Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3045294 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 24, 1962
Filing dateMar 22, 1956
Priority dateMar 22, 1956
Publication numberUS 3045294 A, US 3045294A, US-A-3045294, US3045294 A, US3045294A
InventorsLivezey Jr William F
Original AssigneeLivezey Jr William F
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method and apparatus for laying floors
US 3045294 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 24, 1962 w. F. LIVEZEY, JR 3,045,294

METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR LAYING FLOORS Filed March 22, 1956 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 FIGI. 3o

FIG. 2.

INVENTORi WILLIAM F. LIVEZEYJR AT T YS.

July 24, 1962 w. F. LIVEZEY, JR 3,

METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR LAYING FLOORS Filed. March 22, 1956 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 ,0 I 7 INVENTORZ 37 I, WILLIAM F. LIVEZEY JR.

ATTYS,

United States The present invention relates to a method and apparatus for laying floors, and more particularly to a method and apparatus for laying wooden floors on concrete and similar sub-floors.

The primary reasons for the widespread use of wood flooring are its durability and the ease with which its surface may be refinished. One of the major drawbacks of Wooden and similar fioorings is the problem caused by the expansion and contraction of the material by reason of severe changes in the atmospheric humidity. In addition to changes of atmospheric humidity, substantial damage is normally caused When a quantity of water is spilled on the floor. The conventional method of laying floors lattemps to overcome these difficulties by restricting the expansion and contraction of the flooring. While this method is satisfactory for laying floors in small areas, it is not entirely satisfactory for laying large floors both as to cost and as to resistance against soaking by water spillage.

Another important factor in laying certain types of floors is the requirement for precise leveling of the subfloor, since the finished floor laid in conventional manner, must follow the contour of the sub-floor. The laying of a level sub-floor is so costly, that the trade must tolerate a sub-floor which varies substantially from true level.

In laying conventional floors, the flooring is secured directlyto a support base, either by nailing or by an adhesive coating. To provide a nailable surface on concrete sub-floors, it is the usual practice to lay wooden sleepers at specified locations on the concrete sub-floor. When laying the sleepers, it is possible to compensate for variations from the level of the sub-floor, but the sleepers normally project slightly above the level of the surroundatent ing concrete. The laying of the sleepers is accomplished by securing the sleepers to a base structure, and then 'slushi-ng cinder concrete into the areas intermediate the sleepers. Since the sleepers are laid in a moist substance, they absorb a substantial quantity of moisture and are subject to expansion and later contraction. If the flooring is laid While the sleepers are expanding from the dampness, a loose, squeaky floor with open joints between the individual boards results when the sleepers and flooring boards dry and contract. Should the floor later become wet, for example as a result of spillage, more severe damage occurs, and at a faster rate.

Furthermore, the resilience of the conventional floor varies across its surface. Where the boards are secured to the sleepers, substantially no resilience is present; however, intermediate the sleepers, the boards are unsupported and the flooring exhibits a degree of resilience. If a uniform floor is desired, the sleepers must be laid within short distances of one another which substantially eliminates all resilience. provide resilience in a floor of this type.

In a second conventional method, the base sub-fioor is fabricated within the tolerated limits of level as set forth above. The top surface of the floor is primed or painted with asphalt and an asphalt adhesive or mastic is troweled over the complete surface. The finished flooring is then laid on the mastic, leaving expansion areas at walls, columns, doorways, etc. The expansion area is then filled with hot asphalt. To provide damp-proofing, I

after it has been primed, and the mastic is troweled onto the damp-proofing instead of being placed directly on the primed surface of the concrete. This type of flooring is only as level as the sub-floor, and provides practically no resilience. When laid in large areas, and when the flooring is subject to severe atmospheric changes in humidity, the individual boards, being held against movement, are slightly, but permanently crushed about their periphery by the expansion forces exerted upon them by the adjacent boards. When the humidity disappears, the boards dry out and are no longer subject to the expansion forces. The crushed peripheries of the boards then leave open joints. When water spillage occurs, the expansion forces are sufficiently great to cause the boards to heave up or buckle, causing irreparable damage to the boards, and necessitating laying of a new floor in the damaged area. This method of laying floors does not provide resilience unless a resilient layer is placed over the complete subfioor area intermediate the sub-floor and the finished floor.

With the foregoing in mind, a primary object of the present invention is to provide a method and apparatus for laying floors which provide a uniform resilience over the entire floor area without the requirement for a sheet of resilient material underlying the complete floor area.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a method and appaartus for laying floors which provides a precisely levelfloor substantially independent of the levelness of the sub-floor.

Another important object of the present invention is to provide a floor which affords expansion and contrac-,

tion of the flooring material without buckling or leaving open joints in the floor surface.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a floor which is highly economical to lay, and which may be lifted and replaced by anyone to correct damage.

All of the objects of the invention and the various features and details of the operation thereof are more fully set forth hereinafter with reference to the accornpanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a fragmentary perspective view of a floor being laid in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a sectional view taken on the line 2-2 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is an enlarged sectional View taken on the line '33 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary perspective view of a com posite sleeper made in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 5 is a perspective view of a flooring strip;

FIG. 6 is a view showing an intermediate step in the laying of the floor in accordance with the present invention;

It is not commercially practical to FIG. 7 is a sectional view taken on the line 7-7 of FIG. 6;

FIG. 8 is an enlarged view similar to FIG. 6 showing the succeeding step in the operation; and

FIG. 9 is a plan view showing a further step in the operation.

The present invention provides novel apparatus and methods for laying flooring in which the floor consists of a plurality of short lengths of flooring boards. The individual boards may be 12 inches long, 1 inch high and 1% inches wide, but of course, variations are possible within the scope of the present invention. The individual boards are laid in laterally abutting relationship across the full width of the floor, to form a first series of boards, and subsequent series are laid in endwise abutting relation 1 thereto. The boards are supported at their ends by sleepers which extend across the full width of the area being floored, and an auxiliary support is, provided intermediate the. sleepers to insure substantially uniform resilience .2) along the length of the board. The boards are laterally slidable on the supports to compensate for lateral expansion and contraction due to the changes in temperature and humidity, and means is provided to bias the boards together to insure tight joints therebetween at all times.

Referring now to the drawings, the flooring of the present invention is composed of a plurality of boards 10. As shown in FIGS. 2, 3, 5, and 6, the boards 10 have parallel top and bottom surfaces 11 and 12, respectively, and slightly downwardly tapered side and end surfaces 13 and 14, respectively. The tapered side and end surfaces insure a neat joint on the upper surface of the floor, while affording clearance between the boards adjacent the lower surface. As shown, the ends of the board are grooved as indicated at 16 to receive outwardly projecting flanges 17 of the composite sleeper 18 upon which the ends of the boards are supported.

In accordance with the invention, the sleepers 18 each comprise a base portion 19 preferably formed of cork or a similar resilient substance and an upper portion or facing plate 20 of metal or other durable material. The face plate 20 is formed with an upstanding central portion 21 which mounts the outwardly projecting flange 17 which is received in the groove 16, as described above, and as shown in FIG. 3. Intermediate the sleepers 18 is disposed an auxilary support member 25 which is formed of cork or other suitable resilient material. Thus, when the floor is assembled, the individual boards are held against upward movement by reason of the engagement of the flanges 17 in the grooves 16 at the opposite ends of the board. The board is resiliently supported against downward movement by the undersurface of the board 12 resting on the face plate 28 of the sleepers 18 and on the auxiliary support member 25. However, the board is free for lateral sliding movement on the sleepers 18 and the auxiliary support 25. To insure freedom of movement of the boards laterally, the upper surfaces of the sleepers 18 and the support 25 are lubricated, for example, by a thin coating of paraflin or other wax material. Endwise movement of the boards is limited by the abutting engagement of the boards of one series with those of the adjacent series, and to a certain degree by the engagement of the upper portion of the sleepers 18 in the grooves 16.

The sleepers 18 and the supports 25 are securely united to the sub-floor -27 by means of mastic or other suitable cement indicated at 28 and 29, respectively, in FIG. 3. The sleepers 18 and the auxiliary supporting members 25 perferably extend continuously across the width of the area being laid terminating short of the opposite side walls 30. Likewise, the boards 11 are laid in series extending across the width of the area and are coextensive with the sleepers 18. Since the sleepers 18 terminate short of the side walls 30, the boards 10 are free to slide outwardly toward the wall and to become disengaged from the sleeper, for example, when severe conditions of humidity are present.

The space between the end of the flooring and the wall 30 is covered by a suitable trim 31 such as cove base and the like. In doorways and the like, threshold plates effectively cover the expansion margin. Preferably, the trim 31 is mounted as indicated at 32 to be susceptible of vertical displacement when pressure is exerted on the underside. Thus, under severe humidity changes, when the boards 10 expand toward the wall 30 and disengage the upper portion of the composite sleeper 18, the boards may be displaced upwardly and displace the trim 31, thereby freeing the board. To insure against jamming of the board between the walls, an elevating element 33 is perferably imbedded in the support member 25 to engage the board and effect upward movement thereof upon its disengagement from the flange 17 of the composite sleeper 18.

Under normal conditions, the boards 10 are displaced only slightly in a lateral direction by reason of their expansion to the changes in humidity. Means is provided to return the boards to their normal position when the humidity returns to the condition at which the floor is laid. To this end, the boards are biased inwardly of the area away from the wall 30. While other resilient members may be employed, preferably an elongated spring 36 is tensioned between the outermost board and the sub-floor 27. To this end, as shown in FIG. 2, the spring is anchored in the sub-floor, for example, as indicated at 37 and is engaged at the other end against the outermost board, for example, by an angle member 38. The angle member 38 bears against the outermost board 10 without physical attachment thereto so that upon extremely severe changes in humidity, the board is free to be displaced upwardly by the member 33. Under normal conditions, however, the outermost board remains en gaged with the flange 17 of the sleeper 18 and travels back and forth in accordance with the cumulative lateral contraction and expansion of the series of boards. Freedom of movement of the boards is obtained by tensioning the spring sufficiently to overcome the frictional forces of the boards on the sleeper in moving them laterally along the sleepers. Thus, the spring does not severely restrain the expansion or contraction of the boards, but simply returns the boards to their initial position to close up open joints therebetween as the boards contract after having expanded.

It is noted that the present sleepers 18 and auxiliary supports 25 provide a dead air space intermediate the sub-floor 2'7 and the finish floor composed of the boards 11;. Because of the dead air space between the bottoms 12 of the boards 10 and the sub-floor 27, the boards are not in direct contact with the sub-floor surface. Thus when water spills on the floor, it may accumulate in the dead air space without soaking the flooring boards. Therefore the boards do not soak up the water on the sub-floor as would the boards in conventional floors wherein the boards are in direct contact with the subfloor.

The present invention provides for ready repair of the fioor when damaged. For example, in normal installations, if a substantial quantity of water is spilled on the floor, the conventional floors are severely damaged by reason of the normal restraining forces which limit the expansion of the individual members of the floor. The present invention provides a floor which is readily disassembled in the event of damage. Damage by water spillage is substantially eliminated because the expansion forces are not restrained, and in the event of spillage of an excessive quantity of water, the floor is readily picked up by removing the trim 31 releasing the tension on the spring 36 and sliding out the individual boards 10 beyond the end of the sleeper, and removing them. After the removed boards 10 and the sub-floor have been dried, the floor is relaid in the same manner by simply sliding the boards laterally thereof longitudinally of the sleepers to their original positions on the composite sleepers, reengaging the angle member 38 with the outermost board, and replacing the trim 31.

To provide an indication when severe expansion has taken place, a groove is made in the upper surface 11 of the boards as indicated at 40 in FIG. 2, adjacent the outer terminus of the trim 31. The amount of expansion or contraction may then be observed by gaging the distance between the groove 40 and the outer terminus of the trim 31.

The composite sleeper 18 and the auxiliary support members 25 not only provide resilience in the floor at substantially less cost than the conventional method of laying resilient wood floors, but also provides means for obtaining a precisely level finish floor on the unlevel surface of a sub-floor. This is accomplished by forming the resilient portion 19 of the sleeper 18 in a manner to conform to the contour of the sub-floor on its lower surface, but maintaining precisely level its upper surface which mounts the facing plate 20. Thus, the vertical dimension or thickness of the resilient portion of the sleeper 18'varies in accordance with the variation of the sub-floor surface below the desired level or elevation of the finish floor, and the upper surface of the resilient portion 19 of the composite sleeper 18 is precisely parallel to the desired level or elevation.

The present invention affords an economical method for laying floors which are truly level. In carrying out the improved method of the invention, the sub-floor 27 is laid or poured in the conventional manner so as to be approximately level. Strips of cork or other resilient materials which will constitute the portion 19 of the composite sleeper 18 are cemented to the sub-floor in proper spacing, preferably 12 inches, from center to center, and a strip which forms the supporting member 25 is cemented to the sub-floor intermediate the other strips. Preferably, the strips are laid starting adjacent one end wall of the area being floored. The strips when laid are of uniform thickness and follow the contour of the subfloor. The upper surface of the strips of resilient material is then shaved or cut with the aid of proper instruments to be truly level, the central strip which forms the sup porting member 25 being cut or shaved to a height greater than the other strips by an amount equal to the thickness of the plate 20. i

The upper portion of the composite sleeper 18 is then cemented in place upon the level surface of the resilient material adjacent the end wall, and thereafter the upper surfaces of the sleeper 18 and the strip 25 are lubricated. The first series of boards is then engaged against the upper portion of the strip with the groove engaging the flange 17 and the bottom surface resting on the plate 20 and the strips 25. When the series of boards has been laid with the boards in laterally abutting relation with one another, the upper portion 21a of the next composite sleeper 18a is lubricated by a coating of parafiin or the like and is inserted into the grooves at the other end of the boards and is cemented onto the level upper surface of the corresponding resilient strip which has been previously leveled. When the series of boards has been laid in this manner, a precisely level surface has been obtained, as indicated at 50 in FIGS. 6 and 7.

In the succeeding operation, a resilient strip of greater thickness than the portion 20b of the next sleeper 18b is then cemented to the sub-floor 27, for example, as indicated at 51 in proper spacing for the next series of boards, for example with the center 12 inches from the end of the boards constituting the surface 50. A second strip of resilient material of greater thickness than the strip 51 is then laid intermediate the strip and the level surface as indicated at 52. With the surface 50 as a supporting surface, a machine is then advanced to shave or cut the marginal portion of the strips 51 and 52 to a precise level condition corresponding to the level condition of the surface Stl. The strip 52 is shaved to a height greater than the strip 51 to form an intermediate support 25b, the leveled strip 51 forming the base 19b of the composite sleeper 18b. The next series of boards is then mounted against the boards of the surface 50 in engagement with the composite sleeperindicated at 18a in FIGS. 6 and 8. When laying the boards adjacent the side wall 30, the springs 36, 36 (see FIG. 9) are extended to engage the angles 38, 38 against the outermost board of the series, for example as shown at 3811 in FIG. 9.

With the complete series of boards in place, the upper portion, indicated by broken lines at 21b in FIG. 8, of the composite sleeper 18b, is engaged in the grooves at the opposite ends of the boards 10 comprising the second series and the upper portion 21b is cemented against the upper surface of the base portion 19b. When the strip 21b is cemented to the portion 1%, a second composite sleeper 18b is formed. Thus, the second series of boards constitute a continuation of the level surface 50 formed by the first series of boards. Additional strips of resilient material such as cork are laid beyond the second series and the surface just formed is employed as a guide surface for shaving or cutting the strips to dispose their upper surfaces precisely level, and the next series of boards is laid in the manner just described. These steps are repeated until the complete area is floored at which time the upper surface tis finished inthe conventional manner; the trim strips 31 are applied around its periphery; and the index grooves 40 are formed.

While I have described the preferred method of v installation, several modifications are possible within the scope of the invention. For example, instead of laying the'complete series of boards 10 in place before cementing the upper portion of the composite sleeper to the lower portion, it is possible to assemble the composite sleeper prior to laying the boards of the series and then follow the procedure outlined previously in connection with the replacement and repair of damaged floors.

Also, instead of starting at one end of the area, it may be found desirable to erect a temporary level platform across the full width of the central part of the area which serves as a level guiding base for shaving or cutting the strips forming the bases of the first composite sleepers and the intermediate supporting member to the precisely level condition. 'The plat-form is removed after laying the first series of boards and the remainder of the floor is laid in the manner described above.

, While particular forms of the present invention have been herein illustrated and described, it is not intended to limit the invention to such a disclosure, but changes and modifications may be made therein and thereto within the scope of the following claims.

I claim:

1. A floor construction comprising a sub-floor, a pinrality of sleepers, each consisting of a base portion of resilient material secured ,to said sub-floor and an upper portion united to said base port-ion and having a face plate with an upstanding web terminating in outturned flange portions parallel to said face plate, and a plurality of fioor boards each having a flat undersurface supported at its ends on the face plate of the upper portion of said sleepers and having means defining grooves in its end walls receiving said outturned flange portions, said grooves affording sliding movement of said boards on the upper portions of said sleepers, and spring means of less thickness than said resilient material and underlying said floor boards and overlying said sub-floor intermediate said sleepers, said spring means being secured to said sub-floor rat a point underlying said floor boards and engaging at the other end an outer floor board to bias the same inwardly longitudinally of the sleepers.

2. Construction according to claim 1 wherein said flange portion terminates in spaced relation to the lateral edges of said sub-floor, and including means to displace the boards upwardly upon lateral movement thereof beyond the terminus of said flange portions.

3. The method of laying a level floor comprising the steps of forming a sub-floor, securing resilient base strips to said sub-fioor at spaced parallel locations therealong, forming said secured base strips to dispose their upper surfaces level, securing upper portions to said leveled base strips to form composite sleepers, and mounting a series of floor boards to span between the upper portions of adjacent composite sleepers, to form a row of boards substantially coextensive with said sleepers by sliding successive boards longitudinally of said sleepers into sidewise abutting relation.

4. The method according to claim 3 wherein the boards are mounted row by row and wherein further the previously laid row is used as a guide for forming the base strips to dispose their upper surfaces level.

5. The method according to claim 3 including the step of applying a laterally inward resilient bias on the series of floor boards in each row to resiliently maintain said boards of said series in laterally abutting relation.

(References on following page) UNITED STATES PATENTS Prickett July 29, 1924 Van der Bulcke Oct. 24, 1905 Praray Aug. 23, 1910 Roeder Oct. 2, 1917 Olsen Nov. 24, 1925 McWilliams Jan. 6, 1931 Barrows Aug. 25, 1931 8 Wolfson Nov. 22, 1932 Snyder et a1 Oct. 16, 1934 Kern Sept. 7, 1943 Taphoureau Feb. 16, 1954 Olsen Oct. 2, '1956 FOREIGN PATENTS Great Britain Oct. 12, 1932 Switzerland Apr. 1, 1946 France June 15, 1955

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US802622 *Jan 5, 1905Oct 24, 1905Adolphe Van Den BulckeDevice for the rapid laying and automatic tightening of floors.
US968512 *Feb 9, 1910Aug 23, 1910Charles Ambrose Marshal PrarayReinforced wooden mill-floor construction.
US1241885 *Feb 24, 1916Oct 2, 1917Charles RoederTiling construction.
US1562784 *Mar 23, 1922Nov 24, 1925Olsen Rudolph KAnchor strip for securing finishing structures to concrete
US1788315 *Mar 30, 1929Jan 6, 1931Mcwilliams Joseph LFloor-laying device
US1820041 *Jan 27, 1927Aug 25, 1931California Chemical CorpBuilding construction
US1888611 *Jun 10, 1930Nov 22, 1932Concrete Wood Floor Clip CompaFlooring and the like
US1977496 *Sep 28, 1931Oct 16, 1934Nat Wood Products CoFloor expansion joint
US2328651 *Dec 15, 1941Sep 7, 1943Kern Nathaniel CFloor molding
US2668991 *Mar 1, 1949Feb 16, 1954Leon Taphoureau FernandFloor unit
US2764888 *Jan 15, 1953Oct 2, 1956Roy Olson Clarence LePrecast sleeper construction
USRE15881 *Nov 1, 1920Jul 29, 1924 Concrete and wood floor construction device
CH240178A * Title not available
FR1104493A * Title not available
GB399647A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3143335 *Nov 1, 1962Aug 4, 1964Lassahn Dean WClamping device for constructing flooring, decking, and the like
US3273296 *Jun 17, 1963Sep 20, 1966Glenn E SoulonDetachable baseboard and flooring trim assembly
US3858268 *Oct 19, 1973Jan 7, 1975Pollak Joseph JRug holder
US3893275 *Mar 8, 1973Jul 8, 1975Omholt RayRebound wall and method
US4307879 *Sep 29, 1978Dec 29, 1981Mcmahon Thomas AAthletic playing surface
US4325546 *Jan 9, 1980Apr 20, 1982Mcmahon Thomas AModular athletic playing surface with tuned compliance
US4449342 *Jun 10, 1982May 22, 1984Abendroth Carl WFlooring system
US4589243 *May 9, 1984May 20, 1986Abendroth Carl WFlooring system with strip of resilient material in compression
US4831806 *Feb 29, 1988May 23, 1989Robbins, Inc.Free floating floor system
US4856250 *Apr 17, 1987Aug 15, 1989Gronau Arthur WSleeper for the attachment of covering material to a surface
US4932178 *May 5, 1989Jun 12, 1990Mozingo Ralph RCompound timber-metal stressed decks
US4995210 *May 16, 1989Feb 26, 1991Robbins, Inc.Free floating floor system and method for forming
US5377471 *Mar 16, 1994Jan 3, 1995Robbins, Inc.Prefabricated sleeper for anchored and resilient hardwood floor system
US5388380 *Jul 13, 1992Feb 14, 1995Robbins, Inc.Anchored/resilient sleeper for hardwood floor system
US5403414 *Jun 11, 1993Apr 4, 1995Corston; CharlesMethod and apparatus for construction of flooring to prevent squeaks
US5623803 *Mar 21, 1995Apr 29, 1997Willis; Mark C.Plastic decking and securement system and method of installation
US5727354 *May 21, 1992Mar 17, 1998Triangle Pacific Corp.Fastening system for juxtaposed and parallel laths
US5778621 *Mar 5, 1997Jul 14, 1998Connor/Aga Sports Flooring CorporationSubflooring assembly for athletic playing surface and method of forming the same
US5850720 *Nov 1, 1996Dec 22, 1998Mark C. WillisPlastic decking and securement system and method of installation
US6023907 *Nov 18, 1998Feb 15, 2000Valinge Aluminium AbMethod for joining building boards
US6094882 *Jun 2, 1999Aug 1, 2000Valinge Aluminium AbMethod and equipment for making a building board
US6101775 *Aug 7, 1998Aug 15, 2000Larimore; MarkAerated flooring systems
US6122873 *Jun 12, 1998Sep 26, 2000Connor/Aga Sports Flooring CorporationSubfloor assembly for athletic playing surface having improved deflection characteristics
US6134854 *Dec 18, 1998Oct 24, 2000Perstorp AbGlider bar for flooring system
US6182410Jul 19, 1999Feb 6, 2001Välinge Aluminium ABSystem for joining building boards
US6205639Jun 2, 1999Mar 27, 2001Valinge Aluminum AbMethod for making a building board
US6279279 *Jun 14, 2000Aug 28, 2001Mark LarimoreAerated flooring system
US6324803Oct 5, 2000Dec 4, 2001VäLINGE ALUMINUM ABSystem for joining building boards
US6363671Dec 8, 1999Apr 2, 2002O'mara EdwardTensioned floor assembly
US6367217Nov 4, 1999Apr 9, 2002Robbins, Inc.Sleeper assembly for resilient hardwood floor system
US6427403Nov 3, 1998Aug 6, 2002Nicholas C. TambakisFiber reinforced plastic (FRP) composite structural system for decks, docks, boardwalks, walkways, spa decks, hot tub decks and gazebos and components therefore and method of making same
US6446405Oct 6, 2000Sep 10, 2002Valinge Aluminium AbLocking system and flooring board
US6490836Dec 23, 1999Dec 10, 2002Unilin Beheer B.V. Besloten VennootschapFloor panel with edge connectors
US6497079Nov 14, 2000Dec 24, 2002E.F.P. Floor Products GmbhMechanical panel connection
US6510665Sep 18, 2001Jan 28, 2003Valinge Aluminum AbLocking system for mechanical joining of floorboards and method for production thereof
US6516579Mar 24, 2000Feb 11, 2003Tony PervanSystem for joining building boards
US6526719Mar 7, 2001Mar 4, 2003E.F.P. Floor Products GmbhMechanical panel connection
US6532709Mar 19, 2002Mar 18, 2003Valinge Aluminium AbLocking system and flooring board
US6564522 *Nov 20, 2001May 20, 2003Lee Chiu-YingHidden dual loading spring-type floor board fastening mount structure
US6588166Jan 29, 2001Jul 8, 2003Pergo (Europe) AbFlooring panel or wall panel and use thereof
US6606834Jul 16, 2002Aug 19, 2003Pergo (Europe) AbFlooring panel or wall panel and use thereof
US6637169Mar 15, 2002Oct 28, 2003Robbins, Inc.Sleeper assembly for resilient hardwood floor system
US6647689Jul 26, 2002Nov 18, 2003E.F.P. Floor Products GmbhPanel, particularly a flooring panel
US6715253Sep 18, 2001Apr 6, 2004Valinge Aluminium AbLocking system for floorboards
US6769218Jan 14, 2002Aug 3, 2004Valinge Aluminium AbFloorboard and locking system therefor
US6851241Jan 14, 2002Feb 8, 2005Valinge Aluminium AbFloorboards and methods for production and installation thereof
US6874292Oct 9, 2002Apr 5, 2005Unilin Beheer Bv, Besloten VennootschapFloor panels with edge connectors
US6880305Jun 17, 2002Apr 19, 2005Valinge Aluminium AbMetal strip for interlocking floorboard and a floorboard using same
US6898913Sep 27, 2002May 31, 2005Valinge Aluminium AbLocking system for mechanical joining of floorboards and method for production thereof
US6918220Feb 7, 2003Jul 19, 2005Valinge Aluminium AbLocking systems for floorboards
US6922964Feb 11, 2003Aug 2, 2005Valinge Aluminium AbLocking system and flooring board
US6928779Oct 8, 2002Aug 16, 2005Unilin Beheer Bv, Besloten VennootschapFloor panels with edge connectors
US6955020Oct 9, 2002Oct 18, 2005Unilin Beheer Bv, Besloten VennootschapFloor panels with edge connectors
US6993877Oct 9, 2002Feb 7, 2006Unilin Beheer B.V., Besloten VennootschapFloor panels with edge connectors
US7003925Oct 6, 2004Feb 28, 2006Valinge Aluminum AbLocking system for floorboards
US7040068Sep 27, 2002May 9, 2006Unilin Beheer B.V., Besloten VennootschapFloor panels with edge connectors
US7051486Apr 15, 2003May 30, 2006Valinge Aluminium AbMechanical locking system for floating floor
US7086205Jul 25, 2002Aug 8, 2006Valinge Aluminium AbSystem for joining building panels
US7121059May 7, 2003Oct 17, 2006Valinge Innovation AbSystem for joining building panels
US7131242Aug 18, 2003Nov 7, 2006Pergo (Europe) AbFlooring panel or wall panel and use thereof
US7137229Apr 15, 2003Nov 21, 2006Valinge Innovation AbFloorboards with decorative grooves
US7171791Sep 3, 2004Feb 6, 2007Valinge Innovation AbFloorboards and methods for production and installation thereof
US7275350Aug 6, 2005Oct 2, 2007Valinge Innovation AbMethod of making a floorboard and method of making a floor with the floorboard
US7328536Jun 9, 2006Feb 12, 2008Unilin Beheer B.V.Floor panels with edge connectors
US7386963Feb 3, 2005Jun 17, 2008Valinge Innovation AbLocking system and flooring board
US7398625Jan 30, 2006Jul 15, 2008Valinge Innovation AbLocking system for floorboards
US7431979Oct 31, 2003Oct 7, 2008Kronotec AgWood fiberboard
US7444791Nov 17, 2000Nov 4, 2008Valinge Innovation AbLocking system and flooring board
US7454875Oct 22, 2004Nov 25, 2008Valinge Aluminium AbMechanical locking system for floor panels
US7467499Jun 9, 2006Dec 23, 2008Unilin Beheer B.V., Besloten VennootschapFloor panels with edge connectors
US7484337Nov 10, 2003Feb 3, 2009Kronotec. AgFloor panel and method of laying a floor panel
US7484338Sep 18, 2001Feb 3, 2009Valinge Innovation AbLocking system, floorboard comprising such a locking system, as well as method for making floorboards
US7497058Jun 3, 2002Mar 3, 2009Pergo (Europe) AbFlooring panel or wall panel and use thereof
US7506481Dec 17, 2003Mar 24, 2009Kronotec AgBuilding board for use in subfloors
US7516588Jan 13, 2005Apr 14, 2009Valinge Aluminium AbFloor covering and locking systems
US7550202Mar 10, 2005Jun 23, 2009Kronotec AgInsulation board made of a mixture of wood base material and binding fibers
US7562431Jul 21, 2009Flooring Technologies Ltd.Method for bringing in a strip forming a spring of a board
US7614197Nov 10, 2009Premark Rwp Holdings, Inc.Laminate flooring
US7617645Nov 17, 2009Unilin Beheer B.V., Besloten VennootschapFloor panels with edge connectors
US7617651Nov 17, 2009Kronotec AgFloor panel
US7621092Nov 24, 2009Flooring Technologies Ltd.Device and method for locking two building boards
US7621094Nov 24, 2009Unilin Beheer B.V., Besloten VennootschapFloor panels with edge connectors
US7634886Jun 9, 2006Dec 22, 2009Unilin Beheer B.V., Besloten VennootschapFloor panels with edge connectors
US7634887Dec 29, 2006Dec 22, 2009Unilin Beheer B.V., Besloten VennootschapFloor panels with edge connectors
US7637066Dec 29, 2009Unilin Beheer B.V., Besloten VennootschapFloor panels with edge connectors
US7637067Dec 29, 2009Unilin Beheer B.V., Besloten VennootschapFloor panels with edge connectors
US7637068Dec 29, 2009Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking system for floorboards
US7640708Sep 30, 2005Jan 5, 2010Unilin Beheer B.V., Besloten VennootschapFloor panels with edge connectors
US7641963Oct 31, 2003Jan 5, 2010Kronotec AgPanel and process for producing a panel
US7644555Jan 12, 2010Unilin Beheer B.V., Besloten VennootschapFloor panels with edge connectors
US7644557Aug 31, 2005Jan 12, 2010Unilin Beheer B.V., Besloten VennootschapMethod of making floor panels with edge connectors
US7647741Jun 9, 2006Jan 19, 2010Unilin Beheer B.V. Besloten VennootschapFloor panels with edge connectors
US7647743Jul 9, 2007Jan 19, 2010Unilin Beheer B.V. Besloten VennootschapMethod of making floor panels with edge connectors
US7650727Jan 26, 2010Unilin Beheer B.V., Besloten VennootschapFloor panels with edge connectors
US7650728Jan 26, 2010UNILIN BEHEER BV besloten vennootschapFloor panels with edge connectors
US7651751Feb 10, 2004Jan 26, 2010Kronotec AgBuilding board
US7654054Feb 2, 2010Uniliin Beheer B.V. besloten vennootschapFloor panels with edge connectors
US7658048Oct 31, 2007Feb 9, 2010Unilin Beheer B.V. Besloten VennootschapFloor panels with edge connectors
US7661238Feb 16, 2010Unilin Beheer B.V., besloten, vennootshapFloor panels with edge connectors
US7665265Jun 9, 2006Feb 23, 2010Unlin Beheer B.V.Floor panels with edge connectors
US7665266Nov 30, 2006Feb 23, 2010Unilin Beheer B.V., Besloten VennootschapFloor panels with edge connectors
US7665267Oct 30, 2007Feb 23, 2010Unilin Beheer B.V., Besloten VennootschapFloor panels with edge connectors
US7665268Oct 31, 2007Feb 23, 2010Unilin Beheer B.V., Besloten VennootschapFloor panels with edge connectors
US7669376Mar 2, 2010Unilin Beheer B.V., Besloten VennootschapFloor panels with edge connectors
US7669377Jul 7, 2006Mar 2, 2010Unilin Beheer B.V., Besloten VennootschapFloor panels with edge connectors
US7673431Jul 7, 2006Mar 9, 2010Unilin Beheer B.V. besloten, vennootschapFloor panels with edge connectors
US7677001Oct 29, 2004Mar 16, 2010Valinge Innovation AbFlooring systems and methods for installation
US7677008Oct 30, 2007Mar 16, 2010Unilin Beheer B.V., Besloten VennootschapFloor panels with edge connectors
US7678425Mar 16, 2010Flooring Technologies Ltd.Process for finishing a wooden board and wooden board produced by the process
US7681371Jun 23, 2006Mar 23, 2010Unilin Beheer B.V.Floor panels with edge connectors
US7698868Aug 31, 2005Apr 20, 2010Unilin Beheer B.V. Besloten VennootschapFloor panels with edge connectors
US7698869Jun 13, 2006Apr 20, 2010Unilin Beheer B.V. Besloten VennootschapFloor panels with edge connectors
US7707793May 4, 2006May 4, 2010Unilin Beheer B.V., Besloten VennootschapFloor panels with edge connectors
US7712280Oct 30, 2007May 11, 2010Unilin Beheer B.V., Besloten VennootschapFloor panels with edge connectors
US7726089Jun 9, 2006Jun 1, 2010Unilin Beheer B.V., Besloten VennootschapFloor panels with edge connectors
US7735288Jun 29, 2006Jun 15, 2010Unilin Beheer B.V., Besloten VennootschapFloor panels with edge connectors
US7739849Dec 9, 2003Jun 22, 2010Valinge Innovation AbFloorboards, flooring systems and methods for manufacturing and installation thereof
US7757452Mar 31, 2003Jul 20, 2010Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking system for floorboards
US7757453Jul 20, 2010Unilin Beheer B.V., Besloten VennootschapFloor panels with edge connectors
US7770350Jul 7, 2006Aug 10, 2010Unilin Beheer B. V., besloten vennootschapFloor panels with edge connectors
US7775007Aug 17, 2010Valinge Innovation AbSystem for joining building panels
US7779596Aug 26, 2004Aug 24, 2010Valinge Innovation AbLocking system for mechanical joining of floorboards and method for production thereof
US7790293Apr 27, 2006Sep 7, 2010Flooring Technologies Ltd.Process for finishing a wooden board and wooden board produced by the process
US7810297Oct 12, 2010Unilin Beheer B.V., Besloten VennootschapFloor panels with edge connectors
US7816001Jun 20, 2008Oct 19, 2010Kronotec AgInsulation board made of a mixture of wood base material and binding fibers
US7823359Nov 2, 2010Valinge Innovation AbFloor panel with a tongue, groove and a strip
US7827749Nov 9, 2010Flooring Technologies Ltd.Panel and method of manufacture
US7827754Nov 9, 2010Unilin Beheer B.V., Besloten VennootschapFloor panels with edge connectors
US7827755Jun 13, 2006Nov 9, 2010Unilin Beheer B.V., Besloten VennootschapFloor panels with edge connectors
US7841144Nov 30, 2010Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking system for panels and method of installing same
US7845140Mar 25, 2004Dec 7, 2010Valinge Innovation AbFlooring and method for installation and manufacturing thereof
US7854986Sep 7, 2006Dec 21, 2010Flooring Technologies Ltd.Building board and method for production
US7856784Aug 8, 2008Dec 28, 2010Pergo AGFlooring panel or wall panel and use thereof
US7874113Aug 24, 2009Jan 25, 2011Eberle Iii Harry WExpansion-compensating deck fastener
US7877956Apr 30, 2004Feb 1, 2011Pergo AGFloor element with guiding means
US7886497Feb 15, 2011Valinge Innovation AbFloorboard, system and method for forming a flooring, and a flooring formed thereof
US7908812 *Mar 22, 2011Eberle Harry W IiiDecking system and anchoring device
US7908816Jan 30, 2004Mar 22, 2011Kronotec AgDevice for connecting building boards, especially floor panels
US7926234Mar 20, 2003Apr 19, 2011Valinge Innovation AbFloorboards with decorative grooves
US8003168Aug 23, 2011Kronotec AgMethod for sealing a building panel
US8006458 *Sep 27, 1999Aug 30, 2011Pergo AGFlooring material comprising board shaped floor elements which are joined vertically by means of separate assembly profiles
US8011155Jul 12, 2010Sep 6, 2011Valinge Innovation AbLocking system for mechanical joining of floorboards and method for production thereof
US8016969Jun 18, 2009Sep 13, 2011Flooring Technologies Ltd.Process for finishing a wooden board and wooden board produced by the process
US8042484Oct 4, 2005Oct 25, 2011Valinge Innovation AbAppliance and method for surface treatment of a board shaped material and floorboard
US8061104Nov 22, 2011Valinge Innovation AbMechanical locking system for floor panels
US8161702Apr 24, 2012Blue Heron Enterprises LlcExpansion-compensating deck fastener
US8166723May 1, 2012Unilin Beheer B.V., Besloten VennootschapFloor panels with edge connectors
US8176698Sep 20, 2004May 15, 2012Kronotec AgPanel
US8215078Feb 15, 2005Jul 10, 2012Välinge Innovation Belgium BVBABuilding panel with compressed edges and method of making same
US8234831Aug 7, 2012Välinge Innovation ABLocking system for mechanical joining of floorboards and method for production thereof
US8245477Apr 8, 2003Aug 21, 2012Välinge Innovation ABFloorboards for floorings
US8250825Apr 27, 2006Aug 28, 2012Välinge Innovation ABFlooring and method for laying and manufacturing the same
US8257791Sep 4, 2012Kronotec AgProcess of manufacturing a wood fiberboard, in particular floor panels
US8287206Feb 10, 2011Oct 16, 2012Blue Heron Enterprises LlcDecking system and anchoring device
US8293058Nov 8, 2010Oct 23, 2012Valinge Innovation AbFloorboard, system and method for forming a flooring, and a flooring formed thereof
US8356450Jan 22, 2013Larimore Mark AndrewSmart panel
US8365494Aug 31, 2010Feb 5, 2013Unilin Beheer B.V., Besloten VennootschapFloor panels with edge connectors
US8387312Mar 5, 2013Gordon MurreyPlatform arrangement
US8402709Jul 11, 2006Mar 26, 2013Pergo (Europe) AbFlooring panel or wall panel and use thereof
US8475871Oct 29, 2010Jul 2, 2013Flooring Technologies Ltd.Building board and method for production
US8544233Apr 2, 2012Oct 1, 2013Pergo (Europe) AbBuilding panels
US8578675Jan 28, 2008Nov 12, 2013Pergo (Europe) AbProcess for sealing of a joint
US8584423Jan 21, 2011Nov 19, 2013Valinge Innovation AbFloor panel with sealing means
US8613826Sep 13, 2012Dec 24, 2013Valinge Innovation AbFloorboard, system and method for forming a flooring, and a flooring formed thereof
US8615952Dec 13, 2010Dec 31, 2013Pergo (Europe) AbSet of panels comprising retaining profiles with a separate clip and method for inserting the clip
US8627631May 14, 2013Jan 14, 2014Flooring Industries Limited, SarlFloor covering
US8631623Jul 26, 2012Jan 21, 2014Pergo (Europe) AbSet of panels comprising retaining profiles with a separate clip and method for inserting the clip
US8631625May 14, 2013Jan 21, 2014Flooring Industries Limited, SarlFloor covering
US8661762Nov 13, 2012Mar 4, 2014Pergo (Europe) AbFlooring panel or wall panel and use thereof
US8683698Mar 11, 2011Apr 1, 2014Valinge Innovation AbMethod for making floorboards with decorative grooves
US8789334Jan 3, 2013Jul 29, 2014Unilin Beheer B.V., Besloten VennootschapFloor panels with edge connectors
US8793958Dec 2, 2013Aug 5, 2014Flooring Industries Limited, SarlFloor covering
US8833029Oct 8, 2009Sep 16, 2014Kronotec AgFloor panel
US8850769Apr 15, 2003Oct 7, 2014Valinge Innovation AbFloorboards for floating floors
US8863441Dec 17, 2012Oct 21, 2014Gordon MurreyPlatform arrangement
US8875465Sep 14, 2012Nov 4, 2014Pergo (Europe) AbFlooring panel or wall panel and use thereof
US8904729Jul 1, 2014Dec 9, 2014Flooring Industries Limited, SarlFloor covering
US8919063Sep 7, 2006Dec 30, 2014Flooring Technologies Ltd.Building board having a pattern applied onto side surfaces and conecting mechanisms thereof
US8978334Mar 24, 2014Mar 17, 2015Pergo (Europe) AbSet of panels
US8997429Jun 17, 2014Apr 7, 2015Unilin Beheer B.V.Floor panels with edge connectors
US9032685May 3, 2012May 19, 2015Pergo (Europe) AbFlooring panel or wall panel and use thereof
US9068356Dec 4, 2014Jun 30, 2015Flooring Industries Limited, SarlFloor covering
US9115500Nov 21, 2013Aug 25, 2015Pergo (Europe) AbSet of panels comprising retaining profiles with a separate clip and method for inserting the clip
US9169658Feb 3, 2009Oct 27, 2015Kronotec AgFloor panel and method of laying a floor panel
US9228362Sep 27, 2012Jan 5, 2016Blue Heron Enterprise LLCDecking system and anchoring device
US9234356May 28, 2015Jan 12, 2016Flooring Industries Limited, SarlFloor covering
US9255414Dec 4, 2013Feb 9, 2016Pergo (Europe) AbBuilding panels
US9260869Dec 5, 2013Feb 16, 2016Pergo (Europe) AbBuilding panels
US9290951Apr 2, 2015Mar 22, 2016Unilin Beheer B.V.Floor panels with edge connectors
US9316006Apr 10, 2013Apr 19, 2016Pergo (Europe) AbBuilding panels
US9322162Aug 5, 2011Apr 26, 2016Pergo (Europe) AbGuiding means at a joint
US9322183Sep 9, 2013Apr 26, 2016Valinge Innovation AbFloor covering and locking systems
US9334657Dec 17, 2015May 10, 2016Flooring Industries Limted, SarlFloor covering
US9365028Feb 14, 2007Jun 14, 2016Flooring Technologies Ltd.Method for finishing a building board and building board
US9376823Mar 8, 2016Jun 28, 2016Flooring Industries Limited, SarlFloor covering
US9388585Mar 8, 2016Jul 12, 2016Flooring Industries Limited, SarlFloor covering
US9388586Mar 8, 2016Jul 12, 2016Flooring Industries Limited, SarlFloor covering
US9394699Mar 8, 2016Jul 19, 2016Flooring Industries Limited, SarlFloor covering
US20020178673 *Jul 25, 2002Dec 5, 2002Tony PervanSystem for joining building panels
US20030101674 *Sep 6, 2002Jun 5, 2003Darko PervanFlooring and method for laying and manufacturing the same
US20030123924 *Jan 3, 2002Jul 3, 2003Eberle Harry W.Decking system and anchoring device
US20030196405 *May 7, 2003Oct 23, 2003Tony PervanSystem for joining building panels
US20040016196 *Apr 15, 2003Jan 29, 2004Darko PervanMechanical locking system for floating floor
US20040035078 *Apr 15, 2003Feb 26, 2004Darko PervanFloorboards with decorative grooves
US20040244325 *Nov 14, 2003Dec 9, 2004Nelson Thomas J.Laminate flooring
US20050166502 *Dec 10, 2004Aug 4, 2005Valinge Aluminium Ab.Metal strip for interlocking floorboard and a floorboard using same
US20050166516 *Jan 13, 2005Aug 4, 2005Valinge Aluminium AbFloor covering and locking systems
US20050252130 *Jul 21, 2005Nov 17, 2005Pergo (Europe) AbFlooring material comprising flooring elements which are assembled by means of separate flooring elements
US20050284075 *Aug 31, 2005Dec 29, 2005Unilin Beheer B.V., Besloten VennootschapFloor panels with edge connectors
US20060005499 *Aug 31, 2005Jan 12, 2006Unilin Beheer B.V., Besloten VennootschapMethod of making floor panels with edge connectors
US20060236631 *Jun 9, 2006Oct 26, 2006Moriau Stefan S GFloor Panels with edge connectors
US20060265641 *May 17, 2005Nov 23, 2006International Business Machines CorporationCustom report generation
US20070062960 *Sep 19, 2005Mar 22, 2007Target Brands, Inc.Handbasket
US20070240376 *Dec 8, 2004Oct 18, 2007Pergo (Europe) AbJoint for a Panel
US20100139198 *Aug 24, 2009Jun 10, 2010Eberle Iii Harry WExpansion-compensating deck fastener
US20100186305 *Jan 22, 2010Jul 29, 2010Ram EnterprisesSmart panel
US20110126486 *Jun 2, 2011Eberle Iii Harry WExpansion-compensating deck fastener
US20110129293 *Jun 2, 2011Blue Heron Enterprises, LlcDecking system and anchoring device
EP0860562A3 *Feb 20, 1998Nov 11, 1998Karl BöcklLaying system and clamping means for a laying system as well as method of laying
EP0972893A1 *Jul 13, 1999Jan 19, 2000Headline Sport- en Balletvloeren B.V.Sports floor
EP1103672A2 *Oct 13, 2000May 30, 2001Manfred DeislParquet from massive wood strips
WO1993023636A1 *May 21, 1992Nov 25, 1993Michel ClementSystem for fixing juxtaposed and parallel slats
WO2006066727A1 *Dec 6, 2005Jun 29, 2006Braun + Würfele Gmbh & Co.Fixing clip for connecting wooden structural elements
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/403.1, 52/749.1, 52/747.1, 52/223.7, 52/489.1
International ClassificationE04F15/04
Cooperative ClassificationE04F2201/0511, E04F15/02027, E04F15/04
European ClassificationE04F15/02A6, E04F15/04