Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3043026 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 10, 1962
Filing dateFeb 23, 1961
Priority dateFeb 23, 1961
Publication numberUS 3043026 A, US 3043026A, US-A-3043026, US3043026 A, US3043026A
InventorsSemon William P
Original AssigneeSemon William P
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Non-clogging cleat
US 3043026 A
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 10, 1962 w. P. SEMON- 3,

' NON-CLOGGING CLEAT Filed Feb. 25, 1961 INVEN TOR. Mil/24M P SE/VO/V f MW 1977'dP/VEKF 3,043,026 NGN-CLGGGENG CLEAT William P. Semen, 59 Nassau Ave., Manhasset, N3. Filed Feb. 23, 1961, Ser. No. 91,155 4 Claims. ((3. 36-59) This invention relates to a cleat adapted to be aifixed to the sole of an athletes shoe to grip into the ground and the same is so constructed and arranged as to prevent clogging with dirt, mud and the like between the spikes thereof.

An object of the invention is to provide a cleat for a shoe having a resilient pad affixed to the base thereof between the spikes and which is adapted to be compressed upon engagement with a supporting surface and to return to its normal formation when the foot is raised so as to free the same of dirt, mud and the like adherring to the cleat between the spikes.

Another object of the invention is to provide a cleat of said character with means securely fastening the resilient pad to the spikes.

Still another object of the invention is to provide the resilient pad with a resilient coil spring embedded thereon which is adapted to retain the pad in normally expanded formation and to return the pad to normal formation when released from depressed condition.

With the foregoing and other objects in view, reference is now made to the following specifications and accompanied drawings in which the preferred embodiment of the invention is illustrated.

In the drawings- FIG. 1 is a top plan view of a cleat constructed in accordance with the invention.

FIG. 2 is a sectional view taken on approximately line 2--2 of FIG. 1 and showing the same secured to the sole of a shoe.

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of the cleat and parts thereof shown in separated juxtaposition.

The cleat is of the usual type affixed to an athletes shoe to grip into the ground so as to prevent slipping and provide traction in running and playing games. As illus trated, the cleat includes a base having arcuate side edges 11 and depending from the base at the ends of the adjacent side edges are spikes 12. The spikes are thus three in number and adjacent thereto the base is apertured for receiving fastening means such as screws 13 for securing the cleat against the bottom face of the sole or heel H of a shoe.

In order to prevent the cleat from clogging up with dirt, mud and the like between the spikes 12, a resilient pad 14 is provided which is of the same formation as the base 10 and is secured thereon between the spikes. The pad 14 has an outer face 15 of arcuate shaped formation and has its greatest thickness at the central portion thereof and gradually decreases in thickness toward the spikes. The pad is preferably cemented or otherwise afiixed to a plate 16 which overlies the base 10 between the openings for the screws 13 and embedded centrally therein in hearing engagement against the plate 16 is a resilient coil spring 17 having its smallest convolution adjacent the curved outer face of the pad. In order to retain the pad in position on the cleat, the spikes 12 have threaded side edges 18 for receiving the internally threaded ring mem- 3,413,025 ?atented July 19, 1.362

bers 19. The pad projects beyond the spikes and is.

slotted as at 20 to receive the spikes with the ring members 19 tightened thereon and compressed against the portions of the pad surrounding the spikes.

The pad 14 is of compressible resilient rubber composition and the like which will readily be compressed or reduced in thickness when weight is imposed thereon as when engaging the ground as in running and which will readily return to its normal formation when released from engagement. This prevents the accumulation of mud, dirt and the like between the spikes. A clog of dirt adhering thereto between the spikes will be forced outwardly with the expansion of the pad. The coil spring 17 functions to maintain the outer face of the pad in normal arcuate formation and to return the pad to its normal formation when released from compressed condition.

While the preferred form of the invention has been shown and described herein, it is to be understood that the invention is not so limited but shall cover and include any and all modifications thereof which fall within the purview thereof.

What is claimed is:

1. In a non-clogging cleat, a base adapted to be alfixed to the outer face of the sole of a shoe and having a plurality of depending spikes disposed in angularly spaced relation, a pad of compressible material extending over the lower face of said base between the spikes and having its greatest thickness centrally thereof and gradually decreasing in thickness toward the spikes, and means engaging said spikes securing said pad in position on said base.

2. In a non-clogging cleat, a base adapted to be aifixed to the outer face of the sole of a shoe and having a plurality of depending spikes disposed in angularly spaced relation, a pad of compressible material extending over the lower face of said base between the spikes and having its greatest thickness centrally thereof and gradually decreasing in thickness toward the spikes, a coil spring embedded in said pad centrally thereof, and means engaging said spikes securing said pad in position on said base.

3. In a non-clogging cleat, a base adapted to be afiixed to the outer face of the sole of a shoe and having a plurality of depending spikes disposed in angularly spaced relation, a pad of compressible material extending over the lower face of said base between the spikes and having its greatest thickness centrally thereof and gradually decreasing in thickness toward the spikes, a coil spring embedded in said pad centrally thereof, and internally threaded ring members threadedly engaging said spikes for securing said pad in position on said base.

4. In a non-clogging cleat as set forth in claim 3 in which the pad of compressible material is extended at the spikes and has openings through which the spikes protrude, and the threaded rings are compressed against the extended portions of the pad surrounding the spikes for securing the pad to the base.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,012,057 Brady Dec. 19, 1911 1,041,667 Pierce Oct. 15, 1912 1,058,504 Weston Apr. 8, 1913 1,072,794 Tradesco Sept. 9, 1913

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1012057 *Mar 13, 1911Dec 19, 1911Patrick J BradyBase-ball spike.
US1041667 *Aug 3, 1911Oct 15, 1912George L PierceCleat for athletic shoes.
US1058504 *May 2, 1912Apr 8, 1913Howard WhitehartSpike for shoes.
US1072794 *Apr 12, 1912Sep 9, 1913Daniel A TradescoSpike for base-ball shoes.
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3308561 *Mar 8, 1963Mar 14, 1967Paul Mayo JosephComposition of matter and method of use thereof
US4146979 *Oct 25, 1977Apr 3, 1979Fabbrie Gilbert RSelf-cleaning golf-shoe cleat
US4240215 *Mar 5, 1979Dec 23, 1980Mayo BroussardShoe spike
US4590693 *Jun 19, 1984May 27, 1986Mizuno CorporationBaseball or softball shoe sole
US5533282 *Feb 13, 1995Jul 9, 1996Asics CorporationHard plate of each of spike shoes for field and track events
US6138386 *Jan 22, 1999Oct 31, 2000Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc.Composite cleat for athletic shoe
US6145221 *Nov 12, 1997Nov 14, 2000Hockerson; StanCleated athletic shoe
US6381878Oct 31, 2000May 7, 2002Spalding Sports Worldwide, Inc.Composite cleat for athletic shoe
US8322051 *Feb 23, 2010Dec 4, 2012Nike, Inc.Self-adjusting studs
US8453349Apr 1, 2010Jun 4, 2013Nike, Inc.Traction elements
US8453354Oct 1, 2009Jun 4, 2013Nike, Inc.Rigid cantilevered stud
US8529267Nov 1, 2010Sep 10, 2013Nike, Inc.Integrated training system for articles of footwear
US8533979Feb 18, 2010Sep 17, 2013Nike, Inc.Self-adjusting studs
US8573981Jun 28, 2010Nov 5, 2013Nike, Inc.Training system for an article of footwear with a ball control portion
US8584380Sep 13, 2012Nov 19, 2013Nike, Inc.Self-adjusting studs
US8616892Jun 28, 2010Dec 31, 2013Nike, Inc.Training system for an article of footwear with a traction system
US8632342Dec 11, 2009Jan 21, 2014Nike, Inc.Training system for an article of footwear
US8656610Nov 14, 2011Feb 25, 2014Nike, Inc.Articles with retractable traction elements
US8656611Jul 27, 2012Feb 25, 2014Nike, Inc.Articles with retractable traction elements
US8713819Jan 19, 2011May 6, 2014Nike, Inc.Composite sole structure
US20110203136 *Feb 23, 2010Aug 25, 2011Nike, Inc.Self-adjusting studs
WO1998020763A1 *Nov 12, 1997May 22, 1998Stan HockersonCleated athletic shoe
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/59.00R, 36/134
International ClassificationA43C13/04, A43C13/00
Cooperative ClassificationA43C13/04
European ClassificationA43C13/04