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Publication numberUS3054278 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 18, 1962
Filing dateNov 25, 1960
Priority dateNov 25, 1960
Publication numberUS 3054278 A, US 3054278A, US-A-3054278, US3054278 A, US3054278A
InventorsSalomao J Haddad
Original AssigneeCarolina Knitting Machine Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Knitting methods and means and product formed thereby
US 3054278 A
Abstract  available in
Images(8)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 18, 1962 5. J. HADDAD 3,054,278

KNITTING METHODS AND MEANS AND PRODUCT FORMED THEREBY Filed Nov. 25 1960 8 Sheets-Sheet 1 Frag: Z3 3 54. INVENTOR. T I SALOMAO .z HADDAp 2 319521 2 I If 2 z Sept. 18, 1.962 s. J. HADDAD 3,054,278

KNITTING METHODS AND MEANS AND PRODUCT FORMED THEREBY I Filed Nov. 25, 1960 8 Sheets-Sheet 2 i l'i'i'i'liiin i i I hM hM hm I l'l l l:l:l:l' I i HIHH INVENTOR.

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KNITTING METHODS AND MEANS AND PRODUCT FORMED THEREBY Filed Nov. 25, 1960 8 Sheets-Sheet 4 Fig: 7

INVENTOR 54L OM40 J? #40040 ATTORNEY S. J. HADDAD Sept. 18, 1962 KNITTING METHODS AND MEANS AND PRODUCT FORMED THEREBY Filed Nov. 25 1960 8 Sheets-Sheet 5 Q N INVENTOR. v

a/11.00140 .z HADDAD Afro/may Q wk Sept. 18, 1962 5. J. HADDAD 3,054,278

KNITTING METHODS AND MEANS AND PRODUCT FORMED- THEREBY Filed Nov. 25, 1960 8 Sheets-Sheet 7 amil [1 9 31 W M lli; & 17 1 *1 T i l 2 1 I \w um l ll lnlh|||||| |||l f|1||||||||||mmm W W 1 I;'- s QT? IN VEN TOR.

SALOMAO J1 HADDAD S. J. HADDAD Sept. 18, 1962 KNITTING METHODS AND MEANS AND PRODUCT FORMED THEREBY Filed NOV. 25, 1960 8 Sheets-Sheet 8 INVENTOR. .smo/mo .T. HADDAD BY ATTORNEY United States Patent Ofiice 3,054,278 Patented Sept. 18, 1962 3,054,278 KNITTING METHODS AND MEANS AND PRODUCT FORMED THEREBY Salomao J. Haddad, Charlotte, N.C., assignor to Carolina Knitting Machine Corporation, a corporation of North Carolina Filed Nov. 25, 1960, Ser. No. 71,503 13 Claims. (Cl. 66-8) This invention relates to the formation of circular knit fabric, and more particularly to a method and means for forming such fabric by which a greatly improved length control maybe effected, and by which the resulting fabric is not only thus controlled advantageously as to length but is also formed characteristically with relatively tight sinker wales that enhance its physical properties as explained at further length below.

The method and means of the present invention, and the resulting knit fabric, are of particular significance in the manufacture of ladies" seamless hosiery, for it is in this field that the problem of length control has been most troublesome and diflicult to deal with, while at the same time being a highly important factor in obtaining manageable manufacturing results.

Briefly described, the present invention is characterized by the formation of circular knit fabric with courses in which the loops or stitches are measured prior to drawing in a manner that isolates the amount of yarn needed for the ultimate loop formation from the varying influences of both the yarn supply tension and the weight or weighting of the knit fabric being formed, so as to provide for foirning the individual loops from a given amount of yarn that is fixed independently of these influences and that consequently results in forming the loops much more uniformly than is commonly possible. Moreover, this result is obtained according to the present invention by employing conventional equipment with relatively simple and easily effected modifications that do not impair in any way the normal operating advantage and efficiency of the equipment and, in fact, are arranged purposely to allow alternative conventional operation in particular instances; all as described in further detail below in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a fragmentary side elevation of a circular knitting machine incorporating modifications for operations in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a more or less diagrammatic illustration of a seamles stocking blank such as would be knit by the machine shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is an enlarged detail illustration of the knit fabric predominantly forming the stocking blank shown in FIG. 2 according to the present invention;

FIG. 4 is a schematic diagram of the needles and sinkers as they carry a yarn for knitting;

FIG. 5 is a sectional detail illustrating the relation of the needles and sinkers substantially at the position indicated by the line 5-5 in FIG. 4;

FIG. 6 is a sectional detail illustrating the relation of the needles and sinkers substantially at the position indicated by the line 6-6 in 'FIG. 4;

FIG. 7 is a sectional detail illustrating the relation of the needles and sinkers substantially at the position indicated by the line 77 in FIG. 4;

FIG. 8 is an exaggerated perspective illustration of needles and sinkers as disposed in general correspondance with the diagram in FIG. 4;

FIG. 9 is a sectional detail of a composite stitch cam employed according to the present invention, the detail being shown in relation to a representation of needles, sinkers, and transfer jacks as a knitting yarn is fed thereto;

FIG. 10 is a transverse sectional detail taken substantially at the position indicated by the line 1010 in FIG. 9;

FIG. 11 is a transverse sectional detail taken substantially at the position indicated by the line 1111 in FIG. 9;

FIG. 12 is a transverse sectional detail taken substantially at the position indicated by the line 1212 in FIG. 9;

FIG. 13 is a side elevation of a modified latch needle employed in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 14 is a side elevation of a modified sinker employed according to the present invention;

FIG. 15 is an enlarged diagrammatic illustration of the knit fabric as it is formed according to the present invention from the starting portion formed as indicated in FIG. 9;

FIG. 16 is a sectional detail corresponding generally to FIG. 9 but showing the manner in which the needles and sinkers engage the knitting yarn as the initial transition is made from conventional to special knitting in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 17 is a further sectional detail of the composite stitch cam illustrated in FIGS. 9 and 16, but showing the stitch cam components shifted relatively for knitting alternatively according to the special method of the present invention;

FIG. 18 is a fragmentary perspective view illustrating the composite stitch cam mounting arrangement and actuating means thereat;

FIG. 19 is a sectional detail at the upper portion of the needle cylinder illustrating the formation of fabric by the needles and sinkers according to the present invention;

FIG. 20 is a plan view, partly in section, of the sinker cap positioned for conventional knitting according to the present invention;

FIG. 21 is a further partly sectional plan view corresponding to FIG. 20 but showing the sinker cap shifted for special knitting alternatively according to the present invention;

FIG. 22 is a fragmentary side elevation illustrating the disposition of the latch member provided according to the present invention for positioning the sinker cap as seen in FIG. 20;

FIG. 23 is a further fragmentary side elevation showing the latch member of FIG. 22 raised to provide for positioning of the sinker cap as seen in FIG. 21; and

FIG. 24 is a final fragmentary side elevation of the latch member as fully raised upon releasing movement from the FIG. 22 position.

Referring now in detail to the drawings for describing the present invention more fully in relation to a representative embodiment of the means provided for carrying out the knitting method involved and obtained the improved knitting results made possible, FIG. 1 illustrates generally the arrangement of a conventional circular knitting machine such as is disclosed in US. Patent No. 1,282,958, issued October 29, 1918, to R. W. Scott, with the necessary modifications indicated for knitting in accordance with the present invention.

The circular knitting machine shown in FIG. 1, as indicated generally by the reference numeral 10, comprises a usual arrangement at 11 for supporting a supply of knitting yarn 12 on pirns or the like, as at 13, for tensioned feeding in any suitable manner; although the needles and sinkers provided for knitting the yarn 12 are arranged according to the present invention for special manipulation during the knitting operation as will be described at length presently. In general, however, the knitting machine 10 incorporates a conventional needle cylinder 14 disposed in relation to actuating mechanism for rotary and reciprocatory knitting, including a main pattern drum at 15.

In addition, the knitting machine is provided with a bed plate at 16; a sinker cam cap 17, that is arranged in relation to a sinker bed 18 (see FIGS. 5, 6 and 7) and a latch-guard ring 19 pivotally mounted on a standard 20 extending upwardly from the bed plate 16; and a spindle at 21 for supporting and operating a transfer jack dial (not shown) for knitting an inturned welt, all as more described and indicated in the previously noted prior Patent No. 1,282,958. Also, the knitting machine 10 would normally be equipped with a take-up mechanism for weighting or tensioning the knit fabric as it is formed and an associated discharge device (as indicated at 22 in FIG. 1) for carrying off the stocking blanks as they are completed, the arrangement of such mechanism being disclosed, for example, in U.S. Patent No. 2,625,026, issued January 13, 1953, to R. H. Lawson.

FIG. 2 illustrates the form of stocking blank, as designated generally by the reference numeral 23, that is knit by the knitting machine 10 shown in FIG. 1, the blank 23 having an inturned welt at 24, a continuing leg portion 25 that extends to a heel pocket at 26, which is formed in beginning a foot portion 27 that may terminate at a toe ring 28 beyond which a toe pocket 29 is formed with suitable run-01f courses added at 30. The characteristic nature of the knit fabric from which the stocking blank 23 is predominantly formed according to the present invention is indicated in FIG. 3 in which an enlarged representation is shown of the leg portion fabric at a location such as is enclosed by the broken rectangular outline in FIG. 2 at 25'.

As shown in FIG. 3, the knit fabric portion 25' is characterized by courses (seen extending horizontally) in which the needle loops are not only of consistently uniform shape and size, for the reasons that are explained at further length below, but by which the sinker wales s in the fabric are formed tighter than the needle wales n. The result of this latter characteristic is to give the knit fabric 25' an improved hand and texture and appearance, and additionally appears to improve substantially its snag resistance; beyond the advantageous length control that is obtained in the fabric by reason of the consistently maintained shape and size of needle loop.

Just why the enhanced physical properties beyond length control are obtained according to the present invention in the knit fabric 25 is not entirely understood, but it seems to result from an interplay of several factors among which are the formation of the fabric loops from yarn that has previously been measured and that is rendered loose or slack during drawing in the manner to be noted in detail presently; the uniformly maintained shape of the drawn loops; and the tight sinker wale characteristic of the resulting fabric. Other factors inherent in the knitting operation of the present invention may also be significant in this connection, and the knitting operation is described at length below to make all such factors as apparent as possible.

FIGS. 4 to 8 of the drawings illustrate in particular the manner in which the needles 31 and sinkers 32 are manipulated specially in accordance with the present invention for knitting a yarn 12 to form fabric 25 of the nature described just above. As seen in FIG. 4, the needles 31 and sinkers 32 assume entirely different relations for feeding the yarn 12 and drawing the stitches or loops. As the yarn 12 is carried down by the needles 31 (from the right as seen in FIG. 4) the related manipulation of the sinkers 32 is such as to support bights of the yarn 12 at an elevated level thereon for measuring of loops therebetween during an initial stage of lowering of the needles 31. The purpose of this preliminary measuring of the yarn 12 is to eliminate substantially the normal tendency toward borrowing of yarn from the preceding needle by each needle as it draws a loop; to measure the amount of yarn needed for loop formation while the needles are still short of drawing, so that the yarn measurement is isolated from the effect of fabric pull; and to provide for delivering the measured amount of yarn for the actual drawing of loops in a manner that isolates it from any influence by the yarn supply tension.

These purposes are accomplished first by supporting a progressive series of measured bights of the yarn 12 at an elevated level on the sinkers 32 throughout a zone a (compare FIGS. 4 and 8), involving the action of about eight adjacent needles 31 in relation to the sinkers 32 and resulting in a cumulative grip on the yarn 12 that isolates the measured yarn bights toward the left of the zone a (as seen in FIG. 4) completely from the influence of the yarn supply tension to the right. Accordingly, the first measured yarn bight at the left end of the zone a series may then be released for drawing by a final stage of lowering of the needle 31 thereat without any possibility of changing the amount of yarn previously measured for such drawing. The drawing operation involves a related progressive release of the measured yarn bights to a lower level on the sinkers 32 in a zone b (see FIGS. 4 and 8) at which a progressive series of about four adjacent needles 31 are maintained fully lowered so that as the measured yarn bights are successively drawn an adjacent plurality of needle loops are held .at the drawn extent thereof before the needles 31 are raised again for casting off.

FIG. 8 shows in perspective the relative positions of the needles 31 and the sinkers 32 as they are manipulated in the above described manner, the sinkers 32 in the zone a being shown advanced so as to support the yarn 12 being fed for knitting at an upper level thereon while the related needles 31 are initially lowered therebetween for measuring the yarn '12; and the sinkers 32 in the zone b being shown as passing through a retracting phase to release the measured bights of the yarn 12 successively to a lower level for drawing by further lowering of the needles 31, before advancing again to hold each drawn loop during the subsequent rise of the needles 31 so that these drawn loops will be cast-off properly.

The previously noted loose or slack condition of the knitting yarn 12 that results during the drawing operation is indicated in FIGS. 4 and 8 at 12', and it will be seen that this loose yarn condition allows the previously measured yarn bights to be drawn by the plurality of needles 31 in the zone b with a consistently uniform shape and size by reason of the fixed amount of yarn that is isolated for drawing and by reason of the equalizing effect of having the fixed amount of yarn held at the drawn extent thereof by a plurality of needles 31 in the zone b, before the subsequent manipulation for casting-off commences.

In the latter connection it should also be noted that because the sinkers 32 do not move up to hold the drawn loops for casting-off until the knitting yarn 12 has been fully measured and drawn, the holding pressure of the sinkers 32 on the drawn loops cannot cause any change n the amount of yarn supplied for knitting, whereas the influence of sinker holding pressure has heretofore had an appreciable effect on loop formation and has been impossible to control regularly as a practical matter.

The illustrations in FIGS. 5, 6 and 7 show successively the needle and sinker relations as the knitting yarn 12 is first measured (FIG. 5), and then released for drawing (FIG. 6), and finally drawn (FIG. 7). In FIG. 5, the yarn 12 is shown measured across the upper level of the sinker 32 by the initially lowered needle 31, while the previously formed loop 1 thereat is still retained by the needle 31 short of casting-off so as to eliminate any influence through pull by the knit fabric previously formed on measuring of the yarn for continued knitting (compare FIG. 19). FIG. 6 shows the effect of sinker retraction in releasing the yarn 12 to the loose or slack condition indicated at 12' prior to drawing; and FIG. 7 shows the disposition of the measured loop as finally drawn by the completely lowered needle 31 across the lower level of the sinker 32.

Provision is made according to the present invention for knitting in the above described manner while at the same time allowing conventional knitting to be done alternatively, so that conventional equiment may be adapted readily for utilizing the knitting method of this invention without undue complication and without qualifying in any way the effective use of such equipment for particular purposes that require conventional knitting operation. For example, a knitting machine of the type disclosed in the previously noted prior US Patent No. 1,282,958 that is arranged for knitting an inturned welt 24 requires the welt fabric to be started with conventional knitting in order to allow placing of the dial loops properly on the transfer jacks, as will be noted further presently; while heel and toe pockets, such as are indicated at 26 and 29 respectively in FIG. 2, conventionally require reciprocating operation of the machine during which special knitting according to the present invention would necessitate considerable more adapting modification of the machine than would be warranted, because the reciprocating operation takes place at a slower speed and handles heavier yarn in forming the heel and toe pockets 26 and 29, respectively, so that the knit fabric formed thcreat is not nearly so sensitive to varying tension influences and the like, and because the heel and toe pocket fabric, being knit only in the restricted zones of reciprocating operation, does not affect the problem of length control appreciably anyway.

Accordingly, to provide for alternative conventional knitting, a first selectively settable means embodying a special composite stitch cam, as indicated generally by the ref erence numeral 33, is employed by the present invention in combination with related second selectively settable means for special sinker cam manipulation. The composite stitch cam 33 is seen in FIG. 9 arranged for conventional knitting in starting the welt fabric for a ladies seamless hose, and as thus arranged has a movable stitch cam component 34 and associated landing cam component 35 lowered in relation to a fixed stitch cam component 36 and corresponding landing cam component 37. Such relative positioning of the stitch cam components is located by a gate 38 formed in the movable stitch cam component 34 to provide opposing abutment stops for a key 39 extending therein from the fixed stitch cam component 36, so that the movable components 34 and 35 seat at definite lowered and raised positions in relation to the fixed components 36 and 37 (compare FIGS. 9 and 17).

When positioned for conventional knitting as seen in FIG. 9, the composite stitch cam 33 presents the knitting angle surface 40 of the movable stitch cam component 34 to cam downwardly the butts 41 of all active needles 31 past the knitting point at 40 to draw stitches in the conventional manner. Beyond the knitting point 43, the fixed landing cam 37 acts to raise the needle butts 41 somewhat (compare FIGS. and 11) for carnming downwardly again by the knitting angle 42 of the fixed stitch cam component 36 under the knitting point thereof at 42 (see FIG. 12). However, as the fixed cam knitting point 42 is higher than that of the movable cam component as seen at 40 in FIG. 9, the additional raising and descent of the needles 31 as they pass the fixed cam component has no material effect on the conventional knitting being done for placing the starting welt fabric on the transfer jacks, indicated at 43 in FIGS. 9 through 12, and the needles 31 are subsequently raised by conventional means (not shown) and cleared in the usual manner.

FIGS. 13 and 14 illustrate in enlarged detail the particular forms of needle 31 and sinker 32 that are preferably used according to the present invention for carrying out the special knitting method disclosed, while allowing conventional knitting to be done alternatively as required or desired. The needle 31 is of the familiar latch type, but is specially formed in that the hook thereof at 44 has an elongated continuation at 45 provided to insure retention of the knitting yarn during its loose or slack condition that results when the sinkers 32 retract to release the measured yarn bights for drawing by the needles 31, as previously noted above. The elongated hook continuation is made substantially straight and is proportioned in length with respect to the special upper and lower supporting level arrangement of the sinker 32 to be described presently. As an illustrative example, an elongated continuation 45 having a length beyond the rounded hook 44 of about .031" may be used advantageously in knitting ladies seamless hose with 15 denier nylon yarn at a gauge corresponding to a full-fashioned gauge of about 60. It should also be noted that needles 31 and sinkers 32 of conventional form may be used to carry out the special knitting method of the present invention if particular care is given to setting and maintaining their adjustment, and that conventionally formed needles 31 have been formed to give good results when employed in combination with the specially formed sinkers 32 provided according to the present invention.

The special form of sinker 32 shown in FIG. 14 is of conventional style for disposition *and actuation in the usual manner, but has an upper surface 46 extending backwardly from the nib 47 thereof that is formed lower than usual and made especially fiat and level for measuring the knitting yarn bights effectively in accordance with the present invention, and for releasing the measured yarn efiiciently to the lower sinker surface 48 extending forwardly of the nib 47 to support the yarn during drawing. The lowered disposition of the upper sinker surface 46'is selected to provide an elevation above the lower sinker surface 48 that is sufiicient to allow measuring of yarn bights as closely short of casting-off as may be controlled with consistent regularity under practical operating conditions. By relating the upper and lower sinker surfaces 46 and 48 in this way an undue slaokness in the measured yarn is avoided during its release for drawing, and the drawing operation may accordingly be controlled in a more effective and advantageous manner.

It now remains to explain in further detail the particular means by which the needles 3 1 and sinkers 32 are manipulated for knitting specially according to the present invention while selectively allowing alternative knitting in the usual manner, and this may be done best by describing a representative operating cycle. Assuming then that the knitting machine 10 is to be used for knitting a ladies seamless hose blank 23 of the type shown in FIG. 2, the operating cycle will start with the feeding of yarn to knit the selvage or make up courses in the usual manner; that is, a first course knit on every other needle 31, a second course knit on all the needles 3'1, and then a third course during which the transfer jacks 43 are extended, as indicated in FIG. 9, to form the dial loops seen diagrammatically at 49 in FIG. 15, after which. the continuing courses are knit normally on all the needles 31. This procedure is illustrated and described in the above referred to US. Patent No. 1,282,958.

During this knitting of the starting welt fabric, the composite stitch cam 33 is arranged for conventional knitting as previously noted, and as seen in FIG. 9, in order to allow the formation of the dial loops 49 on the transfer jacks 43, which are not capable of releasing the yarn for drawing after previous measuring, and which accordingly require that the knitting be done thereon in the conventional manner rather than by the special method of this invention. As soon, however, as the dial loops 49 have been formed and knitting of the continuing normal courses has begun, a shift may be made to the special method, and this is conveniently done after about four to eight of the continuing conventional courses have been knit.

The shifting to knit by the special method is done by manipulation of the composite stitch cam 33 of the first settable means in combination with a related adjustment of the phase of sinker actuation or timing by the second settable means. Manipulation of stitch cam 33 for this purpose involves raising the movable stitch and landing cam components 34 and 35 so that they assume the relative position shown in FIG. 17, at which the knitting point 40 of the movable stitch cam component 34 is elevated to a level above that of the fixed cam knitting point 42, and the knitting angle '40 of movable cam component 34 is thereby disposed to serve for lowering the needles 31 initially for measuring, as previously described, while subsequent drawing is accomplished as the needle butts 41 pass beneath the fixed stitch cam component 36 where the knitting angle 42 causes further drawing descent of the needles 31 to the knitting point 42.

The means provided for actuating such manipulation of the composite stitch cam 33 is illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 18, and comprises an arrangement of the cam components on a bracket 50 carried by the bed plate 16 of knitting machine 10, with a vertically slidable post 51 contained in the bracket 50 and having the movable stitch cam component 34 and associated landing cam 35 mounted thereon so as to be shiftable for alternate raised and lowered positioning in relation to the fixed stitch and landing cam components 36 and 37 as previously described above. Control of the movable cam component positioning is effected as illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 18 from the main pattern drum through a thrust bar 52 (see FIG. 1) that extends upwardly to carry a cam block 53 in relation to a follower stud 54 fitted on a downward ly angled leg 55 of a lever 56 that is supported intermediate its length in a pivot yoke 57 (FIG. 18) on the bed plate 16 and reaches to a connection with the vertically slidable post 51 (compare FIGS. 1 and 18), on which the movable cam components 34 and 35 are mounted, to determine the positioning thereof.

The downwardly angled leg 55 of lever 56 is biased by a spring at 55 to maintain the stud 54 thereon in following relation at the thrust bar cam block 53, and the thrust bar 52 is in turn downwardly biased in the usual manner (not shown) for following a suitably programmed camming action of the pattern drum 15. In FIG. 1 the thrust bar 52 is shown riding the pattern drum 15 at a disposition that causes the cam block 53 thereon to displace the follower stud 54 so that the downwardly angled leg 55 of lever 56 is forced outwardly (i.e., to the left in FIG. 1) about the axis of pivot yoke 57 and the lever 56 is thereby depressed at its connection with the composite cam post 51 so as to lower post 51 and the movable cam components 34 and 35 carried thereon to the position required for conventional knitting as seen in FIG. 9; whereas upward camming of the thrust bar 52 by the pattern drum 15 to raise the cam block 53 will allow the follower stud 54 to ride inwardly thereat under the bias of spring 55 and elevate the extending end of lever 56 at the composite cam post 51 so as to shift the movable cam components 34 and 35 to the raised position illustrated in FIG. 17 for carrying out the special knitting method of the present invention.

Concurrently, the previously mentioned adjustment of sinker timing must be accomplished and this is also done from the main pattern drum '15 through a conventional actuating lever (not shown) riding thereon and arranged to pull an actuating rod 58 momentarily to the left (as seen in FIG. 1) in response to camming action of the pattern drum 15 suitably timed for this purpose. A branching rod member 59 is fixed at 60 on the actuating rod 58 to carry a collar 61 in abutting relation at an upwardly reaching rocker arm 62 that is pivotally mounted on the bed plate standard 20, and that supports a horizontally extending latch arm 63 arranged for retaining engagement with the sinker cam cap 17 at a radially projecting pin 64 thereon (compare FIGS. 1 and the rocker arm 62 being biased by a spring 62' to urge the latch arm 63 toward retaining engagement at the sinker cap pin 64, while leftward movement of the actuating rod 58 under the influence of the pattern drum 15 causes the abutment collar 61 on the branching rod member 59 8 to bear on the rocker arm 62 and tilt it to the left so as to raise the latch arm 63 free of the sinker cap pin 64.

By this arrangement alternative adjustment of the sinker cap 17 between the respective positions indicated in FIGS. 20 and 21 is made possible for timing the sinker actuation to knit conventionally or specially in accordance with the present invention. At the FIG. 20 position, the sinker cap 17 is held by engagement of latch arm 63 with the pin 64 thereon so that the sinker cam 65 has its peak 65 set in phase with the knitting angle 40 of the movable stitch cam component 34 to actuate the sinkers 32 conventionally when this cam component is lowered (as seen in FIG. 9) for drawing stitches in the usual manner from the lower surfaces 48 of the sinkers 32. The pattern drum 15 will accordingly be programmed to maintain the sinker cap 17 at the FIG. 20 position during knitting of the starting courses for the welt fabric in the manner that has been noted above.

However, when knitting of the welt fabric has been sufiiciently started to allow a shift to the special knitting method of the present invention, the previously described manipulation of the composite stitch cam 33 to the FIG. 17 relation is accompanied by an adjustment of the sinker cap 17 to the FIG. 21 position at which the peak 65' of the sinker cam 65 will now be set in phase with the knitting angle 42 of the fixed stitch cam component 36, so that the sinkers 32 will remain advanced for measuring the knitting yarn 12 across their upper surfaces 46 during initial lowering of the needles 31 by the raised stitch cam component 34 and will retract for drawing in relation to the stitch cam component 36.

Actually, in order to avoid a series of excessively tight stitches as the shift is made to the special knitting method of the present invention, it is desirable to elfect the adjustment of the sinker cap 17 slightly in advance of the manipulation of the composite stitch cam 33. This slightly advanced adjustment of the sinker cap 17 will result in forming a brief series of enlarged stitches, such as are indicated at 66 in FIG. 15, by causing the sinkers 32 to support the knitting yarn 12 for drawing from their upper surfaces 48, as illustrated in FIG. 16, until the following manipulation of the composite stitch cam 33 is completed so as to cause the knitting to proceed as shown in FIGS. 4 through 8. The enlarged stitches 66, however, are not in any sense a defect because they result from a brief transitory effect that is not substantial, so that they must purposely be searched for in order to be noticed, and also because these stitches 66 are situated at the inturned portion of the welt 24 so as not to be readily apparent in any event.

Returning then to a sequential consideration of the operating cycle, the shift to the special knitting method is efiected following conventional starting of the welt fabric by the action of the pattern drum 15 in first causing the latch arm 63 to be raised from its engaged position illustrated in FIGS. 20 and 22 to release the sinker cap pin 64, as seen in FIG. 24, and assume a riding position thereon as indicated in FIGS. 21 and 23. Such release by the latch arm 63 frees the sinker cap 17 so that it is carried by the rotation of the needle cylinder 14 to the FIG. 21 position, at which it is stopped by the abutment at a post 67, depending from latch-guard ring 19, of an adjustable stud 68 that is carried by a sinker cap lug 69 for use ordinarily, together with an oppositely arranged stud 68' and lug 69', in limiting the sinker cap oscillation during reciprocatory knitting. As soon as the sinker cap 17 is thus adjusted the pattern drum 15 then effects the manipulation of the composite stitch cam 33 to the FIG. 17 relation and the knitting operation then continues according to the special method of the present invention as the inturned welt 24 is completed and closed and the knitting yarn 12 is changed for the following sheerer leg portion 25 that extends to the heel pocket 26.

Upon reaching the heel pocket 26, a change to re- 9 ciprocatory knitting is actuated by the pattern drum and the first resulting reversal of needle cylinder rotation will carry the sinker cap 17 in the same direction so that the sinker cap pin 64 will shift from the FIG. 23 position to become engaged automatically again by the latch arm 63 as seen in FIG. 22, to adjust the sinker cap 17 again to its FIG. 20 position for conventional knitting. Actually, the sinker cap pin 64 will travel further to the left than is seen in FIG. 22 as the sinker cap 17 oscillates reversely until stopped by the stud 68' carried by lug 69', while its oscillation in the other direction will be stopped by the latch arm 63 in the FIG. 22 position. As soon as the last active needle has passed the composite stitch cam 33 upon this change to reciprocatory knitting, the pattern drum 15 also acts to lower the movable stitch cam component 34- for conventional knitting in relation to the adjusted sinker cap 17 while the heel pocket 26 is formed.

Upon completion of the heel pocket 26, the pattern drum 15 actuates a return to knitting by the special method of the present invention to form the foot portion 27, the manipulation of the composite stitch cam 33 and related adjustment of the sinker cap 17 being accomplished again at this time just as had been described above, except that because the majority of the needles 31 are inactive as the reciprocatory knitting period ends, the shift to the special method may be accomplished at this time without forming any enlarged stitches such as were noted at 66 in the shift made following formation of the starting welt fabric. The foot portion 27 is thereupon knit completely in the special manner of the present invention through and including the several courses of the toe ring 28, after which a return to reciprocatory operation and conventional knitting is again actuated by the pattern drum 15 to form the toe pocket 29, followed by a short period of rotary operation to knit the run-off courses 30 still in the conventional manner so that upon pressing off a completed hose blank 23 the machine is ready to start a succeeding operating cycle repeating the movements that have been described above.

The present invention has been thus described in detail above for purposes of illustration only and is not intended to be limited by this description or otherwise except as defined in the appended claims.

I claim:

1. The method of knitting seamless hose which comprises forming selvage courses for an inturned Welt, transferring and holding said selvage courses, and forming several succeeding welt courses, all while drawing the needle loops for said selvage and succeeding courses directly from the knitting yarn supply, and then continuing the knitting of said -welt and an adjoining leg portion with courses formed by measuring yarn from said supply for a plurality of adjacent needle loops prior to drawing completely each needle loop.

2. The method of knitting seamless hose which comprises forming selvage courses for an inturned welt, transferring and holding said selvage courses, and forming several succeeding welt courses, all while drawing the needle loops for said selvage and succeeding courses directly from the knitting yarn supply, and then continuing the knitting of said welt and the remaining structure of said hose with courses formed by measuring yarn from said supply for a plurality of adjacent needle loops prior to drawing completely each needle loop, except at the heel and toe pockets of said remaining structure.

3. The method of knitting seamless hose which comprises knitting the fabric of said hose predominantly with courses formed by measuring a plurality of adjacent needle loops prior to drawing completely each needle loop, while alternatively knitting other courses by drawing needle loops without prior measuring.

4. The method of knitting seamless hose which comprises knitting the fabric of said hose predominantly with courses formed by measuring a plurality of adja- 10 cent needle loops, and then drawing each needle loop as the first measured of said adjacent plurality, while alternatively drawing needle loops and casting off without prior measuring during knitting of other courses of said fabric.

5. The method of forming circular knit fabric which comprises knitting said fabric predominantly with courses formed by first progressively supporting sinker bights at an elevated level and measuring a plurality of adjacent needle loops between said bights, and then progressively releasing said sinker bights to a lower level and successively drawing each needle loop as the first measured of said adjacent plurality, while alternatively knitting other courses of said fabric by drawing needle loops between sinker bights supported at said lower level without prior measuring.

6. The method of forming circular knit fabric which comprises knitting said fabric predominantly with courses formed by first progressively supporting sinker bights at an elevated level and measuring a plurality of adjacent needle loops between said bights, and then progressively releasing said sinker bights to a lower level while successively drawing the measured needle loops and progressively holding an adjacent plurality of said needle loops at the drawn extent thereof.

7. The method of forming circular knit fabric which comprises knitting said fabric by advancing and retracting sinkers in relation to the raising and lowering of latch needles, and alternatively changing the phase of said relation selectively for retracting said sinkers to support bights at a lower level thereon for drawing loops therebetween by said needles upon lowering thereof, and for advancing said sinkers to support bights at an elevated level thereon for measuring of loops therebetween during an initial stage of lowering of said needles and then retracting said sinkers for drawing said measured loops during a final stage of lowering of said needles.

8. In a circular knitting machine having latch needles and sinkers cooperating therewith for forming circular knit fabric, means for causing said needles to measure loops between said sinkers prior to drawing completely, while alternatively allowing loops to be drawn by said needles between said sinkers without prior measuring.

9. In a circular knitting machine having latch needles and sinkers cooperating therewith for forming circular knit fabric, a first selectively settable means for actuating said needles alternatively to measure loops between said sinkers prior to drawing completely and to draw loops between said sinkers without prior measuring, a second selectively settable means for actuating said sinkers to support bights at an elevated level for measuring and at a lower level for drawing, and means controlled by the operation of said machine for respectively setting said first and second means to cause a selected actuation of said needles and sinkers as said machine operates to knit particular portions of said fabric.

10. ln a circular knitting machine having latch needles and sinkers cooperating therewith to form circular knit fabric, a stitch cam formed compositely with leading and trailing components shiftable in such relation to each other that the leading of said components may be shifted alternatively to one position for lowering said needles to draw stitches directly from a knitting yarn supply, and to another position for lowering said needles initially to measure yarn from said supply while final lowering of said needles to draw said measured yarn is accomplished by the trailing of said components.

11. In a circular knitting machine having latch needles and sinkers cooperating therewith for forming circular knit fabric, means for changing the timing phase of said sinkers comprising a sinker cap, means for releasably latching said sinker cap at a first position against movement with the needle cylinder during rotary operation to position sinkers for measuring yarn for drawing of loops by the needles, and means for stopping said sinker cap at a second position upon release of said latching means to 1 1 allow movement thereof with said needle cylinder to position sinkers for drawing without measuring.

12. In a circular knitting machine having latch needles and sinkers cooperating therewith for forming circular knit fabric, a stitch cam formed compositely with components shiftable in relation to each other for alternatively controlling said needles differentially, and a sinker cap having means for related alternative positioning of said cap to maintain the control of said sinkers in phase with said differential needle control.

13. In a circular knitting machine having latch needles and sinkers cooperating therewith to form circular knit fabric, a stitch cam formed compositely with a fixed component and a shiftable component, said components having needle engaging surfaces With extremities that position said needles to draw loops, said shiftable component being shiftable from one position to another position with respect to the fixed component and having its extremity positioned to cause the needles to draw loops before the needles pass to the fixed component when the shiftable component is in one position but which extremity is sulficiently retracted when the shiftable component is in the other position so that the needles are not positioned for drawing loops until the needles pass over the extremity on the fixed component.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,073,309 Wilcomb Sept. 16, 1913 1,209,256 Bosworth Dec. 19, 1916 1,244,674 Wilcomb Oct. 30, 1917 1,244,675 Wilcomb Oct. 30, 1917 1,248,019 Scott Nov. 27, 1917 1,882,430 Lawson Oct. 11, 1932 2,101,005 Lawson Nov. 30, 1937 2,348,313 Smith May 9, 1944 2,374,857 Fregeolle May 1, 1945 2,858,685 Sommers Nov. 4, 1958 2,899,812 Attenborough Aug. 18, 1959 2,913,886 Kale et a1 Nov. 24, 1959

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3256716 *Jan 16, 1962Jun 21, 1966Schubert & Salzer MaschinenCircular knitting machine
US3260072 *Jan 10, 1962Jul 12, 1966Scott & Williams IncKnitting machine
US3478544 *Sep 25, 1967Nov 18, 1969Kayser Roth CorpMethod of knitting sheer seamless support stockings
US3937037 *Jan 9, 1974Feb 10, 1976Scott & Williams, Inc.Method and apparatus for knitting terry fabric
US6854294Apr 5, 2004Feb 15, 2005Sipra Patententwicklungs- Und Beteiligungsgesellschaft MbhMethod and knitting machine for producing knitwear, especially from hard, inelastic thread material
US20040200242 *Apr 5, 2004Oct 14, 2004Rolf WillmerMethod and knitting machine for producing knitwear, especially from hard, inelastic thread material
CN100494534CMar 26, 2004Jun 3, 2009Sipra专利发展合作股份有限公司Method and knitting machine for producing knitwear
EP1469110A1Mar 24, 2004Oct 20, 2004SIPRA Patententwicklungs- und Beteiligungsgesellschaft mbHMethod and knitting machine for making knit articles, particularly articles from hard, inelastic yarn
Classifications
U.S. Classification66/8, 66/57, 66/108.00R
International ClassificationD04B9/00, D04B9/46, D04B35/00, D04B9/02
Cooperative ClassificationD04B15/34, D04B9/025, D04B15/327, D04B1/26, D04B9/46
European ClassificationD04B15/32D, D04B15/34, D04B1/26, D04B9/46, D04B9/02B