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Publication numberUS3046978 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 31, 1962
Filing dateJun 22, 1960
Priority dateJun 22, 1960
Publication numberUS 3046978 A, US 3046978A, US-A-3046978, US3046978 A, US3046978A
InventorsLea Lawrence N
Original AssigneeLea Lawrence N
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Manually operated resuscitator
US 3046978 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y 1962 L. N. LEA

MANUALLY OPERATED RESUSCITATOR 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed June 22, 1960 #2555 FOR canons" 1:

SYEFS HESS iNVENTOR. LAWRENCE N. LEA

mun-rs 1 -0 IY AR FOR July 31, 1962 L. N. LEA

MANUALLY OPERATED RESUSCITATOR 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed June 22, 1960 INVENTOR. LAWRENCE N. LEA

ATTORNEY 3,046,978 Fatented July 31, 1962 3,945,973 MANUALLY OPERATED REUSCITATOR Lawrence N. Lea, 1683 University Ave, Bronx, N.Y. Filed June 22, 196i), Ser. No- 37,871 9 Claims. (Cl. 123-29) This invention concerns a manually operated resuscitator.

The technique of resuscitation of persons whose respiration has stopped, by means of mouth-to-mouth breathing, has proven eifective in numerous emergency situations. However, the direct contact between the mouth of a person administering this form of resuscitation and the patient being revived is unsanitary and has many other obvious disadvantages. It has been proposed to provide first-aid workers with tubes of various types, one end of a tube being inserted in the mouth of the person administering resuscitation and the other end of the tube being inserted in the mouth of the person being revived. This avoids some of the objections to mouth-to-mouth breathing but is still disadvantageous, because air administered to the patient is oxidized to some extent, faceto-face disposition is required between patient and resuscitator, etc.

The present invention has an object avoidance of the above and other disadvantages and difliculties with such devices and the provision of an improved resuscitation device which is manually operated and requires no mouthto-mouth connection.

A further object is provision of a device which is valve controlled for injection of air to the mouth of the patient and permitting free exhalation by the patient.

Another object according to one form of the invention is to provide a resuscitator device in which a manually operable bull) or bladder is connected to a removable sterilized mouth tube or nozzle, the bulb containing a resilient ball or balls for limiting compression of the bulb while administering air to a patient. This form i especially valuable in hospitals and institutions.

Still another object is provision of a resuscitation device of the character described with a two-way valve between the bulb and mouth tube for injecting fresh air orally under pressure into the mouth of the patient and permitting free exhalation by the patient, the device permitting the patients body to be free and clear so that supplementary resuscitation processes such as artificial respiration by diaphragm manipulation can be performed.

For further comprehension of the invention, and of the objects and advantages thereof, reference will be had to the following description and accompanying drawings, and to the appended claims in which the various novel features of the invention are more particularly set forth.

In the accompanying drawings forming a material part of this disclosure:

FIG. 1 is a side elevation View of a device embodying one form of the invention, parts being broken away.

FIG. 2 is a top plan view of the device.

FIG. 3 is a sectional view taken on line 33 of FIG. 2.

FIG. 4 is an exploded perspective view of components of the device.

FIG. 5 is an exploded perspective view on an enlarged scale of a valve core and spring employed in the device.

FIG. 6 is an edge view of a modified form of the invention in collapsed condition.

In FIGS. 1-4, there is shown a resuscitation device designed generally by numeral 10. The device is provided with a tubular nozzle 11 having a curved free end 12 adapted to be inserted into a patients mouth. An oval or rectangular thin fiat shield 13 is integrally formed with the tube and extends perpendicularly thereto near its other end 14. End 14 is formed as a nipple with an external thread 15. The nozzle 11 is preferably formed of a plastic material which is stiflly flexible, such as polyethylene, vinyl, silicone rubber, and the like, but may be made of metal or any other suitable material. The material of the tube should be heat resistant and chemically inert so that it can be sterilized repeatedly by steam or immersion in suitable chemical germicides.

An air pump in the form of a bulb or bladder 16 is provided for forcing air through the nozzle 11. The bulb is formed of an outer resilient oval shell 17 and an inner resilient shell "18 of the same shape, leaving a space between the shells. The shells may be formed of plastic material or rubber. The outer shell 17 is sectional including an upper section 19 and a lower section 20 as viewed in FIG. 1. The sections are fused together at their free edges 21 and 22 to form a hermetically sealed joint 23. The inner shell 18 is similarly sectioned having an upper section 24 and a lower section 25 with their meeting edges sealed as indicated at 26.

Adjacent the apical end of outer shell 17, there is a ni pie 27 provided with a removable closure pin 28. At the apical end of the outer shell, there is another nipple 3%) in line with and receiving a similar nipple 29 in the apical end of the inner shell 18. A one-way valve 31 is fitted in the nipple 3% on the outer shell. Valve 31 includes an externally threaded cylindrical body 32 which has a bore 33 in which is slidably mounted a core 34. This core, as best shown in FIGS. 3 and 5, has a wider cylindrical portion 36 and a cylindrical portion 37 of reduced diameter formed with a plurality of long'tudinal grooves 39 extending radially inward from the cylindrical surfaces of the core. The grooves terminate short of the circular lower end 38 of the core. This end of the core seats on a shoulder of a counterbore 42 formed in the body 32. The diameter of the core is less than the diameter of the counterbore so that when the core is lifted on? the shoulder 40, air can pass freely through bore 33 and grooves 39 and into the inner shell 18 of the bulb via a passage 41 formed at the nipple 29 at the apical end of the shell 18.

A pin 44 is formed on the core. This pin extends through bore 33 and terminates in a head 4 isecured thereto outside the shell. This pin can be manipulated manually if required.

Inside the inner shell 18 of the bulb 16 are elastic, sponge rubber balls 48, 50 which limit manual compression of the bulb when expelling air therefrom through the top end of shell 18. Projections 43 in shell 18 space ball 48 from opening 41.

Outer shell 17 has a nipple 49 formed at the apical end thereof, adapted to receive a nipple 47 on the top end of shell 18. In nipple 49 there is securely and frictionally fitted an elbow end 54 of a connecting tube 50*. Tube 56 is a rigid member having an internally threaded portion 52 at its other end. The thread 15 of nipple 14 engages in this threaded portion 52 asshown in FIGS. 1-3. A coil spring 56 having a diameter smaller than the bore 51 of the tube 50 expands and contracts axially in the tube between the annular end 53 of nipple 14 and a short cylindrical valve element 62. slidable in bore 51. Opposed holes 55, 57 are provided in tube 50. The holes are normally held clear and uncovered by the extended spring 56. When the valve element 62 is moved to the left from its position as shown in FIG. 3, under air pressure, it compresses the spring and closes openings 55-, 57. Element 62 is formed of flexible rubber or plastic material. It has a circular end wall 64 which is slit radially at 65 to form normally closed triangular flaps. These flaps separate under pressure of air ejected from bulb 16 to permit the air to pass through bore 68 in the element 6-2;. A peripheral ridge 72 is formed in tube 59 near the elbow end to serve as a means for limiting d 3 movement of element 62 while subject to expanding bia of spring 56. V

A circumferential ridge 74 is formed at the exterior of shell section 19 and another similar ridge 76 is formed on shell section 20. These ridges are marked adj acentlyat 78 and 80 with indicia comprising instructions for'the use of the device. The several components shown in FIG. 4 will be assembled as shown inPIGS. l-3. The. m uthpiece 11 is removable from the connecting tube 50 for sterilization before and after use.

It be'noted that'ball 48 is larger and is located near the lower apical end of the bulb, while ball 50 is and is located near the transverse plane of largest diameter. Ridge 76 is, located between joints 29 and 26 the lower end of the bulb.

using the device, by a policeman in rescuing an infant vice may be inserted into pocket ofthe policeman or civil defense guard or readily placed in compact form in a small case.

disclosed-and that various changes and modifications may be made within the scope of the invention as defined for example, the pin 28 is removed from the nipple 27 and the nipple placed in the mouth and air forced into the space between the outer and inner shells 17 and 18,

respectively, the air serving as a cushion. The head 4-4 nf the pin 44 is then manually pressed inwardly opening the valve 31 permitting ambient -air to enter into the inner shell 18 expanding said shell.

When the bulb is expanded with air, the user such as the policeman will manually press the lower sections 20 and of the bulb when an infant is to be resuscitated with? the device as advised by instructions'80. The large ball 50 limit the compression of the bulb to pass only a small amount of air out of the bulb with each compressionr 'I'hesmaller ball located near upper ridge 74 will permit greater compression of the bulb to discharge more ail-"such as required in resuscitating small children, as

advised by instructions 78. In order to resuscitate older ehildren-and adults, the upper sections 19 and 24 of the bulb will be compressed at ridge 79 to discharge the largest volume of air at a time, as advisedby instructions 82. K a

' When the bulb 16 is compressed at any portion thereof,

valve element 62 moves under air pressure in tube 50 to compress spring 49 and close holes 55, 57. Further pressure of air forces open the triangular flaps in walls 64 permitting the air to pass through passage 68 in element 62 and passage 15' in tube 11. Spring 56 is arather light spring so that it yields first to permit member 62 to move and close holes 55, 57 before the flaps in walls 64 epen to pass air therethrough. The curved end 12 of the nozzle 11 will be inserted in the mouth of the patient the appended claims.

Having thus described my invention, What I claim as new, and desire to secure by United States Letters Patent 1s: l. A manually operable resuscitator device, comprising anozzle having a curved end adapted for disposition in the mouth of a patient, a flexible'compressible bulbp ro vided with one-Way valve means for passing fresh air into.

the bulb, a tube detachably connecting the nozzle and,

resilient tubular member slidablyvdisposed insaid tube; 7 said member having normally closed end walls slit to, f form flexible separable flaps, said tube having opposed openings normally disposed beyond the tubular memher and adapted to be closed by said member when disposed thereat, and a spring normally retracting said mern-r ber to clear said openings, there being at least one "com-v pressible member in the bulb to limit compression thereof for controlling the amount of fresh air discharged from the bulb when. compressed at said'compressible member,

said spring being sufliciently stiff 'to permit the flexible tubular member to move past the fore the flexible flaps are opened.

2. A manually operable resuscitator device, comprising a V a nozzle having a curved end" adapted for disposition in the mouth of a patient, a flexible compressible bulb pro vided with one-way valve means for passing fresh air into the bulb, a tube detachably connecting the nozzle 7 and bulb for passing fresh air from the bulb to the nozzle, and two-way valve means in the tube to'pass; 'fresh air to the nozzle and to divert exhaled an away a from the bulb, said two-way valve means including a with shield l 3 located between the teeth or gums and the lipsof the patient. After bulb 16 is fully compressed and no more air is being discharged into tube 50, the flaps in walls 64 will close and spring 56 will expand to retract element 62 and clear and uncover holes 55, 5-1. The patient can then exhale freely through the cleared holes in the tube 50.

Valve 31 closes when the bulb is being compressed and expa'nds'du'e was natural resilience to permit air to enter under snction through valve 31. Pin 44 ispushed into valvebody 32 manually against the bias of spring 45 to lift cor'e'34 osof theshoulder of the counterbore 42 and .p'rovidefa passage for through bores 33 and 42 into the bulb. when the pin to close the valve 31' "The devicedescribed can be readily disassembled for clea uing and; sterilizing allcomponents. It provides a regulated amount'of to each patient depending on his respiration requirements. Alternatively the user can progressively increase the amount of air discharged by dhan'ging the position of his hand on the bulb. H desired,the threaded end of valve 31 can be connected to an' external pressurized source of oxygen or air. In FIG. 6, a modified form a resuscitation device 10 is. shown; This device 10' is similar to the resuscitation device 10 of FIG. 1 except that the balls 48 and 50 are omitted from inside the bulb or bladder 16 in order that the bulb or. bladder may be completely collapsed to the "released, spring 45 expands dietitia Sha n in IG- I t is conditim a short flexible resilient tubular member slidably disposed in said tube, said member having normally closed end walls slit to form flexible separable flaps, said tube havingopposed openings normally disposed beyond the tubular member and adapted to be closed by said member:

when disposed thereat, and a spring normally retracting said member to clear said openings, there being at least" one resilient ball in the bulb to limit compression thereof for controlling the amount of fresh air discharged from;

the bulb, said'spring being sufliciently stifi to permit the flexible tubular member to move past the opposed openings before the flexible flaps are opened, V i

3. A manually operable resuscita'tor device, comprising a nozzle having a curved end adapted for disposition in themouth of a patient, a flexible compressible 'bulb pro vided with one-way valve means for passing fresh air a openings normally disposed beyond the tubular member opposed openings be-.

passage therethrough, a core normally held seated on a shoulder on a counterbore in the body by spring means closing said passage, said core having a pin extending out of said body for manual operation to move the core and open said passage, said spring being sufliciently stiff to permit the flexible tubular member to move past the opposed openings before the flexible flaps are opened.

4. A manually operable resuscitator device, comprising a nozzle having a curved end adapted for disposition in the mouth of a patient, a flexible compressible bulb composed of an outer shell and an inner shell spaced therefrom, a nipple on the outer shell for supplying air under pressure into the space between the outer and lnner shells with one-way valve means for passing fresh an into the inner shell of the bulb, a tube detachably connecting the nozzle and bulb for passing fresh air from the bulb to the nozzle, and two-way valve means in the tube to pass fresh air to the nozzle and to divert exhaled air away from the bulb, said two-way valve means including a short flexible resilient tubular member slidably disposed in said tube, said member having normally closed end walls slit to form flexible separable flaps, said tube having opposed openings normally disposed beyond the tubular member and adapted to be closed by sald member when disposed thereat, and a spring normally retracting said member to clear said openings, there being a plurality of resilient balls in the bulb to limit cornpression thereof to different selective degrees for d scharging predetermined amounts of fresh air from U16 bulb to the nozzle, said spring being sufiiciently sttfl to permit the flexible tubular member to move past the opposed openings before the flexible flaps are opened.

5. A manually operable resuscitator device, compr s ng a nozzle having a curved end adapted for disposition in the mouth of a patient, a flexible compressible bulb composed of an outer shell and an inner shell spaced therefrom, a nipple on the outer shell for supply ng an" under pressure into the space between the outer and mner shells with one-way valve means for passing fresh air into the inner shell of the bulb, a tube detachably connecting the nozzle and bulb for passing fresh air from the bulb to the nozzle, and two-way valve means in the tube to pass fresh air to the nozzle and to d1vert exhaled air away from the bulb, said two-way valve means including a short flexible resilient tubular member slidably disposed in said tube, said member having normally closed end walls slit to form flexible separable flaps, said tube having opposed openings normally disposed beyond the tubular member and adapted to be closed by said member when disposed thereat, and a spring normally retracting said member to clear said openings, there being a plurality of resilient balls in the bulb tolimit compression thereof to different selective degrees for discharging predetermined amounts of fresh air from the bulb to the nozzle, said one-way valve means including a valve body having a passage therethrough, a core normally held seated on a shoulder on a counterbore in the body by spring means closing said passage, said core having a pin extending out of said body for manual operation to move the core and open said pas sage, said spring being sufliciently stifi to permit the flexible tubular member to move past the opposed openlngs before the flexible flaps are opened.

6. A manually operable resuscitator device, comprising a nozzle having a curved end adapted for disposition in the mouth of a patient, a flexible compressible bulb provided with one-way valve means for passing fresh air into the bulb, a tube detachably connecting the nozzle and bulb for passing fresh air from the bulb to the nozzle, and two-way valve means in the tube to pass fresh air to the nozzle and to divert exhaled air away from the bulb, said two-Way valve means including a short flexible resilient tubular member slidably disposed in said tube, said member having normally closed end walls slit to t3 form flexible separable flaps, said tube having opposed openings normally disposed beyond the tubular member and adapted to be closed by said member when disposed thereat, and a spring normally retracting said member to clear said openings, said member being movable by pressure of air discharged from the bulb into the tube, said spring being sufliciently elastic to yield first so that the member moves to close said openings before the flaps in said wall separate to admit fresh air, and said flaps close upon release of said pressure before the spring retracts the tubular member from the openings in the tube, said spring being sufficiently stiff to permit the flexible tubular member to move past the opposed openings before the flexible flaps are opened. I

7. A manually operable resuscitator device, comprising a nozzle having a curved end adapted for disposition in the mouth of a patient, a flexible compressible bulb pro vided with one-way valve means for passing fresh air into the bulb, a tube detachably connecting the nozzle and bulb for passing fresh air from the bulb to the nozzle, and two-way valve means in the tube to pass fresh air to the nozzle and to divert exhaled air away from the bulb, said two-way valve means including a short flexible resilient tubular member slidably disposed in said tube, said member having normally closed end walls slit to form flexible separable flaps, said tube having opposed openings normally disposed beyond the tubular member and adapted to be closed by said member when disposed thereat, and a spring normally retracting said member to clear said openings, there being a plurality of resilient balls in the bulb to limit compression thereof to different selective degrees for discharging predetermined amounts of fresh air from the bulb to the nozzle, said one-way valve means including a valve body having a passage therethrough, a core normally held seated on a shoulder on a counterbore in the body by spring means closing said passage, said core having a pin extending out of' said body for manual operation to move the core and open said passage, said member being movable by pressure of air discharged from the bulb into the tube, said spring being sufdciently elastic to yield first so that the member moves to close said openings before the flaps in said walls separate to admit fresh air, and said flaps close upon release of said pressure before the spring retracts the tubular member from the openings in the tube, said spring being sufliciently stiff to permit the flexible tubular member to move past the opposed openings before the flexible flaps are opened.

8. A manually operable resuscitator device, comprising a nozzle having a curved end adapted for disposition in the mouth of the patient, a flexible compressible bulb composed of an outer shell and an inner shell spaced therefrom, a nipple on the outer shell for supplying air under pressure into the space between the outer and inner shells with one-way valve means for passing fresh air into the inner shell of the bulb, a tube detachably connecting the nozzle and bulb for passing fresh air from the bulb to the nozzle, and two-way valve means in the tube to pass fresh air to the nozzle and to divert exhaled air away from the bulb, said two-way valve means ineluding a short flexible resilient tubular member slidably disposed in said tube, said member having normally closed end walls slit to form flexible separable flaps, said tube having opposed openings normally disposed beyond the tubular member and adapted to be closed by said member when disposed thereat, and a spring normally retracting said member to clear said opening, said spring being sufliciently stiff to permit the flexible tubular member to move past the opposed openings before the flexible flaps are opened.

9. A manually operable resuscitator device, comprising a nozzle having a curved end adapted for disposition in the mouth of a patient, a flexible compressible bulb provided with one-way valve means for passing fresh spaeevs air into the bulb, a tubedetachably connecting the nozzle bulb for passing fresh air from the bulb to the nozzle, and two-way valve means in the tube to pass fresh air to thenonzle and to divert exhaled air away from the bulb, said two way valve means including a short flexible resilient tubular member slidably disposed in said tube, said member having normally closed end walls slit to form ings normally disposed beyond the tubular member and adapted to be closed by said member when disposed thereat, and a spring normally retracting said member to clear said opening, said one-Way valve means including a valve body having a passage therethrough, a core normally held seated on a shoulder on a counterbore in the body by a spring means closing said passage, said core having a pin extending out of said body for manual operation to move the core and open said passage, said flexible. separable flaps, said tube having opposed open- 7 member being movable by pressure of air discharged from the bulb into the tube, said spring being sufliciently elastic to yield first so that the member moves to close said openings before the flaps in said walls separate to admit fresh air, and said flaps close upon release ofsaid i pressure before the spring retracts the tubular member" from the opening in the tube;

References Cited in the file of this patent V UNITED STATES PATENTS 654,484 2,902,992 Nenvall se es, 1959' 2,990,838 Cross July 4, .1961

- FOREIGN PATENTS 1,183,803 France Feb. 2, 1959 574,736 Canada Apr, 28, 1959

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Classifications
U.S. Classification128/205.13, 128/205.24, 92/92, 128/207.16, 417/478
International ClassificationA61M16/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61M16/00, A61M2016/0084, A61M16/0078
European ClassificationA61M16/00, A61M16/00M9