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Publication numberUS3055517 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 25, 1962
Filing dateOct 20, 1961
Priority dateOct 20, 1961
Publication numberUS 3055517 A, US 3055517A, US-A-3055517, US3055517 A, US3055517A
InventorsKirkland Joseph T
Original AssigneeKirkland Joseph T
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Parking garage
US 3055517 A
Images(5)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

P 5, 1962 .1. T. KIRKLAND 3,055,517

PARKING GARAGE Filed Oct. 20, 1961 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 JOSEPH 7. file/(LAND Y INVENTOR.

J. T. KIRKLAND PARKING GARAGE Sept. 25, 1962 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed Oct. 20, 1961 JTTOE/VEYS' Sept. 25,1962 J. T. KIRKLAND 3,055,517

PARKING GARAGE Filed Oct. 20, 1961 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 JOSEPH THPKLA/VD INVENTOR.

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5 Sheets-Sheet 5 JOSEPH T- KIRKLAND ATTORNEY J. T. KIRKLAND PARKING GARAGE Sept. 25, 1962 Filed Oct. 20, 1961 United States Patent ()fiFice 3,055,517 PARKING GARAGE Joseph T. Kirkland, 145 N. Kingston St., San Mateo, Calif. Filed Oct. 20, 1961, Ser. No. 147,707 6 Claims. (Cl. 214-161) This application is a continuation-in-part of my copending case, Serial No. 44,377, now abandoned, which was filed in the United States Patent Ofiice on July 21, 1960.

This invention relates to parking garages, and more particularly to an improved, multi-storied garage for parking vehicles, such as automobiles.

At the present time, parking is becoming an increasing problem for high-density population centers, such as the larger cities. Numerous attempts have been made to solve parking problems in such areas by the use of various types of parking garages. However, most of these prior parking garages usually require an excessive amount of time to park or unpark a car, or else require a relatively large amount of parking attendants and involve a substantial waste of space.

This invention provides a parking garage in which automobiles can be quickly parked or unparked with a minimum waste of space, and which requires a minimum number of attendants.

Briefly, the garage of this invention includes a building having an upright elevator shaft in its interior. A plurality of vertically spaced parking floors terminate adjacent the elevator shaft, and a vehicle elevator is disposed in the shaft. The vehicle elevator has a plural ity of vertically spaced turntables, each turntable being adapted to support a vehicle. Means are provided for rotating the turntables and vehicles supported on them so that vehicles can be orientated in any desired direction in a substantially horizontal plane. Means are also provided for moving the vehicle elevator up and down in the shaft to align the turntables on the vehicle elevator with the parking floors in the building. The invention also includes means for moving vehicles from the turntables to adjacent parking floors, and for moving vehicles from the parking floors back to the turntables.

With this invention, a plurality of automobiles can be loaded on the vertically spaced turntable on the elevator and carried to difierent parking levels in the garage. Thus, it is possible to carry more than one car at a time up or down the elevator shaft, which may be made of a diameter only slightly greater than the length of the longest car to be parked. Another advantage is that cars to be unpanked can be loaded onto the various turntables of the vehicle elevator from different directions, thus facilitating the random selection of automobiles to be unparked. This is of particular advantage when there is no way of determining in what order cars will have to be unparked.

The preferred form of the invention includes an operators cage rigidly attached to the vehicle elevator so that both move up and down together. An operators lift is supported in this cage so that the operator can move himself up and down within the cage for ready visual inspection and operation of each turntable, and can watch the cars on the turntables as the vehicle ele vator is raised or lowered. Moreover, the operator can readily position himself so as to observe the unloading of the cars from the turntables and the loading of the cars back onto the turntables from the parking floors.

Moreover, in the continuation-in-part of this application, I provide a pair of vehicle elevators in the centrally arranged elevator shaft, and each may have several levels on which cars may be placed on turntables. The turntables may be retracted into positions so that the two elevators may pass one another. Each turntable 3,055,517 Patented Sept. 25, 1962 may be moved into an advanced position so that its axis of rotation will coincide with the vertical axis of the vehicle elevator shaft so that a car may be moved from the advanced turntable to a parking floor, or from the parking floor back onto the advanced turntable. Such an arrangement will speed up the parking and unpark ing of the cars materially.

Drawings These and other aspects of the invention will be more fully understood from the following detailed description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIGURE 1 is a horizontal sectional view of my parking garage and taken on the line 11 of FIGURE 2;

FIGURE 2 is a sectional elevation taken on the line 22 of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 3 is a sectional plan view taken on the line 33 of FIGURE 2;

FIGURE 4 is a transverse sectional the line 44 of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 5 is an enlarged fragmentary elevation of the vehicle elevator mounted in the elevator shaft of the garage;

FIGURE 6 is a sectional view taken along the line 6-6 of FIGURE 5;

FIGURE 7 is an enlarged fragmentary elevation, partly in section, of the portion of the garage enclosed in the arrows 7-7 of FIGURE 2;

FIGURE 8 is a sectional elevation of an alternate arrangement in which the operators cage moves with the vehicle elevators;

FIGURE 9 is a horizontal sectional view of my park'- ing garage, corresponding to FIGURE 1, but disclosing two elevators disposed in the central elevator shaft, the turntables being arranged to pass one another;

FIGURE 10 is an enlarged view of the central portion of FIGURE 9, with one elevator having its turntable advanced to the center of the elevator shaft and aligned with a parking platform, the other elevator having its turntable retracted; and

FIGURE 11 is a vertical sectional view taken along the line 11-11 of FIGURE 10.

Detailed Description view taken along Referring to FIGURES 1-4, the parking garage includes a circular concrete base 10 mounted at ground level and having a circular well 12 extending down from its central portion. A building 14 is mounted on the base and includes an inner set of radially spaced vertical supports 16 located around the periphery of the center well 12. An outer set of radially spaced and vertical support posts 18 are erected around the periphery of the garage base.

A plurality of horizontal and radially extending parking platforms 20 are attached at their respective inner ends between adjacent supports 16 and at their outer ends between adjacent supports 18 to form a plurality of vertically spaced parking floors 24 within the building. The inner ends of each of the parking platforms 20 are curved to match the curvature of the center well and form an elevator shaft 26 in which a vehicle elevator 28 is adapted to be moved up' and down on cables 29 powered by conventional hoisting means (not shown) mounted on the top of the garage.

As best shown in FIGURES 2-5, the vehicle elevator includes four horizontal, circular and vertically spaced elevator turntables 30 mounted to rotate within a frame that includes cleats 34 secured together by vertical braces 35 (see FIGURE 5). The cleats 34 are mounted to ride in inwardly opening vertical grooves 36 formed in each of the inner surfaces of the supports 16. Each cleat includes an inwardly extending horizontal bearing support surface 38 on which rests ball bearings 40 that support the elevator turntables 30.

In FIGURES 5 and 6, each elevator turntable has been shown as having on its upper surface a four-wheel dolly which includes an electric motor 52 underneath it and connected to a power wheel 54 which has a groove 56 around its periphery to fit over an elongated rail or track 58 rigidly secured to the upper surface of the turntable.

The electric motor for each dolly receives its power through a separate cable 60 coiled in a separate conventional automatic rewind drum 62 mounted in the center of each rotary table. Power for each motor is supplied to the rewind drum through an electrical lead 64 connected to an insulated contact 65 mounted in one of the cleats to extend outwardly from the vehicle elevator and engage one end of an insulated contact 66 extending through one of the vertical supports 16. Each turntable is rotated through a separate ring gear 67 attached to the underside of each table and driven by a respective spur gear 68 which is powered by a separate electric motor 70 mounted on the cleat in which the contact 65 is mounted. Each motor receives its power through an electrical lead 72 which is connected to an insulated contact 74 mounted in the cleat on which the motor is mounted to contact the inner end of an insulated contact 75 mounted in the same upright support 16 as contact 65.

The underside of each dolly also carries a longitudinally extending rotatable rod mounted in a conventional electrically-operated rotating mechanism 82 which is constructed to rotate the rod 80 around its longitudinal axis between two positions apart. When the mechanism 82 is energized, the rod is rotated into the position shown in FIGURE 5 so that upright stops 84 formed integrally at opposite ends of the rod are in the vertical positions shown. When the mechanism 82 is not energized, the stops 84 fall to a horizontal position. Thus, the dolly can be rolled under an automobile, the mechanism actuated to lift the stops 84, and then the dolly powered to move the car longitudinally. Power is supplied to the mechanism 82 through an electrical lead 86 which is stored in the rewind drum and supplied power by a wire 87 connected to an insulated contact 88 mounted in the same cleat as contacts 65 and 74. The contact 88 is disposed to make contact with the inner end of an insulated contact 89 mounted in the same support 16 as contacts 66 and 75.

Power is supplied to the three contacts 66, 75, and 89 in the support 16 from an operators cage 90 which is adapted to be hoisted up and down on a cable 92 in a triangularly-shaped shaft 94 between an adjacent pair of parking platforms 20 (see FIGURE 1). Power is supplied to the operators cage through a conventional arrangement, such as commonly used in elevators. Power from the cage is controlled from a control panel 96 inside the cage and supplied to three vertically spaced contacts 98 mounted on the exterior of the cage to engage three respective contacts for each of the rotary tables as the cage is moved up and down.

An annular turntable 100 is mounted on the base of the garage to rotate about an axis which passes through the center of the well 12. As shown in FIGURE 7, the annular turntable 100 fits in an annular groove 102 formed in the base around the center well 12. The inner periphery of the annular turntable rests on an inner set of ball bearings 104 supported on the base, and the outer periphery of the turntable rests on an outer set of ball bearings 106 supported on the garage base. A ring gear 108 is secured to the underside of the annular turntable and is driven by a spur gear 110 powered from an electric motor 112 which is operated through conventional controls (not shown).

As best shown in FIGURES 3 and 7, an annular curb 113 is formed on the upper surface of the garage base around the inside periphery of the turntable 100. The curb begins behind the operators cage, and extends clockwise (as viewed from above) around the inner periphery of the annular turntable to stop short of the cage by a distance which is slightly greater than the width of the widest car to be parked in the garage. Thus, the curb has a gap 114 which forms an unloading space through which cars are transferred from the annular turntable across an annular, stationary island 116 formed in the base of the garage, and onto one of the turntables of the vehicle elevator.

The means for discharging the cars from the garage (shown best in FIGURES 3 and 4) includes a lateral exit excavation 120 which extends horizontally from the upper end of the well to clear the outer periphery of the garage base, and then extends upwardly along a ramp 122 to return the cars to street level. As shown best in FIGURE 3, the discharge area is in the shape of a V with its apex at the well 12. One branch of the V forms a first exit 124, and the other branch of the V forms a second exit 126. The first exit includes a rail 128 which is identical with the rail 58 on the vehicle elevator turntables, and the second exit also includes a rail 130 of similar construction.

Each of the rails 128 and 130 are located in their respective exits to be collinear with the rail 58 on the turntables as they are rotated to the proper position for discharging cars into the exit. The dolly on each turntable is adapted to ride out on the respective track in each exit portion to carry the front end of the car to the inner end of a conventional automatic towing system 132 mounted in each of the exits. Thus, the dolly, on discharging a car, carries the front wheels of the car over the inner end of the discharge conveyor 132 where the car is automatically picked up and moved to the street level.

The operation of the garage will be understood more fully from the following description. Assuming that a street (not shown) is located on the right side (as viewed in the drawings) of the garage, cars to be parked are driven onto the annular turntable 100 from a loading driveway 140, which opens onto the street. The right front wheel of each car driven onto the annular turntable is directed into a radially extending guide 142 on the top of the turntable. A radially extending track 144 identical with that mounted on each turntable of the vehicle elevator is mounted immediately to the left of each wheel guide 142. As can be seen best in FIGURE 3, a plurality of radially spaced wheel guides and tracks are mounted around the periphery of the annular turntable. Each wheel guide has a wheel chock 146 (see FIGURE 7) mounted in it near its outer end. Each car is driven in until its right rear wheel passes over the chock and is thus prevented from rolling backwards.

After a car is driven onto the turntable, the annular turntable motor 112 (FIGURE 7) is actuated to rotate the annular turntable in a clockwise direction (as viewed from above) until the next wheel guide and track are aligned with the loading area. Then, the next car is driven into position. Each car is driven forward until its front wheels are almost in contact with the annular curb 113. This curb prevents the cars from extending too far into the central portion of the garage. The automobile is left with the brakes oif. The annular turntable is then rotated slowly in a clockwise direction as viewed from above until the next wheel guide is in position with the loading driveway. The annular turntable is rotated sufirciently slowly so that the inertia and static friction of the car, as well as the wheel chock, is sufiicient to prevent the centrifugal force from causing the car to roll outwardly 01f of the annular turntable.

The loading of cars is continued until the first car so loaded is brought into the unloading position which liesv directly over the first exit 124 as shown in FIGURE 3.,

In this position, the front end of the car is now aligned with the gap 114 in the curb 113 formed around most of the inner periphery of the annular turntable on the garage base. The vehicle elevator is operated so that it is in the position shown in FIGURES 2 and 4, i.e., with the top turntable 30 at street level. The operators cage is also in the position shown in FIGURE 2 so that the contacts on the cage engage the three contacts associated with the top turntable. The operator of the cage supplies power to the motor 70 for the top turntable until the top elevator turntable is collinear with a track 150 which extends radially across the stationary island 116 (see FIG- URE 3). The dolly on the upper track is then caused to move outwardly along the tracks by the operator in the cage supplying power to the power wheel motor on the dolly, which is brought to a stop underneath the car to be unloaded from the annular turntable.

The operator then actuates the mechanism 82 to turn the rod 80 so that the stops 84 are in upright position shown in FIGURE 5. The distance between the stops 84 is just slightly greater than the maximum length from bumper to bumper of the longest car to be parked in the garage. In this condition, the stops cradle the bumpers of the car to be unloaded. If desired, the stops 84 may be suitably padded. The operator then supplies power to the dolly to cause the outboard stop 84 to engage the rear bumper of the car, push the car across the stationary island, and onto the top turntable.

The annular turntable is then rotated clockwise until the track under the next car is aligned with the track on the stationary island. The vehicle elevator is then raised until the turntable second from the top is flush with the stationary island. The operator turns the second elevator turntable until the dolly track is collinear with the track on the stationary island. The dolly is then supplied power to drive it across the stationary island in an outward direction and under the second car on the annular turntable. The rod 80 is then turned so the stops 84 cradle the bumpers of the car. The second car is then pulled onto the second vehicle elevator turntable by the dolly, and the foregoing process is repeated until the elevator is loaded with a separate car on each of its turntables.

The elevator is then raised so that each elevator turntable is level with a parking platform 20 on one of the floors of the garage. The operators cage, which can be moved independently of the vehicle elevator, is moved so that the contacts on the cage supply power to the contacts associated with the top elevator turntable. The top car is then moved to a parking position on a parking platform 20 by the operator turning the top turntable on the elevator so that its track is collinear with a track 152 on the top of the platform 20 on which the top car is to be parked. As can be seen in FIGURE 1, each platform has a track 152. The dolly is then actuated to push the top car oh? the elevator turntable and onto the parking platform 20. The mechanism 82 on the top dolly is operated so that stops 84 drop to a horizontal position, and then the top dolly is returned to its turntable. The foregoing is repeated to unload a car from each of the other turntables onto a respective parking platform.

To unpark a car, the process is substantially reversed, i.e., the vehicle elevator is adjusted so that one of its empty turntables is on the same level as the floor of the parked car. The elevator turntable is rotated by the operator so that the dolly track on the turntable is collinear with the track under the car to be removed. With the stops in the lower or horizontal position, the dolly is operated to move out under the car to be removed. The mechanism 82 is operated so that the stops rise to the vertical position and cradle the bumpers of the car. The dolly is then operated to pull the car from the parking platform onto the vehicle elevator turntable.

The car is now ready to be moved to the discharge area immediately, or else additional cars can be loaded onto other elevator turntables prior to making the trip down with the elevator. In any event, the elevator is finally lowered to the position shown in FIGURE 4, assuming that the car to be removed is on the turntable second from top. If the car is to be discharged through the first exit, the turntable is rotated until the dolly track is collinear with the track located in the discharge area leading to the first exit 124. Then the operator moves the dolly and car out until the front wheels of the car pass onto the first discharge conveyor 132. The dolly stops are lowered, the dolly returned to its turntable, and the conveyor turned on by conventional means (not shown) to carry the car up to street level. In another car is on the top turntable, then the elevator is lowered until the top turntable is level with the floor of the discharge area. The turntable is rotated until its track is collinear with the track leading to the second exit 126. The operator then moves the dolly outwardly until the front wheels 'of the vehicle are picked up by the second discharge conveyor 132. The dolly stops are lowered by the operating mechanism 82, and the discharge conveyor is turned on by conventional control means (not shown) so that the car moves out the second exit to the street level.

It will be apparent that with the garage of this invention, a plurality of cars can be moved simultaneously through a single access way or elevator shaft. Moreover, any one of a number of cars can be selected at random (without having to move other cars) by simply rotating the elevator turntables to the desired orientation.

It should be noted that one advantage of loading the cars onto the annular turntable adjacent one side of the operators cage and unloading the cars from the annular turntable to the vehicle elevator on the opposite side of the operators cage permits almost the entire periphery of the annular turntable to be used as reservoir storage space as automobiles come in off the streets.

It will also be noted that the automatic rewind drum 62 under each dolly permits the power leads for each dolly to be extended and automatically re-wound as desired. Moreover, the drum permits the dolly to be driven in either direction.

In the alternate arrangement shown in FIGURE 8, an elongated operators cage is rigidly attached to or formed integrally with the vehicle elevator 28, so the cage and elevator move up and down together. An 0perators lift 162 is supported by a conventional hoisting mechanism 164 within the cage 160 so the operator can move himself up and down within the cage for ready visual inspection and operation of each turntable 30. In the arrangement shown in FIGURE 8, the power is supplied to each turntable 30 by contacts similar to those shown in FIGURE 5, or else through electrical leads (not shown) connected in a conventional manner.

It will be apparent from FIGURE 8 that the elongated operators cage 160 has suflicient height to permit the operator to be moved by the lift 162 so that inspection may be afforded of all the turntables 30 on the vehicle elevator 28. Thus the operator can position himself so as to observe the loading of cars on the elevator turntables or unloading of cars therefrom, with the operator moving to the level of the elevator turntable being utilized at any particular time. Moreover, the operator can shift the lift 162 along the height of the cage 160 so as to inspect the cars on any one or all of the turntables 30, as the vehicle elevator 28 is raised or lowered, and thus determine that the cars are riding properly on the turntables at all times.

Referring now to FIGURES 9, 10 and 11, which disclose the subject matter of the continuation-in-part of the parent application, Serial No. 44,377, it will be noted that the garage building 14 shown in FIGURE 9 is identical with that illustrated in FIGURE 1. The parking platforms 20 in FIGURES 9 and 10 extend radially relative to the vertical axis of the circular elevator shaft 26 in the same manner as in FIGURE 1. Like reference numerals have 7 been applied to corresponding parts of the first embodiment of my invention and the modification shown in FIGURES 9 to 11, inclusive.

As disclosed in FIGURES 9 and '10, a pair of vehicle elevators 170 are arranged in the central elevator shaft 26, and each may be multi-level as in FIGURES 2, 4 and 8, and accordingly each elevator may carry a plurality of cars up and down the elevator shaft 26. Thus the carrying capacity of the two elevators 178 for cars will be doubled that shown in the first embodiment of my parking garage. I As to the details of the elevators 170, each has a platform 171 that defines a segment of a circle, with its con vex edge 172 conforming to the radius of the circular elevator shaft 26. The convex edges 172 bear against the inner set of vertical supports 16 so as to be guided by the latter when the elevators 170 are raised or lowered in the shaft by cables 173, which correspond with the cables 29 previously described. These platforms are guided so that they remain horizontal as they move up and down in the elevator shaft 26. The straight edges 174 of the two platforms are disposed parallel with one another and are spaced equidistantly from the vertical axis of the circular elevator shaft 26, as clearly shown in FIGURE 10.

Moreover, each platform 170 has a plurality of horizontal bars 175 secured thereto to project therefrom. In FIGURE 10, the bars on one platform are arranged in interdigitating relation with the bars on the other platform. Also, the bars on one platform overlap with respect to the bars on the other platform. This arrangement of the bars 175 will allow the vehicle elevators 170 to pass one another in the elevator shaft 26.

It will be noted that each elevator 170 includes an elongated plate 176 arranged to bear against and overlie the bars 175 of the respective vehicle elevator. The plates 176 have been provided with stirrups 177 that fit around the bars 1'75 with a sliding arrangement. Thus the plates 176 may be moved toward and away from the vertical axis of the elevator shaft 26. In FIGURE 9, the elongated plates 176 have been retracted or moved apart, while FIGURE discloses the left-hand bar 176 as being retracted into a position adjacent to its respective platform 171 and the right-hand plate 176 advanced until it extends diametrically across the circular elevator shaft 26, i.e., it extends across the vertical axis of this shaft.

Any suitable means may be provided for retracting and advancing the plates 176 relative to their respective platforms 171. For this purpose, I have shown each plate as having a pair of racks 178 fixed thereto, and these racks mesh with pinions 179 that are turned by electric motors 180. These motors are carried by the underside of the platforms 171 and may be actuated so as to advance or retract the plates 176, under control of the operator. The plates remain parallel with one another as they are moved along the lengths of the horizontal bars 175.

Each plate 176 has a turntable 181 mounted thereabove, with the turntables being swingably secured to their respective plate by journal bolts 182. These journal bolts are disposed vertically so that the turntables 181 may swing horizontally through a complete circle. Thus, when the right-hand turntable has been advanced to the position shown in FIGURE 10, the journal bolt 182 thereof will coincide with the vertical axis of the elevator shaft 26 and this turntable may be rotated horizontally until it is aligned with a selected parking platform 20. Of course, the cables 173 must be attached to the platforms 171 so as to be out of the way with turntables when the latter are aligned with the parking platforms.

In order to rotate the turntables 181, each has a ring gear 183 secured to its undersurface (see FIGURE 11), these gears being interposed between the turntables and the plates 176. Electric motors 184 are supported by the plates 176 and each has a pinion 185 that meshes with one of the ring gears 183. Thus, when the operator desires to rotate a turntable 181, the motor asso ciated therewith is started and the particular turntable will be swung horizontally about its journal bolt 182.

It will be noted that each turntable 181 has flap plates 186 attached to its opposite ends by hinges 187 so as to be swingable into horizontal alignment with their respective turntable. The purpose of the flap plates is to bridge the spaces between the opposite ends of the turntable and the adjacent inner ends 188 of the parking platforms 20, when the turntable has been advanced to extend diametrically relative to the circular elevator shaft 26 (see right-hand turntable in FIGURE 10).

As clearly illustrated in FIGURES l0 and 11, the flap plates may be swung into upright positions relative to their respective turntables so as to cradle cars disposed on the latter, prior to retracting the turntables away from the vertical axis of the elevator shaft 26, i.e., moved toward a concave side of the elevator shaft (see left-hand turntable in FIGURE 10). Thus, the overall longitudinal length of a turntable and its extended flap plates may be shortened so as to fit into the concave side of the elevator shaft. The turntables 181 are arranged slightly higher than their respective elevator platforms 171 so as to slide over the latter, when the turntables are retracted away from the vertical axis of the circular elevator shaft 26.

Obviously, any suitable means may be provided for holding the flap plates 186 in extended horizontal alignment with their respective turntable 181, and for bolding these flap plates in upright position when they cradle a car therebetween. For this purpose, I show solenoidactuated mechanisms 189 in FIGURE 11.

As suggested in FIGURE 9, each vehicle elevator 170 has an elongated operators cage and a lift 162 associated therewith, these cages being formed integrally with their respective vehicle elevator and movable therewith in the same manner as in FIGURE 8. Thus the operators can position themselves so as to observe the loading of cars on the elevator turntables or unloading of cars therefrom, and further the operators can watch the cars as the vehicle elevators are raised and lowered so as to assure themselves that the cars are being carried properly at all times.

It will be obvious that a dolly (see dolly 50 in FIG- URE 5) may be provided on each of the turntables 181 of the vehicle elevators of FIGURES 9, 10 and 11, whereby cars may be moved onto these turntables, transferred to the parking platforms 20, and subsequently moved back onto the turntables from the parking platforms and finally discharged onto the exit conveyors 132. Inasmuch as these parts and operation are identical with that previously described, no further disclosure is deemed necessary for a complete understanding thereof.

I claim:

1. In a parking garage: a building having an upright elevator shaft on its interior; a plurality of vertically spaced parking platforms arranged around the shaft and terminating adjacent to the elevator shaft; a vehicle elevator mounted in the shaft, and having a plurality of vertically spaced turntables, each being made to support a vehicle; means operable for moving the elevator up and down in the shaft to move the turntables to the level of selected parking platforms; means operable for rotating the turntables and any vehicles supported thereon about upright axes so as to align them with selected parking platforms; means operable for transferring vehicles from the turntables to the parking platforms and vice versa; and elongated operators cage rigidly attached to the vehicle elevator so that the cage and the elevator move up and down together; and an operators lift supported in the cage by hoisting mechanism; the cage having sufficient height and being located relative to the vehicle elevator so that the operator can move up and down by the lift for ready visual inspection and operation of the turntables at their various levels during loading of the vehicles on the elevator turntables and unloading of the vehicles therefrom; the lift being movable so that the operator may watch the vehicles on any and all of the vertically spaced turntables as the vehicle elevator is raised and lowered. I

2. In a parking garage: a building having an upright and substantially circular elevator shaft on its interior; a plurality of vertically spaced par-king platforms arranged radially around the shaft and terminating adjacent to the elevator shaft; a pair of vehicle elevators arranged in the shaft, and each having at least one turntable made to support a vehicle; means operable to move the elevators up and down in the shaft to bring the turntables to the level of selected parking platforms; means operable for retracting the turntable on each vehicle elevator away from the vertical axis of the elevator shaft, and into posit-ions wherein the elevators can pass one another in the shaft; said last-named means being operable to move a selected turntable into an advanced position extending diametrically of the circular elevator shaft; and means operable for rotating each diametrically extending turntable about the vertical axis of the elevator shaft so as to be collinear with a selected parking platform.

3. The parking garage, as defined in claim 2; and in which each turntable has flap plates hinged to its opposite ends so as to be swingable into horizontal alignment with the turntable to which they are hinged to provide extensions on their respective turntable that are dimensioned to bridge spaces between opposite ends of the turntable and adjacent inner ends of parking platforms, when the turntable has been advanced to extend diametrically relative to the circular elevator shaft.

4. The parking garage, is defined in claim 3; and in which the flap plates are swingable relative to their respective turntable into a position wherein the overall length of the turntable and its extended flap plates may be shortened so as to fit into a concave side of the elevator shaft, when the turntable is retracted away from the vertical axis of the elevator shaft; the flap plates, when in upright position, being positioned to cradle 21 car disposed on the turntable.

5. In a parking garage: a building having an upright and substantially circular elevator shaft on its interior;

a plurality of vertically spaced parking platforms arranged 10 radially around the shaft and terminating adjacent to the elevator shaft; a pair of vehicle elevators arranged in the shaft; each elevator having at least one platform guided for up and down movement in the elevator shaft; the platform of one elevator being spaced from the platform of the other elevator, whereby the platforms may pass one another in the elevator shaft; the platform of each elevator having a plurality of horizontal bars secured thereto to project toward the other platform; the bars on the platform of one elevator being arranged to interdigitate with the bars of the other elevator; each elevator having an elongated plate slidably guided on its respective horizontal bars, and each elongated plate having a turntable thereon made to support a vehicle; means operable for moving the elongated plate and its respective turntable of each elevator into an advanced position wherein the turntable and plate will extend diametrically relative to the circular elevator shaft; means operable for moving the elevator platforms up and down in the shaft to bring the turntables to the level of selected parking platforms; and means operable for rotating each diametrically extending turntable about the vertical axis of the elevator shaft so asto be collinear with a selected parking platform; the means for advancing the elongated plates and their respective turntables along the bars to diametrically arranged positions being further operable to retract the plates and their respective turntables away from the vertical axis of the elevator shaft, and into positions wherein the elevators can pass one another in the shaft.

6. The parking garage, as defined in claim 5; and in which the platform of one elevator has an inner edge that is arranged parallel with an inner edge of the platform of the other elevator; the elongated plate of one elevator being disposed parallel with the elongated plate of the other elevator, and the elongated plate of each elevator being movable into a position adjacent to the inner edge of its respective platform.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,598,413 Morley May 27, 1952 FOREIGN PATENTS 1,192,994 France Oct. 29, 1959

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
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US3302804 *Mar 2, 1964Feb 7, 1967Short Brothers & Harland LtdApparatus for classifying and otherwise handling articles
US3414141 *May 10, 1965Dec 3, 1968Albert Rougemont RaoulParking device with control means in each stall to control the movement of a vehicle carrier
US3513992 *Mar 8, 1968May 26, 1970Handler Eugene HSpiral storage structure and system for parking vehicles
US3613908 *Mar 18, 1970Oct 19, 1971Potomac Iron Works IncVehicle parking equipment
US3661280 *Aug 27, 1969May 9, 1972Triax CoAutomatic storage and semi-automated order picking system
US3709384 *Dec 14, 1970Jan 9, 1973Molins Machine Co LtdLoading units for machine tools
US3802580 *Feb 22, 1973Apr 9, 1974Supreme Equip & SystMeans for selectively removing a preselected number of articles from an inventory storage means
US3883008 *Nov 15, 1973May 13, 1975Supreme Equip & SystArticle transfer device
US4103787 *May 16, 1977Aug 1, 1978Salloum Charles RContainer handling structure
US4291797 *Dec 26, 1979Sep 29, 1981Werkzeugmaschinenfabrik Oerlikon-Buhrle AgPallet changer for a manufacture plant
US4326624 *Sep 8, 1978Apr 27, 1982Werkzeugmaschinenfabrik Oerlikon-Buhrle AgPallet feeder
US4594044 *Aug 8, 1983Jun 10, 1986Olaf SootRotating truck lift
US6004091 *Jan 21, 1998Dec 21, 1999Roth; Hans U.Apparatus for conveying items to a selected receiving station
Classifications
U.S. Classification414/249, 414/263, 414/259
International ClassificationE04H6/28, E04H6/24
Cooperative ClassificationE04H6/282, E04H6/245
European ClassificationE04H6/28A, E04H6/24A