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Publication numberUS3045293 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 24, 1962
Filing dateOct 15, 1956
Priority dateOct 15, 1956
Publication numberUS 3045293 A, US 3045293A, US-A-3045293, US3045293 A, US3045293A
InventorsJoseph A Potchen
Original AssigneeEvans Prod Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Support and sealing for lightweight panels
US 3045293 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 24, 1962 J. A. POTCHEN 3,045,293

SUPPORT AND SEALING FOR LIGHTWEIGHT PANELS Filed Oct. 15, 1956 Fig. 3

' INVENTOR. 20 23 Y Joseph A. Pofchen @Q 2:? Fig. 4

A r TOR-IVE Ys to install.

3,045,293 SUPPORT AND SE ING FOR LIGHT- WEIGHT PANELS Joseph A. Potchen, Marne, Mich, assignor, by mesne assignments, to Evans Products Company, Plymouth Township, Mich, a corporation of Delaware Filed Oct. 15, 1956, Ser. No. 615,960 4 Claims. (Cl. 20-4) This application relates to the attachment of laminated panels to a supporting structure.

Where large, rigid panels are to be secured to a supporting structure, considerable difficulty has been experienced as a result of discrepancies in spacing from one supporting point to another between the face of the panel and the face of the supporting structure. Where a truly flat panel surface is not required and the panels are flexible, this discrepancy does not result in serious difficulty. Where, however, either of the last two conditions exist, these discrepancies present a serious problem. In the past, a conventional method ofovercoming this difiiculty has been to provide shimsor spacers between the mounting mem her and the supporting structure to fair the supporting members into a common plane. This method is both expensive and time consuming. It is not adapted to quantity production.

This invention overcomes this difficulty by providing a supporting member having sufficient flexibility that it may be deflected or bent to permit the inner surface of the rigid panels to remain flat even though the spacing of the supporting structure from this surface is irregular. This is done by making a supporting member which will stretch or compress to overcome these differences in spacing.

In many cases, the panels involved are used to provide a thermal insulating wall. Where this occurs, it is necessary not only to support the panels but to assurean effective moisture, air and thermal seal between each panel.

This invention provides a combination support and seal. Thus, the use of a single member effects not only the supporting of the panels but provides the seal at the joint between the panels. The member is designed to be nonhygroscopic and non-absorbant of moisture. It is also fabricated of a material having a low coeflicient of thermal conductivity. Thus, its ability to effect a thermal barrier will not be impaired by the collection of moisture within the body of the support member.

This invention has the added advantage of providing a support member which is relatively inexpensive and easy Since a single design is usable with various supports to face spacings, it is adapted to quantity production.

These and other objects and purposes of this invention will be understood by those acquainted with the installation of rigid panels upon reading the following specification and the accompanying drawings.

In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is an oblique view of this invention showing a panel secured to a support by means of the new attachment member.

FIG. 2 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view showing the attachment member in normal position.

FIG. 3 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view showing the attachment member when it has been necessary to deflect it because of a variance in spacing between the supporting structure and the surface of the panels.

FIG. 4 is a sectional view of the attachment member.

In executing the objects and purposes of this invention, there has been provided a mounting which is longitudinally rigid but laterally flexible within a limited range. It is formed of a material which is both a poor absorbant of moisture and a poor conductor of thermal energy.

United States at:

The mounting member has a flange on one end by which it is secured to the supporting structure. At the opposite end, it has a second flange by which it is secured to the panels. It is designed to be mounted at the panel joints and to trace a zig-zag path between them. it forms a seal with the panel cores at its mid-section. The flange provided for attachment to the panels is of sufficient width that the inside surface of two panels may be butted at the center of this flange and both attached to the flange, thus simultaneously securing the panels to the mounting member and joining them together.

To facilitate the following descriptions, the terms inner and outer are frequently used and are to be taken to mean inner as toward the laminated surface of the panels and outer toward the support member.

Referring specifically to FIG. 1, the numeral 1 indicates a support member. it is illustrated as a hat-shaped, channel section. It will be recognized that this support member may be of any suitable material and configuration. It will also be recognized that in place of the channel section the support may consist of a corrugated panel such as corrugated steel, aluminum or any other suitable material. The scope of this invention is not to be considered as limited by the illustration of the support memher.

The panels to be secured to the support member are exemplifier by the panels 2 and 211 (FIG. 2). While these panels may be of various construction, for the purpose of illustrating this invention, they are shown to consist of a relatively thick cellular thermal insulating core 3 such as would be provided by the use of a foamed polystyrene. Firmly bonded to the core, by suitable means such as an adhesive, is a facing lamina 4 consisting ofa surface skin 5 and a rigid sublamina 6. The surface skin 5 may be of any suitable material such as, for example, a polyester synthetic resin reinforced with woven glass cloth. The sublamina 6 likewise may be. of any number of suitable materials such as, for example, plywood or a mineral composition hardboard such as that sold under the name Flexboard by Johns Manville Company or a ligneous hardboard as the material sold under the name Masonite" by the Masonite Corporation. The particular materials selected for the facing lamina 4 are not critical to this invention so long as they provide a good surface for the panel and are of a material capable of providing good bearing for the rivets used to secure the panel to the mounting member.

The edges of the panels 2 and 2a, where they meet, are so shaped that they produce a lapped joint, thus each panel has a tongue portion 10 which, when the panels are brought together, overlap at the center to produce a sealing surface 11 on each panel adjacent the center of the core. These sealing surfaces 11 are parallel to the faces of the panel.

The facing lamina 4 of one of the panels (in the particular illustration appearing in FIGS. 2 and 3, panel 201) is cut back from the edge a suflicient distance to provide adequate bearing strength for a rivet in the facing lamina of the other panel abutting it at the joint. The core of the panel 2a is also removed immediately beneath the facing lamina 4 to produce a pocket 12 for reception of one end of the mounting member. The facing lamina 4 of the other. panel 2 projects beyond the edge of the panelto provide an overlapping tongue 13. The length of the tongue 13 is such that when it abuts the cut-back portion of the facing lamina 4 of the panel 2a the edges of the panels normal to the panel surfaces are spaced apart a distance greater than the thickness of the mounting member. This creates the clearance openings 14 and 14a. The importance of these openings will appear more fully hereinafter.

The mounting member 19 has a central portion 20 3,0 3 which includes a pair of risers 21 and a step 22 (FIG. 4). The step 22 is parallel to the surfaces of the panels 2 and 2a and the risers are normal to these surfaces.

On each end, the mounting member 19 has a terminal flange 23. The terminal flanges are parallel to the surfaces of the panels and extend in opposite directions with respect to each other. The length of the mounting memher is dependent upon the height of the panels with which it is to be used.

The mounting member 19 may be made from a number of materials but where it is to be used with a thermal insulating panel it must be of a material which will neither absorb water nor transmit moisture. It must also be of a material which has a low coeflicient of thermal conductivity. These characteristics are important since, as will be explained subsequently, it passes through the panels to abut the inside face. If it lacks these characteristics under these circumstances, it will produce frost at the panel joint and will substantially reduce the thermal efficiency of the structure. A suitable material for this mounting member is a cured polyester resinous composition reinforced with a filamentary glass.

The polyester resinous composition may be any one of the numerous commercially available polyester resins adapted to this purpose. As available and as generally employed, they are thick, viscous liquids capable of further polymerization and copolymerization under suitable conditions to effect cross-linking and form thermostat bodies. They are made by esterifying an olefinically unsaturated dicarboxylic acid such as a maleic acid, itaconic acid and citraconic acid, as well as mixtures thereof with one another or with a considerable proportion of a functionally saturated dicarboxylic acid, such as phthalic acid, tetrachlorophthalic acid, adipic acid and the like, with a polyhydric alcohol.

Polyhydric alcohols generally employed include ethylene glycol, propylene glycol, butylene glycol, poyethylene glycol, polypropylene glycol, monoesters and monoethers of glycerol and the like. Esterification is carried on until a predominantly linear polymer of suitable viscosity and average molecular weight is obtained.

The predominantly linear polyester thus obtained contains polymerizably reactive ethylenic unsaturation which, by copolymerization with a polymerizable olefinically reactive monomer, leads to the formation of cross-linked thermoset resins.

A particularly high strength mounting member will be created by the impregnation and coating of several layers of a woven glass cloth with the polyester resin. When the glass cloth has been thoroughly impregnated and coated with the resin, it may be cured in any suitable die structure which will give the resulting member the desired shape.

Not only do these materials give the mounting member the desired thermal and moisture characteristics but they also produce a member having high tensile strength both longitudinally and laterally. Such a member is particularly strong in shear loading in the direction of its longitudinal axis. At the same time, however, it has a certain degree of resiliency in cross section, permitting it to be slightly deformed when required. This characteristic is most important because it permits the spacing between the support 1 and the inside surface 25 of the panels to vary since the member may be slightly twisted or deflected in cross section to accommodate these variations in spacing. This ability to be deflected in cross section is most important as will appear under the heading Operation.

Operation As a preliminary operation, the mounting member 19 may be first secured to the support 1 or it may be secured to one of the panels and then secured to the support 1. In the latter case, the other panel is joined to it by moving it into position and securing it to the support member. For purposes of illustration, it will be assumed that the support member 19 is first secured to the support 1 by suitable fasteners such as the rivets 28. The number and spacing of the rivets 28 will be determined by the expected loading to be applied to the support member. In the conventional installation, a number of the support members are present, spaced apart a distance corresponding to the width of the panels. A mounting member 19 is secured to each of these support members.

Once the mounting member 19 has been secured to the support 1, either one of the panels may be placed in proper position and secured. For purposes of illustration, FIG. 1 shows the mounting of panel 2a secured to the mounting flange 23. Panel 2a is brought into position with the inner terminal flange 23 slidably introduced into the pocket 12 under the facing lamina 4. The panel 211 is moved onto the mounting member 19 sufliciently to provide good edge margin for the rivets attaching the inner terminal flange 23 to the facing lamina 4 of this panel. In this operation, care is taken to assure the existence of gaps 14 and 14a between the edge of the panel and the mounting member. The panel is then secured by driving the rivets 2%. The panel 2 is then placed in position and moved over the mounting member 19 until the edge of its facing lamina 4 abuts the facing lamina of the panel 2a. It is then secured by driving the rivets 30. The length of the overlapping portion 13 of the facing lamina 4 of the panel 2 is such that a small gap is left between the riser portions of the mounting member 19 and the panels edge.

In forming the lapped edges of the panels, the sealing surfaces 11 are so cut that they either fit snugly against the step portion 22 of the mounting member or are slightly crushed as they are brought against it. This is important, since it assures a tight seal at this point. If this seal is properly made, it provides an effective moisture and thermal barrier. The seal is effected mid-way between the surfaces of the core 2 where it is isolated from the extreme conditions on either surface. If the pocket 12 is carefully fabricated to effect a close sliding fit between the core 2a and the inner terminal flange of the mounting member 19, a second seal is provided when the rivets 29 and 30 are driven. This sea-l is effective against the migration of moisture or air through the joint irrespective of whether an effective seal is created between the terminal flange and the core since the rivets pull the terminal flange tightly against the facing lamina 4.

FIG. 2 illustrates an ideal installation situation. FIG. 3 illustrates a frequently experienced condition in these installations, i.e. where the spacing between the support member 1 and the inner surface 25 of the panels deviates from the established dimensions. In the particular case illustrated, this spacing is such that the panels are closer to the support member than the established standard. The method of installation remains the same. The only difference in this case is that the outer portion of the mounting member 19 is bent to one side. This, in effect, squeezes or decreases the spacing between the inner and outer terminal flanges 23. This is possible because the mounting member has lateral resiliency and may be adjusted in cross sectional shape. As the mounting member is bent, the terminal flanges 23 separate slightly in a direction parallel to the faces of the panels 2 and 2a. Under severe conditions of such off-set, the riser 21 of the mounting member may interfere with the core of the panel. When the core material is of a low density, resinous composition such as a foamed polystyrene, this may be overcome by pressing the riser against the core with suflicient force to effect a slight crushing action. This does not in any way of disturb the seal effected at the center of the core as illustrated in FIG. 3. The pressure of the sealing surfaces 11 against the step portion 22 of the mounting member normally will exert suflicient force against the mounting member to prevent the step portion from deflecting. In those cases where extreme differentials are experienced, both risers of the mounting member may become somewhat inclined and the step portion may tip at a slight angle to the surfaces of the panels. In this case, a seal will be effected since one surface of the step portion will bear against the tongue of one of the panels and the opposite surface will bear against the surface of the tongue of the other panels. The fact that these points of contact are off-set from each other will not destroy the thermal or moisture seal where the mounting member 19 is fabricated of a material which is neither absorbant of moisture nor an effective thermal conductor.

While this invention has been illustrated as utilizing the mounting member to overcome dislocation of the supporting members with relation to the surface of the inside surface of the panels where this spacing is less than the established norm, it will be obvious that by bending the mounting member in the opposite direction it may be utilized Where the departure from the norm is in the pposite direction, that is, represents an increase in this dimension.

It will also be obvious that to prevent warpage of the inner surface of the panels 2 and 2a, it is necessary that the facing lamina 4 have sufiicient rigidity to overcome any pressure exerted by the mounting member as a result of its being shaped to fit the circumstances of the particular installation. Depending upon which way the mounting member is deflected, it will exert a pressure having a tendency either to push the facing lamina 4 inwardly or to draw it outwardly. These forces will result from the inherent resiliency of the mounting member. Unless this resiliency is present, the mounting member will not have sufficient strength to firmly support the panels under many operating circumstances such as where there is vibration or twisting motion.

Because of this resiliency, the mounting member as disclosed by this invention is particularly useful for thermally insulated portable units such as refrigerated truck bodies. In such units the resiliency of the mounting member produces some shock and vibration albsorbing effect. Such use is merely illustrative and is not to be considered a limitation upon the scope of this invention. Further, if the mounting member is of a non-resilient material whereby, when deflected to an off-set position as shown in FIG. 3 it takes a permanent set, it will not effectively support the panels with their inner faces in a flat plane where they are subject either to vibration or impact loading. Under these latter circumstances the mounting member may assume additional permanent deflection resulting in misalignment of the panels.

This invention provides a member serving both as a means of supporting the panels and of securing them to a supporting structure. It also provides a member adapted to effect a tight seal at the panel joints. It is easy and simple to install and it does not involve any long or complex manual operations in its utilization.

While I have described my invention and its use, this is to be considered a description of a preferred embodiment. Other embodiments of this invention may be made incorporating the principles of this invention.

I claim:

1. In a support and joint for adjacent panels each having a facing sheet and a core, the combination comprising a member characterized by lateral resiliency, said member in cross section having a pair of parallel riser portions separated by a central step portion substantially normal to said riser portions, a terminal flange on the free end of each of said riser portions, said terminal flanges being substantially parallel to said step portion and extending in opposite directions, one edge of each of said adjacent panels-being shaped to fit opposite sides of the riser and step portions of said member, the core adjacent to the facing sheet of one of said panels being undercut to form a pocket in the core of said panel and receiving one of said terminal flanges, the edges of the facing sheets of said adjacent panel is abutting intermediate the ends of said pocket and the edges of said one terminal flange and secured thereto, the riser portion of said member adjacent the other of said terminal flanges being spaced from the edges of said cores, said step portion of said member bearing tightly against the cores of adjacent panels.

2. In a support and joint for adjacent panels each having a facing sheet and a core, the combination comprising a member characterized by lateral resiliency, said member in cross section having a pair of parallel riser portions separated by a central step portion substantially normal to said riser portions, a terminal flange on the free end of each of said riser portions, said terminal flanges being substantially parallel to said step portion and extending in opposite directions, one edge of each of said adjacent panels being shaped to fit opposite sides of the riser and step portions of said member, the core adjacent to the facing sheet of one of said panels being undercut to form a pocket in the core of said panel and receiving one of said terminal flanges, the edges of the facing sheets of said adjacent panels abutting intermediate the ends of said pocket and the edges of said one terminal flange and secured thereto, the riser portions of said member being spaced from the edges of said cores said step portion of said member bearing tightly against the cores of adjacent panels.

3. In a support and joint for adjacent panels each having a facing sheet and a core, the combination comprising a member characterized by lateral resiliency, said member in cross section having a pair of parallel riser por tions separated by a central step portion substantially normal to said riser portions, a terminal flange on the free end of each of said riser portions, said terminal flanges being substantially parallel to said step portion and extending in opposite directions, one edge of each of said adjacent panels being shaped to fit opposite sides of the riser and step portions of said member, the core adjacent to the facing sheet of one of said panels being undercut to form a pocket in the core of said panel and receiving one of said terminal flanges, the edges of the facing sheets of said adjacent panels abuttingintermediate the ends of said pocket and the edges of said one terminal flange, and secured thereto, the riser portion of said member adjacent the other of said terminal flanges being spaced from the edges of said cores, said step portion of said member bearing tightly against the cores of adjacent panels the other of said terminal flanges being spaced outwardly of said panels.

4. A support and joint as claimed in claim 2 wherein said member has a woven filamentary glass cloth reinforcement impregnated with and covered by a high density polyester resin.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,675,313 Awbrey June 26, 1928 2,029,352 Beckwith Feb. 4, 1936 2,054,573 Mendenhall Sept. 15, 1936 2,200,649 Wardle May 14, 1940 2,268,147 Hasenburger Dec. 30, 1941 2,317,428 Anderson Apr. 27, 1943 2,328,977 Hasenburger Sept. 7, 1943 2,335,302 Olsen Nov. 30, 1943 2,433,772 Lyons Dec. 30, 1947 2,438,428 Birdsall Mar. 23, 1948 2,822,584 Urbain Feb. 11,. 1958 2,857,632 Gouser Oct. 28, 1958 2,890,499 Cutler June 16, 1959 OTHER REFERENCES Plastics, p. 21, December 1948.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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US2029352 *Apr 15, 1932Feb 4, 1936Johns ManvilleReenforced insulating roof slab
US2054573 *Feb 7, 1936Sep 15, 1936David A WallaceBrick construction
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US2268147 *Apr 4, 1940Dec 30, 1941Prebilt Housing CorpBuilding wall construction
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3159943 *Mar 30, 1960Dec 8, 1964Alsco IncComposite building siding
US3226150 *Mar 29, 1963Dec 28, 1965Kemlite CorpRefrigerator panel
US3242625 *Jan 16, 1963Mar 29, 1966Pullman IncSpacer for insulated wall structure
US3282011 *Apr 25, 1962Nov 1, 1966Johns ManvilleThermal insulating structure
US3290845 *May 24, 1965Dec 13, 1966Butler Manufacturing CoPrefabricated insulated panel system
US3313073 *Sep 24, 1962Apr 11, 1967Foam Products CorpJoint assemblies for insulation panels
US3432979 *Aug 25, 1966Mar 18, 1969Fruehauf CorpInsulated wall construction
US3511007 *Mar 5, 1964May 12, 1970Babcock Henry NStructural systems employing foaming-in-place
US3849956 *Nov 1, 1972Nov 26, 1974Collins HFloating roof deck construction
US4226676 *May 18, 1978Oct 7, 1980Nuclear Power Company LimitedLiquid metal cooled nuclear reactors
US4439960 *Oct 30, 1981Apr 3, 1984Owens-Corning Fiberglas CorporationComposite insulation panel
US4527370 *Apr 8, 1982Jul 9, 1985Heinz SchuetteModular building
US4642950 *Mar 25, 1981Feb 17, 1987Kelly Thomas LReroofing with sloping plateau forming insulation
US5373676 *Sep 28, 1992Dec 20, 1994Francis; Steven R.Thin brick panel assembly
US5501049 *Feb 22, 1994Mar 26, 1996Francis; Steven R.Thin brick panel assembly
US5526630 *Nov 14, 1994Jun 18, 1996Francis; Steven R.Method of producing a thin brick panel assembly
US6009791 *Jun 5, 1998Jan 4, 2000Medlin; Richard C.Armored vehicle with a retractable weapon platform system
US6327954Jun 2, 1994Dec 11, 2001Richard C. MedlinLightweight armored vehicle and method of making same
US6499797 *Oct 21, 1999Dec 31, 2002Meritor Automotive GmbhComposite component for vehicle bodywork
US7036285 *Jun 21, 2003May 2, 2006Hunter Jr John PSeamless foam panel roofing system
US20120225236 *Feb 28, 2012Sep 6, 2012James Edward CoxComposite Building Panel and Method
EP0142423A1 *Oct 26, 1984May 22, 1985René TredoulatMethod of making a load-carrying wall
WO1994029665A1 *Jun 2, 1994Dec 22, 1994Richard C MedlinImproved lightweight armored vehicle and method of making same
WO2011044696A1 *Oct 15, 2010Apr 21, 2011Allan GillisDevice and method for attachment of insulation
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/309.8, 105/424, 296/191, 52/408, 52/483.1, 52/506.8
International ClassificationE04F13/08, E04B2/58
Cooperative ClassificationE04F13/0837, E04F13/081, E04F13/0821, E04B2/58
European ClassificationE04F13/08B3A2B, E04F13/08B2C, E04B2/58, E04F13/08B2C8