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Publication numberUS3049977 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 21, 1962
Filing dateJun 13, 1960
Priority dateJun 13, 1960
Publication numberUS 3049977 A, US 3049977A, US-A-3049977, US3049977 A, US3049977A
InventorsReich Robert J
Original AssigneeReich Robert J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Automatic action revolver
US 3049977 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug- 21, 1962 R. J. REICH 3,049,977

AUTOMATIC ACTION REVOLVER Filed June 1.3, 1960 3 Sheets-Sheet l @oaf/er j RIE/H JNVENToR.

BYMMW Aug. 21, 1962 R. J. REICH AUTOMATIC ACTION REVOLVER 5 Sheets-Shes?I 2 Filed June 13, 1960 om\ mm ADOBE/er] @z5/CH JNVENTOR.

Aug. 21, 1962 R. J. REICH AUTOMATIC ACTION REVOLVER 3 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed June 13, 1960 /ofr f @l5/CH INVENTOR.

Y B MATA @W1- United States Patent O 3,049,977 AUTOMATIC ACTION REVLVER Robert I. Reich, 2135 E. Vine Ave., West Covina, Calif. Filed .lune 13, 1960, Ser. No. 35,802 Claims. (Cl. 89-154) This invention relates to automatic action iirearms and more particularly to a revolver incorporating a mechanism for automatically cocking the hammer each time the revolver is red.

Multiple shot firearms which incorporate arrangements for removing a iired cartridge case from the tiring chamber, inserting a fresh loaded cartridge in the chamber, and cocking the firing mechanism are Well known. In most cases, unless fully automatic tiring is desired, an arrangement is provided for holding the firing mechanism cocked until the trigger is released and pulled again to fire a succeeding shot. Such weapons are commonly referred to as semi-automatic firearms.

While many semi-automatic ries and pistols have been developed and are found in common use, revolvers generally require that the hammer be cocked by hand or by the action of the trigger each time a shot is to be red. Although attempts have been made to develop a semi-automatic revolver whichV provides an automatic hammer cooking action, the resulting arrangements have not met with -Wide commercial acceptance, principally because they are cumbersome in operation and subject to corrosion from the explosive gases utilized to operate the cocking mechanism.

In revolvers commonly used at present, the action of cocking the hammer is applied through a rotator mechanism, or iinger, lwhich rotates the cylinder to bring a fresh cartridge into position for tiring. When the hammer is cocked by hand, as is customarily done in slow iiring for target practice, maximum accuracy is possible because the trigger need only be pulled a short distance sufficient yto slide the hammer retaining mechanism, commonly referred Ato as the sear, off the foot of the hammer. However, when the hammer is cocked and the cylinder is rotated by the -action of the trigger, as is customarily done in rapid firing, the trigger must be pulled its full distance and a substantial `force must be exerted thereon. This adversely aiiects the accuracy and limits the effectiveness of the revolver as a rapid -iire weapon.

lIt is therefore an object of the invention to provide an improved revolver rearm.

lt is another object of the invention to provide a revolver having an automatic cocking and cylinder rotating action. Y

It is a further object of the invention to provide an automatic action revolver which utilizes the recoil force of the cartridge as the cartridge is iired.

Briefly, in accordance with the invention, a revolver is provided in which a cartridge case is permitted'to move under the force of the exploding gases produced` by the tiring of the cartridge, Iwith the movement of the case being transferred toa recoil plate assembly and thence to the hammer itself. The movement of the recoil plate assembly drives the hammer of the revolver-back to a cocked position. l By means of a spring positioned.

between the foot of the hammer and a rotating iinger which rotates the cylinder, a time lag is provided between the cocking of the hammer and the rotating of the cylinder so as to absorb theY mechanical shock between the hammer and the cylinder rotating mechanism. The spring is compressed by .the rotation of the hammer, and thereafter the energy from the compressed spring is released to cause the rotating finger to move upward and rotate the cylinder tothe next unred cartridge. Furthermore, a disconnector may be provided in accordance with I the invention which disconnects the sear from the trigger so that the hammer may be retained in the cocked posi- `tion by the sear while the trigger is still in the ring position. A sear latch is attached to the trigger for engaging the sear when `the trigger is in the released position. However, with the trigger fully depressed, .as it is to release the hammer for firing the forward motion of the hammer rotates the disconnector, which in turn rotates and moves the sear latch out of engagement with the sear by means of a camming surface adjacent the sear latch. This disconnects the sear `from the trigger so that the sear is thus able to engage the hammer in the cocked position while the trigger is depressed. When the trigger is released, the sear latch engages the sear and the Weapon is again ready for iiring.

Various embodiments of the movable recoil plate assembly mentioned above may be employed in the automatic action revolver of the invention. Certain speciiic arrangements of the movable recoil plate assembly of the invention will be described in detail in-connection with the description of the drawing. Basically, however, these embodiments are of two types: either a Vmechanism mounted within the revolver frame by means of springs so as to transmit -force from the cartridge case to the hammer, or a specially shaped portion of the hammer itself arranged to enter an opening in the frame and receive the reaction force of the cartridge case directly.

The invention may be better understood from a consideration of the following detailed description taken in conjunction with the drawings, in which: f

FIG. l is a side View of a revolver having partcula portions removed for purposes of illustration and depicts the firing mechanism thereof in accordance with one specific embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 2 is another view of the embodiment of FIG. 1 showing the position of the firing mechanism after the gun is red;

FIG. 3 depicts in detail a particular portion of the em'- bodiment of FIGS. 1 and 2;

FIG. 4 is a view of a portion of- FIGS. l and 2 illustrating a second specific embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 5 is `a view of a portion of FIGS. l and 2 illustrating a third specific embodiment of the invention;

FIGS. 6A and 6B are side and top viewsof portions of -a revolver illustrating a fourth spccilic embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 7 is a side view of a portion of a revolver illustrating a iifth specific embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 8 is a perspective view of the cylinder rotating mechanism of a revolver in `accordance -With an aspect of the invention; and Y FIG-9 represents the hammer retainingand trigger disconnecting mechanism in accordance with a further aspect of the invention.

In PIG. l there is shown a portion of a revolver 1 with its side plate removed in order to better illustrate the iiring mechanism of one specific embodiment of the invention. The revolve il` is shown comprising-a frame 2, a barrel 3, a cylinder 4, a hammer 5 rotatable about a hammer mounting pin 10, a trigger 6 and a trigger guar-d 9. Also shown are an extractor '7, a plurality of cylinder l-atching .slots S and a cylinder stop 26. Bearing against the extractor 7 is a cylinder rotator 14 which serves to rotate the cylinder 4 as the hammer 5 is pulled back to the cocking position. Force is transmitted fromv the hammer 5 to the rotator 14 through a spring 13i which is connected to the hammer 5 by means of the cylinder rotator push rod pin 12. A disconnector 17 is attached to the rotator 14 and moves therewith. Also shown is a lSear ',20 which serves to latch the hammer 5 in the cocked posi- 3 assembly in accordance with my invention comprising a recoil plug 36, a ring pin 33, a recoil plug retaining spring 32, a tiring pin spring 34 and a spring retaining ring 31. This assembly will be discussed in greater detail in connection with FIG. 3. As is clear from the diagram, FIG. 1 depicts the hammer in the firing position with the nose of the firing pin 33 protruding from the front of the movable recoil plate assembly for striking a cartridge in position to be tired within the cylinder 4.

FIG. 2 depicts the revolver shown in FIG. 1 just after a cartridge has been tired. Similar elements are shown in the figure and are given corresponding numeral designations.

As the cartridge is fired, driving the bullet 22 down the barrel of the revolver 1, the pressure from the exploding gases produces a force in the opposite direction on the cartridge case 27. This rearwardly directed force drives the cartridge case 27 partially out of the cylinder 4 against the head plate of the frame 2. In its movement the cartridge case 27 strikes the recoil plug 36 of the movable recoil plug assembly and drives it back against the hammer 5. The hammer 5 immediately rotates to the cocked position where it is retained by the sear 20.

As the hammer 5 rotates it compresses the spring 13 which applies a force against the rotator 14. However, motion of the rotator is delayed due to the inertia of the cylinder and associated parts. This time lag permits the bullet 22 to clear the tiring chamber of the cylinder 4. Further, the spring 13 advantageously serves to absorb some of the shock which would otherwise be transmitted to this mechanism by the hammer 5'.

As the hammer 5 rotates to the cocked position, the force from the compressed spring 13 causes the rotator 14 to begin to move. This causes the disconnector 17 to rotate in turn, unlatching the cylinder 4 by releasing the cylinder stop 26. The rotator 14 is then permitted to continue its travel whereby it rotates the cylinder 4 to the next cartridge position. A more detailed description of the operation of this portion of the invention will be found below in connection with the discussion of FIGS. 8 and 9.

FIG. 3 depicts in detail a portion of the specific embodiment of the invention shown in FIGS. 1 and 2. In FIG. 3 a particular movable recoil plate -assembly 30 is shown having a recoil plug 36 mounted within the frame 2 of the revolver 1. The plug 36 is held in a particular position within the frame 2 by the recoil plug spring 32 which bears against the retaining ring 31 attached to the plug 36. Concentric with the plug 36 and extending therethrough is a firing pin 33 which is held in position by a spring 34 bearing against a retaining ring 35.

A slightly different movable recoil plate assembly 40 is shown in FIG. 4 having a recoil plug 41, a firing pin 43, and corresponding springs 45 and 46 within the frame 2. The frame 2 and recoil plug 41 have threaded portions for engaging threaded spring retaining collars 42 and 44 respectively.

Another slightly different arrangement is shown in FIG. 5 wherein a movable recoil plate assembly 50 is shown comprising Ia recoil plug 51 and a firing pin 52 within the frame 2. The ring pin 52 has an enlarged end for absorbing impact between the recoil plug 51 and the revolver hammer. In this embodiment of the invention the firing pin 52 is connected to the recoil plug 51 by means of a retaining pin S3 slidable within slots provided in the recoil plug 51. Also shown is a spring 54 for holding the entire -assembly in a predetermined position.

FIGS. 6A and 6B are side and top views, respectively, of a portion of the revolver 1 of FIGS. 1 and 2 illustrating a still diierent embodiment of the invention. These figures show the revolver frame 2 and the hammer S. Mounted to the hammer 5 is a recoil plug 6'1 which is in the Shape of a narrow blade. The frame 2 is arranged with a slotted portion 63 for receiving the recoil plug and ring pin assembly. The firing pin of this embodiment is a protruding nose 62 on the forward edge of the recoil plug 61.

FIG. 7 depicts a portion of the revolver 1 of FIGS. l and 2 and illustrates a still different specic embodiment of the invention. In this gure a firing pin 71 is shown fastened to the hammer S. Within the frame 2 a recoil plug 72 is retained by a retaining spring 73. Both the recoil plug 72 and the firing pin 71 have mating surfaces which engage when the hammer 5 is in the firing position to direct the force from the red cartridge case 27 through the recoil plug 72 and the tiring pin 71 to the hammer 5, causing it to rotate to the cocked position.

FIG. 8 `depicts in greater detail a portion of the mechanism of the specic embodiment of the invention shown in FIGS. 1 and 2. In FIG. 8 the hammer 5 is shown in the released, or uncooked, position in association with the rotator 14 and the disconnector l17. The spring 13 is shown extending between the pin 12 and the rotator 14 for transmitting force from the hammer 5 to the rotator 14 when the hammer is cocked in the manner already described. The spring rod 11 is provided coaxially with the spring 13 for maintaining .the spring in proper position. The rod 11 rides throufgh a hole in the rotator 14. The rotating nger 15 is shown as the part of the rotator 14 which bears against the extractor 7 of FIG. 1. The disconnector 17 and the rotator 14 are secured together by means of the pin 18. The disconnector 17 has a surface 19 which bears against the pin 12 when the hammer 5 is in the cocked position and serves to rotate the disconnector 17 in a counter-clockwise direction when the hammer is released for tiring. Also shown in FIG. 8 is a hammer lip 16 which serves to engage a mating portion of the sear 20 of FIG. 1 when the hammer is cocked.

FIG. 9 also shows the details of FIG. 8 together with additional elements to illustrate the operation of the trigger release mechanism in accordance with an aspect of the invention. In FIG. 9, the hammer 5 is shown rotated counter-clockwise about its hammer mounting pin 10 and latched by the sear 20` in the cocked position. The sear 20 and the trigger 6 are held in position by, and rotate about, the sear pin 28. When pulled, the trigger 6 rotates the sear 20 about the sear pin 2S by applying force through a sear latch 23 secured to the trigger 6 by the sear latch pin 25. It will be noted that the sear latch 23 rests in a notch of the sear 20 in the position shown. Part of the trigger 6 is a trigger stop surface 21 which limits the travel of the trigger 6 by bearing against the trigger guard 9.

With the hammer and related mechanism in the position shown in FIG. 9, pulling the ltrigger 6 rotates the sear 20 by means of the sear latch 23 and releases the hammer 5. The hammer then rotates in a clockwise direction to fire the cartridge in the ring chamber. As it does so, the pin 12 bears against the surface `19 of the disconnector 17, driving the disconnector 17 in a counterclockwise direction. As the disconnector 17 rotates thusly, a camming surface 24 contacts the end of the sear latch 23 and cams it out of its position in the notch of the sear 20. Thus, even though the trigger 6 is maintained in ring position, the sear 20 is released so that it engages the hammer 5 as the latter is immediately returned to the counter-clockwise position by the action of the automatic cooking mechanism in the manner described above and the sear 20 holds the hammer 5 in the cocked position. The next shot cannot be red until the trigger 6 is released a short distance to permit the end of the sear latch 23 to drop into the notch of the sear 20, after which the trigger may be pulled again and the firing action is repeated.

It should be clear from the above description that the described embodiments of the invention advantageously operate to restore the hammer of the revolver to the cocked position each time the gun is tired and to hold it there until the trigger is released and pulled again, thus achieving semi-automatic firing in a revolver pistol. Once cocked initially, the gun may be fired repeatedly as rap- Iidly as the trigger can be released and squeezed Without the disadvantages present in commonly used revolvers which require that the squeezing of the trigger cock the hammer and rotate the cylinder.

Although specific arrangements of a revolver in accordance with the invention have been described for the purpose of illustrating the manner in which the invention may be utilized to advantage, it will be appreciated that the invention is not limited thereto. Accordingly, any and all modifications, variations or equivalent arrangements falling within the scope of the annexed claims should `be considered to be a part of the invention.

What is claimed is:

1. An automatic action revolver comprising a frame, a cylinder rotatably mounted on said frame, an explosive cartridge including a case within a portion of said cylinder, a hammer for firing said cartridge, and a movable recoil plate assembly disposed to be moved forward by the hammer to engage the case of said cartridge in the firing position and actuated -by said cartridge case for cooking said hammer upon the tiring of said cartridge.

2. An automatic action revolver comprising a frame, a cylinder rotatably mounted on said frame, an explosive cartridge within said cylinder and having a case disposed to move rearward when the cartridge is fired, a hammer for tiring said cartridge, and means for cocking the hammer upon the firing of the cartridge including a bladeshaped portion of the hammer engaging the case of the cartridge, said revolver frame being slotted to receive the blade-shaped portion of the hammer.

3. An automatic action revolver comprising a frame, a cylinder rotatably mounted on said frame, an explosive cartridge including a case in said cylinder and positioned to move rearward upon being red, a hammer for firing said cartridge, and a movable recoil plug attached to said frame for transmitting the rearward motion of a fired cartridge case Within the cylinder to cock the hammer, said recoil plug and said hammer having mating surfaces for engaging each other in one position f said recoil plug.

4. An automatic action revolver comprising a frame, a cylinder rotatably mounted on said frame, and explosive cartridge including a case positioned for rearward motion in said cylinder, a hammer for tiring said cartridge, and means actuated by the rearward motion of said cartridge case upon the firing thereof for cocking said hammer comprising a movable recoil plug abutting against said hammer and said cartridge in the firing position, means for positioning said recoil plug within said frame, a firing pin within said recoil plug, and means for positioning said firing pin relative to said recoil plug.

5. An automatic action revolver comprising a frame, a cylinder rotatably mounted on said frame, an explosive cartridge including a case positioned for rearward motion within said cylinder, a hammer for exploding said cartridge, and means actuated by the rearward motion of said cartridge case upon the tiring thereof for cocking said hammer comprising a recoil plug, a firing pin within said recoil plug and having an enlarged section at one end interposed between said recoil plug and said hammer, said enlarged section overlapping the rearward end of said recoil plug to carry said recoil plug forward against said cartridge when said hammer is in the ring position and to apply force from said recoil plug directly to said hammer upon the firing of said cartridge, a pin slidably affixing said recoil plug and said firing pin, and a spring for positioning said recoil plug and said tiring pin within said frame.

6. An automatic action revolver comprising a frame, a cylinder rotatably mounted on said frame, an explosive cartridge including a case positioned for rearward movement within said cylinder, a hammer for tiring said cartridge, and means actuated by the rearward motion of said cartridge case upon the ring thereof for cocking said hammer comprising a recoil plug having shaped surfaces for mating with said hammer and said cartridge respectively, a spring for positioning said recoil plug within said frame, and a spring retaining collar aiixed to said frame.

7. An automatic action revolver comprising a frame, a barrel mounted on said frame, a 'cylinder rotatably mounted on said frame to permit alignment with said barrel, an explosive cartridge including a case which is in a portion of said cylinder aligned with said barrel and positioned to move rearward when fired, said frame having a facing surface for engaging the cartridge case and arresting the rearward movement of said cartridge case, a hammer attached to said frame for firing said cartridge, and means operable through an aperture in said facing surface for transmitting the rearward motion of said cartridge case directly to said hammer upon the tiring of said cartridge in order to cock the hammer automatically.

8. An automatic action revolver comprising a frame, a barrel mounted on said frame, a cylinder rotatably mounted on said frame to permit alignment with said barrel, an explosive cartridge including a case which is in a portion of said cylinder aligned with said barrel and positioned to move rearward when fired, said frame having a facing surface for engaging the cartridge case and arresting the rearward movement of said cartridge case, a hammer attached to said frame for firing said cartridge, and means including a movable recoil operable through an aperture in the facing surface to move forward thereof against the cartridge when the hammer is in ring position and to transmit the rearward motion of said cartridge case directly to said hammer upon the tiring of said cartridge in order to cock the hammer automatically.

9. An automatic action revolver in accordance with claim 8 wherein said last mentioned means includes a spring extending between the frame and the recoil plug for positioning the recoil plug within the frame.

10. An automatic action revolver in accordance with claim 9 wherein said hammer includes a firing pin attached thereto and arranged to move forward past said recoil plug to re said cartridge.

11. An automatic action revolver in accordance with claim 8 wherein said recoil plug is aixed to said hammer and movable therewith, said frame having a recessed portion for receiving said recoil plug within said aperture.

l2. An automatic action revolver in accordance with claim ll further including a ring pin ixedly mounted on said recoil plug.

13. An automatic action revolver comprising a frame, a barrel mounted on said frame, a cylinder rotatably mounted on said fra-me to permit alignment with said barrel, an explosive cartridge including a case which is 1n a portion of said cylinder aligned with said barrel and positioned to move rearward when tired, said frame having a facing surface for arresting the rearward movement of said cartridge case including an aperture aligned with said cartridge and smaller than the diameter of said cartridge, the facing surface being separated from said cartridge by a predetermined distance, a hammer attached to said frame for tiring said cartridge, and means operable through the aperture in said facing surface for said predetermined distance for transmitting the rearward motion of said cartridge case directly to said hammer upon the firing of said cartridge in order to cock the hammer automatically.

14. An automatic action revolver comprising a frame, a barrel mounted on the frame, a cylinder rotatablv mounted on the frame to permit alignment with the barrel, an explosive cartridge positioned for firing within the cylinder and having a cartridge case disposed to move rearward upon the firing of the cartridge, a hammer and a ring pin connected to the frame in order to fire the cartridge, and a recoil plug connected to the frame and disposed to bear directly on the hammer when the hammer is in the ring position, said recoil plug being arranged to move forward a predetermined distance to engage the cartridge when the hammer is moved to the firing position and to move rearward to its original position to restore the hammer to the cocked position when the cartridge is red.

15. An automatic action revolver comprising a frame, a barrel mounted on said frame, a cylinder rotatably mounted on said frame to permit alignment with said barrel, an explosive cartridge positioned for ring within said cylinder and having a cartridge case disposed to move rearward when the cartridge is fired, a hammer and ring pin connected to the frame for tiring the cartridge, a facing surface portion of said frame disposed to engage the cartridge case and arrest its rearward motion, and means movable by the hammer to a position forward of said facing surface portion to engage the cartridge and movable rearward with the cartridge case to cock the hammer automatically when the cartridge is red.

References Cited in the le of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,972,763 Dutton Sept. 4, 1934 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent No, 3,049,977 August 2l, 1962 Robert J.. Reich It is hereby certified that error appears in the above numbered patent requiring correction and that the said Letters Patent should read as corrected below.

Column 2, line 57, for "revolve" read revolver column 5, line 44, for "and'n read an column 6, line 30, after "recoil" insert, plug Signed` and sealed this 27th day of November 1962.

(SEAL) Attest:

E TON G. JOHNSON S DAVID L. LADD XXNEX'XNKXWMX Attesting Officer Commissioner of Patents

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1972763 *Nov 27, 1933Sep 4, 1934Dutton Howard BFirearm construction
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3242607 *Oct 12, 1964Mar 29, 1966Tappehorn Roy JFirearm firing mechanism, especially for revolvers
US4109402 *Dec 17, 1975Aug 29, 1978Inigo Diaz GuardaminoDevice for regulating the pressure to be applied to the trigger on firearms
US4221065 *Aug 2, 1978Sep 9, 1980Bangor Punta Operations, Inc.Firing mechanism for revolvers
US5613315 *Aug 1, 1995Mar 25, 1997Phillips And Rodgers, Inc.Firing pin mechanism
US6615527 *Jun 28, 2002Sep 9, 2003Derrick J. MartinTrigger mechanism
US6729322Nov 6, 2002May 4, 2004Mark SchavoneCompressed gas-powered gun simulating the recoil of a conventional firearm
US6820608Jan 9, 2001Nov 23, 2004New-Matics Licencing, LlcCompressed gas-powered gun simulating the recoil of a conventional firearm
US6874492May 3, 2004Apr 5, 2005New-Matics Licensing, LlcCompressed gas-powered gun simulating the recoil of a conventional firearm
US7025052Jan 9, 2002Apr 11, 2006New-Matics Licensing, LlcCompressed gas-powdered gun simulating the recoil of a conventional firearm
US7581954Nov 22, 2004Sep 1, 2009Newmatics Licensing LlcFirearms training simulator simulating the recoil of a conventional firearm
US7878102 *May 18, 2007Feb 1, 2011Smith & Wesson Corp.Revolver for firing high velocity ammunition
US20040074486 *Jan 9, 2002Apr 22, 2004Mark SchavoneCompressed gas-powdered gun simulating the recoil of a conventional firearm
US20050072415 *May 3, 2004Apr 7, 2005Mark SchavoneCompressed gas-powered gun simulating the recoil of a conventional firearm
US20050260545 *Nov 22, 2004Nov 24, 2005New-Matics Licensing, LlcFirearms training simulator simulating the recoil of a convention firearm
US20110035982 *May 18, 2007Feb 17, 2011Smith & Wesson Corp.Revolver for firing high velocity ammunition
EP0278795A1 *Jan 6, 1988Aug 17, 1988Matra Manurhin DefenseFirearm percussion device for firing cartridges of two different calibres
WO1991000981A1 *Oct 19, 1989Jan 24, 1991Federico SacchettiA device for the automatic rearmament of the cock, for revolvers and automatic pistols
WO2006040675A1 *Oct 6, 2005Apr 20, 2006Debo S.R.L.Hunting and sporting firearm
WO2009138321A1 *Apr 28, 2009Nov 19, 2009Civolani, AndreaSemiautomatic revolver
Classifications
U.S. Classification89/154, 42/65, 89/155
International ClassificationF41A19/52, F41A19/00, F41C3/14, F41C3/00
Cooperative ClassificationF41A19/52, F41C3/14
European ClassificationF41C3/14, F41A19/52