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Publication numberUS3049895 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 21, 1962
Filing dateSep 27, 1960
Priority dateSep 27, 1960
Publication numberUS 3049895 A, US 3049895A, US-A-3049895, US3049895 A, US3049895A
InventorsLarson Arthur G, Raver Francis M
Original AssigneeMcquay Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Machine for making ice in flake form
US 3049895 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 21, 1962 A. G. LARsoN ETAL 3,049,895

MACHINE FOR MAKING ICE IN FLAKE FORM Filed Sept. 27, 1960 2 Sheets-Sheet l I I I A/-Tg I' III \Y` /33 I II 62 -I' I I I9 L I "25 f 62 I WSG' 62 I @f2 I :8b I \/8b I I @4 LT: l.' 6| I 18' I; 2: /40

56 I A "I2 I I I I 62 II I I I I 24 I III -51 I I I I I 5l 5 I 2l 7 *I INVENTORS 7o III I I I I Gv'l'h'ul G'. Larson,

Filed Sept. 27, 1960 A. G. LARsoN ETAL 3,049,895 MACHINE FOR MAKING ICE IN FLAKE FORM 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Izlg m65 6o 7: 44" l I 46 |I 47 A8 26 l T r 25 i I8 [i -|9 ffl. t N I/ 24 I l 52 I 2o INVENTORS Clv'lhuz" G, L cnf-son, Francis M- R av e1A Bij m v WILL/W United States Patent iiiice MACHINE FOR MAKING ICE IN FLAKE FORM Arthur G. Larson, Minitrista, Minn., and Francis M.

Raver, Yoe, Pa., assignors to McQuay, Inc., Minneapolis, Minn., a corporation of Minnesota Filed Sept. 27, 1960, Ser. No. 58,802

14 Claims. (Cl. 62-354) Our invention relates to machines for continuously producing ice flakes, particularly such machines wherein liquid is frozen on the outer surface of a refrigerated tubular casing and broken therefrom into fragments by means of la rotating ice-breaking structure loosely encompassing the casing.

A known machine of the nature .aforesaid has been found to be objectionable from various standpoints. It is la machine having an evaporator including an upright cylindrical tube or inner casing and a water jacket or outer casing surrounding the inner casing, the two casings forming a chamber between them which has an elevated opening for .the discharge of ice flakes therefrom. Water maintained within the chamber at a constant level freezes on the outer surface o-f the evaporator casing, the ice, upon attaining a given thickness, being broken into fragments from said casing by means of a rotating ice-breaking structure in the form of a resilient helical coil surrounding the casing and slightly clearing its outer surface. The ice-breaking helical coil is driven from its upper end relatively slowly by means of a gear motor and, as a result of its screw effect, it :advances the flaked fragments of ice upwardly in the water in the chamber to the surface Ithereof and thence out of the cham-ber through its discharge opening.

An outstanding objection to said known machine is that the torque requirements of the helical ice-breaking coil are not only normally relatively high but vary widely producing shock loads of varying and, at times, ruinous intensity on the gear motor. Furthermore, objectionable wear of the evaporator casing and of the resilient helical ice-breaking coil by contact of Vthe 'latter with the former is attended with excess torque requirements in the rotation of said coil. Additionally, the product of said known machine is objectionable in that the flakes or fragments of ice are too thin and/oi too small to meet with popular demand in the trade.

Our present invention solves the various problems arising out of the aforesaid objectionable features of said known machine. The invention involves the medial constriction of the tubular evaporator casing, in hourglass fashion, to provide clearance in varying degree between Said casing and 'the helical coil encompassing the casing, the clearance being greatest at the locality where greatest lateral deflection of the coil can occur. This provision eliminates objectionable rubbing of the helical coil against fthe outer surface of the evaporator casing. The invention further involves corrugating the tubular evaporator casing to provide alternating annular ridges and valleys at its outer surface. This feature minimizes the extent of any wearing contact possibly occurring between the helical ice-breaking coil and the evaporator casing. More importantly, it lowers Ithe level of the torque requirements of the helical coil and minimizes variations in loading of the coil which subjects the gear motor to shock. And, very importantly, by reason of the corrugations in the evaporator casing, the fragments of ice broken from the evaporator casing are desirably relatively large heavybodied akes.

With the object of reducing the torque requirements of the ice-breaking structure to the lowest level possible in order that a motor of relatively small size and low power may be employed to drive such structure, and

3,049,895 Patented Aug. 21, 1962 with the further object of minimizing shock loading of the gear motor to the greatest possible `degree in the interest of longevity of the motor employed, we have improved upon the resilient helical coil as an ice-'breaking expedient by devising Ia rigid cage-like structure for bre-aking frozen liquid in fragments Ifrom the evaporator casing. The improved cage-like ice-breaking structure encompasses .the evaporator casing and is rotated about said casing by the gear motor, as in the case of the ice-breaking resilient helical coil. In its construction, the improved cage-like ice-breaking structure includes a number of bars disposed coextensively relative to the evaporator casing in annularly spaced relation about said casing. Each bar has at least one ice fracturing member thereon adjacent to, but never contacting, the outer surface of the evaporator casing, there being one such ice `fracturing member for each of a number of given zonal areas of such surface. Each ice fracturin-g member extends longitudinally relative to the `evaporator casing at least spanning the distance between the margins of its respective zonal area, there being at least one annular ridge of the corrugated evaporator casing contained within each of the zonal areas of said casing.

With the object of effectively acting upon :the flakes of frozen liquid which have been broken from the evaporator casing by the ice fracturing members of the aforesaid cage-like ice-breaking structure so that the flakes will be advanced to the level of the liquid in the freezing chamber and thence ejected from the discharge opening in said chamber, we secure a helical rib to the inner surface of the outer casing in the chamber defined between said outer casing and the evaporator casing. As will be readily comprehended, the effect of such helical rib in its particular form of the invention corresponds with the flake ejecting screw effect of the resilient helical ice-breaking coil in its particular application.

The aforesaid and other objects Iand advantages of our invention will more fully hereinafter appear in the following description made in connection with the `accompanying drawings wherein:

FIGURE 1 is a fragmentary front elevational view illustrating a preferred form of our invention, portions of the structure shown being broken away to reveal otherwise obscure construction.

FIGURE 2 is a vertical sectional view in detail, taken as on the line 2 2 of FIGURE 1.

FIGURE 3 is an elevational view in detail illustrating the ice-breaking structure shown in FIGURE 2. l

FIGURE 4 is a plan view of the structure shown in FIGURE 3.

FIGURES 5, 6, 7 and 8 are views similar to FIG- UREl 2, showing alternate forms of freezing and flaking apparatus.

An embodiment of our invention, shown in FIGURE 1,

includes a liquid freezing and ilaking apparatus A, a flowA control device B for regulating the supply of liquid to be frozen in said apparatus A, and a refrigerating mechanism C for supplying a refrigerant to such apparatus. Said liquid freezing and ilaking apparatus A, flow control device B and refrigerating mechanism C are mounted on a.. platform 10 which constitutes the top wall of a cabinet D having a front wall 11, a rear wall 12, and end walls 13 and a bottom panel 14. This cabinet D forms a storage chamber 15 for the reception and storage of ice flakes produced in the freezing and iiaking apparatus A, the front wall 11 of said cabinet being provided with an access opening 16 which is normally closed by a door 17. Y

The freezing and flaking apparatus A, shown in FIG- URES l and 2, is of preferred form. This apparatus A includes an upright inner tubular casing 18, and an outer cylindrical casing or jacket 19 coaxiallyl disposed relative to said inner casing 18. Said inner casing 18 is tightly fitted at its lower end into the central opening in a base ring 20 and is brazed or otherwise suitably secured to said ring. The outer casing 19 is telescoped at its lower end over the base ring 20, the joint between said base ring 29 and inner casing 18 being rendered fluid tight by means of an O ring 21 occupying an annular groove 22 in said base ring 20. Said inner and outer casings 18 and 19 define a processing chamber 23 therebetween for the reception of liquid to be frozen and then broken into fragments, the outer casing 19 being provided with an inlet nipple 24 leading into said processing chamber 23 near the bottom thereof for suplying liquid thereto.

The flow control device B feeds liquid into the processing chamber 23 via said inlet nipple 24 maintaining the level of liquid 25 in said chamber near the top thereof, as at 26. Said flow control device B may be of any conventional type suitable to the intended purpose. The form of such device illustrated in FIGURE l includes a housing 27 forming a Afloat chamber 28. A float 29 within said chamber 28 is operatively connected with a valve 30 which is opened and closed by said float to regulate the inow of liquid to the float chamber 28 from a liquid supply line 31, the valve closing action of the float 29 being such that the valve 30 is held open until and closed when the level of the liquid in the oat chamber 28 corresponds with the desired level of liquid, as at 26, in the processing chamber 23 of the freezing and aking apparatus A. A conduit 32 leading from the bottom of the housing 27 to the inlet nipple 24 of the outer casing 19 feeds liquid by gravity from the oat chamber 28 of said ow control device B to the processing chamber 23 of the freezing and flaking apparatus A.

The tubular inner casing 18 of the freezing and flaking apparatus A constitutes the body of a refrigerating evaporator 33, said tubular body being fitted at its upper end with a closure cap 34 and being also fitted Within its lower portion with a closure Wall or plug 35. Said inner tubular casing 18 with its closure cap 34 and closure wall 35 dene a refrigerant evaporating chamber 36 within said casing '18.

The refrigerating mechanism C includes a conventional form of compressor, indicated at 37 in FIGURE l, and a conventional form of condenser, indicated at 38. A conduit 39 conducts a refrigerant from the compressor 37 to the condenser 38. A feed conduit 40, supplied with a conventional expansion -valve 41, leads from the condenser 38 to the freezing and aking apparatus A, the terminal portion of said feed conduit 4t! extending through the closure wall 35 in the evaporator casing 18 and thence into the upper portion of the evaporating chamber 36 within Said Casing 18. A refrigerant return conduit 42, leading from the v'upper portion of said evaporating chamber 36, extends through said closure wall 35 in the evaporator casing 36 and returns to the compressor 37. It will be readily understood by those versed in the refrigerating art that during operation of the refrigerating mechanism C, the outer surface of the tubular evaporator casing 18 will be chilled sufficiently t cause liquid in the processing chamber 23 to be accumulatively frozen on such surface.

The liquid frozen on the outer surface of the evaporator casing 18 is broken from such surface into fragments by means of an ice-breaking structure 43 which preferably is of cage-like construction mounted to rotate about the evaporator casing 18 within the processing chamber 23 of the freezing and aking apparatus A. This ice-breaking structure 43 includes an annular head block 44 formed with a downwardly opening annular recess 45. An annular bearing or bushing 46 is received in said recess 45. This bearing or bushing 46 revolubly vreceives a spindle '47 upstanding from the closure cap 34 of the tubular evaporator casing 18. The head block 44, bearing 46, spindle 47 and evaporator casing 18 have a common axis. A plurality of upright bars 48 are welded, as at 49, or otherwise suitably secured at their upper end portions to the head block 44 about the periphery thereof in annularly spaced relation. Depending from said head block 44, said bars 48 are accommodated within the processing chamber 23 defined between the evaporator casing 18 and the outer casing 19 of the freezing and fiaking apparatus A. Said bars 44, at their lower end portions, are firmly socketed in upwardly opening bores 5t) (FIG. 2) in a tiering 51 which encircles and turns about a bushing or bearing 52 encompassing the evaporator casing 18 at its lower portion.

The cage-like ice-breaking structure 43 is rotated slowly by a gear motor mechanism 53 (FIG. l) of conventional unitary form surmounting and suitably secured to a cover piece 54 capping the uper end of the outer casing 19 of the freezing and flaking apparatus A, said mechanism 53 including an electric motor 55 and a train of gears (not shown) in a gear casing 56, the gear train including a drive shaft 57 extending downwardly through an opening 54a in said cover piece 54. Keyed to the reduced lower end of said drive shaft 57 by means of a pin 58 is a coupling member 59 of lateral rectangular cross section. Said coupling member 59 ts snugly in a correspondingly formed axial opening 60 in the head block 44 of the icereaking structure 43 thus connecting the drive shaft 57 of the gear motor mechanism 53 to the ice-breaking structure 43 thereby imparting rotation of the former to the latter. As the ice-breaking structure rotates, the bars 48 depending from the head block 44 move planetarily about the evaporator casing 18. Said bars 48 are suitably made from round rod material. Longitudinally spaced sections of said bars 48 are undercut or otherwise suitably reduced circumferentially, as at 61, to provide at least one cylindrical boss 62 on each bar 48. These bosses 62 constitute ice-fracturing members, which skirt the outer surface of the evaporator casing 18 engaging accumulated frozen liquid thereon and breaking it into fragments from said casing. The working portion 6La (FIG. 4) of each cylindrical ice-fracturing boss 62 is the trailing portion of the leading quarter quadrant of the boss adjacent to the evaporator casing 18. In the case of each boss 62, a laterally curved surface thereof faces the outer surface of said casing 18, the curvature of said surface, in retrograde, becoming progressively more closely in proximity to said outer surface of said evaporator casing. This feature avoids any cutting, shaving, gauging or the like of the frozen liquid on the casing 18 and thus minimizes tendencies of the ice-breaking structure 43 to impose shock loads preferably slightly overlap each other.

upon the gear motor mechanism 53. Furthermore, said feature results in the production of ice flakes of popularly desired character which are relatively large and heavy bodied.

Annularly of the ice-breaking structure 43, the cylindrical bosses 62 on the bars 48 are propressively staggered in the direction longitudinally of said structure, the longitudinal dimensions of said bosses 62 being such that the annular paths of adjacent bosses at least meet and Thus it will be seen that of the several zonal areas of the outer sur'- face of the evaporator casing 18, there is one such area opposite each ice-fracturing boss 62, such area being spanned from margin to margin thereof by its respective boss.

To enhance the production of relatively large heavy bodied ice flakes, the evaporator casing 18 is of laterally.

circular cross-section and laterally corrugated to provide alternating annular ridges 18a and valleys 18b along said casing 18, there being at least one such ridge 18a in each of the aforesaid zonal areas of the casing 1-8. In other words, there is at least one ridge 18a for each boss 62 of the ice-breaking structure 43, such ridge 18a being opposite its respective boss 62.

Considering the number of said bosses 62 employed in the ice-breaking structure 43 and the substantially uniform spacing thereof about the evaporator casing 1 8, it will be readily appreciated that loads on the bearings 46 and 52 are effectively minimized,vand more importantly that the stresses set up in breaking ice from said casing 18 are substantially equally distributed about the same, thereby contributing to the minimization of shock loads on and torque requirements of the gear motor mechanism 53.

Ice flakes which have been broken from the outer surface of the evaporator casing 18 are moved about said casing by the bars 48 of the ice-breaking structure 43. On being so moved, such iiakes are urged upwardly in the liquid 25 in the processing chamber 23 to the surface of said liquid and thence further upwardly and out of a discharge opening 63a in the freezing and iiaking apparatus A. The means for inducing such upward movement of ice fiakes consists of a helical bead 64, suitably of half-round Wire, secured to the inner surface of the outer casing 19 and projecting into the processing chamber 23. This helical bead 64, spiralling upwardly in the direction of rotation of the ice-breaking structure 43, completes a full convolution and extends from a point near the bottom of the processing chamber 23 to a point near the top of the outer casing 19 at the far side (FIG. 1) of the discharge opening 63a. Said discharge opening 632- is formed in part by a notch 65- in the upper marginal portion of the outer casing 19 and in part by an upwardly and outwardly directed spout 66 formed in the cover piece S4 of the freezing and flaking apparatus A, said spout being defined by spaced upright wall portions 67 and an upwardly and outwardly curved wall portion 68 of the cover piece '54.

The lower portion of the outer casing 19 of the freezing and flaking apparatus A is received in an opening 69 in the top wall l of the cabinet D (FIG. 1). Said apparatus A includes a mounting bracket 70 which is fastened by screws 71 to the base ring 20. This bracket 70- is accommodated within the cabinet D and fastened by bolts 72 to the `underside of its top wall 107. Ice akes ejected from the discharge opening 63a at the top of the freezing and -aking apparatus A fall into the storage chamber of the cabinet D through said opening 69 in the top wall 10 of said cabinet, said opening 69 being considerably oversized in relation to the diameter of the outer casing 19 to enable the falling ice flakes to pass therethrough alongside said casing 19.

FIGURES 5, 6, 7 and 8 are similar to FIGURE 2 and illustrate alternate forms of the freezing and flaking apparatus A, shown in said FIGURE 2. The various parts shown in FIGURES 5, 6, 7 and 8, having corresponding parts in FIGURE 2, are designated by reference characters corresponding with those of said FIGURE 2 and need no further detailed explanation. In the freezing and flaking apparatus A5, shown in FIGURE 5, the casing 18 of the evaporator 33 is cylindrical and has a 6 bushing 52 encircling the lower portion of the casing 18. The screw effect of the coil 74 in this ice-breaking structure A7 of known construction advances ice fragments along the processing chamber 23 and ejects themfrom said apparatus A7 through the discharge opening 63a. `Our improvements in this form of apparatus A7, shown in FIGURE 7, take into account the hereinbefore mentioned objections growing out of the lateral deflection of the resilient coil 74 and the objectionable form of ice flakes produced in the breaking of fragments of frozen liquid from the outer surface of the evaporator casing. To overcome these objections We employ in the evaporator 33, a tubular casing 18 of lateral circular cross section which casing is inwardly tapered from its opposite ends, in hom-glass fashion, to graduate the clearance between the corresponding end portions of said evaporator casing 18 and coil 74, progressively increasing such clearance toward a locality intermediate the coil. Additionally, said evaporator casing 18 is laterally corrugated to provide alternating annular ridges 1* a and valleys 18D along the surface of said casing. Through the said expedients of tapering and corrugating the casing 18 of the evaporator 33, `as above described, the level in torque requirements for rotating the ice-breaking structure 43@L is relatively low, shock leads on the gear motor mechanism 53 and wear on the coil 74 and evaporator casing 18 are substantially eliminated, and the character of the ice flakes produced is improved.

The form of freezing and iiaking apparatus A8 shown in FIGURES is the same as that shown in FIGURE 7, eX- cept that the evaporator casing 18 is straight walled and not corrugated to provide annular ridges and valleys at the outer surface of the evaporator casing, as in FIG- v URE 7. This form of apparatus has the same overall advant-ages of the form shown in FIGURE 7 and will produce ice iiakes of lesser size and Ibody thickness than in .the form shown in FIGURE 7 to meet any demand for akes of that characten Changes in the specific form of our invention, as herein disclosed, may be made within the scope of what is claimed without departing lfrom the spirit of our invention.

Having described our invention, what we claim as new and desire -to protect by Letters Patent is:

1. A machine for making -ice in fiake form, comprising an outer casing, a tubular inner casing within said outer casing, said casings .defining a chamber therebetween, means for supplying liquid to said chamber to be frozen, means for chilling the inner casing sufficiently to effect the A lreezing on its outer surface of a quantity of the liquid smooth straight-Walled outer surface without grooves therein. With this construction re'latively fine ice fragments are produced.

In the freezing and processing apparatus A6 shown in FIGURE `6, the tubular casing 18 of the evaporator 33 is formed With double helical grooves 73 which, in relation to the rotation of the ice-breaking structure 43, is directed to induce upward movement of ice fragments broken from said casing 18 to the end that such fragments may be elevated to the surface of the liquid 25 in the processing chamber 23 and thence ejected from said apparatus Afi through its discharge opening 63a. In this form of apparatus the ice fragments or flakes are more heavily bodied than the ice flakes produced in the construction shown in FIGURE 5.

In the form of freezing and aking apparatus A7, shown in FIGURE 7, the familiar ice-breaking structure 43a includes a resilient helical coil 74 loosely encompassing the tubular casing 18 of the evaporator 33. The upper convolution of the coil 74 is welded to the head block 44 peripherally thereof, and the lower convolution of said coil 74 revolubly embraces the bearing or within said chamber, means for breaking frozen liquid into fragments from said inner casing, s-aid last means including a revoluble ice-breaking structure loosely encompassing the inner casing, means for rotating said structure about said inner casing, said `structure having fracturing elements which engage frozen liquid on the outer surface of the inner casing and effect the breaking of such frozen liquid from such surface, said outer surface of said inner casing having relatively high portions which are closely skirted by the fracturing elements of the rotating ice-breaking structure, and having relatively low portions less closely skirted by said fracturing elements.

2. A machine, as defined in claim 1, wherein the outer surface of 4the tubular inner casing is laterally circular, said surface having a purality of grooves therein annularly thereof.

3. A machine, as defined in claim l, wherein the tubular inner casing is circular in lateral cross section and laterally corrugated.

4. A machine, as defined in claim 1, wherein the outer surface of the tubular inner casing has a helical groove therein.

5. A machine, as defined in claim 4, wherein the helical groove in the inner tubular casing is spirally directed, in the direction of the rotation of the ice-breaking structure,

to induce the upward advancement therealong of fragments of -frozen liquid broken from the outer surface of said inner casing.

6. A machine for making ice in iiake form, comprising an outer casing, a tubular inner casing within `said outer casing, the outer surface of said inner casing being formed with alternating ridges and valleys, said casings defining a chamber therebetween, means for supplying liquid lto said chamber to be frozen, means for chilling the inner casing sufficiently to effect the freezing on its outer surface of a quantity of the liquid within said chamber, a cage-like structure loosely encompassing said inner casing, said structure being revoluble about the inner casing yfor breaking frozen liquid into fragments from its outer surface, said structure including a plurality of annular spaced bars coextensive with said inner casing, means for rotating said structure and thereby effecting lateral movement of said bars planetarily about said inner casing, the outer surface of said inner casing having a number of zonal areas each containing at least one of the ridges of said outer surface, each of said bars having atleast one ice-fracturing member disposed adjacent to the outer surface of the inner casing to lbreak frozen liquid therefrom, there being one fracturing member for each zonal area of the inner casing, each fracturing member extending longitudinally of the inner casing opposite its respective zonal area of said casing, at least from margin to margin thereof, each fracturing member 4being in nearest proximity to the outer surface of said inner casing adjacent its respective ridge on said surface.

7. A machine, as defined in claim 6, wherein the outer casing is cylindrical and provided with a helical bead at its inner sur-.face projecting into the chamber defined by said inner rand outer casings to induce movement of the fragments of frozen liquid along the outer casing.

8. A machine for making ice in flake form, comprising an outer casing, a tubular inner casing within said outer casing, said casings defining a chamber therebetween, means for supplying liquid to said chamber to be frozen, means for chilling the inner casing sufficiently to effect the freezing on its outer surface of a quantity of the liquid Within said chamber, means for breaking frozen liquid into fragments from the outer surface of said inner casing, said last means including a resilient helical coil loosely encircling the inner casing with clearance between said inner casing and coil, said coil being revolubly mounted to turn about said inner casing, means for applying driving force -to said coil at one end thereof to notate the coil about the inner casing, said inner casing being generally tapered inwardly within the coil from the ends of said casing, in hourglass fashion, thereby to generally graduate the clearance between the corresponding end portions of said inner casing and coil, increasing the clearance toward a locality intermediate the coil.

9. A machine, -as defined in claim 8, wherein the outer surface of the inner casing is laterally circular and has a plurality of annular grooves therein.

10. A machine, as `defined in claim 8, wherein the tubular inner casing is circular in lateral cross section and laterally corrugated.

11. A machine for making ice in iiake form, comprising an outer casing, a tubular inner casing within said outer casing, said casings defining a chamber therebetween, means for supplying liquid to said chamber to be frozen, means for chilling the inner casing sufficiently to effect the freezing on its outer surface of a quantity of the liquid within said chamber, means for breaking frozen liquid into fragments from the outer surface of said inner casing, said last means including a resilient helical coil loosely encircling lthe inner casing with clearance between said inner casing and coil, said coil being revolubly mounted to turn about said inner casing, means lfor `applying driving force to said coil at one end thereof to rotate the coil about the inner casing, the outer surface of the inner casing having a plurality of annular grooves therein laterally thereof, the clearance between the coil and the inner casing being relatively the least at those portions of the coil adjacent those portions of the casing between the annular grooves therein.

12. A machine, as defined in lclaim ll, wherein the tubular inner casing is circular in lateral cross section and annularly corrugated.

13. A machine for making ice in flake form, comprising an outer casing, a tubular inner casing within said outer casing, said casings defining a chamber therebetween, means for supplying liquid to said chamber to be frozen, means for chilling the inner casing suiciently to effect the freezing on its outer surface of a quantity of the liquid within said chamber, an ice-breaking structure within the chamber, said structure being revoluble about the inner casing for breaking frozen liquid into fragments from its outer surface, means for rotating said structure, said structure including an ice frac-turing member which moves in a circular path uniformly adjacent to the outer surface of the inner casing, said member having a working surf-ace extending rearwardly and inwardly into near proximity to said inner casing for ice-fracturing engagement with the frozen liquid thereon.

14. A machine, as defined in claim 13, wherein the working surface of the ice-fracturing member is of convex curvature extending rearwardly and inwardly into near proximity to the inner casing.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,930,570 Taylor Oct. 17, 1933 2,063,066 Vogt Dec. 6, 1936 2,199,038 BriX-Hansen Apr. 30, 1940 2,280,320 Taylor Apr. 21, 1942 2,440,397 Erickson Apr. 27, 1948 2,962,878 Keller Dec. 6, 1960 FOREIGN PATENTS 12,850 Switzerland Sept. 10, 1896 220,263 Australia Feb. l2, 1959 Disclaimer 3,049,895.Artkur G. Larson, Minitrista, Minn., and F'rawz's M. Rfwer, Yoe, FoRM. Patent dated Aug.

Pa. MACHINE Fon MAKING ICE 1N FLARE 21, 1962. Disclaimer filed Aug. 20, 1964, by the assignee, M cQuay, Inc.

Hereby enters this disclaimer to claims v13 and 14 of said patent.

[Official Gazette December 15, 1964.]

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3133428 *Jul 2, 1962May 19, 1964Ross Temp IncFlake ice-making apparatus
US3159010 *Jul 27, 1962Dec 1, 1964Theodore KattisFlake ice maker
US3197974 *Jun 24, 1963Aug 3, 1965Ice O Matic IncAuger type ice chip making machine
US3217512 *Nov 25, 1960Nov 16, 1965Seeburg CorpIce flake making machine
US3238740 *Jan 17, 1964Mar 8, 1966Ross Anthony JAuger ice maker
US3320769 *May 24, 1966May 23, 1967Ross Anthony JAuger ice making machine
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US3921415 *Aug 30, 1974Nov 25, 1975Kattis TheodoreFlake ice maker
US4048815 *Oct 28, 1975Sep 20, 1977Theodore KattisFlake ice maker
US4532776 *Oct 29, 1982Aug 6, 1985Arcangeli Henio RHigh efficiency ice making machine and fail safe mechanism therefor
US5363660 *Jun 22, 1993Nov 15, 1994Y. T. Li Engineering, Inc.Orbital type freezing apparatus and method
US5768894 *Jun 22, 1994Jun 23, 1998Y.T. Li Engineering, Inc.Apparatus, process and system for tube and whip rod heat exchanger
US5953924 *Mar 24, 1998Sep 21, 1999Y. T. Li Engineering, Inc.Apparatus, process and system for tube and whip rod heat exchanger
US7469552 *Jul 25, 2007Dec 30, 2008Follett CorporationIce delivery and cleaning apparatus
US20080011000 *Jul 25, 2007Jan 17, 2008Brunner Roger PIce Delivery and Cleaning Apparatus
WO1995000807A1 *Jun 16, 1994Jan 5, 1995Y.T. Li Engineering, Inc.Orbital type freezing apparatus and method
Classifications
U.S. Classification62/320, 366/328.1, 366/149, 62/354
International ClassificationF25C1/14, F25C1/12
Cooperative ClassificationF25C1/142
European ClassificationF25C1/14B