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Publication numberUS3044779 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 17, 1962
Filing dateMar 18, 1960
Priority dateMar 18, 1960
Publication numberUS 3044779 A, US 3044779A, US-A-3044779, US3044779 A, US3044779A
InventorsJoseph L Hvizdash
Original AssigneeJoseph L Hvizdash
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Game
US 3044779 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 17, 1962 J, L. HVIZDASH 3,044,779

GAME

Filed March 18, 1960 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 BLOW-O JT so BACK 2 MILES FIG. I.

INVENTOR. JOSEPH L. HV/ZDASH JZM XW July 17, 1962 J. HVIZDASH GAME 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed March 18, 1960 FIG. 2.

D E N m T u A c MOTOR SKIP I HOLD POSITION HOLD POSITION FIG. 5.

FIG. 4.

FIG. 3.

COMPETITION R A C T S A L T X E N H W W P U E T N m H w P D L O H FIG. Z

FIG. 6.

CES MIL BACK! M IF TIED, ADVANCE! MILE PASSED CAR GO BACK1 MILE ES ILE IF TIED, ADVAN PASSED cAR GO 17/1 IF n20, ADVANCE 2 MILES PASSED CAR 60 BACK 2 MILES JOSEPH L. HV/ZDASH INVENTOR.

Y FIG. .9.

BY ww fi A7701? E Y 3,044,779 GAME Joseph L. Hvizdash, N. Main St., North Uxbridge, Mass. Filed Mar. 18, 1969, Ser. No. 16,014 2 Olaims. (Cl. 273-434) This invention relates to a game and more particularly to a form of entertainment which may be played by a plurality of persons and which simulates the thrills of antomobile racing.

In the past a number of games have been devised which were intended to give the thrills of automobile racing. Most of these games, however, were relatively simple and were designed for children. Adults who played such games readily became bored and soon tired of the game. Furthermore, the prior art games of this type have failed in many respects to simulate actual automobile racing in that many of the chance occurrences which take place during :an actual race were missing from the game. These and other deficiencies of the prior art apparatus of this kind have been obviated in a novel manner by the present invention.

It is, therefore, an outstanding object of the invention to provide a game which may be played by a plurality of persons and which simulates the thrills of automobile racing.

Another obiect of this invention is the provision of an automobile racing game of sufficient complexity to be of interest to adults.

A further object of the present invention is the provision of a game which contains all of the possibilities for chance happenings which are available in an actual automobile race.

It is another object of the instant invention to provide a game in which the events taking place differ greatly from one playing to another.

It is a further object of the invention to provide a game in which the individual participants have equal opportunity on a chance basis to have favorable or unfavorable occurrences.

A still further object of this invention is the provision of a racing game in which provision is made for the race to contain a plurality of laps similar to an actual race and means is provided for keeping account of the lap positions of the participants.

With these and other objects in view, as will be apparent to those skilled in the art, the invention resides in the combination of parts set forth in the specification and covered by the claims appended hereto.

The character of the invention, however, may be best understood by reference to one of its structural forms, as illustrated by the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a plan view of a game board for use in practicing the present invention;

FIG. 2 shows a set of the backs of a group of cards for use in the invention; and

FIGS. 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9 show the faces of a representative group of cards for use in the game.

Referring first to FIG. 1, wherein are best shown the general features of the invention, the game board, indicated generally by the reference numeral 10, is shown in use with markers 11, 12, 13, and 14 which are in the form of miniature racing automobiles. Printed on the surface of the board is an oval track 15 which is divided into lanes 16, 17, 18, and 19. Extending transversely of the track across the lanes are distance-indicating lines 21 which divide the track into segments 22. In the preferred embodiment there are thirty-six of these segments 22, and there are, of course, four lanes. The number of segments and lanes may be varied, if desired. At the corners of the board are mounted lap registers 23, 24, 25,

United States Patent ,If before seven miles, return to start.

and 26, associated respectively with the markers 11, 12, 13, and 14, which, in turn, rest in lanes 16, 17, 18, and 19, respectively. Each of these lap registers provides a series of numbered holes and a peg (not shown) for indicating the lap which its respective marker has completed.

Along the inner edge of the track 15 is a distance strip 27 in which are numbered all of the segments from 1 to 36. Associated with some of the segments are indications of credit or debit moves which may be made on the past of a marker which lands in that segment. For instance, a segment 28 is marked boxed-in, go back one mile; a segment 29 is marked accident, go back five miles; a segment 31 is marked perfect turn, advance two miles; a segment 33 is marked open stretch, advance three miles; a segment 34 is marked spin out, next move void. A starting flag 35 is shown associated with the first segment along a stretch of the track and a directional arrow 36 indicates the direction of movement of the racing automobiles. On the inner edge of the track 24, 25, and 26, respectively. Referring to FIG. 2, it can be seen that each marker or racing automobile is also provided with a set of cards, the backs of one of each of these cards being shown. The card 37 is shown as representative of the back of each of the cards used in connection with the racing car 11, While the card 38 shows the back used with the racing car 12; the'card 39 is the back used with the racing car 13 and the card 41 is the back used with the racing car 14. In this connection, it is to be noted that the lanes are numbered 1, 2, 3, and 4, while the corresponding markers and cards are numbered in the same manner. Furthermore, the lanes, cards, and cars are colored differently to make them readily distinguishable.

The faces of the cards are marked with indicia indicating moves which the various automobile markers may make. These are generally in the form of credits or debits, typical card faces being shown in FIGS. 3 to 9. For instance, FIG. 3 shows a DISQUALIF IED card 42 indicating that car which bears the number 2 is DIS- QUALIFIED and is to take the action indicated; that is,

must hold position; that is to say, it is not to move at that time. FIG. 5 shows a CAUTION card which indicates that the car numbered 1 has been cautioned and, therefore, must hold position and cannot move at that time. In FIG. 6 is shown a REFUELING card 45 indicating that car number 2 is to hold position. FIG. 7 shows a COMPETITION card 46 which, as is indicated, causes car number 4, if it is last, to tie up with the nextto-last car. "In FIG. 8 are shown an assortment of PASS cards 47, 48, and 4%. Card 47 indicates that if car number 3 is tied with any other car, it is to advance two miles, and that the car which it thus passes must go back two miles. This is also indicated by the colored pennants on the PASS cards. Card 48 indicates that if car number 2 is tied, it is to advance three miles and the car which it passes is to go back one mile. Card 49 indicates that if car number V1 is tied, it is to advance one mile, and the car which it thus passes is to go back one mile. FIG. 9 shows an assortment of SCORING It should be cards 51, 52, and 53. These scoring" cards can be made up in any combination of particular markers and particular miles. It is considered, of counse, that each segment 22 of the track is considered as one mile. For instance, the card 51 indicates that car number 4 is to advance one mile, while card 52 indicates that car number 2 is to advance three miles, and card 53 indicates that marker number 1 is to advance two miles.

It will be understood that each marker has a complete set of these cards associated with it in varying amounts and types, the sets being balanced so that theoretically no one car has any advantage over any other.

The operation of the invention will now be readily understood in view of the above description. The board is laid on a flat surface, such as a card table, and the players arrange themselves around it, selecting a particular marker and sitting at the corner of the board associated with the lap register of their marker. The markers are lined up ahead of segment 1 in the manner shown in FIG. 1. Each player shufiies his particular deck of cards and places them in front of him with the backs uppermost. If, before the game begins, the cards of all sets are mixed together, it is easy to separate them out into their respective decks or sets because of the colored backs, as shown in FIG. 2. Then, the players in order turn up the cards and make the moves With their markers which are indicated on the cards. Each players cards do not all bear moves which are to be made by his own marker only; they sometimes indicate moves which are to be made by another players marker. As the cards are successively drawn by the players, the markers are moved around the track in their respective lanes in the direction indicated by the arrow 36. If, because of a move indicated by a card which is turned up, a marker lands on one of the segments 28, 29, 31, 33, 34, or 54, that car, in addition to the move indicated by the card, must partake of the credit or debit indicated by that segment. It should be noted at this point that the segment 54 indicates a blowout so that the marker which lands on that segment must go back two miles. As a marker passes completely around a lap and enters the initial segment again, the player advances his peg on his respective lap register to indicate the lap which has been completed. Usually, the game will consist of five laps and, in the ordinary course of events, will occupy about two and onehalf hours. The player whose marker completes the five laps first, of course, wins the game.

In the preferred embodiment, lane 16 which is lane 1, is colored green to match car 11, which is a green marker, which bears the number 1 on its back, and which is called the GREEN HORNET. Lane 17, which is lane 2," is colored red to match its red marker 12, which carries the number 2 on its back, and which is called the RED COMET. Lane 18, which is lane 3 is colored yellow to match the marker 13, which also bears the number 3 on its back, and which is called the YEL- LOW JACK. Lane 19, which is lane 4, is colored blue to match marker 14, which is blue, which bears the number 4 on its back, and is called the BLUE HORI- ZON. The backs of the decks of cards 37, 38, 39 and 41 are colored the same color as the respective markers and in any card face the numbered marker or automobile is also colored in the same manner. The debit segments and cards are also sometimes called the hazard segments and cards. It should be noted that the board and each of the cards on its back is provided with the number 29. This is only to indicate a particular track number so that, if more than one of these games is owned by a family, it will be easy to separate the cards. Since the cards are arranged scientifically to give equal opportunities to all of the markers or cars, the introduction of a card from another game would upset the balance and, for that reason, the players should note when they receive their cards whether they all have the proper track number on them. It will be understood that during the playing of the game a card which would normally be considered a credit card might possibly be a debit card, since the movement of the marker as indicated on the credit card would land it on a hazard segment or debit segment and the net result would be that the marker would move backward further than it is advanced. When less than the four players participate in the game, those remaining should, of course, remove from their decks any cards relating to the car which is not being played. At the same time they remove from the deck of the non-playing car all cards which concern their own cars and place them in their own deck. This will equalize all of the remaining cars, as far as opportunity to win is concerned and leave it to pure chance.

Each deck contains fifty-two cards, thirteen of which relate to its own car and the remainder of which refer to the other cars against which it is racing. The deck associated with marker 11, for instance, which is car 1 (the GREEN HORNET), contains twenty-two scoring cards arranged as follows:

Number of Car Number Miles Credit Cards It should be noted in this instance that the deck associated with car 1 favors itself by having three cards which credit car 1 with three miles, while it only has one card for a similar mileage for the other three cars. If the mile credits contained in the car 1 deck are added, it will be found that these cards will give car 1 fifteen miles credit, while they provide only nine miles of credit for each of the other cars. This is true of each of the decks in favoring its own marker. At the same time, the set or deck of cards associated with car 1 contains six COM- PETITION cards similar to card 46 of which three of them are for car 1, one card is for car 2, one card is for car 3, and one card is for car 4. The deck of car 1 contains three DISQUALIFIED cards, one for each of the cars 2, 3, and 4, but none for itself. It also contains three MOTOR-SKIP cards 43 containing one for car 2, one for car 3 and one for car 4. Also, the deck of car 1 contains three CAUTION cards 44, one of which is for car 2, one for car 3, and one for car 4. The deck of car 1 also contains three REFUELING cards 45, there being one for car 2, one for car 3, and one for car 4. It is interesting to note that the deck of car 1 contains no hazard or debit cards which will appear against itself. In connection with the PASSING cards shown in FIG. 8, the deck of cards associated with card 1 contains twelve cards arranged as follows:

Amount of Miles Pass ing Credits Penalty Miles Which Pass Car Goes Back Amount of Cards For Car Number In this connection, it should be noted that car 1 in the passing cards gives itself seven miles of passing credit, while each of the others only receives five. The decks of each of the other cards are arranged in a similar manner.

It is obvious that minor changes may be made in the form and construction of the invention without departing from the material spirit thereof. It is not, however, desired to confine the invention to the exact form herein shown and described, but it is desired to include all such as properly come within the scope claimed.

The invention having been thus described, what is claimed as new and desired to secure by Letters Patent is:

l. A game, comprising a rectangular board carrying indicia simulating an oval-shaped automobile race track divided into a plurality of parallel lanes, the track being divided into mileage segments by lines which extend across the lanes, a marker for each lane in the form of a racing automobile, certain of the segments containing indicia of value affecting the progress of the markers around the track, a set of cards associated with each marker, the cards being adapted to be turned up in turn by players associated with the markers and carrying on their faces indicia designating value determining the progress of the markers from segment to segment around the track, and a block at each corner of the board provided with holes and pegs to serve as a lap register.

2. A game, comprising (a) a rectangular board carrying indicia simulating an oval-shaped automobile race track divided into a plurality of parallel lanes, the track being divided into mileage segments by lines which extend across the lanes,

(b) a marker for each lane in the form of a racing automobile, certain of the segments containing indicia of value affecting favorably or unfavorably the progress of the markers around the track, the indicia being associated with events commonly encountered during racing,

(0) a set of cards associated With each marker, the cards being adapted to be turned up in turn by players associated with the markers and carrying on their faces indicia designating values determining favorably or unfavorably the progress of the markers from segment to segment around the track, each set,

of cards containing cards carrying indicia which affect favorably and unfavorably the progress of other markers than the marker with which the set is associated,

(d) and a block at each corner of the board provided with holes and pegs to serve as a lap register.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,448,201 Cornell et al Mar. 13, 1923 1,628,073 Sousa May 10, 1927 2,036,603 Pallada Apr. 7, 1936 2,653,027 Barash Sept. 22, 1953 FOREIGN PATENTS 624,595 Great Britain June 13, 1949

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1448201 *Sep 13, 1920Mar 13, 1923Cornell AllynRacing game
US1628073 *Apr 21, 1926May 10, 1927John B SousaGame
US2036603 *Apr 19, 1934Apr 7, 1936Hubert PalladaGame apparatus
US2653027 *Jul 28, 1950Sep 22, 1953Robert F BarashGame apparatus for simulating a roller derby
GB624595A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3533628 *Jun 12, 1967Oct 13, 1970Bruce T FisherSpace travel board game apparatus
US3954268 *Dec 13, 1974May 4, 1976Zyla Gregory JDrag racing game apparatus
US4550917 *Sep 27, 1983Nov 5, 1985Marvin Glass & AssociatesBoard racing game
US5308078 *Feb 4, 1993May 3, 1994Gary HatterAuto racing board game
US5322293 *Oct 15, 1993Jun 21, 1994Goyette Daniel AAuto racing game apparatus and method of play
US5551698 *Mar 10, 1995Sep 3, 1996Lyon; Robert F.Board game
US6095522 *Jan 27, 1999Aug 1, 2000Spell; James A.Stock car racing game
US7118108May 5, 2004Oct 10, 2006Mattel, Inc.Racing board game
US7992874 *Sep 25, 2009Aug 9, 2011Daryl DavidsonDart racing game
US20050006843 *May 5, 2004Jan 13, 2005Brian YuRacing board game
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/246
International ClassificationA63F3/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63F3/00006, A63F3/00082
European ClassificationA63F3/00A10