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Publication numberUS3044426 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 17, 1962
Filing dateMar 23, 1960
Priority dateMar 23, 1960
Publication numberUS 3044426 A, US 3044426A, US-A-3044426, US3044426 A, US3044426A
InventorsArthur Schwarzberger
Original AssigneeArthur Schwarzberger
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Work-handling apparatus for quilting machines
US 3044426 A
Abstract  available in
Images(7)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 1962 A. SCHWARZBERGER 3,044,426

WORK-HANDLING APPARATUS FOR QUILTING MACHINES Filed March 23, 1960 7 Sheets-Sheefil INVENTOR. ARTHUR SCHWARZBERGER ATTORNEYS.

' July 17, 1962 A. SCHWARZBERGER WORK-HANDLING APPARATUS FOR QUILTING MACHINES Filed March 23, 1960 7 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR. ARTHUR SCHWARZBERGER ATTORNEYS.

July 17, 1962 A. SCHWARZBERGER 3,044,426

WORK-HANDLING APPARATUS FOR QUILTING MACHINES '7 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed March 23, 1960 'INVENTOR. ARTHUR SCHWARZBERGER ATTORNEYS July 17, 1962 A. SCHWARZBERGER WORK-HANDLING APPARATUS FOR QUILTING MACHINES Filed March 23, 1960 FIG.6

7 Sheets-Sheet 4 INVENTOR. ARTHUR SCHWARZ BERGER BY MM ATTORNEYS.

y 1962 A. SCHWARZBERGER 3,044,426

WORK-HANDLING APPARATUS FOR QUILTING MACHINES Filed March 23, 1960 7 Sheets-Sheet 5 FIG. 7

INVENTOR. ARTH UR SCHWARZBERGER ATTORNEYS.

July 17, 1962 A. SCHWARZBERGER 3,

WORK-HANDLING APPARATUS FOR QUILTING MACHINES Filed March 23, 1960 7 Sheets-Sheet a INVENTOR. ARTHUR SCHWARZBERGER BY MM ATTORNEYS.

WORK-HANDLING APPARATUS FOR QUILTING MACHINES Filed March 25, 1960 July 17, 1962 A. SCHWARZBERGER 7 Sheets-Sheet 7 INVENTOR. ARTHUR SCHWARZBERGER ATTORNEYS.

United States Fatent My invention relates to machines which stitch quilting lines in assembled layers of textile materials in conformity with a base pattern, and more particularly to means for handling and moving the work with facility.

One object of the novel apparatus is to provide a pair of frames in which units of worksuch as quiltsare designed to be clamped and stretched into proper form for receiving the quilting line stitching, and design the apparatus in a manner to perform the stitching operation in one work unit while the other is being clamped and stretched.

A further object is to design a mechanism which facilitates the exchange of finished work units with ones prepared for the line stitching operation in consecutive order, whereby to keep the apparatus in continuous operation.

Another object is to provide a carrier assembly for work units completed for the line stitching operation, such assembly having means for moving the work unit according to the course of the pattern, and being designed to afford a path of approach to the stitching facility in case the latter requires service or repair.

With the above objects in view, a better understanding of the apparatus may be gained by reference to the accompanying drawings, in which FIG. 1 is a top plan view of the apparatus in relation to the stitching facility, and showing one unit of the work prepared in its frame for the stitching operation, the alternate frame being omitted in order to reveal its support;

FIG. 2 is an elevation of the showing of FIG. 1, viewed from the right-hand side thereof;

FIG. 3 is a front-end elevation of the table or support for the alternate frame, as seen from the line 3-3 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a rear-end elevation of the said table, as seen from the line 4-4 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 5 is an enlarged duplication of the left-hand portion of FIG. 2, plus a fragment of the center portion thereof, showing changes in the positions of vital parts;

FIG. 6 is a top plan view of a typical frame which is designed to receive a work unit;

FIG. 7 is an enlarged front elevation of a work-receiving frame as mounted in the topsection of a carrier, as seen from the line 7-7 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 8 is a top plan view of the larger part of FIG. 7;

FIG. 9 is a section on the line -9 of FIG. 6;

FIG. 10 is a section on the line 1010 of FIG. 7;

FIG. 11 is an enlarged fragmental section on the line 1111 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 12 is an elevation of the showing in FIG. 11;

FIG. 13 is a section on the line 13-13 of FIG. 12;

FIG. 14 is a perspective view of the engaging end of a frame moving arm;

FIG. 15 is an enlarged duplication of the left-hand portion of FIG. 8, given a quarter turn in the clockwise direction;

FIG. 16 is a section on the line 1 616 of FIG. 15, showing a clamp in the closed position;

FIG. 17 is a view similar to FIG. 16, showing the clamp in the open position;

FIG. 18 is a section on the line 18-18 of FIG. 15;

FIG. 19 is a section on the line 19-19 of FIG. 17;

FIG. 20 is a duplication of the left-hand central position of FIG. 7 on a larger scale; and

FIG. 21 is a similar view, minus a frontal part, and takenon the section line 21-21 of FIG. 8.

The basic unit served by the work-handling apparatus is the stitching facility; and the motive supports for the framed work units are the carriers. The stitching facility and the carriers are shown and described in detail in my copending patent application on Follower Unit for Quilting Machines, filed on January 5, 1960, under Serial No. 548. However, brief mention will be made of these units in the present case to help identify them. Thus, specific reference to FIGS. 1 and 2 of the drawings indicates the bridge frame of the stitching unit at 20-, the lefthand post thereof at 20a, the right-hand post at 20b, and the sewing machine within the bridge frame at 21. The same figure also shows a pair of floor rails 30 extending along the front and rear of the bridge frame 20, respectively. These rails are secured to the floor of the space occupied by the machine, and are designed to form a track for the travel of a carrier 32 in the lower part of the machine from side to side in the space between the posts 17 and 18. The carrier 32 is formed with crossbars 33, and has wheels 35 which ride on the rails 30.

The side bars of the carrier 32 are also formed to serve as a track for an upper carrier whose travel is crosswise of the track rails 30, that is, between front and rear positions. The carrier 40 also has cross-bars 41 and wheels 42 which ride on the side bars of the carrier 32.

Mounted as described, the upper carrier til-may not only be moved forth and back, but from side to side with the lower carrier 32, as the latter rides the track rails 39. This permits any object on the carrier 40 to be Wheeled in any lateral direction, such as to follow the meshes of a quilting pattern 45. The latter, which may be of wood or metal, ,rests on the floor between the rails 30, and the carrier 41? has a follower 47 which depends into tracking contact with the strip detail 45a of the pattern.

FIG. 1 shows that the carrier 32 is situated substantially at the left-hand extreme of its travel, while the carrier 40 is situated at the front end of its travel.' A corner space is thus created between the carriers and the right-hand portion of the bridge frame 20, as seen in FIG; 1, which afiords immediate access to the sewing machine 21, in case the same should require threading, changing a broken needle, or other services. Finely dotted lines show the carriers located at the right-hand and rearmost positions in relation to the bridge frame.

FIG. 1 also shows a Work unit orquilt at as clamped in a frame 51, the latter being mounted on the carrier 40. The assembly of the framed work unit and the carriers may now be wheeled by hand to the position where the follower 47 engages the starting point of the pattern detail 45a. An electric motor 53 in the carrier 40, and a motor (not shown) for the sewing machine, may now be actuated by suitable controls to set the follower and stitching operation in motion for imposing the stitching line in the work unit 50 according to the design of the pattern. While this operation is in progress, the other work unit frame rests on a table shown in the bottom part of FIG. 1 and in enlarged side elevation in FIG. 5. However, as has been mentioned in the brief description of FIG. 1, the showing of the alternate frame 55 has been omitted from FIG. 1 in order to present therein a clear showing'of the table 60. The main operation in the present apparatus is to withdraw the frame 51 from the carrier assembly, when the line stitching operation has been concluded, so that the frame 51 may change places with the alternate frame 55, the withdrawing movement of the frame 51 toward the front being accomplished by a mechanism of swinging arms, while the rearward sliding movement of the alternate frame 55 is induced 3 by a screw device, both of these mechanisms being contained in the table 60.

The completing point in the pattern detail is planned to place the work unit 50 in the position shown in FIG. 1 when the stitching operation has ended, that is, in proximity to the table 60. At this point the follower 47 depresses a limit switch 63 which shuts off the sewing machine and opens an electrically controlled compressed air valve 65 admitting air to a conduit 66 which leads to a position under the table 60. The top of the carrier 40 includes side bars which flare outwardly as seen in the right-hand lower part of FIG. 8 and have guard flanges 40a on the outer side. Near the front ends the side bars carry sunken surface rollers 68. As seen in FIG. 6, the work unit frame 51 is essentially of angle bar construction; and it rests in the side bars of the carrier 40 as noted in FIGS. 1 and 8.

A iragmental cross-sectoin of the table 60 is seen in FIG. 13, and it is noted in this figure and also in FIG. 1

that companion angle rails 70 are mounted at the sides of the table. It is intended that the frame 51 with the finished work unit 50 be drawn forwardly off the carrier to be deposited in the rails 70. For this purpose a subframe 60a in the table 60 carries bearings 60b for a cross-shaft 72. To the latter are attached the lower ends of a pair of sweep arms 73 which normally occupy forwardly-inclined positions, as shown at the left in FIG. 2. The air conduit 66 leads to thefront end of an air cylinder 79, and the aforesaid action of the follower 47 to open the compressed air valve 65 passes air through ..the conduit to move the plunger rod 79a of the air cylinder 'rearwardly. The rod is connected by an attaching plate 73d to the sweep arms, so that these are therefore drawn to the rearwardly-inclined positions indicated by full lines in FIG. 5.

The sweep arms terminate with forked receptacles 73a at their upper ends; and hooks 7312 are pivoted to the receptacles at 73c to'lie in the extended position of FIG. 5, but be foldable over the receptacles to the position shown in FIG. 14. FIGS. 5, 7 and 8 show that the work unit frame 51 has upstanding blocks 51a in front for securing a pair of side pins 75, the outer ends of which have heads 75a.

When the work unit frame 51 extends forwardly from the carrier 40 as shown in FIG. 5, the pins 75 occur in the path of the sweep arm hooks 73b in case the sweep arms are swung toward the left from the full-line position in FIG. 5. In such event the sweep arms engage the frame 51 when they are in the dotted-line position A,

and then draw on the frame, so that when the arms are in I the position B theframe is in the dotted-line position b. .The further swing of the sweep arms and progress of the frame is indicat'ed by positions Cc and Dd When the position Cc is reached the frame is mostly removed from the carrier, and supports for the rear portion of the frame are necessary. The support on one side is seen from the top and side in FIGS. 11 and 12, and from the rear in FIG. 13. Each support is a bowed bracket 77 secured by a bolt and nut 77a-77b to' the table 60. The upper end of the bracket has an inwardly-directed side pm 770 on which a roller 77d is freely mounted. FIG. shows that the side bars of the frame 51 have mounted the rollers 77d when the frame is in the position c; and the rear portion of the frame is solely supported by the rollers 77d when it has reached the position d fully removed from the carrier 40. The forward swing of the sweep arms is'induced by a lug 73 which actuates a alternate work unit frame -seen alone in FIG. 6-is at rest in the angle rails 'of the table. During the stitching operation on the work uhit 50 in the frame 51, and during the travel of the completed work unit as just described, the frame 55 receives its own work unit (not shown) comprising an assembly of textile materials laid in the frame. At the time the sweep arms approach the front of thetable at points C, the textile assembly will have been clamped and stretched by means carried by the frame 55 and operated by an attendant standing in front of the table; and the clamping and stretching means will be described in sections to follow.

While the Work unit 50 and the frame 51 were still in the carrier 40, means were effective to prevent the accidental travel of the frame 51 in forward directionthat is, toward the table 60. FIG. 7 illustrates such means as an angle barcket S5 bolted at 88a under the frontal rail of the carrier 40. An angle-shaped detent 90 is pivoted at 91 to the bracket and drawn by a spring 92 to project in front of the frame 51 and block the forward movement thereof. A solenoid 95 carried by the bracket has an arm 95a linked to an eye 90a depending from the detent 90. Thus, when the follower 47 actuates the switch 63, it also closes a contact to energize the solenoid 95 and pull the detent 90 to the position indicated by dotted lines, clearing the path for the advance of the work bearing frame 51.

It was mentioned that, when the sweep arms 73 approach the fiont of the table at points C, the work unit in the alternate frame 55 was in the clamped and stretched condition, and therefore ready for the line-stitching operation. At the time being considered, one of the sweep arms meets and closes a switch 97 located in the bottom of the table to put in motion an electric motor 100 carried by the front end of the table sub-frame 60a and shown in FIG. 5. A chain drive 102 rises from the motor to operate a shaft 103 extending longitudinally under the top of the table. For the most part this shaft is formed as a screw 103a. A carriage 105 under the table top has a. pendent traveling nut 105a in mesh with the screw 103a, the carriage having an upward lug 105b which rises through a longitudinal slot 60c made in the center of the table, as seen in FIG. 1. Normally, the lug 10517 is in front of the alternate frame 55. However, when the switch 97 is actuated and the motor 100 set in motion, the carriage 105 will be moved rearwardly from the position shown in FIG. 5, with the effect of pushing the frame 55 from the table onto the carrier 40, such as to a. position approaching the sewing machine 21. It is inadvisable to push the frameunder power to the point of engaging the sewing machine, as its needle may be broken by theimpact. Thus, when the frame reaches the position proximate to the sewing machine, the traveling nut 105a strikes a switch 107 (see FIG. 5) which reverses the motor 100 for the automatic return of the pusher lug 10512 to its position of origin. This lug now strikes a switch 108 which shuts off the motor. Now,

since the frame 55 is carried on rollers 68, and the frame is made largely of aluminum, it is an easy matter for the attendant to push the frame to a point where the sewing machine may be applied for the line-stitching operation. The sewing machine has an independent drive and control, in order not to be affected by the movements of the work supports. It may be mentioned at this time that no conflict exists between the movements of the frames 51 and 55, since the frame Slenters and rides over the table at an elevated level, while the frame 55 slides at table level. 7

Reference to FIG. 6 indicates a series of clamps 110 in each side of the work unit frame (51 or 55). When the assembly of textile layers for a quilt or mattress cover is laid in the frame, the sides of the assembly are inserted between the jaws of these clamps; and the upper or movable jaws thereof are connected in gang relation by shafts 112 which extend from the front of the frame to receive operating levers 113. The clamping is accomplished by swinging these levers down from inclined to level positions; and in such positionas per FIG. 6- each lever may be locked from return travel by swinging a detent 115 over it as shown, the detent being vertically pivoted to the frame at 116.

Clamps 120 similar to the others are also carried by the front and rear rails of the frame (51 or 55), but the shafts 121 thereof are individually controlled by handles 122. Also, front and rear rails of the frame are not in one piece, but divided into sections 123. These carry opposed blocks 124 and 125 in which the end portions of a rod 127 are lodged. The rod is made fast in the block 125, but is slidable in the block 124. As seen in FIGS. 7 and 8, a long horizontal link 130 is pivoted with one end at 130a to the right-hand frame rail section 123. The left-hand section receives one end of a lever 132 on a pivot 133, the lever having a downward offset 132a, and a side lug 132b at its other end. The offset makes a pivoting connection 135 with the left-hand end of the link 130.

When a frame (51 or 55) has received a work assembly, the sides of the same are secured in the clamps 110 and the. ends inserted in the clamps 120. The hand levers 132 are now in vertical position as indicated by dotted lines in FIG. 20. Now each lever is swung downwardly, as indicated by dotted lines in FIG. 7. This causes each link 130 to descend from the dotted line position in FIG. 20 and also move toward the right. Thus, the breakjoint between the lever and the link straightens out and descends beyond horizontal center, as shown in FIGS.- 7 and 20. This action causes the separation of the work frame sections 123, and the locking of the same in the separated position when the side lug 13212 of the lever seats on the link as shown. The separating movement is alined by the sliding of the rod 127 in the block 124. The effect of the frame separating action is to stretch the work assembly from side to side. The end clamps 120 are now operated by means of their handles 122 to en gage the ends of the Work assembly, so that the latter becomes tautly mounted in the frame.

The side clamps 110 for the work assembly operate on the same principle as the end clamps 120; and the mechanism of the latter will now be described. It is noted from FIGS. 15 and 19 that the clamp jaw 120 and its base 140 are of fan shape to secure a Wide grip; and these parts are perforated at 141 to save Weight. The clamp base 140 has side walls 140a which are extended with outward journals 14% for the shaft 121 which carries the handle 122 for operating the clamp. The shaft has a keyway 121a for mounting a disc 143 having a thickened radial portion 144. A pair of curved links 146 are connected with their lower ends to the portion 144 as. shown at 146a; and the upper ends of the links are connected at 14612 to an internal web 120a of the upper clamp jaw 120. Thus, when the handle 22 of the clamp is up, the clamp is open, as shown in FIG. 17; and when the handle is swung down to the position of FIG. the clamp closes to engage the work assembly as shown in FIG. 16. The closing of the jaw 120-after the work has been grippedcauses a crosspin 150 in the back of the jaw to bear down on a compression spring 152 lodged in a post 153 secured at 155 to the frame rail; and the post has side slots 153a to clear the end portions of the crosspin 150 as it descends. The upper clamp jaw 120 thus follows the downpull of the links 146 until they pass bottom center by the rotation of the disc 143 to lock the links against return motion; and the urge of the spring maintains the locked position of the clamp.

It is now apparent that the carriers for the work-bearing frame have a unique relation to the stitching facility in order to be movable beyond the sameto the left, as seen in FIG. 1for access by the attendant for changing the thread or re-threading the needle, or for the making of a repair, without the need of removing the carriers from the zone of the stitching facility. Further, the car- 6 riers form a unit not only independent of the stitching facility, but also separate from the work-preparing table, as clearly seen in the same figure. Further, the feed of the work-bearing framesis in separate paths, so that the work-bearing frames cannot collide at any time. In fact, the frame prepared for the advance toward the stitching facility cannot move until the frame returning from the latter has ended its forward travel over the tables, where its position is elevated and amply spaced from the frame which is still on the table. Further, each frame receiving the Work assembly has facilities for clamping and stretching the same into taut condition before the frame begins its rearward travel toward the stitching facility. Further, the controls employed for instituting and stopping movements in the machine are of standard electrical or air-operated types and suitable for connection by those skilled in the art. Thus the limit switch 63 is a triple action type, one part opening thesewing machine circuit when the follower 47 rolls on the switch; a second part closes in such event to complete the circuit of solenoid 95 and draw the detent 90 away from the frame-retaining position; and the third part actuates the electricallycontrolled air valve 65 to admit compressed air to the conduit 66, so that the plunger in the cylinder 79 will be driven rearwardly to draw the sweep arms from their foremost position-at C-in FIG. 5- to the full-line position in the same figure. The switch 97 is a normally-open type and actuated only by the forward stroke of one of the sweep arms to turn on a'standard motor reversing magnetic unit, the latter putting the motor 160 in motion to back the pusher carriage 105. The switch 107 is normally open, and is closed by the carriage atthe rear end of its travel to reverse the motor and return the carriage to the front. It was not believed necessary to illustrate the controls just mentioned and the necessarily involvedwiring connecting them, as their nature and application are familiar for starting, operating or stopping mechanical movements.

I claim:

1. The combination with an overhead frame containing a stitching facility; of a carrier adapted for travel in said frame under the stitching facility, a work-containing frame mountable on the carrier for transportation by the same toward the stitching facility for the work to be engaged by the latter, a table on the side of the carrier remote from the stitching facility and having a second work-containing frame with work receivable therein for a stitching operation, means carried by the table and engageable with the first-mentioned work-containing frame when the carrier is in a position near the table to draw such work-containing frame off the carrier and mount such frame over the table, and supports carried by the table causing the work-containing frame being drawn to ride at an elevation from the second work-containing frame.

2. The combination with an overhead frame containing a stitching facility; of a carrier adapted for travel in said frame under the stitching facility, a work-containing frame mountable on the carrier for transportation by the same toward the stitching facility for the work to be engaged by the latter, a table on the side of the carrier remote from the stitching facility and containing a second work-containing frame with work receivable therein for a stitching operation, means carried by the table and engageable with the first rnentioned work-containing frame when the carrier is in a position near the table to draw such work-containing frame off the carrier and mount suoh frame over the'table, supports carried by the latter causing the-work-containing frame being drawn to ride at an elevation from the second work-containing frame, and other means effective during the travel of the work'containing frame being drawn over the table to move 7 thereon in replacement of the work-containing frame drawn therefrom.

3. The combination with an overhead frame containing a stitching faciliy; of a carrier adapted for travel in said frame under the stitching facility, a work-containing frame mountable on the carrier for transportation by the same toward the stitching facility for the work to be engaged by the latter, a table on the side of the carrier remote from the stitching facility and containing a second work-containing frame with work prepared for a stitching operation, means carried by the table and engageable with the first-mentioned work-containing frame when the carrier is in a position near the table to draw such work-containing frame off the carrier and mount such frame over the table, supports carried by the latter causing the work-containing frame being drawn to ride at an elevation from the second work-containing frame, other means eifective during the travel of the work-containing frame being drawn over the table to move the second work-containing frarne in the direction of the carrier and mount such second work-containing frame thereon in replacement of the work-containing frame drawn therefrom, the end of the first-named work-containing frame opposite the table having side pins, said first means comprising a pair of sweep ar-rns mounted pivota-lly under the table to extend inclinedly in one direction with hooks behind said side pins, and second means for swinging said sweep arms to draw the first workcontaining frame as stated and extend inclinedly in the opposite direction, said other means being actuated by the sweep arms as they travel in said opposite direction.

4. The combination with an overhead frame contain ing a stitching facility; of a carrier adapted for travel in said frame under the stitching facility, a work-containing frame mountable on the carrier for transportation by the same toward the stitching facility for the work to be engaged by the latter, a table on the side of the carrier remote from the stitching facility and having a second work-containing frame with work receivable therein for a stitching operation, means carried by the table and engageable with the first-mentioned work-containing frame when the carrier is in a position near the table to draw such work-containing frame off the carrierand mount such frame over the table, and supports carried by the table causing the work-containing frame being drawn to ride at an elevation from the second work-containing frame, other means effective as the first-mentioned work-containing frame is drawn over the table to move the second work-containing frame in the direction of the carrier and mount such second work-containing frame thereon in replacement of the first-"mentioned work-containing frame, controls operated by said first-mentioned means to draw the first-mentioned work-containing frame 05 said supports when the second work-containing frame has cleared the table, and the first-mentioned work-containing frame being drawn becoming deposited on the table in such event in replacement of the second work- 7 containing frame.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3122290 *Sep 21, 1960Feb 25, 19641556 Penobscot BldgDrapery pleating
US3124256 *Nov 14, 1960Mar 10, 1964 Frame exchange mechanisms for quilting machines
US3158116 *Jul 11, 1960Nov 24, 1964United Mattress Machines Co InQuilting machines
US3228364 *Jan 14, 1963Jan 11, 1966Phillips Van Heusen CorpApparatus for facilitating the attachment of buttons
US3336886 *Aug 16, 1965Aug 22, 1967Akron Standard Mold CoSewing machine and method of splicing fabric together
US3382825 *Oct 20, 1965May 14, 1968James Cash MachineQuilting apparatus holder interchanging means
US3500777 *Mar 7, 1968Mar 17, 1970Mathewson CorpQuilting apparatus
US3559600 *Jan 21, 1970Feb 2, 1971Mathewson CorpQuilting apparatus
US3960095 *Mar 14, 1975Jun 1, 1976Story Wayne GAutomatic quilting machine
US4192241 *Sep 15, 1978Mar 11, 1980Reed Donald KApparatus for quilting layered fabrics
US4497269 *Apr 25, 1983Feb 5, 1985Charles SchneiderMethod of making aesthetic quilting
US4505212 *Jun 1, 1983Mar 19, 1985Abm Industries, Inc.Shape forming and quilting apparatus
US4883009 *Oct 3, 1988Nov 28, 1989Fritz Gegauf AgMethod of and apparatus for processing textile material webs, especially for the manufacture of quilts and the like
US5040473 *Jun 29, 1990Aug 20, 1991Aktiengesellschaft Adolph SaurerMethod of, and apparatus for, processing textile material webs, particularly for manufacturing quilts and the like
US5325802 *Jul 9, 1992Jul 5, 1994Nahmaschinenfabrik Emil Stutznacker Gmbh & Co. KgSewing machine for large-surface, frame clamped material
US6223665Feb 8, 2000May 1, 2001Lora L. HindsleyQuilt clamp
US6446567Apr 27, 2001Sep 10, 2002Lora L. HindsleyPortable hand-operated machine quilting clamp
US6662737 *May 17, 2002Dec 16, 2003L&P Property Management CompanyMattress label sewing clamp
US7302898 *Jun 2, 2003Dec 4, 2007Martelli John DQuilt holding clamp and method of use
Classifications
U.S. Classification112/117, 112/470.36
International ClassificationD05B11/00
Cooperative ClassificationD05B11/00
European ClassificationD05B11/00