and air inlet ports, and therefore the fluid fuel injection or ejection from chambers 55, need not be more than say fifteen or twenty pounds or as much more than that, as is desired, and the air pressure in the conduit 67 for scavenging of the cylinders need not be more than say five to ten pounds. The fuel spraying or atomizing pressure may in either type be as high as is desired for efficient spraying or atomizing of the fuel as ejected from fuel nozzle 36. In the event that the direct fuel injection is used, with a two cycle engine, as in FIGURE 5 and FIGURE 6, there may be a dual type of compression means as in FIGURES 1 and 2, and the induction of fuel and compression, illustrated as by blower vanes 21, may be by any type of air compression means such as any reciprocating piston compression means, although the fluid circulation, illustrated as by vanes 22, may be by the same type, namely centrifugal blower or rotor means, the fluid in the circuit being, however, at a pressure as high as may be necessary, say even as high as one thousand to two thousand pounds.

The passages 29 of either form are passages which pass a fuel mixture of air and fuel atomized therein and to some extent vaporized therein and they are designated in the specification as ejection passages. They may otherwise be called fuel mixture discharge passagesrefening to the discharge from the conduit circuit, or alternatively they may be called-fuel mixture inlet passages-referring to the inlet therefrom to associaed combustion units. The use of the term fuel mixture is descriptive of the mixture of air and fuel injected thereto and circulated therewith in the conduit circuit, and it may be noted that this mixture should have a proportion of air which is considerably less than sufficient for combustion of the fuel included, but this proportion of air should have at least a suflicient proportion of air or a carrier gaseous fluid which is suflicient as a carrier for the atomized fuel carried thereby. This proportion may in any case be as is determined to be best and most effective for a particular construction. The rotative fluid impeller 20 should have such relatively high speed that a very rapid circulation of fluid is maintained so that there may be at least several or a number of circulations of fluid during the time of each cycle of the associated engine, in the latters operation.

While I hav shown particular devices and combinations of devices in the illustration of my invention, I contemplate that other detailed devices and combinations of devices may be used in the realization of my invention without departing from the spirit and contemplation thereof. I have shown the fuel distribution device as used with a reciprocating piston engine, but it is intended and contemplated that this distribution means for fuel may be used with any engine having combustion units each including a combustion chamber and an intake passage thereto for fuel bearing fluid, and such units may be used for reciprocating or turbine engines.

What I claim is:

1. In a fuel distributing means for combustion engines having a plural number of combustion units each unit including a combustion cylinder, a reciprocable piston in the combustion cylinder, a means for supply to the combustion cylinder of the main charge of air for combustion, and an exhaust from the combustion cylinder; a conduit circuit for fuel mixture circulation therein; a plural number of fuel mixture discharge passages discharging from said conduit circuit all of restricted and substantially equal flow capacity; each of said combustion units having discharge of fuel mixture thereto from said conduit circuit by at least one of said passages; a fluid impeller means interposed in said conduit circuit for actuation to induce circulatory movement of fuel mixture in said conduit circuit; a means in association with said fluid impeller means to continuously introduce air from atmosphere to said conduit circuit under pressure exceeding pressure in said conduit circuit and having capacity to maintain pressure exceeding atmospheric pressure in said conduit circuit; a means to continuously introduce fuel to said conduit circuit under pressure exceeding pressure in said conduit circuit; means actuating said fluid impeller means to maintain rapid circulation of fuel mixture in said conduit circuit.

2. In a fuel distributing means for combustion engines having a plural number of combustion units each of which includes a combustion chamber and a main air intake passage thereto by which a main charge of air is inducted to the combustion unit; a conduit circuit for fuel mixture circulation therein; a plural number of fuel mixture passages discharging from said conduit circuit and of which passages at least one is associated with each of said combustion units to permit flow of fuel mixture to the combustion unit from the conduit circuit; a rotative fluid impeller means interposed in said conduit circuit to receive fuel mixture from one adjacent part of the conduit circuit and pass it to the other adjacent part of the conduit circuit; means included with said rotative fluid impeller means to continuously induct atmospheric air and to introduce such inducted air to said conduit circuit at a pressure exceeding pressure in said conduit circuit; a fuel pumping means and pump discharge therefrom to the inducted atmospheric air entering the fuel mixture in the conduit circuit and means driving the fuel pumping means to procure introduction of fuel to such inducted air.

3. The device as defined in claim 2, and: the said main air intake passages to said combustion units and said fuel mixture passages providing flow from said conduit circuit being each associated one passage from the conduit circuit with one main air intake passage; and valve means in each said main air intake passage to cyclically control movement therethrough, and means cyclically actuating said valves.

4. The device as defined in claim 2, and: the means driving said fuel pumping means procuring drive of the fuel pumping means at speed substantially proportionate with the speed of cyclic charging and combustion in said combustion units.

5. The device as defined in claim 2, and: the means driving said fuel pumping means procuring drive of the fuel pumping means at speed substantially proportionate with the speed of cyclic charging and combustion in the said combustion units per unit of time, and means for regulating the flow of fuel from said fuel pumping means in accordance with the air volume in said combustion unions in cyclic combustion phases.

6. In a fuel distributing means for combustion engines having a plural number of combustion units each said unit including a combustion cylinder and a main air intake passage thereto and a piston reciprocable in the combustion cylinder; a conduit circuit for circulation of fuel mixture therein; a plural number of fuel mixture passages each of restricted and substantially equal flow capacity and associated with said combustion units to provide conduction of fuel mixture from said conduit circuit independently to each of said combustion units by at least one said fuel mixture passage; a rotative fluid impeller interposed in said conduit circuit for actuation to induce circulatory movement of fluid in said conduit circuit; a fuel pumping means and means driving it; a compressor means to induct atmospheric air and discharge it into said conduit circuit under pressure exceeding atmospheric pressure and having capacity to maintain pressure exceeding atmospheric pressure in said conduit circuit; a conduit from said fuel pumping means to inject fuel to the air stream entering into and circulating in said conduit circuit; and means actuating said rotative fluid impeller and said compressor means.

7. The device as defined in claim 6, and: the said main air intake passages of said combustion units having each an air intake valve associated therewith to cyclically permit flow through the intake passage to the associated combustion cylinder, the said intake passages of said combustion units providing for intake of atmospheric air for combustion in said combustion cylinders to supplement the air delivered to said conduit circuit with the fuel borne thereby.

8. The device as defined in claim 6, and: the means driving said pumping means procuring drive of the fuel pumping means at speed substantially proportionate with the speed of the cyclic charging and combustion in said combustion cylinders; and means for regulating the flow of fuel per cycle from said fuel pumping means to said conduit circuit and a pressure responsive means subjected to pressure in said intake passages and controlling said means for regulating the flow of fuel to effect diminishment of that flow of fuel in proportion to the diminishment of pressure in said intake passages and to effect increase according to increase of pressure in said intake passages.

9. In a fuel distributing means for combustion engines having a plural number of cylinders each cylinder having a piston reciprocable therein and each cylinder having a main air intake port thereto for introduction of a main air charge from passage means therefor; a conduit circuit having fuel mixture discharge passages each of restricted flow capacity and each of substantially equal volumetric capacity and each fuel mixture discharge passage delivering from said conduit circuit to an associated one of said air intake ports; an air compressing means inducting air from atmosphere and delivering to said conduit circuit; a rotative fluid impeller interposed in said conduit circuit to induce circulatory movement of fuel mixture therein; means for actuating said air compressing means and said rotative fluid impeller; a fuel pumping means driven at speed substantially proportionate to the speed of reciprocation of said pistons and delivering fuel to the air entering into and circulating in said conduit circuit for admixture with the air flowing thereto and therethrough.

10. The device as defined in claim 9, and: the said first named passage means for receiving main air supply having a throttle means therein; a pressure responsive means responsive to pressure in said passage means for receiving atmospheric air between said throttle means and said air intake ports, said pressure responsive means having in actuatable interconnection with it a fuel regulation means for diminishment or increase proportionately of the'fuel delivered by the fuel pumping means to said conduit circuit by admixture with air flowing therethrough from said air compressor means.

11. The device as defined in claim 9, and: the means driving said air compressing means and rotative fluid impeller being more particularly defined as a driving interconnection between them and said pistons of the combustion engine.

12. In a fuel distributing means for combustion engines having a plural number of engine cylinders each having a piston reciprocable therein and each having means for entry of a main supply of air thereto for combustion therein and each having means for exhaust of gases therefrom; a plural number of fuel mixture inlet ports at least one to each engine cylinder for supply of fuel mixture thereto; a conduit circuit having passages therefrom at least one to each injection port, the said fuel mixture inlet ports and said passages providing for restricted and substantially equivalent flow from said conduit circuit to each of said engine cylinders under pressure exceeding atmospheric pressure; a rotative fluid impeller interposed in said conduit circuit to induce circulatory movement of fluid in said conduit circuit; a compressor means actuable to induct atmospheric air and deliver such air to said conduit under pressure exceeding pressure in the conduit circuit; means for actuating said rotative fluid impeller and said compressor means; a fuel pumping means driven at speed substantially proportionate to the speed of reciprocation of said pistons in said engine cylinders and delivering fuel under pressure exceeding pressure in the conduit circuit to the air entering from the compressor means and circulating in the conduit circuit.

13. The device defined in claim 12, and: the said conduit circuit and fuel mixture inlet ports and passages thereto being further defined as including, for each fuel mixture inlet port, two passages associated one such passage discharging from one side of the conduit circuit to a fuel mixture inlet port and another such passage discharging from an opposite side of the conduit circuit 1,612,377 to the fuel mixture inlet port. 1,625,997

References Cited in the file or this patent 5 888,797 UNITED STATES PATENTS 961,686

906,393 Dock Dec. 8, 1908 1,375,931 Rateau Apr. 26, 1921 1,574,130 Smith Feb. 23, 1926 10 Jepson Dec. 28, 1926 Gronkwist Apr. 26, 1927 FOREIGN PATENTS France Sept. 13, 1943 France Nov. 21, 1949 OTHER REFERENCES Becker et 211.: German application, Ser. No. B25817/ Ia/46C printed Feb. 16, 1956.

Patent Citations
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US906393 *Feb 1, 1908Dec 8, 1908Dock Gas Engine CompanyInternal-combustion engine.
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US1574130 *Aug 20, 1923Feb 23, 1926Jay M SmithManifold and method of supplying explosive mixtures to internalexplosion engines
US1612377 *Mar 17, 1922Dec 28, 1926John W JepsonInternal-combustion engine
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3973531 *Nov 4, 1974Aug 10, 1976Turner Research, Inc.Engine with compressor and bypass for combustible mixture
US4884534 *Nov 25, 1988Dec 5, 1989J. C. Moore Research, Inc.Fuel and air induction structure and mechanism for internal combustion engines
US6062178 *May 20, 1998May 16, 2000Southwest Research InstituteMethod of operating uni-flow two-cycle engine during reduced load conditions
US7743749Jul 21, 2009Jun 29, 2010Ford Global Technologies, LlcFuel pump drive system
Classifications
U.S. Classification123/592, 123/445, 123/54.6, 123/559.1
International ClassificationF02M69/50, F02D3/02
Cooperative ClassificationF02D3/02, F02M2700/055, F02M69/50
European ClassificationF02D3/02, F02M69/50