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Publication numberUS3044272 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 17, 1962
Filing dateDec 3, 1959
Priority dateDec 3, 1959
Publication numberUS 3044272 A, US 3044272A, US-A-3044272, US3044272 A, US3044272A
InventorsEisendrath David C
Original AssigneeCory Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Dehumidifier control having collected-condensate responsive means
US 3044272 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 17, 1962 D. c. EISENDRATH 3,044,272

DEHUMIDIFIER CONTROL HAVING COLLECTED-CONDENSATE RESPONSIVE MEANS Filed Dec. 5. 1959 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 July 17, 1962 D. c. EISENDRATH DEHUMIDIFIER CONTROL HAVING COLLECTED-CONDENSATE RESPONSIVE MEANS 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Dec. 3, 1959 w w W a w m ahunl n V M 5 z 4 1 j 7 w 0% x fi m?) 1 c 5 B j i2 1 United States Patent l 3,044,272 DEHUMIDTFIER CONTROL HAVING COLLECTED- CONDENSATE RESPONSIVE MEANS David C. Eiscndrath, Chicago, 111., assignor to Cory Corporation, a corporation of Delaware Filed Dec. 3, 1959, Ser. No. 857,000 Claims. (Cl. 62-176) This invention relates to a control for an electrical device and more particularly to a control for selectively operating a dehumidifying device of conventional construction by automatic means adapted for actuation by a condensate receptacle or by manual means.

Dehumidifying devices have become very useful and necessary appliances in homes throughout the country by virtue of their ability not only to protect household items against moisture deterioration but also to provide comfortable air conditions for many activities requiring humidity control. Despite these desirable features, a dehumidifying device does present a difficult problem as to coordinating its operation with the disposal of condensate. Y

In the past dehumidifying units have been provided with manual flip switches for turning the unit on and off which required the user to keep a constant vigil of the condensate receptacle to prevent overflowing. Only if a unit without a receptacle were placed over a drain or the like, thereby permitting the condensate to flow away continuously, did a flip switch prove satisfactory.

This invention contemplates obviating the above problem by providing a control capable of automatically turning on the device by the insertion of a condensate receptacle and again shutting it off when the receptacle becomes full thereby permitting convenient removal of the receptacle to dispose of the condensate. The control is further adapted to stay turned off while the receptacle is removed and to beturned on again only by the reinsertion of the receptacle. Independent manual means is provided to turn the unit on and off without the need of a receptacle.

A general object of this invention, therefore, is to provide a new and improved control for an electrical dehumidifying device.

A more particular object is to provide an automatic control-having a first control means to turn on the device when a condensate receptacle is inserted and another control means to shut off the device when a predetermined level of condensate is reached in the receptacle.

Another object of this invention is to provide both manual and automatic controls, the manual control when rendered operative superseding the automatic control.

Yet another object is to provide means inconjunction with both automatic and manual controls to lock the device in the ofl condition when it is desired not to operate the 'unit.

It is still another object of this invention to provide an economical and durable control for an electrical dehumidifying device.

These and other objects and advantages will be more apparent from the following detailed description and drawing, wherein:

FIGURE 1 is an elevational view of the control in the on condition showing fragmentary portions of the dehumidifier framework and condensate receptacle, and additionally, in broken-out line, showing the float means in the off position, i.e., with the bucket filled; FIGURE 2 is an enlarged elevational view of the control switch as shown in FIGURE 1, now shown in the off condition and further-showing an empty receptacle ready to be inserted to thereby turn on the device;

FIGURE 3 is an enlarged side elevational view of the control taken substantial-1y along line 3-3 of FIGURE 1;

, 3,044,272 Patented July 17, 1962 FIGURE 4 is a vertical sectional view of the control taken substantially along line 4 -4 of FIGURE 2;

FIGURE 5 is a fragmentary and enlarged sectional view of a portion of the control taken substantially along line 5'5 in FIGURE 3, illustrating the movement of the manual rod;

FIGURE 6 is a view like FIGURE 5, except that the switch is now shown locked in the off condition by the manual control means;

FIGURE 7 is a plan view of the control taken substantially along line 77 of FIGURE 6, showing a wire arm and movable switch members in an engagement;

FIGURE 8 is a sectional view of a portion of the control taken substantially along the line 8-8 of FIGURE 3; and 7 FIGURE 9 is a schematic diagram of the electrical circuit of the present device.

A general description shall be given first to facilitate understanding the exemplary embodiment of the invention. As shown in FIGURES 1 and 2 of the drawings, framework portions 10 represent an electrical dehumidifying device of a commercially available type having a switch 11 attached to one side thereof. The switch is operated by a movable member 12 to effect the on and off condition of the device, it being immaterial by what manner of construction the switch functions as long as a movable member can be lifted, turned or depressed to operate it. The dehumidifying device is adapted to collect condensate within a receptacle, such as bucket 13 positioned as in FIGURE 1. An arm 14 is pivoted about a central shaft 15 to operably engage the movable member of the switch. A

To regulate the operation of the device three distinct control means are incorporated, each acting upon the arm and capable of turning the device on or off. There is a first control means having a float 16 displaced by rising level of condensate within the bucket causing the arm to pivot and shut off the device at a predetermined level 17; A second control means is positioned beneath the arm having a bracket strip 18 actuated by the insertion of the bucket to pivot an extension thereof into the bucket and thereby freeing the float and arm to pivot downwardly into the bucket to turn on the device. The bracket extension within the bucket can subsequently be brushed upward by the top edge of the bucket as it is withdrawn to lift the arm upwardly into a position where the device is locked 01f. Finally, there is a third control means utilizing a manually operated rod 19 linked to an arm which independently turns the device on and off without the-need for any receptacle.

Turning now to a more detailed consideration of the exemplary embodiment, it is seen that the movable member 12 is comprised of a resilient blade adapted to turn off the device when depressed by the arm 14, as shown in FIGURE 2, and to turn on the device when free to straighten up, as shown in FIGURE 1. The arm 14 is a strand of wire formed about the horizontally disposed shaft 15 on the framework, being free to pivot in a vertical plane. The arm extends in opposite directions from the shaft, one extension 20 engaging the movable member of the switch and the other extension 21 extending over the bucket having a length sufficient to pivot down into the bucket and be immersed .in condensate. V

Proceeding now to the first control means, generally designated 22, it has a float 16 fitted securely between the turn 23 of the wire strand at the end of the arm, as shown in broken-out line in FIGURE 3. It should be specifically noted that the first control means, when free to pivot will turn on the device as the float end of the arm swings into the bucket by virtue of its own weight and turn off the device as condensate lifts the float. This freedom to pivot is limited somewhat by the second control means which will be described subsequently. The float should be carefully positioned on the arm so that a level of condensate is never reached within the bucket which is too near the bucket top making disposal of the condensate difficult. Any suitable buoyant material can be used to make the float, such as expanded poly-plastic foam.

The second control means, generally designated 24, comprises a U-shaped bracket 25 having two arms 26 and 27 pivotally mounted on the shaft with arm 14 spaced therebetween. A bracket strip 18 is rigidly fastened to the underside of the U-shaped bracket forming angularly disposed fingers 28 and 29 spaced less than 90 apart. The fingers extend in the same vertical plane in which the U-shaped bracket and arm swing. Finger 29 extends downwardly having a slight turn 30 to engage the side of the bucket as it is slid sideways into operating position, shown in FIGURE 2. Finger 28 extends parallel to the arm extension 21 having end 31 bent diagonally upward. Since finger 28 is disposed less than 90 from finger 29, it is tilted into the bucket when finger 29 is pushed to the right. Once the finger 28 is within the bucket, it can be engaged by the bucket top 32 as the bucket is withdrawn for disposal, thus returning the bracket strip back to its initial position.

-An angle piece 33 is rigidly fastened to the upper surface of the bracket strip extending normally thereto. The angle piece has a vertical slot 34 spaced intermediate its sides in which the arm is guided in free vertical movement and restrained from moving laterally. The bottom of float 16 is engaged by finger 28 of the bracket strip as the strip is pivoted upwardly for disposal and thereby lifting the arm from the reclining position of a full bucket to the horizontal position shown in FIG- URE 2. This is the only instance where the freedom of the first control means is overridden by the second control means.

In conjunction with the automatic means, it is desirable to be able to lock the arm 14 in the off position when the bucket is removed thus avoiding any necessity to unplug the device. To this end a nose portion 35 is provided on the uppermost portion of the arm 27 of the U-shaped bracket. The nose portion engages an over-centering spring 36 fastened to the overhead framework so that the arm can be supported in a permanent locked off position when the bracket strip is pivoted sufiiciently. The nose portion can be freed from the over-centering spring when a bucket is inserted thereby forcing the bracket strip in the opposite direction.

The third control means, generally designated 37, includes a push-pull rod 19 slidably mounted on the framework above the arm having an expansion spring 38 about the rod urging it normally inward. The rod is pivotally connected by a pin 39 to a bracketed controller 40 rotatably mounted on shaft 15. Extension legs 41 and 42 extend inwardly from opposite sides of the bracketed controller adjacent the bottom thereof being on opposite sides of the shaft. The bracketed controller is positioned on the shaft so that each of the extension legs extend transversely of the arm 14 and thus the controller is able, when pivoted sufficiently, to turn the device on and ofi.

It is desirable not only to hold the manual control in a neutral position while the other controls are in use, but also it is desirable to lock the manual control in an off position for reasons stated in conjunction with the automatic means. To these ends, a plate 43 is fixedly mounted adjacent the rear side 48 of the bracketed controller having a rounded edge 44 leading to a shoulder 45. A detent 46 protrudes from the rear side of the bracketed controller and is arranged to ride clear of the edge 44 up to the shoulder when the bracketed controller is pivotally urged by the spring 36. At this position, the

bracketed controller is held having the extension legs 41 and 42 disengaged from the operative movements of either arm 14 or the bracket strip 18. However, when a sufficient hand force pushes the rod inwardly to pivot the bracketed controller further, the detent slips past the shoulder into an index hole 47. In this position, the leg 41 of the bracketed controller has engaged the arm 14 to pivot it into the off position and be locked unti1 further manual movement of the rod. The rod must be pulled to free the detent from the index hole and when the rod has been pulled outward a sutficient distance, the leg 42 of the bracketed controller will engage the arm causing it to pivot oppositely and turn on the device. It should be noted that the legs 41 and 42 are positioned so that when one leg is in engagement with arm 14 the other leg is in engagement with the bracket strip to coordinate both the arm and bracket strip.

As shown diagrammatically in FIG. 9, a humidistat control 53 of a commercially known type is incorporated into the dehumidifying device to insure operation only when atmospheric conditions demand it. The humidistat operates in response to varying conditions of relative humidity to start and stop the fan motor 49 and compressor 50 of the dehumidifier by actuation of switch 51.

To indicate to an observer whether the humidistat or automatic float control is responsible for a turned off dehumidifier, a signal system is provided. Signal light 52 is connected between power line L2 and terminal 54 of switch 11. Switch 11 is a single pole, double-throw switch having a movable contact 55 connected to power line L1 and is actuated by the float control to remove the dehumidifier and humidistat from the circuit and turn on the signal light 52. Confusion is therefore obviated by ob serving whether the light is on or off to know which control has turned off the dehumidifier.

To operate the device by use of the first and second control means, namely, the automatic means, a user merely slides an empty bucket into operating position whereby the bucket side will bear against the bent portion of the finger 29 of the bracket strip. The bracket strip then pivots counterclockwise bringing the other finger into the bucket and freeing the float to swing likewise into the bucket. As condensate is collected in the bucket, the float rises to gradually pivot the arm clockwise and ultimately turn off the device when a full bucket is reached. At some convenient time, the bucket may then be removed to dispose of the condensate. As the bucket is slidably withdrawn, the top edge 32 brushes across the bracket strip to pivot it into a horizontal position and lift the arm therewith by engagement of the bottom of the float secured to the arm. In the horizontal position the nose portion 35 has over-centered the spring 36 to hold the arm in the locked off position until a bucket is reinserted to free the bracket strip from the spring and thereby starting the cycle all over again.

To turn on the device by use of the independent manual means, the bracketed controller must be brought from its neutral position where it is normally urged to rest against the shoulder, into engagement with the arm. To do this, the rod 19 is pulled thus pivoting the bracketed controller counterclockwise whereby the legs 41 and 42 coact to engage the arm and bracket strip and swing them downwardly into the bucket. The rod will return to its neutral position by action of the spring 38 while the arm and bracket strip remain down by their own weight. To turn oif the device, the rod is pushed inwardly generally beyond the neutral position to pivot the bracketed controller clockwise, thus lifting the arm and bracket strip to turn ofi the device. At the moment the device is turned off, the detent on the bracketed controller engages the index hole in the adjacent plate to lock the arm and device in the off condition until the rod is again pulled to free the detent from the index hole and returning the bracketed controller to the neutral position.

Although a specific embodiment of the invention has been shown and described, it is to be understood that such description is for illustrative purposes only. The'invention is to be limited only by the appended claims.

I claim:

1. In an electrical dehumidifying device having provision to collect condensate within a bucket and a switch operated by a movable member to effect the on and off condition of the device, a control, comprising: an arm piv otally supported on said device engageable with said movable member to operate said switch; first control means displaced by a rising level of condensate within the bucket to pivot said arm and shut oil the. device when a predetermined level of condensate is reached; second control means overriding said first control means to pivot said arm comprising a bracket having a pair of angularly disposed fingers, one-finger engaged by the bucket side as the bucket is inserted into operating position causing said bracket to pivot said arm and turn on the device and the other finger engaged by the bucket top as the bucket is withdrawn causing said bracket to pivot said arm oppositely and turn oil the device; and manual control means for actuating said arm to turn the device on and oif and being operable independently of said first and second control means.

2. In an electrical dehumidifying device having provision to collect condensate within a bucket and a switch operated by a movable member to effect the on and oil condition of the device, a control, comprising: an arm pivotally supported on said device between on and off positions havingone endengag eable with said movable member to operate said switch; means to lock said arm in the turned off position; first control means connected to said arm having a fioat displaced by a rising level of condensate within the bucket pivoting said arm to turn off the device when a predeterminedlevel of condensate is reached; second control means overriding said first control means to pivot said arm comprising a swingably mounted bracket having a pair of angularly disposed fingers, one finger engaged by the'bucket side as the bucket is inserted into operating position causing said bracket to pivot said arm and turn on the device, the other finger engaged by the bucket top as the bucket is withdrawn to cause said means to hold the arm in the locked off position; manual control means having a rod linked to said arm for actuation thereof, said manual control means being operable independently of said first and second control means to turn the device on and off.

3. In an electrical dehumidifying device having provision to collect condensate within a bucket and a switch operated by a movable member to eifect the on and oil condition of the device, a control, comprising: a rocker arm rockably supported about a first axis on said dehumidifying device having one end engageable with said movable member to operate said switch means; and a bracket swingably mounted on said dehumidifying device about an axis coincident with said first axis being engageable with said rocker arm so that movement of said bracket causes said rocker arm to operate said switch means, said bracket having a pair of angularly disposed fingers, one finger being engaged by the side of the bucket when the bucket is horizontally moved into operating position to rock the rocker arm and turn on the device and the other finger being lowered into the interior of said bucket when the one finger is so engaged, said other finger being engaged by the top edge of the bucket when the bucket is horizontally withdrawn from operating position to oppositely rock the rocker arm and turn the device.

4. In an electrical dehumidifying device having provision to collect condensate within a bucket and a switch operable by a movable member to effect the on and ofii condition of the device, a control, comprising: an arm pivotally supported on said device engageable with said movable member to operate said switch; an over-centering spring mounted on said device; a bracket pivotally supported on said device being engageable with said arm so that movement of said bracket causes the arm to operate the switch, said bracket having a nose extension engageable with said over-centering spring to lock said arm in ofi position, said bracket having angularly disposed fingers less than 90 apart, one finger being engaged by the bucket side as the bucket is inserted into operating position freeing said arm to pivot and turn on the device, the other finger being engaged by the bucket as the bucket is withdrawn therefrom causing said nose extension to over-center said spring to lock the said arm in position where the device is turned off; manual control means comprising a push-pull rod swivelly connected to a bracketed controller having extension legs to engage said arm, movement of said rod causing the extension legs to engage said arm for eflecting the on and oil condition of the device independently of said bracket.

5. A control as described in claim 2, wherein said manual control means includes an expansion spring mounted on said rod, a detent extending outwardly from said bracketed controller and a detent plate mounted adjacent said bracketed controller, said detent plate having a shoulder and an index hole arranged to receive said detent, and said spring urging said rod inwardly to bring the detent against the'shoulder for holding said bracketed controller disengaged from said arm, further manual movement of the rod inwardly causing said detent to move past the shoulder into the index hole and thereby retaining said arm in the locked ofl position.

6. In an electrical dehumidifying device having provision to collect condensate within a bucket and a switch operable by a movable member to efiect the on and ofi condition ,of the device, a control, comprising: an arm pivotally supported about a first axis on said device engageable with said movable member to operate said switch;'first control means having a float displaced by a rising level of condensate within the bucket to pivot said arm and shut ofi the device when a predetermined level of condensate is reached; second control means overriding said first control means to pivot said arm into the turned off position comprising a bracket having a pair of angularly disposed fingers, one finger being engaged by the bucket side as the bucket is inserted into operating position causing said bracket to pivot said arm and turn on the device, the other finger being engaged by the bucket top as the bucket is withdrawn causing said bracket to pivot said arm oppositely and turn off the device; and manual control means comprising a pushpull rod swivelly connected to a bracketed controller rotatably mounted on said device, said bracketed controller having extension legs extending outwardly therefrom and each being on opposite sides of said first axis so that pivotal movement of said bracketed controller in either direction will cause at least one extension leg to engage said arm and pivot the said arm in a corresponding direction to turn the device on or ofi respectively.

7. In an electrical dehumidifying device having provision to collect condensate within a bucket and a switch operated by a movable member to effect the on and off condition of the device, a control, comprising: an arm pivotally supported on said device engageable with said movable member to operate said switch; first control means displaced by a rising level of condensate within the bucket to pivot said arm and shut off the device when a predetermined level of condensate is reached; and second control means overriding said first control means to pivot said arm comprising a bracket having a pair of angularly disposed fingers, one finger engaged by the bucket side as the bucket is inserted into operating position causing said bracket to pivot said arm and turn on the device and the other finger engaged by the bucket top as the bucket is withdrawn causing said bracket to pivot said arm oppositely and turn off the device.

8. An electrical dehumidifying device, comprising: a dehumidifier having an electric motor for driving the same and a bucket for holding condensate delivered by the dehumidifier; a humidista-t electrically associated in series with said motor being exposed to the atmosphere to be dehumidified and operable under varying conditions of relativehurnidity to start or to stop said motor by respectively closing and opening the electrical line connected to an electrical power source leading to said motor; an electrical indicating means having an electrical line connected to an electrical power source independent of said motor and humidistat; a single-pole, doublethrow switch interposed between the electrical line of said motor and humidistat and the electrical line of said indicating means, said switch having the pole connected to an electrical power source to complete a circuit through said motor and humidistat or through said indicating means depending on the position of said pole; a first means responsive to the level of condensate within said bucket; and a second means actuated by said first means to operate said switch to remove the motor and humidistat from circuit when the bucket is full regardless of the status of said htunidistat and put the indicating means into circuit to inform an observer that the level of condensate in said bucket rather than a lack of humidity in the atmosphere has caused said dehumidifier to cease operation.

9. In an electrical dehumidifying device having provision to collect condensate within a bucket and a switch operated by a movable member to effect the on and ofi? condition of the device, a control, comprising: an arm pivotally supported on said device and engageable with said movable member to operate said switch; and means to pivot said arm and operate the device and including a and a bucket removably associated therewith for holding condensate delivered by the dehumidifier, a humidistat exposed to the atmosphere to be dehumidified and including a first switch connected in electrical series relationship with said motor, control means including a second switch connected in electrical series relationship with said first switch and motor, each switch being operable to prevent operation of the motor, said humidistat further including means to open said first switch when the level of humidity is below a preselected level and said control means further including means mechanically independent of the humidistat to open said second switch when the level of condensate in said bucket, with said bucket disposed in said association with the dehumidifier, is above a preselected level, and electrically operated indicating means, said second switch further including means connected in series relationship with said indicating means and arranged to energize said indicating means whenever the second switch is arranged to prevent operation of said motor, thereby to indicate to an observer that the level of condensate in said bucket rather than the low level of humidity in the atmosphere has caused operation of said motor to be prevented.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,142,577 Jacobson June 8, 1915 1,282,178 Bousquet Oct. 22, 1918 1,384,767 Kurz July 19, 1921 1,476,525 Lazzari Dec. 4, 1923 1,821,699 Fleck Sept. 1, 1931 2,289,882 Myers July 14, 1942 2,438,120 Freygang Mar. 23, 1948 2,448,634 Smith Sept. 7, 1948 2,725,196 Frittschuh Nov. 29, 1955 2,811,842 Taylor Nov. 5, 1957 2,841,369 Carraway July 1, 1958

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3110161 *Apr 4, 1962Nov 12, 1963Admiral CorpFloat switch assembly for air conditioning apparatus
US3496731 *May 8, 1968Feb 24, 1970Westinghouse Electric CorpDehumidifier control system
US3500654 *Jun 11, 1968Mar 17, 1970Westinghouse Electric CorpDehumidifier structure
US3807191 *Apr 24, 1972Apr 30, 1974Zanussi A Spa IndustrieRemovable air conditioning unit for cooling rooms
US4277657 *Jun 18, 1979Jul 7, 1981Hoechst AktiengesellschaftApparatus for determining the quantity of particles present in a container
US5884495 *Oct 9, 1997Mar 23, 1999Whirlpool CorporationDehumidifier with an adjustable float for setting the moisture level shut off
Classifications
U.S. Classification62/176.1, 200/61.2, 62/188, 200/84.00R
International ClassificationF24F13/00, F24F13/22
Cooperative ClassificationF24F13/22
European ClassificationF24F13/22