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Publication numberUS3046644 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 31, 1962
Filing dateMay 12, 1960
Priority dateMay 12, 1960
Publication numberUS 3046644 A, US 3046644A, US-A-3046644, US3046644 A, US3046644A
InventorsDay Herbert W, Gehrig Albert K
Original AssigneeFlorence Vivian Gehrig
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Valve spring depressor
US 3046644 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 31, 1962 A. K. GEHRIG ETAL 3,046,644

VALVE SPRING DEPRESSOR Filed May 12, 1960 2 Sheets-Sheet l NVENTORS ALBERT K. GET/RIG TO ATMOSPHERE ATTORNEY July 31, 1962 A. K. GEHRIG ETAL 3,046,644

VALVE SPRING DEPRESSOR Filed May 12, 1960 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTORS ALBERT K. GEHR/G BYHERBERT 0g )2 ATTORNEY United States Patent 3,046,644 VALVE SPRING DEPRESQGR Aihert K. Gehrig, 2921i Junction Ave, and Herbert W- Day, 417 Sea View Drive, El Cerrito, Calif, assignors of one-third to Florence Vivian Gehrig, Richmond, Calif.

Filed May 12, 156%, Ser. No. 28,686 8 Ciairns. (Cl. 29-213) This invention relates to a device for compressing the valve spring on engines for removing and later reinserting the valve springs.

There have been a number of valve spring depressors used for the general purpose ofthis invention but none of them seem to be suited to all modern-day engines and there are some engines that are particularly difficult to deal with. The present invention makes it possible to work on those devices and to do so easily and in the minimum amount of time.

The proper support of the engine head during valvespring removal has been a difficult problem, but it is solved by this invention, which provides a rotatable bed for supporting the engine head in a variety of positions and also provides a series of interchangeable plastic trays with novel support means that prevents the engine head from slipping or sliding around.

Another problem solved by the invention is the proper alignment of the valve spring remover with the valve stems, and the easy movement from one valve to another.

A further problem solved by the invention is the easy removal of the keepers from depressed valve springs.

Thus, among the objects of this invention are the provisions of proper alignment, easy movement from one valve to the next, proper positioning and retention of the engine head, easy removal of the spring keepers, and savings in time and labor in the removal of valve springs. Other objects and advantages will appear from the following description of a preferred embodiment, which will serve as an illustrative example of the invention.

In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a view in perspective of a device embodying the principles of the invention.

FIG. 2 is an enlarged view in side elevation and in section of a portion of the device of FIG. 1, with an engine block installed on the table and with the valve compresssing apparatus in place ready to depress a valve spring.

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary view of a portion of FIG. 2 shown on a further enlarged scale, with the valve spring depressed and ready for removal of the keeper and spring.

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary view in side elevation and in section taken generally along the line 44 in FIG. 5 and on a somewhat larger scale than either that view or FIG. 2.

FIG. 5 is a View in front elevation and in section, taken along the line 5-5 in FIG. 4 but shown on a somewhat reduced scale with respect to that view, and with the end portion of one shaft broken ofi.

FIG. 6 is a view in perspective of the engine supporting table used in this invention.

FIG. 7 is an enlarged view in perspective of the crowfoot which directly contacts the valve spring when it is being depressed.

FIG. 8 is a somewhat diagrammatic view in elevation and partly in section of the pneumatic circuit of the device.

FIG. 9 is a view in elevation and in section of a portion of the valve of FIG. 8, taken along the line 99 in FIG. 8.

FIG. 10 is a view in perspective of a typical keeper used to hold a valve spring in place and removed and reinserted by use of this invention.

' The invention comprises a stand with apparatus 3,946,644 Patented July 31, 1962 for removing the valve springs and their keepers from an engine. The stand 15 shown in FIG. 1 comprises a frame to having legs 17 and a suitable lengthwise bracing member 18. At the top of the legs 17 at each end of the frame 16 are end plates 2% and 21. Between the end plates 29 and 21 extend two stationary shafts 22 and 23 that, in addition to serving as additional braces for the frame 16, also support the functional members of the stand 15. Thus, the larger shaft 22 is centrally located and rotatably supports a flat metal table 24 and separately supports, rotatably and slidably, a crane 25; the smaller shaft 23 is in front of and slightly below the shaft 22 and carries adjustment mechanism 26.

The table 24 may comprise a generally fiat bed or plate of steel, having at each end a vertical plate 31. Each plate 31 has a depending portion 32 journaled on the-shaft and an upper portion 33 with a bolt opening 34 adapted to lie opposite any one of a plurality of bolt openings 35 in the end plates 20, 21. One end plate 31 may have an upwardly extending handle 36 facilitating movement of the table relative to the end plates 20 and 21 and alignment of the opening '34 with a desired opening 35 to place the table bed 30 at the proper inclination or on the level, as shown, depending on the type of engine being Worked on. Then a bolt 37 is inserted through the chosen opening 35 and the opening 34 to hold the table 24 in the selected posltion.

The bed 3? may also be provided with studs 38 that project up from its upper surface and'serve to anchor a plastic tray that is a distinctive feature of this invention (see FIG. 6). The tray 4% has a handle 41 at each end, a pair of stud-receiving openings 42, and a main flat surface 43 on which are a suitable number of plastic projections 44 that serve to locate an engine head 45 thereon by engagement with cylinder portions 46 on its lower side, beneath the engine valves 47. The projections 4-4 thus prevent the engine head 45 from sliding or otherwise moving when it is being worked on. There are many different types of heads 45, with differently sized and differently spaced cylinders; so this invention contemplates the use of a different tray 46? for each type, in conjunction with a single table 24. The first head 45 of each type may be used to mold the projections 44- on to the surface 43, a lump of a suitable plastic (i.e., one that will bond to the surface 43 but not to the head 45) is placed at each location, the head 45 placed thereon, and the openings 46 will shape the lump into the proper size and shape for the projections 44. Thereafter, that tray 4t) canbe used for each engine head 45 i sary, to get the most convenient orientation of the valves 4-7 and their springs 48. V

The valves 47 have split stem locks or keepers 50 (FIG. 10) that are held by the springs 48 between a cupped Washer 51 on the end of each spring 43 and an end portion 52 of a valve stem 53, a rim 54 of the keepor 5t) fitting into a recess 55 on the stem 53.- When the washers 51 are forced down, depressing the spring 48,

the keepers 48 can be removed. Then, when the spring v 48 is released, it and the Washer 51 come off readily, and

to a collar 62 by a series (preferably three) of strong slender legs 63 leaving large spaces in between, through which access is afforded, so that a mechanic can easily extract the keeper 50 when the spring 48 and washer 51 are depressed by the ring 61.

Preferably, a pneumatic device is used to propel the crowfoot 69. For example, a pneumatic cylinder 64 may have a piston 65 from which a rod 66 extends. The collar 62 is attached to the rod 66 by a set screw 67. Ports 63 and 69 provide for entry of air into either end of the cylinder 64 from conduits 70 and 71. The pneumatic circuit shown in FIG. 8 may be used along with a valve 72 (FIG. 9) that may be mounted on one end plate 2t It provides for venting to the atmosphere through a vent 73, the port 68 or 69 not being filled with air, and provides a single handle 74 for operation. When the handle 74 is turned in one direction, the rod 66 is pushed out, and when the handle 74 is turned in the other direction, the rod 66 is retracted. A foot pedal may be used instead, if desired. I

In this invention, the cylinder 64 is provided with a ball 75 that is mounted for universal rotation in a socket 76 on the outer end of the curved crane arm 25. The inner end of the crane arm 25 is provided with a sleeve '77 that is freely rotatable and freely slidable on the shaft 22. The crane arm 25 has a short generally radially outwardly portion 78 and a long curved portion 79 terminating at the socket 76 which is always in line with the shaft 22, so that the rod 66 can always extend radially toward the shaft 22.

Movement of the crane arm 25, both along the shaft 22 and around it, is accomplished by the adjustment mechanism 26. This mechanism 26 comprises a collar 80 rotatably and slidably mounted on the shaft 25 for lengthwise movement therealong. The collar 30 supports a sleeve 81 in which is a rotatable outer shaft 82 and a separately rotatable inner shaft 33. The inner shaft 83 has a disc handle 84 which is used to turn it and thereby change the rotational position of the crank arm 25. The outer shaft 82 also has a disc 85, to which is secured a handle 86 for rotating the shaft 82 and thereby moving the crane arm 25 lengthwise along the shaft 22.

The inner adjustment shaft 83 has a threaded portion 87 that is engaged in a nut 88 that is swivel mounted in the arm portion 73. When the disc 84 is turned, the shaft 83 advances in or is retracted from the swivel nut 88 and, since the lengthwise position of the shaft 83 is fixed and the crane arm 25 is rotatable on the shaft 22, this action causes rotation. This action makes it possible to align the rod- 66 with any valve stem 53, so far as rotation is concerned. For extreme angles, it may be convenient first to tilt the table 24 and then to adjust the crane arm 25. Once the angular position of the crane arm 25 has been properly set, it need not be changed for any one set of valves 47, but simply moved along lengthwise of the shaft 22.

The outer adjustment shaft 32 is provided with a pulley wheel or cable drum around which a cable 91 is given at least one complete turn. The cable 91 then extends parallel to the shaft 23, and its ends are secured to the end plates and 21 (FIG. 5 When the handle 86 is turned, the pulley 90 turns and carries the collar 80 along the shaft 23. The connection provided by the inner shaft 83 to the crane arm simultaneously carries the crane arm 25 along the shaft 22 to any desired position.

To summarize the operation, a suitable tray is chosen for the engine head concerned, and this tray 40 placed on the bed 39, the studs 38 fitting in the holes 42. Then the engine head 45 is placed on the tray 40, being held by engagement of the projections 44 with the openings 46. The table 24 can be swung to the desired orientation either before or after the engine head 45 is placed thereon, being locked to the end plates 20 and 21 by the bolts 37. The handle 36 is used to locate the crane arm 25 in lengthwise alignment with the first valve stem 53,

and then the handle 34 is used to align the rod 66 with the stem 53. The crowfoot 60 is placed on the collar 51, and then the handle 74 is turned to send air to the port 63, to depress the springs 48. The keepers 50 are removed through the crowfoot openings and the handle 74 turned to release the springs 48, which may then be removed. This takes but a few seconds.

The handle 86 is now turned to move the crank arm 25 to the next valve 47. It is already properly aligned rotationally speaking; so all that need be done is to put the crowfoot 66 in place and use the handle 74 as before. These operations are repeated until the valve springs 48 are all removed. After the desired operations on the valves 47 and engine head 45, the springs 48 are put back on and depressed for reinsertion of the keepers 50, all in the same manner. Operation is then quick, accurate, and done with little labor.

The crane arm valve compressor 15 of this invention can be used to remove valve stem locks 50 so that the valves 47 can be removed from the overhead cylinder head 45 of all makes and shapes of engines.

The crane arm 25 is adjustable from 10 to so that the air cylinder 64 and crowfoot 60 are parallel to the valve stem 53 and spring 48; so the locks 50 can be removed when the spring 48 has been compressed; and

in all positions of the crane arm 25, the pressure is centered on the horizontal shaft 22. With this arrangement the heavy cylinder 45 need not be moved each time, but the table 24 does swivel so that cylinder heads 45 with two diflerent valve angle settings can quickly be adjusted. Moreover, for heavier-than-usual jobs the cylinder 64 can be replaced with a larger cylinder.

The device of this invention takes up no more space than a mechanics tote bench for tools and will take all overhead valves for automobiles, tractors, diesel trucks, motorcycles, and other vehicles. It will accommodate long heads as well as short ones, including V-eights, straight eights, sixes, and fours.

The tray or valve board 40 allow the operator to insert all the valves 47 in the head 45 at the same time. It also enables him to transport the head 45 from the bench to the stand 15 and back without losing the valves when the springs are removed.

The stand 15 and its associated parts reduce the time taken for valve removal to less than half of what it has taken heretofore.

To those skilled in the art to which this invention relates, many changes in construction and widely differing embodiments and applications of the invention will suggest themselves without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention. The disclosures and the description herein are purely illustrative and are not intended to be in any sense limiting.

We claim:

1. An engine-head stand for valve removal and the like, including in combination: a main frame having two parallel shafts; a table journaled to one said shaft and lying above it; means to hold said table in desired orientation; a crane arm rotatably and slidably mounted on said one shaft; a pneumatic cylinder having an outer end swivel-mounted to said crane arm and an inner end from which a piston rod projects; a valve-spring-contacting member secured to said rod; and means slidable on the shaft other than that on which said arm and table are mounted for changing the rotational and longitudinal position of said crane arm.

2. The stand of claim 1, wherein said last named means comprises a collar slidable along said other shaft and having a depending bracket; a third shaft journaled in said bracket at a right angle to said other shaft; means for translating said collar, bracket and third shaft along said other shaft; and a fourth shaft coaxial with said third shaft and rotatable with respect thereto and threadedly engaging said crane arm in a swivel connection, whereby said fourth shaft adjusts the rotational position of said crane arm and provides rotational alignment of said valvespring-contacting member and said fourth shaft also connects said crane arm to said third shaft for movement lengthwise therewith.

3. An engine-head stand for valve removal and the like, including in combination: a main frame having an end plate at each end; first and second parallel shafts extending between said end plates; a table journaled to. said first shaft and lying above it parallel to it; means to hold said table in desired orientation; a crane arm rotatably and slidably mounted on said first shaft; a pneumatic cylinder having an outer end swivel-mounted to said crane arm and an inner end from which a piston rod projects; a valve-spring-contacting member secured to said rod; and means slidable on said second shaft for changing the rotational position of said crane arm and its location along said first shaffl 4. The stand of claim 3 wherein said means to hold said table in desired orientation comprises a series of accurately located bolt openings in said end plates, vertical plates at each end of said table, each vertical plate having an upper portion with a bolt opening for alignment with any one bolt opening of said end plates, and bolts for the bolt openings.

5. The stand of claim 3 wherein said last named means comprises a nut swivel mounted in said crane arm ofiset from said first shaft; a collar slidable along said second shaft and having a depending bracket; a third shaft journaled in said bracket at a right angle to said second shaft; means for translating said collar, bracket and third shaft along said second shaft; and a fourth shaft coaxial with said outer shaft and rotatable relative thereto and threadedly engaging said swivel-mounted nut, whereby said fourth shaft adjusts the rotational position of said crane arm and provides rotational alignment of said valve-spring-contacting member and said fourth shaft also connects said crane arm to said third shaft for movement lengthwise therewith.

6. An engine-head stand for valve removal and the like, including in combination: a main frame having end plates with a series of accurately located bolt openings; first and second parallel shafts extending between said end plates; a table having a flat bed and vertical plates at each end, each vertical plate having a depending portion journaled to said first shaft and an upper portion with a bolt opening for alignment with a bolt opening of a said end plate; a pair of bolts for said bolt openings to hold said table in a desired orientation; a removable plastic tray supported by said bed, said tray having on its upper surface a series of projections engageable in spaced openings in said engine head; a crane arm rotatably and slidably mounted on said first shaft and supporting a swivel-mounted nut at a spaced distance from said first shaft and having an outer end with a ball socket thereon; a pneumatic cylinder having an outer end with a ball mounted in said socket and an inner end from which a piston rod projects; a crowfoot having a collar secured to said rod through slender legs afiording access for fingers between said legs; a collar slidable along said second shaft and having a depending bracket; an outer shaft journaled in said bracket at a right angle to said second shaft; means for tranlsating said collar, bracket and outer shaft along said second shaft; and an inner shaft extending through said outer shaft and rotatable there threadedly engaging said swivelmounted nut, whereby said inner shaft adjusts the rotational position of said crane arm and provides rotational alignment of said crowfoot and said inner shaft also connects said crane arm to said outer shaft for movement lengthwise therewith.

7. An engine-head stand for valve removal and the like, including in combination: a main frame having legs and end plates with a series of accurately located bolt openings; first and second parallel shafts extending between said end plates; a table having a flat bed with upwardly projecting studs and vertical plates at each end, each vertical' plate having a depending portion journaled to said first shaft and an upper portion with a bolt opening for alignment with any one bolt opening of a said end plate; a pair of bolts for said bolt openings to hold said table in desired orientation; a removable plastic tray resting on said bed and having openings to receive said studs, said tray having on its upper surface a series of projections engageable in spaced openings in said engine head; a crane arm rotatably and slidably mounted on said first shaft and having a swivel-mounted nut spaced from said shaft and having a generally radially extending portion and a generally vertical portion with an outer end with a ball socket thereon; a pneumatic cylinder having an outer end with a ball mounted in said socket and an inner end from which a piston rod projects; a crowfoot having a collar secured to said rod, a ring, and slender legs connecting said ring to said collar, affording access for fingers between said legs; a collar slidably splined to said second shaft and having a depending sleeve at right angles thereto; an outer shaft extending through said sleeve and rotatable therein and having a handle on one end and a pulley wheel on the other end; a cable wound around said pulley wheel and having ends secured to said end plates; and an inner shaft extending through said outer shaft and rotatable therein and having a handle at one end and a threaded portion on the other end engaging said swivelmounted nut, whereby the handle of said inner shaft adjusts the rotational position of said crane arm to provide rotational alignment of said rod and said inner shaft connects said crane arm to said outer shaft for movement lengthwise therewith provided by said cable When said I pulley wheel is rotated.

8. An engine-head stand for valve removal and the like, including in combination a main frame having end members; table means extending between said end members and supported rotatably by said frame and having a longitudinal center line; a shaft veitically beneath the said center line of said table when said table is horizontal and along the center of rotation of said table and extending between said end members parallel to said table means;

a crane arm mounted rotatably and slidably on said shaft; valve-spring-contracting means supported by said crane arm above said table means; means for moving said valvespring-contacting means toward said table along a line extending radially toward said shaft to depress a valve spring; and means for changing the rotational and lengthwise position of said crane arm on said shaft.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent, No, 3,046,644 July 31, 1962 Albert K. Gehrig et al.

It is hereby certified that error appears in the above numbered patent requiring correction and that the said Letters Patent should read as corrected below.

Column 4, line 39, for "allow" read allows column 5, lines l and 62, for "tranlsating" read translating column 6, line 48, for "va ve-spring-contracting means" read valve-spring-contacting means Signed and sealed this 20th day of November 1962.

(SEAL) Attest: A

ERNEST w. SWIDER DAVID LADD Attesting Office! Commissioner of Pa

Patent Citations
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US1600134 *May 1, 1923Sep 14, 1926Peterson George MWork-supporting stand
US1734122 *Oct 31, 1928Nov 5, 1929Glaspy George CCombined engine-head support and valve-spring compressor
US1849538 *Feb 10, 1930Mar 15, 1932Bernitz Jr ErnestUtility device
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4581685 *Aug 2, 1983Apr 8, 1986Nippon Soken, Inc.Ultrasonic transducer
WO1983004206A1 *Jun 4, 1982Dec 8, 1983Duane E KlyberMethod and apparatus for compressing valve springs
WO1998043780A1 *Mar 13, 1998Oct 8, 1998Lowemark BengtA device for compressing the compression springs of disk valves in motor cylinder heads
Classifications
U.S. Classification29/213.1, 29/252
International ClassificationB25B11/00, B25B27/14, B25B27/26
Cooperative ClassificationB25B11/00, B25B27/26
European ClassificationB25B27/26, B25B11/00