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Publication numberUS3044190 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 17, 1962
Filing dateDec 18, 1959
Priority dateDec 18, 1959
Publication numberUS 3044190 A, US 3044190A, US-A-3044190, US3044190 A, US3044190A
InventorsUrban Urbany
Original AssigneeUrban Urbany
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Inflatable sole and heel structure with replaceable tread portions
US 3044190 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

ly 17, 1962 u. URBANY I 3044190 INFLATABLE SOLE AND HEEL STRUCTURE WITH REPLACEABLE TREAD PORTIONS Filed Dec. 18, 1959 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 2 IO 30 2 2o 8 32 I 26 z: a 24 'l J 50 7? -35 I 4s Flg. 2

26 2's 24 I 24 20 2e 1/ 50 22 52 Flg. 3

INVENTOR.

URBAN URBANY BY July 17, 1962 3,044,190 u. URBANY INFLATABLE SOLE AND HEEL STRUCTURE WITH REPLACEABLE TREAD PORTIONS Filed Dec. 18, 1959 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 52 82 Fig. 5

INVENTOR.

URBAN URBANY ilnite The present invention relates generally to footwear and more particularly to inflatable sole and heel structure with replaceabletread portions.

The primary object of this invention is to provide a foot supporting structure for a shoe or boot, specifically the sole and heel thereof, incorporating air inflatable cushion chambers and easily replaceable tread portions.

Another object of this invention is to provide sole and heel structure in which the cushion chambers are inflated through simple self-sealing valves integral with the structure.

A further object of this invention is to provide sole and heel structure in which the tread portions are held in place magnetically and are automatically located and aligned in proper position.

Finally, it is an object to provide sole and heel structure of the aforementioned character which is simple, safe and convenient to use and which will give generally elficient and durable service.

With these and other objects definitely in view, this invention consists in the novel construction, combination and arrangement of elements and portions, as will be hereinafter fully described in the specification, particularly pointed out in the claim, and illustrated in the drawings which form a material part of this disclosure, and in which:

FIGURE 1 is an exploded perspective view, cut away, of a heel structure;

FIGURE 2 is a sectional view taken on the line 2-2 of FIGURE 1;

FIG. 3 is a sectional view taken FIGURE 2;

FIGURE 4 is a top plan view of a sole structure; and

FIGURE 5 is a sectional view taken onthe line 55 of FIGURE 4.

Similar characters of reference indicate similar or identical elements and portions throughout the specification and throughout the views of the drawings.

Referring now to FIGURES 1-3 of the drawings, the base element of the heel is made of two parts, a heel base 12 and a lower heel portion 14- shaped in the manner of a conventional heel. The heel base 12 has a large cavity 16 in the underside thereof, leaving a depending, peripheral wall 18, While the lower heel portion 14 has a large cavity defined in part by a bottom wall 20 with an upstanding, peripheral wall 22, said walls having confronting faces of corresponding size and shape and said lifts being secured together in sealed relation by cement ing or otherwise bonding said confronting faces of the walls. To facilitate assembly, the wall 22 has a plurality of small sockets 24, the wall 18 having a plurality of correspondingly dimensioned and positioned raised portions 26, which fit into said sockets and align the top and bottom lifts of the heel. The air chamber 27 thus formed in the heel 10 is inflated through a small valve 28 fixed in the front, generally flat wall 30, the valve illustrated being a readily available type made of rubber or similar resilient material and having an opening "32 in which are two spaced diaphragms 34 and 36, the space between the diaphragms being filled with an air drying sealing fluid 38. Inflation is accomplished by means of -a thin probe attached to an air hose 42, the probe being forced through the diaphragms 34 and 36, as indicated in broken line in FIGURE 2. When the probe 46 is withdrawn, the

partially on the line 3-3 of btates atent small holes close and are sealed by the fluid 38. This type of valve is simple and especially suitable for the purpose, but it should be understood that other valves may be used if so desired.

The base element of the heel 10 is preferably made from substantially resilient material to obtain maximum cushioning effect and good wearing qualities are ensured by the use of a replaceable wear lift 44 of suitable wear resistant material, such as hard rubber or leather. The top surface of the wear lift 44 is provided with an endless raised rib 46 spaced slightly inwardly from the outer edge, the lower surface of the bottom lift 14 having a correspondingly dimensioned and positioned groove 48, so that the tread portion fits accurately into place on the base element of the heel. To simplify replacement of the tread portion 44' when necessary, the bottom wall 20 of the base element of the heel or more specifically of the lower heel portion 14 is impregnated with magnetic material 50 adjacent the lower face thereof, and the tread portion or wear lift 44 has its upper part impregnated with magnetic material 52, so that the tread portion is strongly attracted to the heel and held securely in place during normal use. When displaced accidentally, the tread portion 44 is easily fitted back into place.

Similar structure may also be applied to a sole 6%, as illustrated in FIGURES 4 and 5, said sole comprising an upper sole portion 62 and a lower sole portion 64. The upper sole portion 62 has a cavity 66 surrounded by a depending peripheral Wall 68, while the lower sole portion 64 has a cavity defined in part by a. bottom wall 70 and an upstanding peripheral wall 72, the wall 72 having sockets 74 and the wall 63 having a correspondingly dimensioned and positioned protuberant portion 76 for alignment, as previously described. The air chamber 77 in the sole is fitted with a valve '78, similar to the valve 28, in the rear section of the composite wall comprised of the Walls 68 and 72.

Attached to the underside of the bottom Wall 79 is a replaceable wear sole portion 80, having a raised rib 82 which seats in a corresponding groove 84 in the bottom wall 79, said bottom wall 7d being impregnated with magnetic material 50 and said tread portion also containing magnetic material 52.

The sole and heel can be attached to a conventional shoe or boot upper in any suitable manner to provide a comfortable cushioning effect and the pressure in the air chambers 27 and '77 can be changed as necessary to suit the wearer. Due to the replaceable tread portion, the wear on the cushioned sole and heel structure is minimized.

The operation of this invention will be clearly comprehended from a consideration of the foregoing description of the mechanical details thereof, taken in connection with the drawings and the above recited objects. It will be obvious that all said objects are amply achieved by this invention.

It is understood that minor variations from the form of the invention disclosed herein may be made without departure from the spirit and scope of the invention, and that the specification and drawings are to be considered as merely illustrative rather than limiting.

I claim:

The combination in a shoe having a sole portion and a heel portion: each said portion having a base element; at least one of said base elements having an air chamber defined on the lower side thereof by a bottom wall; said bottom wall being impregnated with magnetic material; and a wear surface having the upper part thereof impregnated with magnetic material and thereby removably secured to said bottom wall.

(References on following page) UNITED STATES PATENTS Busby Nov. 20, 1906 Scott Nov. 28, 1911 Kaye Sept. 1, 1914 Gay July 27, 1915 Emery June 21, 1921 Winter Feb. 21, 1922 4 Conger Mar. 27, 1923 Glanzer July 8, 1924 Keller Jan. 5, 1926 Schaffer Ian. 9, 1934 Mohun Feb. 22, 1938 Litschert May 2, 1939 Moody Mar. 15, 1949 DAmico Jan. 2, 1951 Beckwith et a1 Dec. 22, 1959

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US836364 *Feb 5, 1906Nov 20, 1906E A G BusbyDetachable tread for boots and shoes.
US1010187 *Jul 8, 1911Nov 28, 1911 Boot and shoe.
US1109130 *Oct 13, 1913Sep 1, 1914Edgar C KayePneumatic sole for shoes.
US1148376 *Jul 27, 1915 Pneumatic insole.
US1382180 *Dec 22, 1919Jun 21, 1921Emery Elias JSole-tap for boots and shoes
US1407506 *May 16, 1921Feb 21, 1922Winter George JCushion heel
US1449498 *Feb 17, 1920Mar 27, 1923Conger Thomas MCushion heel
US1500583 *Dec 9, 1922Jul 8, 1924Ludwig GlanzerPneumatic sole
US1568405 *Aug 30, 1924Jan 5, 1926Frank B SmithPneumatic footwear construction
US1942883 *Aug 15, 1931Jan 9, 1934Adolf SchafferPneumatic shoe
US2109180 *Mar 30, 1936Feb 22, 1938Meade MohunShoe construction
US2156342 *May 21, 1938May 2, 1939Litschert Carl ZCushion heel
US2464251 *Oct 24, 1946Mar 15, 1949Moody Howard HRubber heel
US2536539 *Apr 13, 1949Jan 2, 1951Sabatino D AmicoResilient heel
US2917840 *Oct 23, 1958Dec 22, 1959Beckwith Arden IncHeel and base assembly
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4237625 *Sep 18, 1978Dec 9, 1980Cole George SThrust producing shoe sole and heel
US4342157 *Aug 11, 1980Aug 3, 1982Sam GilbertShock absorbing partially liquid-filled cushion for shoes
US4358902 *Apr 2, 1980Nov 16, 1982Cole George SThrust producing shoe sole and heel
US4577417 *Apr 27, 1984Mar 25, 1986Energaire CorporationSole-and-heel structure having premolded bulges
US4887367 *Jul 11, 1988Dec 19, 1989Hi-Tec Sports PlcShock absorbing shoe sole and shoe incorporating the same
US4936030 *Nov 8, 1988Jun 26, 1990Rennex Brian GEnergy efficient running shoe
US5113599 *Sep 27, 1990May 19, 1992Reebok International Ltd.Athletic shoe having inflatable bladder
US5224277 *Apr 23, 1992Jul 6, 1993Kim Sang DoFootwear sole providing ventilation, shock absorption and fashion
US5365678 *Apr 22, 1993Nov 22, 1994Kabushiki Kaisha HimikoMid-sole or sole of shoes
US5425184 *Mar 29, 1993Jun 20, 1995Nike, Inc.Athletic shoe with rearfoot strike zone
US5502901 *May 10, 1994Apr 2, 1996Brown; Jeffrey W.Shock reducing footwear and method of manufacture
US5509938 *Jan 4, 1994Apr 23, 1996Phillips; Van L.Prosthetic foot incorporating adjustable bladder
US5545463 *Mar 6, 1995Aug 13, 1996Energaire CorporationHeel/metatarsal structure having premolded bulges
US5625964 *Jun 7, 1995May 6, 1997Nike, Inc.Athletic shoe with rearfoot strike zone
US5667738 *Apr 29, 1996Sep 16, 1997Krajcir; Dezi A.Methods for the production of resilient molded heels for boots and shoes
US5673500 *Dec 11, 1995Oct 7, 1997Raymond HwangShoe with weighing means
US5685090 *Dec 13, 1995Nov 11, 1997Nike, Inc.Cushioning system for shoe sole and method for making the sole
US5979079 *Jun 11, 1997Nov 9, 1999Krajcir; Dezi A.Resilient molded heels for boots and shoes
US5987779 *Apr 17, 1996Nov 23, 1999Reebok International Ltd.Athletic shoe having inflatable bladder
US6055746 *May 5, 1997May 2, 2000Nike, Inc.Athletic shoe with rearfoot strike zone
US7213350Oct 10, 2003May 8, 2007B & B Technologies LpShock reducing footwear
US7383648Feb 23, 2005Jun 10, 2008Reebok International Ltd.Inflatable support system for an article of footwear
US7448150Feb 28, 2005Nov 11, 2008Reebok International Ltd.Insert with variable cushioning and support and article of footwear containing same
US7600331May 19, 2008Oct 13, 2009Reebok International Ltd.Inflatable support system for an article of footwear
US7622014Jul 1, 2005Nov 24, 2009Reebok International Ltd.Method for manufacturing inflatable footwear or bladders for use in inflatable articles
US7694438Dec 13, 2006Apr 13, 2010Reebok International Ltd.Article of footwear having an adjustable ride
US7784196Dec 13, 2006Aug 31, 2010Reebok International Ltd.Article of footwear having an inflatable ground engaging surface
US7930839Oct 7, 2009Apr 26, 2011Reebok International Ltd.Inflatable support system for an article of footwear
US7934521Dec 20, 2006May 3, 2011Reebok International, Ltd.Configurable fluid transfer manifold for inflatable footwear
US8230874Oct 7, 2008Jul 31, 2012Reebok International LimitedConfigurable fluid transfer manifold for inflatable footwear
US8256141Apr 7, 2009Sep 4, 2012Reebok International LimitedArticle of footwear having an adjustable ride
US8414275Jan 11, 2007Apr 9, 2013Reebok International LimitedPump and valve combination for an article of footwear incorporating an inflatable bladder
US8540838Nov 23, 2009Sep 24, 2013Reebok International LimitedMethod for manufacturing inflatable footwear or bladders for use in inflatable articles
US8572786Oct 12, 2010Nov 5, 2013Reebok International LimitedMethod for manufacturing inflatable bladders for use in footwear and other articles of manufacture
USRE34102 *May 14, 1991Oct 20, 1992Energaire CorporationThrust producing shoe sole and heel
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/29, 36/35.00R, 36/32.00R
International ClassificationA43B13/18, A43B13/20
Cooperative ClassificationA43B13/20, A43B13/206
European ClassificationA43B13/20T, A43B13/20