Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3046620 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 31, 1962
Filing dateMar 20, 1956
Priority dateMar 20, 1956
Publication numberUS 3046620 A, US 3046620A, US-A-3046620, US3046620 A, US3046620A
InventorsAndrew Braunitzer, Tvorik Stephen W
Original AssigneeAndrew Braunitzer, Tvorik Stephen W
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ceiling hanger
US 3046620 A
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 31, 1962 h @mm s. w. TvoRlK ETAL 3,046,620

CEILING HANGER Filed March 20, 1956 Unite States Patent O,"

3,046,620 CEILING HANGER Stephen W. Tvorik, 7066 Beresford Ave., and Andrew Braunitzer, 6966 Orchard Blvd., both of Cleveland 30,

Ohio

Filed Mar. 20, 1956, Ser. No. 572,650

' 3 Claims. (Cl. Ztl-92) ing from the oor above toprevent the transmission of sound and vibrations from room to room.

In the normal building construction of the multi-unit type wherein an occupied suite is superimposed on another suite, a problem arises in the transmission of noise from suite to suite when dry wall construction is used in the ordinary manner on the ceilinig. The usual manner of installing dry wall plasterboard is to nail it directly to the iloor joist when making a ceiling or to the studding for wall construction.

The-preferred embodiment of the invention disclosed herein is primarily adapted for use in the ceiling construction. When the dry wall panel is nailed directly to the lower side of the floor joist, the noise produced by walking on the oor above is transmitted directly through the the floor joist and the panel with the result that an undesirable disturbance in the room below occurs. In order to eliminate this disturbing sound transmission, a series of hangers areused which suspend the ceiling from the oor joist in such a manner that a barrier is produced which will not transmit the noise from the room above. Conventional furring strips are held in a stirrup-like hanger Vsupported across the width thereof, in such a manner that there is no tendency for thefurring strip to turn or twist. Also, the furring strip is against the joist during the nailing of the ceiling panel, which results in an unyielding structure in which to drive the nails. The separation of the furring strip and the joist is achieved automatically =by the deflection of spring-like portions of the hanger when the Weight of the ceiling is applied thereon. The springs further function to resist the transmission of vibration, and the transmission of sound from room to room, therefore, is substantially prevented.

Another object of this invention is to provide a hanger for suepending furring strips to which the dry wall paneling is nailed to form the ceiling.

A still further object of this invention is to provide a hanger which will hold the furring strips against the joist during the nailing operation when applying a dry wall plasterboard thereto and which will allow the furring strip to be suspended free of the joist when the weight of the plasterboard is carried thereby.

A still further object of this invention is to provide a ceiling hanger having spring sections included in the structure for resiliently carrying the ceiling structure, and preventing the transmission of sound through the hanger to the ceiling from the door above.

Another object of this invention is to provide a ceiling hanger having structure which permits the furring strip carried thereby to be held against the ceiling during the nailing operation and suspended freely of the joist to which the hanger is attached after the ceiling material has been nailed to the furring strip.

A still further important object of this invention is to provide a ceiling hanger which engages the bottom and sides of the furring strip which is suspended thereby and eliminates any tendency of the furring strip to turn or twist.

Other objects and advantages more or less ancillary to .the ceiling board installed;

3,046,620 Patented July 31, 1982 ICC the foregoing, `and the manner in which all the various objects are realized, will appear in the following description, which considered in connection with the accompanying drawings sets `forth the preferred embodiment of the invention. Y

In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is an elevational end view showing the hanger in place with the furring strip in position for nailing;

FIG. 2 is a side View of the hanger shown inV FIG. l;

FIG. 3 is an end view of the hanger of FIG.-1 with FIG. 4 is a modified view of the hangerof FIG. 1 wherein a slot for the nail is provided; and

FIG. 5 is the hanger of FIG. 4 in the position `assumed after installing the ceiling.

Referring iirst to FIG. l, a Hoor joist 10 is shown therein of the type usually found in buildings for ,supporting the flooring 12. The-floor 12 is in direct contact with the joist and aiXed thereto.

A hanger 14 of stir-tup configuration is aflixed to the joist 10 by nails 16 when the hanger is installed.` Afurring strip 18 lies in the rebent portion 20 of the hanger 14 and the hanger is so positioned when nails 16' are installed that the furring strip 18 is in contact with the lower face of the joist10. The hanger 14 includes springlike bends 22 which flex to allow vertical movement of the furring strip 18 when a load is applied thereto. This ilexing and the new position of the `furring strip 18 is better illustrated in FIG. 3 lwherein the ceiling panel 24 is fastened to the furring strip 18 by nails 26. Y

When the nailing has been completed, and the load of. y the ceiling panel 24 is allowed to be carried by the furring strip 18 by removing temporary support` required during nailing thus releasing the ceiling panel to apply the weight thereof to the furring strip 18, the hanger bends 22 are ilexed to a point that the furring strip V18 is separated from the joist 10. This -results in a gap between the furring strip 18 and the joist 10, incapable of installation, the hanger 14 and yfurring strip 18 are in the Y uppermost position and the nail 16 is installed at the lower end of the slot 28, in each leg of the hanger 14. When the ceiling panel 24 has been applied to the -furring strip 18, the hanger 14 moves downwardly until the upper end of the slot 28 engages with the nail 16. This feature provides for nailing the ceiling panel 24 to the l furring strip 18 while it is against the joist 10. and after Y the nailing operation is completed the hanger suspends the furring strip 18 in spaced relation to the joist 10. Bends 22 are provided for the spring action required to prevent the travel of sound and vibrations through the hanger 14 into the ceiling structure.

It is noted that in each instance the furring strip 18 is rmly and uniformly bearing against the joist 10 when n the ceiling. panel 24 is being installed, therefore, holding the furring strip `18 firmly in place during this operation. After the nailing has been completed, the weight of the ceiling construction accomplishes the separation of the furring strip 18 from the joist 10. Since the ceiling structure is in suspended relation to the iioor structure above and the suspension means includes a spring, there isY no path remaining for the sound vibrations from the iloor above to be transmitted to the room below.

A hanger construction has been described as primarily adapted for mounting a furring strip to a joist, from which a dry wall ceiling is to be suspended, however, the hanger would be equally as successful in insulating against the, travel of sound when other types of ceilings such as plaster, acoustic, wallboard, etc., are used. In other modications, the expanded metal lath or sheet rock lath would be nailed to the furring strip prior to the placing of the plaster thereon. The hanger disclosed herein therefore, is particularly adapted for suspending any sort of object below a horizontal building 'structure in such a way that transmission of sound and vibrations will be inhibited.

It is to be understood that the specific nature of the present disclosure is not intended to be restrictive or conning and that various rearrangements of parts and moditications of design may be resorted to without departing from the scope or spirit of the invention as herein claimed.

Having thus described our invention, what we claim and desire to be secured by Letters Patent is:

1. A ceiling suspension clip for ultimately resiliently supporting a ceiling-supporting, wood, furring strip adjacent and spaced below a wooden ceiling joist comprising solely a thin narrow strip of resilient sheet material, said strip lbeing formed to include a flat end section and a pair of symmetrical spaced leg members having a gen eral extent substantially perpendicular to each respective terminus of said end section, each said member including a iirst at portion remote from said end section for attachment to the side face of a joist, and an outwardly extending spring-like, rebent portion formed between said end section and said rst flat portion and a second flat portion relatively closely adjacent said end section and co-planar with said iirst iiat portion for holding a furring strip in alignment with a joist, said rebent portion being adapted to span the space between the furring strip and the joist.

2. A ceiling suspension clip for ultimately resiliently supporting wood furring strips adjacent and spaced below Wooden ceiling joists comprising a thin narrow strip of resilient sheet material, said strip being formed to include a substantially rectangular, three-sided, upwardly-opening bottom section having a at bottom leg and two at side legs extending perpendicularly upwardly from each end of said bottom leg, said strip having an outwardlyextending, spring-like rebent portion formed symmetrically immediately above the upper terminus of each said bottom section side leg, and two at upper legs each extending upwardly from the upper terminus of a respective rebent spring-like portion Within the plane of the respective bottom section side leg, whereby said clip may be applied to hold a furring strip in alignment below and in direct contact with a joist prior to application thereto of ceiling elements, said rebent portion being adapted to span the space between the furring strip and the joist.

3. A ceiling suspension clip for ultimately resiliently supporting wood furring strips adjacent and spaced below wooden ceiling joists comprising a thin narrow strip of resilient sheet material, said strip being formed to include a substantially rectangular, three-sided, upwardly-opening bottom section having a flat bottom leg and two tlat side legs extending perpendicularly upwardly from each end of said bottom leg, said strip having an outwardlyextending, spring-like rebent portion formed symmetrically immediately above the upper terminus of each said bottom section side leg, and two at upper legs each extending upwardly from the upper terminus of a respective rebent spring-like portion within the plane of the respective bottom section side leg, said clip bein'g completely free of any elements between the two opposed planes of said bottom section side legs with the exception of said single flat bottom leg connecting the lower terminus of said bottom section side legs, whereby said clip may be applied to hold a furring strip in alignment below and in direct contact with a joist prior to application thereto of ceiling elements.

References Cited in the tile of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,578,964 Duphiney Mar. 30, 1926 1,675,226 Munroe June 26, 1928 1,778,412 Balduf Oct. 14, 1930 1,935,536 Balduf Nov. 14, 1933 1,980,900 Bemis Nov. 13, 1934 2,039,382 Balduf May 5, 1936 2,041,773 Manske May 26, 1936 2,181,885 Goldsmith Dec. 5, 1939 2,714,305 Nelsson Aug. 2, 1955

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1578964 *Jul 29, 1925Mar 30, 1926Philip DuphineyCeiling hanger
US1675226 *Jun 4, 1927Jun 26, 1928MunroeMethod of securing fibrous sheet material
US1778412 *Aug 6, 1928Oct 14, 1930United States Gypsum CoSound-insulated building
US1935536 *Jun 10, 1931Nov 14, 1933United States Gypsum CoBuilding construction
US1980900 *Feb 19, 1931Nov 13, 1934Bemis Ind IncBuilding construction
US2039382 *Oct 13, 1933May 5, 1936United States Gypsum CoBuilding construction and clip means therefor
US2041773 *Dec 19, 1932May 26, 1936United States Gypsum CoResilient building wall clip construction
US2181885 *Mar 2, 1938Dec 5, 1939Goldsmith William MFurring attachment
US2714305 *Jan 19, 1951Aug 2, 1955United States Gypsum CoClip retained wall structure
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3225394 *May 8, 1963Dec 28, 1965Kaiser Gypsum Company IncCeiling suspension clip
US3420019 *Sep 20, 1965Jan 7, 1969Flexstrap IncBuilding joint with flexible connecting strap
US3784144 *Aug 9, 1972Jan 8, 1974Armstrong Cork CoCeiling system suspension clip
US4466225 *Dec 3, 1981Aug 21, 1984National Gypsum CompanyStud extenders
US5127760 *Jul 26, 1990Jul 7, 1992Brady Todd AVertically slotted header
US6088982 *Sep 15, 1997Jul 18, 2000Hiesberger; Michael A.System for connecting structural wall members
US6615559Apr 4, 2001Sep 9, 2003Owens Corning Fiberglas Technology, Inc.Resilient construction member, especially a unitary construction member
US6711867Jun 23, 1999Mar 30, 2004Owens Corning Fiberglas Technology, Inc.Self-jigging resilient construction member and retrofit system using same
US6745536 *Dec 9, 2002Jun 8, 2004Van S. TallmanCeiling tile support system and method
US6755003Dec 11, 1998Jun 29, 2004Owens Corning Fiberglas Technology, Inc.Resilient construction member
US7814722Oct 29, 2007Oct 19, 2010Larry PerraultRoof truss
USRE39462 *Feb 5, 2005Jan 9, 2007Brady Todd AVertically slotted header
EP1842978A1 *Apr 6, 2006Oct 10, 2007Rockwool International A/SA device and system for suspending a building panel
WO2000034594A1Dec 3, 1999Jun 15, 2000Brien Bernini Frank C OResilient construction member
WO2000052277A1Feb 24, 2000Sep 8, 2000Richard D GodfreySound attenuating structural systems and sound attenuating board members used therefor
WO2000079070A1Jun 19, 2000Dec 28, 2000Owens Corning Fiberglass CorpSelf-jigging resilient construction member and retrofit system using same
WO2001016440A1Aug 23, 2000Mar 8, 2001Hettler Neil RSystem for retrofitting a wall to increase sound attenuation
WO2001033007A1Oct 27, 2000May 10, 2001Clarke Ii BerdanResilient construction member and retrofit system using same
WO2003071044A1 *Feb 4, 2003Aug 28, 2003Lafarge Platres S AResilient brace
WO2004031504A1 *Oct 1, 2003Apr 15, 2004Gondosch RobBuffering material for use in floor, ceiling and wall construction
WO2007115669A1 *Mar 26, 2007Oct 18, 2007Rockwool IntA device and system for suspending a building panel
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/714, 52/344, 52/712, 52/346, 52/393, 52/506.6, 52/204.599
International ClassificationE04B9/18
Cooperative ClassificationE04B9/18, E04B2009/186
European ClassificationE04B9/18