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Publication numberUS3042408 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 3, 1962
Filing dateJul 5, 1957
Priority dateJul 5, 1957
Publication numberUS 3042408 A, US 3042408A, US-A-3042408, US3042408 A, US3042408A
InventorsJohnson Kenneth G
Original AssigneeJohnson Kenneth G
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Game
US 3042408 A
Images(7)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 3, 1962 JOHNSON 3,042,408

GAME

Filed July 5, 195'? 7 Sheets-Sheet 1 F/G.

/N VE N 70/? KENNETH G. JOHNSON 1 flap Attorney July 3, 1962 Filed July 5, 1957 FIG. 2

FIG. 6

FIG. 1/

K. G. JOHNSON GAME FIG. 6

FIG. 9

FIG. IZ

FIG, /5

'7 Sheets-Sheet 2 FIG. 4

FIG. IO

FIG. 18

FIG. /6

INVENTOR.

KENNETH G. JOHNSON ATTORNEY July 3, 1962 K. G. JOHNSON GAME 7 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed July 5, 1957 FIG. /9

FIG/8 FIG. 3/

FIG. 4

FIGJO FIG 24 uvmvroa KENNETH e. JOHNSON f4 Jzaf TTORNEY y 3, 1962 K. G. JOHNSON 3,042,408

GAME

Filed July 5, 1957 7 Sheets-Sheet 4 F/G 42 H043 46 INVEN TOR. KEhNETH G. JOl-NSON ATTORNEY y 1962 K. G. JOHNSON 3,042,408

GAME

Filed July 5, 1957 7 Sheets-Sheet 5 FIG 7/ FIG. 76

l l; J

INVBVTOR. KENNETH G. JOHNSON ATTORNEY July 3, 1962 K. G. JOHNSON 3,042,408

GAME

Filed July 5, 1957 '7 Sheets-Sheet 6 FIG". 92 FIG. 93

FIG, /02 FIG. /03 FIG. /05

F/G/IO F76. //4 FIG. //5 FIG. //6 a a w INVENTOR. KENNETH G. JOHNSON JfZ/JJ ATTORNEY July 3, 1962 K. G. JOHNSON GAME '7 Sheets-Sheet 7 Filed July 5, 1957 FIG. /2/

FIG/30 FIG. /35

FIG. /40

FIG/l9 FIG. /29

FIG. /34

FIG. /39 i j FIG/33 FIG. I27

IN V EN TOR.

KENNETH G. JOHNSON BY 2 ATTORNEY United States Patent Orifice 3,042,498 Patented July 3, 1962 3,042,403 GAME Kenneth G. Johnson, Madison, Wis. (3014 N. Cramer, Milwaukee 11, Wis.) Filed July 5, 1957, Ser. No. 670,305 3 Claims. (Cl. 273-135) The present invention relates to a game and more specifically it relates to a game wherein a plurality of cards and a playing board or boards constitute the components of the game.

It has not been proposed heretofore to utilize cards in a game wherein the cards have pictures thereon; the pictures on the playing cards being the combination of a first pictorial indicia, second pictorial indicia and third pictorial indicia, each card unique with respect to all of the other non-sequential picture bearing cards, the cards being divided into a plurality of classes each class being divided into a plurality of groups, each card within each group being unique within the group but corresponding to another card within each other group in the same class and a plurality of playing boards containing a plurality of divisions thereon adapted to maintain the cards in a particular arrangement on the board.

It also has not been proposed heretofore to arrange the cards having pictures thereon in a unique manner so that the cards in each row, column or diagonal have some characteristic in common, as for example all the pictures on the cards in one row have the same species of first pictorial indicia in common while the pictures on the cards in the second row might have the same species of a second pictorial indicia in common.

An object of this invention is a game which provides recreational opportunities for children and adults.

Another object is a game which serves as an educational device for children.

Other objects will become apparent from the drawings and the following description in which it is intended to illustrate the applicability of the invention without thereby limiting it to a scope less than that of all equivalents which will be apparent to one skilled in the art and in which;

FIGURE 1 is a diagrammatic view of a playing board suitable for my invention;

FIGURES 2-16 are face views of some pictorial indicia suitable for use in forming pictures which may be utilized on the cards of my game; and

FIGURES 17141 are face views of cards bearing pictures thereon which may be utilized in my invention.

There is shown in FIGURE 1 a playinglboard utilized for my game consisting of a plane having inscribed thereon a plurality of areas; said areas preferably all being of equal size and the size of the playing board being of a convenient size to be used by a player.

FIGURES 2, 5, 8, 11 and 14 show different species of animal heads which constitute a first pictorial indicia suitable for use in forming the pictures which may be used on the cards of the invention.

FIGURES 3, 6, 9, 12 and 15 show diiferent species of animal bodies which constitute a second pictorial indicia suitable for use in forming pictures which may be used on the cards of the invention.

FIGURES 4, 7, 10, 13 a1'1d16 show different species of animal tails which constitute a third pictorial indicia suitable for use in foaming pictures which may be used on the cards of the invention.

By combining difierent species of first, second and third pictorial indicia, pictures such as those shown in FIGURES 17-141 may be formed.

A suitable card bearing a picture thereon for use in my game is shown in FIGURE 27. The picture on FIG- URE 27 is obtained by copying the pictorial indicia of the body of FIGURE 3, the head of FIGURE 8, and the tail of FIGURE 13 on a card of the desired shape. Another card having three pictorial indicia thereon which together form a picture suitable for use in my game is shown in FIGURE and may be obtained by copying the head of FIGURE 2, the body of FIGURE 9 and the tail of FIGURE 16 on a card. Cards having suitable pictures thereon can be obtained by combining the pictorial indicia of the following:

The head of FIGURE 2, the body of FIGURE 6 and the tail of FIGURE 4 together provide the picture on the card of FIGURE 116.

The head of FIGURE 14, the body of FIGURE 12 and the tail of FIGURE 4 provide the picture on the card of FIGURE 136.

It may thus be seen that a plurality of pictures suitable for use on cards used in my game can be obtained by combining the pictorial indicia shown in FIGURES 2-16. The various possible combinations are shown on the cards of FIGURES 17-141.

It should be noted that by combining the first, second and third pictorial indicia of FIGURES 2, 3, 4, FIGURES 5, 6, 7, FIGURES 8, 9, 10, FIGURES 11, 12, 13, FIG- URES 14, 15, 16 the pictures of a wolf, lion, monkey, tiger, and panda may respectively be obtained.

The number of playing boards used for my game is preferably equal to the number of participants in the game so that each player has his own board. However if the participants desire to play on a lesser number of boards, the object of the game is not necessarily destroyed.

The playing cards of the game consist essentially of sheets of a suitable material, preferably paper or card board, each sheet having suitable dimensions so as to fit or almost fit the areas inscribed on the playing board utilized in my invention and having on one surface thereof a picture composed of various combinations of species of first, second, and third pictorial indicia. By first, sec- 0nd and third pictorial indicia, I means a picture of an object or figure divided into 3 parts. By using different species of the picture of the object or figure, thus divided in first, second and third pictorial indicia, it is possible to obtain a plurality of pictures all being different one from another. For example one suitable picture may be formed by taking the first pictorial indicia of one species combined with the second pictorial indicia of a second species combined with third pictorial indicia of a third species. While the pictorial indicia of the previously described figures have combined to form pictures of animals, other pictorial indicia may be used to form other pictures which may be used on the playing cards of the game. For example, instead of parts of animals there may be used as the first, second and third pictorial indicia parts of human beings, parts of birds, or parts of mechanical objects such as automobiles; the pictures on the playing cards used all being different one from an- 3 other but many of the cards having certain aspects in common.

While this game may be played by any number of people, the following description refers to a game being played by four people.

A game for four people consists preferably of four boards of the type shown in FIGURE 1 and a deck of preferably 125 cards. The deck of cards is made so that of the 125 cards having pictures thereon, there are five species of second pictorial indicia, five species of first pictorial indicia and five species of third pictorial indicia used to form the pictures on the faces of the cards. These species used on one face of the cards may then be d1- vided so that for each species of second pictorial indicia there are twenty-five cards; no two cards being the same.

The object of the game may be to place cards bearing pictures on one face thereof on the playing board in such a manner as to complete three rows or columns or any combination of the preceding with a diagonal or diagonals. The cards in each row, column or diagonal must have some characteristic in common, as for example, all of the pictures in one row may have the same species of first pictorial indicia in common while the picture in the second row might have the same species of a second pictorial indicia in common. A card common to both rows would have to have the same species of first pictorial indicia and second pictorial indicia thereon.

As for the rules of the basic game i.e., that intended for children, each participant is preferably given a board. The dealer begins by giving each player five cards and placing the remaining undealt cards face down in the middle of the table with the exception of the top card which is turned face up and is used to start a second pile of cards called discard pile. The player to the left of the dealer then proceeds to draw one card from the center or the discard pile. He next plays as many cards from his hand to his board as he Wishes, keeping in mind the object of the game. The same player then draws as many cards from the center pile or discard pile or both as he placed on his board. Thence, in order to have no more cards than he initially had to begin with, the participant discards one card to the discard pile. The same procedure is then followed around the board with a participant only placing, removing or moving cards from his board when it is his turn.

If a player wishes to move a card from one place on his board to another he must pay a penalty by' discarding a card from his hand without a corresponding pickup of a card. If a player wishes to remove a card from his board, he must pay a penalty by discarding two cards from his hand.

The first player to complete three rows, columns or a combination of both with a diagonal or diagonals announces this by calling out a prearranged signal such as Game or CraZeeZoo, which ends the game. Anyof in the row, column or diagonal in which it is placed, rather than just having pictorial features in common among those cards in completed rows, as is the case in the more simple modification.

A scoring system is added to the more advanced game as follows:

1st player to complete one row, diagonal or column-- 5 points.

1st player to complete two rows, diagonal or columns 10 points.

1st player to complete three rows, diagonals or columns25 points.

Each player having cards on the board at the completion of the game2 points per card.

As before, the game is completed when a player calls out the signal after completing three rows, columns or a combination of the preceding with a diagonal or diagonals. The penalty for calling out the signal without having the proper arrangement of cards on the board is the same as in the more simple modification.

In the advanced modification there is no penalty for moving a card from one place on the participants board to another, provided the pictorial indicia on the card fits correctly into the new location. However, if a player must remove a card from his board or wishes to remove one from his board he must pay a penalty of five points. The scoring system used in the advanced game has proven very enjoyable to adults as a number of games may be played to determine a winner.

Children from 7 to 14 find the game interesting and the game serves to sharpen the senses of the children be-.

sides giving them many hours of relaxation.

While certain modifications and embodiments of the invention have been described, it is of course to be understood that there are a great number of variations which will suggest themselves to anyone familiar With the subject matter thereof and it is distinctly understood that this invention should not be limited except by such limitations as are clearly imposed in the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A game comprising a pack of cards, said pack comprising a plurality of picture-bearing cards, said pictures being the combination of first pictorial indicia, second pictorial indicia, and third pictorial indicia, each of said indicia being a pictorial representation of a portion of an object which has physical reality, each card unique with respect to all of the other picture-bearing cards and carrying a single complete picture made up of said first, second, and third pictorial indicia, said cards being divided into a plurality of classes, each class divided into a plurality of groups, each card within each group being unique one calling out the signal without having the three rows, 5

columns, etc. properly completed is penalized by having one card removed from his board by each opponent, the option of which card being vested in the opponents and available when their, the opponents, turn comes. Any so picked up cards, may be used by the opponent so picking it up on his board, consistent With the rules of the game.

The game may be modified by using different human faces with five different facial characteristics, five hair colors and five tie colors. In a similar way airplanes, cars, trucks, birds, fish, etc. may be utilized to form suitable pictorial indicia for the cards of my game.

In a more advanced modification each card bearing combinations of three pictorial indicia which together form a picture on one face thereof placed on the board must have some pictorial feature in common with all of the other cards bearing combinations of three pictorial indicia which together form a picture on one face there- Within the group but corresponding to another card within each other group in the same class and each of the other classes and at least one playing board comprising a plurality of blank spaces of substantially equal size arranged in lines and rows.

2. A game comprising a pack of cards, said pack compr sing a plurality of picture-bearing cards, said pictures being the combination of first pictorial indicia, second pictorial indicia, and third pictorial indicia, each of said indicia being a pictorial representation of a portion of an animal, each card unique with respect to all of the other picture-bearing cards and carrying a single complete picture made up of said first, second, and third pictorial indrcia, said cards being divided into a plurality of classes, each class divided into a plurality of groups, each card within each group being unique within the group but corresponding to another card within each other group in the same class and each of the other classes and at least one playing board comprising a plurality of blank spaces of substantially equal size arranged in lines and rows.

3. A game comprising a pack of cards, said pack comprising a plurality of picture-bearing cards, said pictures being the combination of first pictorial indicia, second pictorial indicia, and third pictorial indicia, each of said indicia being a pictorial representation of a portion of a living thing, each card unique with respect to all of the other picture-bearing cards and carrying a single complete picture made up of said first, second and third pictorial indicia, said cards being divided into a plurality of classes, each class divided into a plurality of groups, each card within each group being unique within the group but corresponding to another card Within each other group in the same class and each of the other classes and at least one playing board comprising a plurality of blank spaces of substantially equal size arranged in lines and rows.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS France Nov. 28, 1938

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3892409 *Sep 23, 1974Jul 1, 1975Herbert Jr Charles HGame based on categories of subject matter of playing tiles
US4272081 *Nov 7, 1978Jun 9, 1981Broom James CGame with board and tokens
US4325554 *Feb 26, 1981Apr 20, 1982Broom James CGame with board and tokens
US4440398 *May 24, 1982Apr 3, 1984Cha-Du-KeCard game and method of playing same
US4498869 *Mar 12, 1984Feb 12, 1985Faison Marilyn DSystem for teaching visual discrimination of spatially oriented subject matter
US6554279 *Jun 9, 2000Apr 29, 2003Russell VanderhyeSecret demise
US7461845 *Jul 20, 2005Dec 9, 2008Doublestar, LlcMemory game and method of playing same
EP1184057A2 *Aug 28, 2001Mar 6, 2002Konami CorporationDeck of cards
EP1977800A1 *Jan 18, 2007Oct 8, 2008Tomy Company, Ltd.Card toy
EP2165656A2Sep 18, 2009Mar 24, 2010Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Lockout arrangement for a surgical stapler
EP2165657A2Sep 18, 2009Mar 24, 2010Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical stapler with apparatus for adjusting staple height
EP2165658A2Sep 18, 2009Mar 24, 2010Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical stapler having an intermediate closing position
EP2165659A2Sep 18, 2009Mar 24, 2010Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical stapling instrument with cutting member arrangement
WO1996017662A1 *Dec 6, 1995Jun 13, 1996Felice GaudiosoDecks of cards for a newly devised game
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WO1997003738A1 *Jul 19, 1996Feb 6, 1997Gaudioso FeliceDecks of cards for the newly devised game 'wormhole action match' and for other games of the 'wormholegame' project
WO2011044020A1Oct 4, 2010Apr 14, 2011Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical stapler having a closer mechanism
WO2011044026A2Oct 4, 2010Apr 14, 2011Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Surgical stapler comprising a staple pocket
WO2011044032A2Oct 4, 2010Apr 14, 2011Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc.Method for forming a staple
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Classifications
U.S. Classification273/271, 273/292, 273/156, 273/273
International ClassificationA63F1/02, A63F1/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63F1/02
European ClassificationA63F1/02