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Publication numberUS3044517 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 17, 1962
Filing dateNov 3, 1959
Priority dateNov 3, 1959
Publication numberUS 3044517 A, US 3044517A, US-A-3044517, US3044517 A, US3044517A
InventorsDaisy O Levi
Original AssigneeDaisy O Levi, Renato Levi
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Reversible furniture cover or receptacle and method for making same
US 3044517 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

D. O. LEVI ITURE July 17, 1962 REVERSIBLE FURN COVER OR RECEPTACLE AND METHOD FOR MAKING SAME 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Nov. 3

Fug-z July 17, 1962 D. o. LEVI 3,0

REVERSIBLE FURNITURE COVER OR RECEPTACLE AND METHOD FOR MAKING SAME 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed NOV. 3, 1959 P INVENTOR.

04 AS v 0. 4 E V/ %maz fl mum qrrolen/sPs July 17, 1962 o, v 3,044,517

REVERSIBLE FURNITURE COVER OR RECEPTACLE AND METHOD FOR MAKING SAME 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed Nov. 5

INVEN TOR. 0A AS 3 O 4 E V/ )fz MM ,4 rive/vars" 3,044,517 REVERSELE FURNITURE (RIVER R REUEP- TACLE AND METHUD FOR MAKING SAME Daisy 0. Levi, 6850 Santona Sh, Coral Gables, Fla, assignor to Daisy 0. Levi and Renato Levi Filed Nov. 3, 195?, Ser. No. 850,655 4 Claims. (till. (l-52) This invention relates to the general class of receptacles in the nature of covers for articles of furniture and, more specifically, the instant invention pertains to the cover construction as Well as to a method for making the same.

By way of example only, and not to be construed as limitations on the scope of the applicability of this invention, a cover constructed in accordance with the following specification and as illustrated in the drawings will be found readily adaptable to cover pillows, cushions, mattresses, suitcases, trunks, Ottomans, pads, handbags, etc. Coverings for such articles are not new, per se, but coverings for such items as are presently available on the open market or as are known in all prior art devices, are subjectto at least three basicobjections, for example, one of the most serious and obvious drawbacks to the conventional article cover is found in its propensity or aflinity to become soiled after but a short period of usage. Cover soilage gives rise, in turn, to secondary undesirable consequences which may be classified as (l) lacking sanitation and (2) being offensive to the aesthetic eye. In connection with the matter of sanitation, assume that the article to be covered is a pillow for the users head. Medical science has long looked with disfavor upon the application of soiled or begrimed articles to the human body for reasons so obvious as to preclude a dissertation herein. Facial contact, therefore, with a soiled pillow cover comprises an open invitation to infection, disease, and other health complaints. As for the aesthetic phase, no one knows better than the homemaker or interior decorator, for example, the destructive effect a soiled article of furniture plays in an otherwise perfectly appointed room.

A second of the major disadvantages with known prior art article coverings resides in its lack of versatility. By way of elaboration, let it again be assumed that reference is made to the cover for a pillow. When the exposed side of the pillow is covered with a conventional closure and the exterior side thereof becomes soiled, the cover must be removed and replaced. This, in turn, may create two additional problems. In the first place, the color of the replacement cover may clash with the surrounding environment, and/or it may be found that the desired size of the replacement cover is not immediately available. Under either of these circumstances, a person of discriminating taste would be obliged to remove the article from sight until such time that a suitable replacement or substitute cover comes to hand.

The third main objection to conventional furniture article covers resides in the method of construction. For the most part such covers are poorly seamed which permits joined panels to gap and become disengaged, and further, the seams are easily snagged and ripped.

To overcome these and other objectionable features and characteristics, this invention proposes to provide, as a primary object thereof, a reversible cover for an article of furniture, equipage or accouterment wherein the exposed face or surface of the cover always comprises the finished or display side of a fabric'material.

A further object of this invention is to provide for an article to be covered a cover member wherein each delineated side thereof comprises a pair of fabric panels disposed in juxtaposition relative to each other with each pair having, preferably, a differing color.

Still another object of this invention is to provide a hired rates Fatent Qf'ice multi-paneled receptacle or article cover formed of a fabric material and having interlocking seams joining proximate panels.

This invention contemplates, as a still further object thereof, the provision of a reversible multi-paneled receptacle or article cover having a waterproof or allergy preventative insert disposed between each pair of op posed panels, the inserts being fixedly disposed in their respective positions both prior and subsequent to the reversal of the receptacle or the turning inside out thereof.

It is a further object of this invention to provide a sewing method of assembly for joining superimposed pairs of fabric panels to form, as an end result of the seaming or stitching operations, an article cover of the type generally described supra.

This invention contemplates, as a still further object thereof, the provision of an article cover which is noncomplex in construction and assembly, inexpensive to manufacture, and durable in use. 7

Other and fur'therobjects and advantages of the instant invention will become more evident from a consideration of the following specification when read in conjunction with the annexed drawings, in which:

FIGURE 1 is a perspective view of a plurality of substantially.v rectangular panels formed of fabric material and utilized in constructing a cover member for an article of furniture in accordance with this invention;

FIGURE 2 illustrates the first step in the method for constructing the aforementioned cover member;

FIGURE 3 discloses the second method step for constr-ucting the cover member, FIGURE 3 comprising an exploded perspective view of the arrangement of the several panels;

FIGURE 4 illustrates the sewing or stitching operations as carried out on the panel assembly shown in FIG- URE 3;

FIGURE 5 illustrates the next succeeding step in forming the cover member wherein the cover member is shown as being turned inside out through an opening formed for that purpose;

FIGURE 6 shows the resultant finished cover member as formed from the preceding method steps;

FIGURE 7 is an enlarged transverse detail cross-sectional view taken substantially on the vertical plane of line 7'7 of FIGURE 6, looking in the direction of the arrows;

FIGURE 8 is an enlarged detail fragmentary crosssectional view taken substantially on the vertical plane of line 8-8 of FIGURE 6, looking in the direction of the arrows;

FIGURE 9 is an exploded perspective view of a plurality of panels utilized in constructing a cover member in accordance with a second embodiment of this invention;

FIGURE 10 illustrates a step in the construction of the cover member and illustrating the manner in which the panels of FIGURE 9 are fixedly secured together;

FIGURE 11 illustrates the next succeeding step in forming the cover member wherein substantially one-half of all of the panels making the cover member are shown as being drawn through an opening formed in one of the panels; I

FIGURE 12 is a view similar to FIGURE 11 and illustrating the next succeedingstep in constructing the cover member wherein the other end of the assembled panels is shown as being Withdrawn through an opening provided therefor;

FIGURE 13 is a perspective view of the completed cover member;

FIGURE 14 is an enlar ed detail cross-sectional view I taken substantially on the vertical plane of line 1414 of FIGURE 13, looking in the direction of the arrows;

Patented July 17, 1962 the stitching terminates short of the latter to provide a ralityof substantially rectangular panels formed of fabric and water-proof or allergy preventative panels utilized in constructing a receptacle or cover member for an article of furniture in accordance with a third embodiment of this invention;

FIGURE 16 illustrates the first step in the method for constructing the aforementioned receptacle or cover member;

FIGURE 17 discloses the second method step for forming the cover member or receptacle according to this embodiment of the invention, FIGURE 17 comprising an exploded perspective view of the arrangement of the several panels; V

FIGURE 18 illustrates the first sewing or stitching operation as carried out on the panel assembly shown in FIGURE 17; a

FIGURE 19 illustrates the'next' succeeding step in forming the cover member or receptacle wherein the cover member is shown as being turned partially inside out through an opening provided for that purpose;

FIGURE 20 lilustrates the resultant finished cover member as formed from the preceding method steps;

FIGURE 21 is an enlarged transverse detail cross-sectional view taken substantially on the vertical plane of line 21--21 or FIGURE 20, looking in the direction of the arrows; and, a

FIGURE 22 is an enlargeddetail fragmentary crosssectional view taken substantially on the vertical plane of line 22-22 of FIGURE 20, looking in the direction of the arrows.

Referring more specifically to FIGURES 1 to 8,=inelusive, illustrating one embodiment of this invention, reference numeral designates, in general, a receptacle or cover member for a pillow, pad or other similar article constructed in accordance with teachings of the instant invention. As represented in the several figures, the cover member 10 is seen to be constructed of four elongated substantially rectangular panels 12, 14, 16 and 18 (see FIGURE 1) having substantially identical dimensions. Preferably, one pair of the panels 12, 14 is o'f'a pre-selected color and design and the other pair of panels 16, 18 of still another pre-selected color and design. Since each panel has a finished and unfinished side the same are identified in the stated order by the addition of the letters and U to the panel reference numeral.

Having precut the panels 12, 14, 16 and 18, the first assembly step comprises the superimposition of a panel selected from each group, for example, the panels 12 and 16 (see FIGURE 2) with the finished sides thereof 12F and 16F facing one another. Thereafter, a pair of adjacent ends .of the panelsare secured as zit-20 in a twoply seam. V

The panel16 is then folded, in the direction of the arrow in FIGURE 2, about the stitches 20 so as to superimpose the finished sides 12F, 16F of the panels 12, 16 against each other with the marginal edges 22, 24- thereof, respectively, being disposed therebetween and adjacent the connected ends thereof (see FIGURE 3). 7

Subsequently, and still referring to FIGURE 3, panel 18 is juxtaposed on the panel 16 with the finished sides 18F and 16F facing one another, and in a similar manner the finished side 14F of the panel 14 is superimposed against the finished side 12F of the panel 12. The assembly is such that the free ends of the panels 12, 16 and the adjacent'ends of the panels 14, 18 are vertically aligned while the opposed ends of the latter'project beyond the sewed ends of the former. The assembled panels are now sewn together upon the longitudinally extending opposed sides and at the aligned ends thereof as at 26 (see FIGURE 4) to form a four-ply seam.

The projecting ends of the panels 14, 18 are now sewn together in a two-ply seam from one adjacent corner to-' wards the other adjacent corner as is indicated at 28, but

' The finished cover member is herein designated, in gengap 30 (see FIGURES 4 and 5) therebetween.

Having completed this last operation, the operator now reaches into the assembled panels through the gap 30 between either of the pairs of adjacent panels 12, 14 or 16, 18 and grasps the opposed sewn ends 32 of the panels and draws the ends 32 through the gap 30 as is illustrated in FIGURE 5. This turns the panels inside out so that the panels 16, 18 are disposed exteriorly of the panels 12, 14, with the panel 18 superimposed against the panel 14 and the panel 16 superimposed against the panel 12. In this arrangement, the finished sides 18F and 16F face outwardly while the finished faces 14F and 12F confront each other. After completing this turning step it is seen (FIGURE 7) that the outer marginal edges 34, 36, 38 and 40 of the panels 12, 14, 16 and 18, respectively, are disposed between the confronting unfinished sides 14U, 13U, of the panels 14 and 1 8, respectively, and on the same side of the stitches 26. The remaining unsewn projecting ends of the panels 14, 18 are reverted inwardly and are stitched together as at 28 to close the gap 3%. This completes the construction of the cover member 11}. It should be noted, however, that the step of turning the cover member 10 inside out could be accomplished in the same manner as described above by inserting a hand of the operator between the panels 12 and 14.

Should it be desired to display the cover panels 12, 14, the user reaches through the open end 42 of the cover 10 and grasps the sewn opposed end 32 thereof and draws it'through the open end 42 to turn the cover member inside out. The finished sides 12F, 14F of the panels 12, 14 now face outwardly and the finished sides 16F, 18F of the panels 16, 18 are superimposed in confronting relation interiorly of the panels 12, 14.

Reference is now made to FIGURES 9 to 14, inclusive which illustrate a second embodiment of this invention.

oral, by reference numeral 50 as shown in FIGURE 13. As in the preceding embodiment, four elongated substantially rectagular panels 52, 54, 56 and 58 are precut from fabric material, and of these panels the pairs of panels 52, 54 and 56, 58, respectively, are formed of materials having differing colors and designs (see FIGURE 9). For rea sons to be made more clear below, the panels 52 and 58 are somewhat longer than panels 54, 56. Each of the pan els 52, 54, 56 and 58 includes finished and unfinished surfaces designated by the letters F and U which immediately follow the reference numeral designating a given panel.

Panels 52, 53 are now out transversely intermediate theirltrespeotive opposed ends to serve a function to be described. Panels 52, 54 are now superimposed against one another with their respective finished sides 52F and 54F disposed in confronting relation (see FIGURE 10) and the same step is performed with respect to panels 56, 58. The pains of panels 52, 54 and 56, 58 are now stacked together with the opposed end edges thereof being contained in a pair of spaced parallel planes and with the unfinished sidesof the panels 54U and 56U being superimposed against each other and with the unfinished sides 52U and 58U of the now outer panels 52, 58 facing outwardly and away from each other. The confronting inner adjacent ends 60, 62 of the panel 52, and the corresponding ends 64, 66 of the panel 58, are now reverted over the unfinished sides of their associated panels. The panels .52, 54, 56 and 58 and the revented ends 60, 62, 64 and 66 are now secured together in a four-play seam by a peripheral line of stitches 68. V

The operator now inserts his hand through the slot 70 which extendsbetween the reverted ends 60, 62 between the confronting finished side's 52F, 54F of the panels52, 54 and grasps the sewn edges 72 of all of the panels and turns the same inside out through the gap 7 0, see FIGURE grasps (see FIGURE 12) the sewn edges 74 and draws the same through the gap 7 0 to turn the remaining portion inside out. As the edges 12 are drawn through the gap 70, they are turned in the reverse direction over the reverted end 62 in the directionof the arrow shown in FIGURE 11, and as the sewn edges 74 are drawn through the gap 712 they too are turned in the reverse direction over the reverted end 611 in the direction of the arrow shown in FIGURE 12 associated therewith. This completes the construction of the cover member 51 Of course, the joined ends of the panels could be drawn through the gap 76 between the reverted ends 64, 66 as the final step if so desired. In either case, the outer marginal edges of the panels remain between the unfinished sides 52U and SSU of the panels 52, 58 and are disposed on one side of the line of stitching 68.

It will be noted that as the final step of turning inside out is completed, the gaps 71), 76 are aligned with one another. In this instance, the reverted ends 69, 64 and 62, 66 are juxtaposed against each other, and when desired, the finished sides 56F and 58 F of the panels 56, 58 may be displayed by turning the cover member inside out through the aligned slots 70, 76.

Referring now more specifically to FIGURES 15 to 22, inclusive, which illustrate a third embodiment of this invention, reference numeral 110 designates, in general, the finished receptacle or cover member. As is disclosed in these several figures, the receptacle or cover member 110 is seen to be constructed of six elongated substantially rectagular panels 112, 114, 116, 118, 121) and 122, all having substantially identical dimensions and, preferably, the pair of panels 112, 114 is formed of a fabric having a preselected color and design, and the pair of panels 116, 118 are formed of a fabric having still another pre-selected color and design. The waterproof and/ or allergy preventative panels 121 122 need not be provided with any distinctive color or design since the same do not become visible at any time.

The first amembly step in constructing the reversible receptacle or cover member 110 comprises the superimposition of a panel selected from the pairs of panels 112, 114 and 116, 118. In the embodiment of this invention as is illustrated in F GURES 15 to 22, inclusive, the panel 112 is superimposed against the panel 116 with the finished surfaces or sides thereof 112E, 116F disposed in confronting relationship relative to each other. One of the waterproof panels, panel 120, is now superimposed against the unfinished side or surface 112U of the panel 112, and the assembled panels are now arranged with their edges coincident one with the others. Thereafter, one of the adjacent ends of the panels 112, 116 and 1211 are secured as at 124 in a sewn three-ply seam.

The panel 116 is then folded, in the direction of the arrow in FIGURE 16 about the stitches 124 so as to superimpose the unfinished side 116U against the panel 120 I thereby disposing the finished sides or surfaces 112E, 116E of the panels 112, 116 in a remote relationship, one with respect to the other. Thus, the panel 121 becomes sandwiehed between the panels 112, 116 shown in FIGURE 17. As is seen in the last named figure, the marginal edges of the panels 112, 116 and 120 at the sewn edges thereof become located between the panels 116, 1219.

Subsequently, and still referring to FIGURE 17 of the drawings, the panel 118 is superimposed on the panel 116 with the finished sides 118F and 116E facing one another, and in a similar manner the finished side 114-F of the panel 114 is superimposed against the finished side 112E of the panel 112. The waterproof or allergy preventative panel 122 is now superimposed against the unfinished side 118U of the panel 118. The assembly is such that the free ends of the panels 112, 116 and the adjacent ends of the panels 114, 118, and those ends of the panels 120, 122 aligned immediately adjacent thereto are vertically aligned and the longitudinally opposed sides of the latter are coincident, while the opposed ends of the panels 114,

6 118 and 122 project beyond the sewed ends of the panels 112, 116 and 121}. The assembled panels are now sewn together upon the longitudinally extending opposed edges thereof and at the edges of the aligned ends thereof to form a six-ply seam, this line of stitches being indicated at 126 (see FIGURE 18).

The projecting ends of the panels 114, 118 and 122 are sewn together in a three-ply seam from one adjacent corner towards the other adjacent corner as is indicated at 123, but the stitching terminates short of the latter to provide a gap 131} (see FIGURES 18 and 19) therebetween.

This last operation having been completed, the operator now reaches into the assembled panels through the gap 131) between either of the pairs of adjacent panels 112, 114 or 116, 113 and grasps the opposed sewn ends 132 of the panels and draws the same through the gap 131) in the manner illustrated in FIGURE 19. This turns the panels inside out so that the panels 116, 118 are disposed exteriorly of the panels 112, 11 4 with the unfinished sides 114U, 11SU of the panels 114, 118 juxtaposed relative to the opposed sides of the waterproof panel 121). Thus, the finished sides 114E, 118F of the panels 114, 118 are remotely disposed relative to each other (see FIGURE 21). Simultaneously, the finished sides 112E,

116E of the panels 112, 116 are remotelyl disposed relative to each other, the unfinished sides of the last mentioned panels being disposed in confronting relationship relative to the opposed sides of the waterproof or allergy preventative panel 122. After completing this turning step it is seen (FIGURE 21) that the outer marginal edges 134, 136, 138 and 140 of the panels 112, 114, 116 and 118, respectively, and the outer marginal edges 142, 144 of the panels 120, 122, respectively, are disposed between the panels 114, 126 and lie on the same side of the stitches 126. The remaining unsewn projecting ends of the panels 114, 118 and 122 are now reverted inwardly and are stitched together as at 128 to close the gap 130. This completes the construction of the cover member 110.

As in the first embodiment of thisinvention, it is obvious that the step of turning the cover member 1111 inside out could be accomplished in the same manner as described above by inserting the hand of the openator between the panels 112, 114.

Should it be desired to display the cover panels 112, 11 4, the user now reaches through the open end 1 46 and grasps the sewn opposed end 132 thereof and draws it through the open end turning the cover member inside out. The finished sides 112E, 114F of the panels 112, 114 now face outwardly and the finished sides 116E, 113F of the panels 116, 118 are disposed in confronting relation interiorly of the panels 112, 114.

Depending upon the material from which the panels 120, 122 may be formed, it is now seen that the reversible receptacle or cover member 116 may be made both waterproof and allergy preventative if so desired.

It will also be recognized from the drawings and the i above specification that the panels in any one of the given embodiments of this invention will not shift with respect to one another thereby preventing the panels from bunching which, of course, leads to distortion of the receptacle or cover member, a feature very evident in prior art constructions.

Having described and illustrated several embodiments or this invention, it is to be understood that the same are offered merely by way of example, and that this invention is to be limited only by the scope of the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

l. A method for constructing a reversible cover member for an article of furniture formed of two pairs of panels of fabric materials, each pair of said panels having the same dimensions and configurations as the other of said pairs of panels, said method comprising the steps of superimposing one panel of a first pair of panels against '7 the second panel of .said .first pair of panels with the edges thereof coiniciding, stitching together a pair of adjacent ends-of said first'pair of panels in a two-Iply seam, folding said "panels of said first .pair of panels about :said stitching to superimpose'the formerly remote surfaces thereof against one another with the marginal edges of said ends disposed therebetween and falling on one side of said stitching, superimposing the panelsof the second pair of panels, respectively, against the exposed surfaces of said :first pair of :panels with the'ends and sides of said second (pair of ,panels coincident withthe unstitched ends and sides of said first pair of panels except for those ends'o'f said second pair of 'panels'which project beyond the stitched ends of said first pair of panels, stitching together the ends and sides of said first and second pairs of panels adjacent the coincident marginal edges thereof except for said projecting ends of said second pair of one pairof immediately adjacent inner and outer panels 7 having inwardly turned marginal edges along all other sides thereof, the other pair of'immediately adjacent inner panels to leave access openings at the unstitched ends of said second pair of panels extending between, respectively, each immediate adjacent pair of said first and secondpanels, and the final step of turning all oftsaid panels insideout'through a selected one of said openings.

2. A method for constructing a reversible cover memher for an article of .furnituretfo rmed of two pairs of panels of fabric materials, each pair of panels having the same dimensions and same configurations and comprising the steps of superimposing one panel of a first pair of panels adjacent the second panel of said first pair of panels with the-edges thereof coinciding, stitching together a pair of adjacent ends'of said first pair ofpanels in a twoeply seam, folding said panels of said first pair of panels about said stitching to superimpose the formerly remote surfaces thereof against one another with the and outer panels having inwardly extending marginal edges along all other sides thereof, said last-named inwardly extending marginal edges being interposed etween the immediately preceding named inwardly turned marginal edges, all of said other marginal edges of said panels being disposed \between said first pair of immediately adjacent inner and outer panels, and stitching extending through all of said last-named marginal edges of said panels to secure the same in a four ply seam.

4. A method for constructing a reversible receptacle or cover member formed of two sets of laminated panels of which each one of said sets of panels includes two panels formed of a fabric material and one panel of waterproof material and with the panels of said sets of panels having the same dimensions and configurations, said method comprising the steps of superimposing one fabric panel against the second fabric panel of the first set of panels, superimposing said waterproof panel of said first set of panels on said superimposed fabric panels 7 and arranging the three superimposed panels to make the edges thereof coincident, sewing together said three superimposed panels at an adjacent end thereof in a three-ply seam, reverting the outermost fabric panel of said sewn panels around said sewing and superimposing the same marginal edges of said ends of said first panels disposed therebetween and falling on one side of said stitching, superimposing the panels ,of the second pair of panels, respectively, against the exposed surfaces of ,said first pairof panels with theends and sides of said second pair of'panels coincident with the unstitched ends and sides of said first pair of panels except for those ends of said second pair 'of panels which project beyond the stitched ends of said first pair ofpanelastitching together the, ends and sides of said first and second pairs of panels in a four-ply seam adjacent the coincident marginal edges thereof except for said projecting ends of said second pair of panels to leave access openings at the unstitched ends of said second pair of panels extending between, respectively, each immediately adjacent pair of said first and second panels, turning all of said panels inside out through a selected one of saidopenings, and the final step of stitching together :in a two-ply seam said projecting ends ofsaidsecond pair of panels.

3. A reversible cover member forzan :article of furniture comprising two pair of panels superimposed one on top of the other, each adjacent pair of inner and outer panels having inwardly folded marginal'edges disposed in confronting relation relative to each other adjacent a common end ofsaid cover member, stitching extending through each pair, respectively, of said marginal edges,

against said waterproof panel whereby the marginal edges of said superimposed panels at the sewn ends thereof are disposed intermediate the reverted panel and said waterproof panel, superimposing the fabric panels of the sec- 0nd of said sets of panels against, respectively, the fabric panels of said first pair of panels, superimposing the second Waterproof panel of said second set of panels against one of the fabric panels of said second set of panels, sewing the marginal edges of all of said superimposed panels in a six-ply seam except those ends of said panels of said second set of panels disposed adjacent the sewn edges of said ends of said panels of said first of said sets of panels, sewing together in a discontinuous three-ply seam the marginal edges of said excepted panels to leave a digital access opening along the unsewn edges of the excepted panels, turning all of said panelstinside out through said access opening, and sewing together in a three-ply seam the unsewn edges of the excepted panels of said second set of panels.

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Classifications
U.S. Classification150/158, 112/400, 383/66, 5/490, 2/DIG.200, 383/43, 383/109, 150/105, 112/426
International ClassificationA47C31/10
Cooperative ClassificationY10S2/02, A47C27/002, A47C31/10
European ClassificationA47C31/10, A47C27/00T