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Publication numberUS3044092 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 17, 1962
Filing dateNov 6, 1958
Priority dateNov 6, 1958
Publication numberUS 3044092 A, US 3044092A, US-A-3044092, US3044092 A, US3044092A
InventorsFox Gerald B, Vandeveer Donald E, Welch Henry E
Original AssigneeHobart Mfg Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Glassware cleansing machine
US 3044092 A
Abstract  available in
Images(5)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 17, 1962 G. B. FOX ETAL 3,044,092

GLASSWARE CLEANSING MACHINE Filed Nov. 6, 1958 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTORS GERALD B. Fox,

BY DONALD E.VANDEVEER a HENRY E.WELCH ATTORNEYS July 17, 1962 -G. B. FOX ETAL GLASSWARE! CLEANSING MACHINE 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Nov. 6, 1958 INVENTORS GERALD B. FOX DONALD ENANDEVEER a BY HENRY E. WELCH ATTORNEYS July 17, 1962 G. B. FOX ETAL 3,044,092

GLASSWARE CLEANSING MACHINE Filed Nov. 6, 1958 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 47 55 INVENTORS 53 55' GERALD 8. FOX

48 DONALD E.VANDE\IEER a BY HENRY E. WELCH ATTORNEYS July 17, 1962 G. B. FOX ETAL 3,044,092

GLASSWARE CLEANSING MACHINE Filed Nov. 6, 1958 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 ,,--4,a I52, FIG-1O M!!! 4, 42

INVENTORS GERALD B. FOX DONALD ENANDEvkER & BY HENRY E. WELCH ATTORNEYS July 17, 1962 G. B. FOX ETAL GLASSWARE CLEANSING MACHINE 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed Nov. 6, 1958 FIG-14 FIG-13 .a w 8 m g T H N mmwm m WFME W am ,6 EE wDY ALR M GMW Y B 3,044,092 Patented July 17, 1962 3,044,992 GLASSWARE CLEANSING MACHINE Gerald B. Fox and Donaid E. Vandeveer, Troy, Ohio,

and Henry E. Weich, Minneapolis, Minn, assignors to The Hobart Manufacturing Company, Troy, Ohio, a

corporation of Ghio Filed Nov. 6, 1958, Ser. No. 772,254 9 Claims. ((11.15-75) This invention relates to glassware cleansing machines suitable for cleansing tumblers and the like.

The purpose of the machine is to remove soil, residue material, cosmetic, etc. from the tumbler or other receptacle and also to sanitize the tumbler surface, rendering it substantially free of bacterial contamination. These two results are achieved by the same cleansing action which repeats itself during each cycle of operation of the machine. Each item of glassware is thus ensured of an effective cleansing operation to make it lit for re-use.

It has heretofore been common practice in connection with washing machines for glasses and the like to supply washing fluid at a relatively high temperature, frequently of the order of Nil-180 F. The heat of the washing fluid at this temperature is such as to contribute materially to the sterilizing effect and even though germicidal materials were added to the washing solution, the temperature of the solution was maintained at this relatively high value in order to obtain the necessary cleansing effect.

In accordance with the present invention a glassware washing machine is provided particularly adapted for the washing of glasses, tumblers, and the like, utilizing a supply of unheated water supplied from the water tap and a measured amount of germicidal material, this combination being highly effective at the relatively low temperature. The machine is designed to accomplish an effective washing and scrubbing action of the inner and outer surface of the tumbler while at the same time introducing a flow of germicidal'material and unheated water directly onto the surface to be cleaned, assuring a full and complete coverage of the entire surface of the article being washed.

Further, where it has been common in the pastto have a washing cycle in which all or a part of the washing liquid is recirculated, the present invention provides for a direct continuous flow of unheated fresh water from a tap or supply line into which a predetermined quantity of the cleansing agent is introduced. An arrangement such as this has several advantages. That is, it makes it possible to obtain adequately clean glasses without the need for a supply of hot water. The machine is merely connected to an ordinary cold water supply line and there is a consequent reduction in the expense for installation and operation. It likewise eliminates the need for a collecting tank or reservoir as well as a water pump for recirculating wash water from such reservoir. The machine thus is smaller in size, lighter in weight, and more economical in manufacture.

Still further, the machine is operation utilizes a continuous how of fresh water which serves at one time during the cleansing cycle as a carrier for the germicidal agent mixed therewith, and thereafter, the flow of fresh water provides a rinsing action at the glassware surface, removing the germicidal agent.

During the cleansing cycle, it is possible to vary the point at which the cleansing agent is included within the stream of fresh water, thereby providing if desired, a prewash in which a major part of the foreign material, soil, etc. is first removed. The prewash is then followed by the cleansing and rinsing action.

Since all residues do not respond in the same manner to a given cleansing cycle, various changes may be made in the duration of prewashing, cleansing, rinsing, so as to provide the most effective steps of removal of the foreign material. Even for the most adherent typev foreign materials such as those with a high fatty content, an effective cleansing cycle can be obtained with the machine of the present invention using water at ordinary tap temperatures.

The machine in operation, simultaneously scrubs both the inner and outer tumbler surfaces while at the same time providing a continuous flow of water and cleansing agent against said inner and outer tumbler surfaces.

A further object of the invention is to provide a scrubbing action on the items of glassware in such manner that there is only negligible unbalance of forces on the glass wherein no apparent twisting effect is developed on the glass making it quite effortless to hold the item of glassware in washing position. This object is accomplished by means of a central brush rotatable about the longitudinal axis'thereof and a series of outer brushes also rotatable about the longitudinal axis of said inner brush but in the opposite direction of rotation. During the described counterrot-ation, a .flow of water and lcleansing agent is provided through said inner brush as well as through an outer spray ring. The means for achieving counterrotation of the brushes is a novel arrangement of coaxial drive shafts which are turned oppositely for actuation of the respective inner and outer brushes. Drive means are associated with one end of each of said drive shafts to receive motive power from a source such as an electric motor or the like.

It is a feature of the machine construction that the series of outer brushes are mounted for radial movement toward and away from the central brush to accommodate different diameter size glassware. The outer brushes are further mounted to rock slightly about their centers in order that the brushes can conform with the outer surface of the glassware thus making it possible to cleanse outer brushes into forcible engagement with the outer glassware surface.

It is an object of the invention to accomplish a complete washing and rinsing cycle of the glassware in a short period of time thus-conserving water and cleansing agent which are the washing materials, and also making it possible to handle greater quantities of glassware. The time period of thewashing and rinsing cycle can be reduced because of the efficiency of cleansing operation, which takes place over a definite time period so that each item of glassware will receive a standard cleansing treatment which enables the glass to meet rigorous hygienic requirements. A timer mechanism is provided for this purpose and the operator is not required to guess what is the proper time to allot each item of glassware. machine operation begins automatically by inserting an item of glassware in washing position, it runs fora prescribed period and then shuts itself off, all automatically.

It is a further object of the invention to provide a glass washing machine operation which provides at each cleansing cycle, a predetermined quantity of cleansing agent having both germicidal and detergent properties, the structure providing this being an axial flow positive displacement pump which delivers said cleansing agent during any selected portion of the cleansing cycle.

It is of further importance to the invention that the outer brushes are reversible end-for-end to provide greater The provided so that the machine will not be operatedwhen there is either insuiiicient water pressure or insufficient cleansing agent. A further safety feature of the machine is the arrangement for disposing of the Waste water and cleansing agent after it is expended, with no possibility of siphoning the wastage back to the potable water supply. Also an object of the invention is the fluid distribution arrangement wherein a part of the fluid flow is directed through the drive shafts into theinterior of the glassware and another part of the fluid flow is directed through a circular arrangement of conduits and is directed onto the exterior of the glassware.

-Other objects and advantages of this invention will be apparent from the following description, the accompanying drawings and the appended claims.

. In the drawings FIG. 1 is an isometric view of the glassware cleansing machine; a

FIGJZ is a sectional view of the machine taken through the center thereof;

FIG. 3 is an enlarged sectional view of the drive mechanism for rotatingthe scrubbing members, one hal-fof.

the drive mechanism being broken away to illustrate details of the friction drive and fluid distribution;

FIGS. 4 and 5 are sectional views taken on the respectively indicated section lines in FIG. 3;

FIG. 6is a sectional view of an upper part of the the section line being taken online 6-6 The central brush consists of a corrosion resistant post 37 having a number of bristles 38 extending radially outward from the longitudinal brush axis which is the axis of rotation of the brush 36. The bristles 38 are formed in three rows along the length of the post 37, as indicated in FIGS. and 11. Since the tips of the bristles 38 are most effective in cleansing the interior surfaces of 7 the glassware 35 the bristles arecut at an angle (FIGS.

inner and ou'te'rbrush members before and after insertion of the tumbler in washing position;

' FIG. 12 is an isometric View of the conduit system for distributing the wash water and cleansing agent, the fluid 7 metering pump used in measuring out liquid cleansing agent; 7

FIG. 14 is an enlarged detail sectional view of the pump valves showing their relative position during upstroke of the pump, effected when the machine is initially actuated; V

FIG. 15 shows the check valve located at the discharge end of the pump illustrated in FIGS. 12 and 13; and

FIG; 16 is a Wiring diagram used in operating the various control elements for starting the machine'and operating its various parts including an arrangement of safety features preventingoperation of the machine under certain conditions. v

Referring to FIG. 1, the glassware cleansing machine is indicated generally by reference numeral 29. The machine includes a cabinet 21' for housing a major portion of the operating mechanism. The front face 22. of the cabinet is provided with an oval shaped catch basin 23 and a cylindrical casing 24 which defines a washing chamber 25 (FIG. 2), The end of the casing 24 is sealed off by a rubber gasket 28 provided with a funnel shaped guard 30.

The glassware is inserted through the opening 31in the guard and is passed into the washing chamber 25. Assuming that the glassware is :a tumbler, it is inverted at the time it is put into the washing chamber 25, the

. position of the tumbler being shown in FIG. 12, reference numeral 35. The inverted tumbler 35 fits over a central 2, 10) sothat they extend outwardly with a tapered radial dimension. As shown in FIG. 11 this has the effect of providing contact of at least a portion of the bristles along the tips thereof regardless of variations in dimension of the tumbler. At the top of the central brush 36 (FIG. 2) the bristles 38 extend in such a direction that they will contact the inside bottom of the glass to perform a scrubbing action at this surf-ace. Thus a glass which is inverted and fitted over the inner brush will have all of the inner surfaces thereof cont acted by the bristles 38. V V

A number of outer brushes 40 are spaced circumferential-ly within the machine (FIGS. 10, 11) to scrub the outer surface of the tumbler 35, Each outer brush 41 comprises a corrosion resistant backing 41 constructed from a suitable plastic material such as nylon or the like. Bristles 42 are spaced along the length of the backing 41 and are fixed at the ends thereof in the backing 41. The bristles are relatively pliable so that they can bend at the tips thereof in order to accommodate various size tumblers. Backing 41 has at its midsection a slotted boss 43 which can be press tit-ted onto a cross bar 45 of an adapter 46. The. adapter 46 in turn, is mounted by trunnions 47 in the slotted arms 48 of a rotatable spider designated generally by reference numeral 49.

Threepairs of arms 43 are provided for as many adapters 46, each carrying an outer brush 40. The slotted boss 43 allows'the outer brush 40 to rock back and forth on the cross bar 45, this rocking movement being limited in one direction by a stop 59 and in the other direction by a stop 52. The adapter 46 rocks back and forth on trunnion 47 which fits within the slots 53 of arms 48; The described rocking movement of the outer brushes 4G enables usage of the machine with various size and shaped tumblers. The adapters 46 can retract radially for larger size tumblers and the brushes will rock back and forth 'to insure complete contact along the enthe outer surface of the glass.

End 55 of each adapter is enlarged and forms a counterweight with respect to the outer brush carried oppositely to trunnion 47 which acts as a fulcrum. The ends 55 tend to be thrown radially outward by centrifugal force when the spider 49 is rotated, thus pivoting the adapters 46 on trunnions 47 and bringing the outer brushes 4!) radially inward against the surface of the tumbler 35.

Each of the outer brushes can be pulled off its associated cross bar 45 and reversed end-for-end in order to equalize wear of the bristles which tend to become worn at a faster rate along the leading edges 57 thereof.

When the brushes are reversed, the zone of greater wear is transferred from one side of the brush 40 to the other, so that longer usage is had from the brush before it is discarded from normal attrition.

The outer brushes 4%) are rotated by the spider 49 which is fastened through a central bushing 58 with a bayonet lock 60 (FIGS. 3, 8) to end 61 of drive shaft 62 (FIG. 3), the drive shaft 62 being rotated by a bevel driving member 63 having a spline connection 65 with the end 66 of shaft 62 (FIG. 5). The bayonet lock 60.

end 73 of drive shaft 70 is a bevel drive member 74 similar in construction to the bevel drive member 63 and likewise a spline connection 75 therebetween. The two bevel drive members 63 and 74 can move relatively to the coaxial shafts to provide for variations in location of the power shaft 76 having a bevel drive 77 frictionally engaging members 63 and 74. A spring 78 is provided to urge the drive member 77 into engagement with bevel drive members 63 and 74, the force of engagement between drive member 77 and the two drive members 63, 74- is equalized by cups 8% connected'to each member 63, 74 and having bearing balls 82 therebetween. Power shaft 76 is turned by a motor 85 mounted on an inclined axis as indicated in FIG. 2.

To cleanse the tumblers, a fresh water supply is provided through the inlet conduit 87 (FIG. 12) at tap temperature and no eifort is made to elevate the temperature thereof. The incoming water passes through a screen 89 which strains out any foreign material in the incoming water.

An inlet valve 90 turns the supply of water off and on. The inlet valve 90 admits water at constant flow rate regardless of line pressure this being accomplished by suitable flow control orifice within the valve. The water supply is fed upwardly in a conduit 92 where it passes through an elevated vacuum breaker 95, the purpose of which is to prevent reverse flow of water back through the supply conduits 92 and 87 and into the potable water supply. Once the water supply passes the vacuum breaker it is fed downwardly through conduit 56 to a mixing chamber 98 where it meets with a slug of fluid cleansing agent which is brought from storage chamber or tank 191 (FIG. 2) through line 162 by pump 194. The combination of cleansing agent and water then leaves the mixing chamber 93 through a length of corrosion resistant conduit 1415 which connects with a T 106 where the flow is divided between conduit 107 and conduit 108. The conduit 167 extends upwardly and is then bent into a circular or ring outline 109 terminating at closed end 110. A series of perforations 111 project the water and cleansing agent inwardly in a spray which is directed against the external surface of the tumbler.

The flow in conduit 168 is fed to an annular chamber 112 (FIGS. 3 and 4) where it passes through openings 113 into a second annular chamber 114, the chamber 114 being defined as the spacing provided between collar 116 and shaft 62 (FIG. 4). The fluid in chamber 114 passes radially inward through conduit sections 115 and into a passage way 117 where it passes upwardly through the center of the shaft 70. The conduit sections 115 also serve as retaining pins for the collar 116 which forms the inner surface of chamber 114. Instead of the four conduit sections 115 shown in FIG. 4, it is also possible to use a less number as for example two in order to simplify the construction and provide greater economy in manufacturing. The fluid then passes through the hollowed center portion 118 of the post 37 of the center brush 36 and is ultimately discharged through outlet openings 120 (FIG. 2) at the upper end of the post 37. The discharge through openings 120 subjects the interior surface of the tumbler to a spray of water and cleansing agent to provide a washing md rinsing action at this interior surface.

Suitable seal members 125, 126, 127 and 128 are provided to confine liquid within chambers 112, 114 and 117.

To transfer the cleansing agent from storage 100 (FIG. 2) to mixing chamber 98, the pump 104 is solenoid actuated to pull the piston 130 (FIGS. 13, 14) upwardly causing a positive fluid displacement by axial flow through the pump. As the piston 130 moves upwardly, one-way valve 131 is raised from seat 132 against the resistance of spring 133 allowing liquid cleansing agent to flow in the direction indicated by the arrows. The ball check valve 135 remains seated by the spring 136. Within the reduced diameter portion 138 of the piston there is an annular spacing 139 which, being filled with fluid, is discharged $1 through the outlet passage 140 against-the resistance of spring loaded ball check valve 141. Thus, during the upstroke of the piston a quantity of liquid cleansing valve 135, and liquid cleansing agent is forced through interior chamber 144 and radial passages 14-5 to annular spacing 139. Since the cross sectional area of chamber 143 is greater than the cross sectional area of spacing 139, more fluid is displaced on the downstroke of the piston then was pumped during the upstroke of the piston. This additional volume is forced through outlet as provided by the action of valves 131, 141. The slug of fluid which is pumped during downstroke of the piston 130 remains in the vicinity of chamber 98 since water flow is stopped at the time of the piston downstroke. The slug is retained in the chamber 98 and is carried out by the flowing water along with the slug of fluid displaced during'upstroke of I the piston 1311 in the next cleansing operation. The pump 111- 1 is thus double acting in that an axial flow is provided I during operation of the pump in either direction. The pump is self-priming and is particularly adapted to deliver precise quantities of cleansing agent. The quantity of liquid delivered for each reciprocation of the pump is measured by the length of stroke of piston 13%. This stroke length is regulated by means of a stem 148 threads edly received in an end plate 151 of casing 149 of the pump to define the lowermost position of the piston 130. Since the upstroke of piston 131) is controlled by solenoid operation, the regulation of pumping volume is determined by movement of the stem 148 so as to control movement of the piston 13% in the opposite or downward direction. Once an adjustment is made the stem is locked by nut 150. Accuracy of volumetric delivery by the pump can be adjusted and maintained to within extremely close limits.

Placement of a tumbler or other item of glassware 35 in washing position is used to start operation of the machine. When an inverted tumbler 35 is fitted over the inner brush 36 the tumbler is moved downwardly until the base contacts push rod 152 (FIGS. 2, 3 and 6) fitted within opening 153 of the inner brush 36. Grooves 154 along the sides of opening 153 permit movement of water and cleansing agent upwardly for discharge through outlet opening 121). There is a spacing between push rod 152 and the opening 153 of the inner brush 36 which permits the passage of fluid to flow upward and out the tip of the post 37 so that the bottom of the tumbler (or other item of glassware) is wetted by the cleansing and rinsing fluid. The clearance need not be great, only suflicient to allow the fluid to pass between push rod 152 and opening 153 and out of the opening in the end of post 37.

The push rod 152 is moved downwardly against the resistance of spring 166 acting against washer 162 received within a recess in rod 163. The end 165 of rod 163 is socketed to receive the push rod 152 therein. Tapered end 167 of rod 163 is moved downwardly by insertion of the tumbler, thereby contacting cam follower 168 (FIG. 2) to close normally open switch 170 (FIG. 16). Closing of switch 171? will start operation of the machine assuming there is suflicient water pressure and suflicient cleansing agent in storage.

The machine is inoperative when there is insufficient water pressure. A switch 172 (FIG. 16) responsive to pressure in the water supply line is connected to line 88 (FIG. 12) which leads from the inlet water supply line 87. The switch 172 is arranged to break the circuit from conductor 175 to conductor 176 when the water pressure drops below a predetermined value.

To safeguard against operation of the machine where there is insuflicient cleansing agent, a float 177 is provided which is responsive to the level of the cleansing opening 22!} (FIGS. 2; 12).

agent in storage'tank ltlili The float tilt) is arranged to drop with the falling level of detergent to open switch 178 breaking the circuit in conductor 176 to 179, thus preventing operation ofthe machine under these conditions. A-light signal 180 is lit by completing a circuit from conductor 1'76-to conductor 131, signaling the need for replenishing the cleansing agent.

When theswitch 17i} is'closedby insertion of a tumbler in washing position the timer 132 is started; Assuming that cleansing agent is to be used' at the start of the washing. cycle (no prewashing'phase), thcswitch 183 is closed and switch 184 opened so that current is made to flow through conductors 186, l87 by operation of thetimer 182 and thence through conductors 189, 1 91 and 193 to energize solenoids 194' to open inlet'valve 9t and'energize solenoid 196to operate pump 1% by lifting piston 130. Conductor 193 completes the circuit to 'motor 85 whichhas .a capacitor 1%, for starting of the motor 85. Conductors 206, 201 and ZGIfrom the sole no'ids 196,,194and motor 85 are connected with conductor '295 to complete the circuit to the master switch 206. H v

For washing seme'kinds of residue from glassware such as'milk or other fatty content materials, it is some: times advisable to provide 'a prewash cycle which will flush the residue from the tumbler, this prewash being followed by a slug of cleansing agent and thereafter a gent pump solenoid 1 96. To provide a full measure of cleansing 'agent,'-the switch 18-; is immediately opened thereafter, and solenoid 196 is deenergized, causing downstroke of the piston 135 to add a further increment of cleansing agent. This sequence is in contrast with the previous arrangement, in which cleansing agent is provided only at the very beginning of the cycle and the total cleansing cycle of approximately 4 to 6 seconds per item of glassware. Assuming the water flow rate of two gallons per minute there is appronimately 15 to 22 ozs. of water used per glass per washing cycle. In conjunction with this water, an amount of cleansing agent of the order of ml. is suitable. An iodophor cleansing agent having both germicidal and detergent properties has been found very effective for purposes of the present invention. A satisfactory material is that put out for example by Economies Laboratories, Inc., under the trade Mikro-Kleen GW or a product of Dubois Co. Inc. under the trade name IOdEiI. This material can be replaced if desired by other suitable detergentgermicidal cleansing agents.

Assuming that the glassware is to be cleansed without a prewash, the timer is set to operate the pump 1% immediately upon starting operation of the machine. An item of glassware, such as tumbler is inserted through opening 31, and being inverted, it is fitted over the inner brush 36. The base of the tumbler pushes against the rod 152 bringing end 167 into contact with cam wheelfollower 16?, closing switch 179. Assuming that there is sufiicient water pressure and cleansing agent, the closing of switch 174) will initiate operation of the machine.

The timer is started to run and will continue to run for a six'second period during which time current will flow from conductors 186, 187, 193 to energize motor 85. Drive member 77 frictionally engages the tapered oppositely rotatable drive members 63 and 74 which counterrotate the coaxial 'drive shafts 62 and 70. The drive shafts in turn counterrotate brush 36 and the spider 49 carrying outer brushes 40. The counterrotating brushes are caused to turn at approximately 500 rpm. As the outer brushes rotate, the ends 55 of their associated adapters 46 move radially outward under centrifugal force to bring the brushes into engagement with the outer surface of the tumbler 35. The outer brushes can rock back and forth at the center thereof so 'as to accommodate diiferent tumbler shapes and sizes.

Since the inner and outer brushes are counterrotating,

. the wiping action of the bristles on the tumbler at the timer provides for energization of the pump actuator soleno'i'd'196 at the beginning and at the end of the wash- 7 ing cycles. 7

During the cleansing operation'the liquid cleansing agent and water is discharged within the chamber 25 against the glassware and flows downwardly against the walls of casing 24 where it is collected at the lowermost part of the catch basin 23 and then runs out discharge The discharge opening 220 discharges the waste fluid through a T to a discharge line 221 having a hose 222 connected therewith. The flexible length of hose 222 then leads to a waste sink. In some installations the discharge line-221 can be permanently connected to a discharge facility. If the discharge line 221 becomes clogged and drainage becomes inadequate,

waste fluid will eventually reach a spill line indicated by the dashed liquid level 225 whereupon it'spills out over the lip of the catch basin. Above this level 225 is a short length of conduit 226 which can drain substantially all of the liquid in the fluid line beyond vacuum breaker 95,

thus preventing any siphonage of fluid back to the potable water. supply even in the event of malfunctioning of vacuum breaker 95. p

. Since conduit 226 is at all times above uppermost level to which wastage fluid can rise, there is no possibility inner end and outer surfaces is in opposition and the forces are substantially balanced so that very little effort is required by the operator to hold the tumbler in place while it is being brushed.

During the'cleansing cycle the timer also completes a circuit through conductors 186, 187, 191, to energize solenoids 194 operating valve 90 in the water inlet line 87 so that water is supplied continuously during the cycle to the machine. It has been found from control test procedures that the water need not be heated in order to produce an eifective sanitizing of the glass. Although hot water can be used, it has become unnecessary to rely on heat as a cleansing factor in the invention. When the water enters the machine, it passes through conduit 92, the vacuum breaker 95, conduit 96 to the mixing chamber 98 Where there is awaiting the cleansing agent metered from the pump 104. Approximately one half of the meas ure of cleansing agent is obtained from the downstroke of the piston at the last part of the preceding wash cycle and the other half comes from the upstroke of'the piston which takes place at the very first part of each wash cycle.

va. quantity of cleansing agent, which, adds to the increment from the preceding cycle already contained in the mixing chamber 98.

The two fluids, water, and cleansing agent pass through conduit 105 to the T 166 where the flow is divided between conduits 107 and 108, the flow in conduit 107 being sprayed over the external surface of the tumbler and the flow in 108 beingpassed upwardly through the coaxial drive shafts and center brush post for discharge through openings 12% onto the interior of the tumbler. Fluid is also caused to spray out of the end of post 37 because of the clearance between the push rod 152 and opening 153. The glass receives the mixture of cleansing agent and water for about the first second of the washing cycle. A part of the flow in conduit 108 is also directed to the short length conduit 226 (FIGS. 2, 4, 12) where it is directed out the opening 230 forming a spray which is directed in the direction of the lip of the tumbler.

' For the next five seconds of the washing cycle the liquid sprayed on the tumbler consists entirely of the cold water which rinses the cleansing agent from the tumbler surfaces and also facilitates removal of residue, foreign material, etc. from the tumbler surface. The inner and outer brushes continuously counterrotate to provide scrubbing action throughout the six second glass cleansing operation.

While the operation is described as lasting six seconds, this time period can be lengthened or shortened as desired, by suitable adjustment of the timer 182. Also, the quantity of cleansing agent can be varied to suit requirements, this adjustment being as previously described.

Once the machine is set for a given time period of cleansing operation, the machine will cycle at this period for each item of glassware and then the machine will shut itself off by breaking contactof conductor 186 with conductor 187 (see FIG. 16) through the timer 182 at which time the motor 85 is shut ofi, the water valve 90 is closed to shut oft" the supply of water to the level and the solenoid 196 of the cleansing agent pump is deenergized causing downstroke thereof.

The timer resets itself so that the machine is then ready for the next succeeding cleansing cycle.

The machine is constructed so that it will not pass contamination from one item of glassware to the next. That is, the brushes themselves are self-cleansing so that if they should pick up any bacterial contamination from one item it will not be passed onto the next because each cycle ensures cleansing action of the brushes as well as the glassware.

The over-all cleansing efficiency of the machine is accomplished by reason of the fluid distribution system which exposes substantially all of the glassware surface and brushes to the cleansing agent material which has both detergent and germicidal properties.

The cleansing cycle is more efiective for removing residue material such as the residue from milk shakes and the like if there is used a prewash, followed by an injection of detergent and then a rinse. In this case, the six-second cleansing cycle consists of a two-second spray of water, then a one-second detergent-water spray, then three seconds of clear water rinse. Especially for removing milk residue from glasses this prewash step is desirable. The variation is provided by changes in the timer 182 in which switch 183 is opened, switch 184 is closed. The timer 182. then acts to close switch 210 to energize the cleansing agent pump solenoid 196 to operate the pump 104 after a set duration of the cleansing cycle.

Because the machine is used to sanitize the glassware used in public institutions, it must be subject to periodic checkings to determine whether it is in satisfactory working order. It forms an important part of the invention that the machine can be readily inspected and checked to see if in proper working order. For example, the line 102 from the cleansing agent tank 109 to the pump 104 contains aflexible length of plastic conduit which can be connected with a delivery pipette containing liquid cleansing agent. The machine is then operated to determine whether or not the operation of pump 104 will 1 remove the prescribed quantity of fluid fromthe pipette.

As an additional safety factor, the machine will not operate under inadequate water pressure by reason of operation of sensing apparatus 172; neither will the machine operate if there is an inadequate supply of cleansing agent in the tank by operation of the float valve 177 and switch 178.

Thewashing cycle is sufficiently rapid so that large quantities of glassware can be treated. Therefore the machine is especially adapted for restaurants, hospitals, public institutions, etc. where glassware must be cleaned rapidly and efliciently. Because each item of glassware is subjected tothe same cycle, the cleansing action provides a uniform protective treatment .to all items of glassware without the independent judgment of the operator. 7

While the form of machine herein described constitutes a preferred embodiment of the invention, it is to be understood that this invention is not limited tothis precise form of machine and that changes may be made therein without departing from the scope of the invention which is defined in the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

l. A cleansing machine adapted for eflective operation with unheated water to cleanse and sterilize individual pieces of glassware and the like, comprising counter rotatable brush means concentrically arranged to receive a piece of glassware therebetween and to provide simultaneous scrubbing actions in opposite directions at the interior and exterior surface of said glassware, motor means to rotate said brush means, conduit and spray means connected to transmit unheated water from a supply line onto the glassware while it is being scrubbed, starter switch means, means responsiveto movement of a piece of glassware into scrubbing relation with said brushes to close said switch means and initiate operation of said machine, electrically operated valve means controlling water flow through said conduit means to provide a washing and rinsing cycle, a timer mechanism controlling the duration of operation of said motor means and operation of said valve means to provide a continuous flow of water through said conduit means during said washing and rinsing cycle in responseto actuation of said switch means, a storage chamber for liquid germicidal agent, and a positive displacement pump also controlled by. said timer mechanism and connected for metering quantities of germicidal agent from said chamber into the flow of water conducted onto the glassware during the washing portion of each operating cycle.

2. In a glassware cleansing machine, counterrotatable brush means concentrically arranged to provide simultaneous scrubbing actions at the interior and exterior surface of individual pieces of glassware, motor means to rotate said brush means, conduit means to transmit fluid for washing and rinsing said glassware while it is being scrubbed, starter switch means, means responsive to movement of said glassware into scrubbing relation with said brushes to operate said switch means and initiate operation of said machine, a timer mechanism actuated by said starter switch means for controlling the duration of operation of said motor mean-s, a normally closed electrically operated valve means operable by said timer to allow continuous fluid flow through said conduit means during a washing and rinsing cycle, a positive displacement pump actuated by said timer and operative to meter quantities of germicidal agent into said fluid tobe carried by said fluid over said glassware, and circuit means predetermining the point in said cycle at which said pump becomes operative.

3. In a glassware cleansing machine suitable for cleansing tumblers and the like, two oppositely rotatable coaxial drive shafts each having a beveled drive member at one end thereof, said drive members being adjacent arranged facing each other, means connecting each said sprayed liquid.

ii drive member to its respective drive shafts while pro yiding for movement'of the drive members along the lengths of said drive shafts, a motor for driving said ble brush means operated by said respective drive members, the bristles-of said brush means being proportioned to receive an inverted tumbler therebetween for cleansing simultaneously and in opposite directions the interior and exterior surfaces thereof.

4. In a machine for cleansing individual pieces of V glassware, a fluid distribution system for conducting ermicidal a ent and rinse water to said assware, said fluid distribution system comprising a first conduit having a circular perforated portion forldisch-arging fluid onto the exterior of the glassware, oppositely rotatable coaxial drive shaft means each having brushing elements associated therewith for simultaneously cleansing the interior and exterior of said glassware, a second conduit constructed interiorly of said drive shaft means for con- 'drive shafts, beveled drive means connected to said ducting fluid to the interior of the glassware, electrically operated valve means for connecting a water pressure source to said conduits, mechanically opera-ted switch means for initiating operation of said machine in response to placement of a piece of glassware between said brushing elements, a positive displacementpump means for measuring out a predeterminedquantity of germicidal and detergent material, said pump being connected to inject such material into the water supply admitted through said valve means, a timer mechanism actuated initially by said switch means and regulating the duration of cleansingoperation, said timer operating both said valve means and said pump means and including electrical control means for determining the stage at which said pump is operated. H 1 i 5. A machine for rapidly cleansing and sanitizing individual pieces of glassware, tumblers, and the like, comprising wall means defining a washing chamber, hollow coaxial drive shafts extending into said chamber through said wall means, concentric inner and outer cleaning brushes mounted on said shafts and defining therebetween a washing'station for a single piece of glassware, a spray member adjacent said outer brush and having means to direct a spray of cleansing liquid over the outer surface of a piece at said washing station, a central spray device within said inner brush and arranged to direct cleansing liquid over the interior of the piece, conduit means extending from said spray member and said central spray device and adapted for connection to 'a supply source of water, a control valve in said conduit means and selectively operable to determine the length of time of spraying each piece, drive means operable to rotate said shafts during opening of said valve, a storage tank for germicidal cleansing agent mounted adjacent said chamber, a selectively controlled metering pump connected to withdraw a predetermined amount of cleansing agent from said tank and to inject said amount into said conduit means for direct supply with water to said spray member and said central spray device at each actuation of said pump, timer means operating said pump during a portion of the length of time said valve is opened and prior to closing of said valve to distribute the germicidal agent over the piece before spraying of water is comdrainconnection from said chamber for disposing of all 6. A machine for rapidly cleansingand sanitizing individual pieces of glassware, tumblers, and'the 1ike,'comprising wall means defining a washing chamber, hollow coaxial drive shafts extending into said chamber through said wall means, concentric innerand ,ou ter'cleaning brushes mounted on said shafts and defining therebetwe en a washing station for a single piece of'glassware, motor means driving said shafts in opposite directions causing opposed action of said'inner and outer brushes on a tumbler inserted in said washing station, a spray ring surcontrol valve in said conduit means and selectively opcrable to determine the length oftime of spraying each piece, a storage tank for germicidal cleansing agent mounted adjacent said chamber, a selectively controlled metering pump connected to withdraw a predetermined amount of cleansing agent from said tank and to inject said amount into said conduit means for direct supply with water to said spray ring and said central spray device at each actuation of said pump, timer means controlling the duration of opening of said valve and running of said motor means and operating said pump during a portion of the length of time said valve is opened substantially prior to closing of said valve to distribute the germicidal agent over the piece before spraying of water is completed, and a drain connection from said chamber for disposing of all sprayed liquid.

7. A machine for rapidly cleansing and sanitizing individual pieces of glassware, tumblers, and the like, comprising wall means defining a washing chamber, hollow coaxial drive shafts extending into said chamber through said wall means, concentric inner and outer cleaning brushes mounted on said shafts and defining therebetween a washing station for a single pieceofglassware, a spray ring surrounding said outer brush and having means todirect a spray of cleansing liquid over the outer surface of a piece at said washing station, a central spray device within said inner brush and arranged to direct cleansing liquid over the interior of the piece, conduit means extendingfrom said spray ring and said central spray device and adapted for connection to a supply source of water, a control valve in said conduit means and selectively operable to determine the length of time of spraying each piece, drive means operable to rotate said shafts during opening of said valve, a storage tank for germicidal a predetermined portion of the length of time said valve I is opened and prior to closing of said valve to distribute the germicidal agent over the piece before spraying of water is completed, a drain connection from said chamber fortdisposing of all sprayed liquid, and a timer control connected to said valve, said drive means, and to said pump and operable to cause a spray of water mixed with cleansing agent followed by a rinsing spray of water alone while maintaining functioning of said drive means and opening of said valve for a predetermined time.

S. A machine as defined in claim 7 wherein said timer control is constructed to open said valve prior to operating said pump providing a pre-wash spray of water, and said timer control subsequently energizes said pump to spray a mixture of water and cleansing agent followed by a rinsing flow of water alone.

9. A machine for rapidly cleansing and sanitizing individual pieces of glassware, tumblers, and the like, comprising wal-l means defininga washing chamber, hollow 13 coaxial drive shafts extending into said chamber through said wall means, concentric inner and outer cleaning brushes mounted on said shafts and defining therebetween' a washing station for a single piece of glassware, a spray ring surrounding said outer brush and having means to direct a spray of cleansing liquid over the outer surface of a piece at said washing station, a central spray device within said inner brush and arranged to direct cleansing liquid over the interior of the piece, conduit means extending from said spray ring and said central spray device and adapted for connection to a supply source of water, a control valve in said conduit means and selectively operable to determine the length of time of spraying each piece, drive means operable to counter-rotate said shafts during opening of said valve, a storage tank for germicidal cleansing agent mounted adjacent said chamber, a selectively controlled metering pump connected to withdraw a predetermined amount of cleansing agent from said tank and to inject said amount into said conduit means for direct supply with water to said spray ring and said central spray device at each actuation of said pump, means operating said pump during a portion of the length of time said valve is opened and prior to closing of said valve to distribute the germicidal agent over the piece before spraying of water is completed, a drain connection from said chamber for disposing of all sprayed liquid, a timer control connected to operate said drive means and to open said lva lve for a predetermined cycle time, said control also having a connection to actuate said pump during an initial portion of said cycle time, and switch means responsive to positioning of a piece at said washing station to initiate operation of said timer control.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,921,681 Kopnicky Aug. 8, 1933 1,959,842 Schnee May 22, 1934 2,408,009 Titus Sept. 24, 1946 2,504,945 Austin Apr. 18, 1950 2,561,631 Negri July 24, 1951 2,563,528 Hamilton Aug. 7, 1951 2,631,313 Webber Mar. 17, 1953 2,636,199 Stanton Apr. 28, 1953 2,641,270 Allen June 9, 1953 2,706,486 Loeb Apr. 19, 1955 2,718,481 Tuthill Sept. 20, 1955 2,908,598 Bowe et al Oct. 13, 19.59 2,955,304 Noe Oct. 11, 1960 FOREIGN PATENTS 509,000 Germany I Oct. 7, 1930 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent; No. 3 044 092 July l? 1962 Gerald B., Fox et a1,

It is hereby certified that error appears in the above numbered patent requiring correction and that the said Letters Patent should read as corrected below.

Column 10 line 62 for "operable" read opemable column l l line 11 for "'l 921 68l" read 1,921,680

Signed and sealed this 13th day of November 1962..

SEAL) meat:

RNEST W. SWIDER DAVID L. LADD nesting Officer Commissioner of Patents

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3146718 *May 17, 1962Sep 1, 1964Hobart Mfg CoPump for sani-quick glassware
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Classifications
U.S. Classification15/75, 417/259, 134/103.2, 92/60.5, 422/29, 422/300, 134/100.1
International ClassificationA47L15/44, A47L15/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47L15/0068, A47L15/4418
European ClassificationA47L15/00D2, A47L15/44B