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Publication numberUS3055575 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 25, 1962
Filing dateOct 8, 1959
Priority dateOct 8, 1959
Publication numberUS 3055575 A, US 3055575A, US-A-3055575, US3055575 A, US3055575A
InventorsGeorge Gerard
Original AssigneeJiffy Mfg Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bag construction
US 3055575 A
Images(3)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 25, 1962 v G. GERARD BAG CONSTRUCTION 3 Sheets-Sheet l Filed OCT.. 8, 1959 Sept. 25, 1962 G. GERARD 3,055,575

BAG CONSTRUCTION Filed Oct. 8, 1959 .'5 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVEN TOR.

Patented Sept. 25, 1962 3,055,575 BAG CONSTRUCTION George Gerard, Point Pleasant, NJ., assignor to Jrtfy Manufacturing Company, Hillside, NJ., a corporation of Delaware Filed Oct. 8, 1959, Ser. No. 845,131

9 Claims. (Cl. 229-66) rPhe present invention relates to `a shipping bag construction and it particularly relates to a bag for shipping materials which require protection during handling.

It is among the objects of the present invention to provide a novel padded shipping bag which may be readily manufactured by mass production and which can be readily opened .and which will be compact, ldurable and enable protected mailing or `shipping of books or similar articles through the mails without (damage thereto.

Another object is to provide a protected shipping bag or enclosure which may be readily utilized for mailing', shipping or handling of various types of readily damaged materials through the mails so that such articles may be received in original condition without scuing or damage due to handling, even though subjected to the normal rough handling procedures in handling parcel pos-t or express packages.

Still further objects and advantages will appear in the more detailed description set tort-h below, it being understood, however, that this more detailed description is given by way of illustration and `explanation only and not by way of limitation, since various changes therein may be made by those skilled in the att without departing from the scope and spirit tot the present invention.

ln accomplishing the above objects, according to one preferred -form of the present invention, the bag construction is so formed that there will be an inside layer of a relatively strong kraft paper and an outside layer of a relatively strong kraft paper, between Which will be placed -a stulng or padding material.

Ihese materials are preferably formed into a at tube with the overlap being formed of four layers of paper, but with stufling only being inserted between two of the layers.

The seam of the overlap desirably extends longitudinally of one side of the flattened tubular member. To rform the complete package, first one end is tur-ned in and stapled `and then ,the other end. After it receives the book or other article to be shipped or transported, it may be stapled or otherwise sealed to form a complete package.

A particular feature of the present invention is the provision of a tear strip or cord extending along the inside edge or side of the tube and outside ot the double plies at a place where the stuffing or hlling material is omitted.

This tear string is `desirably so incorporated with one of the end turned in portions that there will be a tab enabling ready grasping of the tear string, which, upon being pulled away trom the package, will enable one side of the package to be torn open and the article removed therefrom.

Desirably the rip cord is glued or otherwise adhesively connected to the inside edge of lone of the double folds at the side of .the folded tubular member and it will be held in position both by the [fold and by the glue.

Such a tear lstring is desirably of twisted cotton or nylon and it will readily rip through the folded edges which at this point should be free of the intervening iiller material.

lDesirably in forming the glue attachment, whether of twisted cotton or nylon, it is coated with glue or other adhesive and then is placed in the interior of the fold and laid in position as the bag is being made.

In the preferred bag construction the outer kraft sheet has a strength of about v11/2 to 2 times the inner kraft tube and it desirably has 10% to 20% more Weight.

For example, the outer kraft sheet may have a weight of 50 or 60 pounds per reanr, while the inner kraft sheet may have a weight of 40 to 50 pounds per ream.

With the foregoing and other objects in vieW, the invention consists of the novel construction, combination and arrangement of parts as hereinafter more specically described, and illustrated in |the accompanying drawings, wherein is shown an embodiment of the invention, but it is to be understood that changes, variations Iand modiiication-s can be resorted to which fall within the scope ot the claims hereunto appended.

In the drawings wherein like reference characters denote corresponding parts throughout the several views:

FIG. l is a top perspective view of a finished bag or enclosure in the form in which it is used Ifor shipment of `an article through commerce.

FIG. 2 is a top perspective view of a partly opened bag, showing the manner in which the rip string or cord may be used to rip `open the side of the bag.

FIG. 3 is a transverse sectional view of the bag of FIG. l taken upon the line 3-3 of LFIG. l, showing the construction ot the bag, upon an enlarged scale as compared to FIG. 1.

FIG. 4 is a transverse sectional view upon the line 4-4 of FIG. 3.

FIG. 5 is a separated view indicating the manner in which the inside and outside paper tubular elements of the rip cord and batting are assembled to form the tinal bag construction.

FIG. 6 -is a transverse sectional view upon an enlarged scale showing an alternative form of the invention with fthe rip string or strip glued in position by forming a tubular member.

FIG. 7 is a transverse sectional view similar to FIG. 6 with one end of the member turned inwardly and glued in position.

FIG. 8 is a transverse lsectional view similar to FIGS. 6 and 7 ofthe complete tube.

FIGS. 9 and l0 are top perspective views, respectively showing the nal enclosure of FIGS. 6 to 8, FIG. 9 showing the enclosure before the rip string is pulled out to open the side of the bag and FIG. 10 showing the nip string partly ripped out.

FIG. 1l is `a transverse sectional view of still another embodimentshowing a rip cord adhesively connected to one extension of the cross-section of the container.

FIG. l2 is a transverse sectional View upon the line 12'-12 of the completed cylindrical container ready for carrying purposes.

lFIGS. 13 and 14 are top perspective views showing the assembled bags, FIG. -13 showing the final assembly With Athe rip cord in position before it is removed and FIG. v14 showing the rip cord partly removed to operate the bag structure.

Referring to FIGS. 1 and 2, there is shown a tubular structure A having lan loverlap at B withthe end enclosures C and D.

The tear string E is shown in .position in FIGS. 3 and 4 and is shown as it is assembled in FIG. `5.

The rip string E Vis in the one side edge F of the flattened tubular enclosure A, while the other side edge G is of normal construction. The assembly is formed from the elements as shown in FIG. '5, with the inside kraft paper layer H of lighter Weight having the glue or adhesively coated rip cord E associated therewith, while the outer paper layer I associ-ated with the batting K has a break in the batting at L corresponding to the position or" the rip cord E land to the position of the edge F so that the rip cord or string YE will never have to rip through the layers H and I nor through the batting K.

Although the batting K is a fairly loose material, nevertheless when it is positioned between the inner paper layer H and the outer paper layer I it offers a tremendous resistance to the ripping open of the side of the bag with a cord and it has been `found that an open space between the inner layer H and the outer layer J will accordingly facilitate opening of the bag or enclosure.

Referring specifically to the structure as shown in FIG. 5, the inside kraft sheet H may be fed in the direction of the arrow 20, together with the rip string E, which rip string E is positioned at the -point where the sheet H will be folded, as indicated at F.

Desirably the cord E is also fed in the direction 20 and Ait is caused to carry a wet vegetable glue which will strengthen it and also cause it to adhere to the sheet H.

The glue should penetrate about half way through the rip cord E without penetrating into the middle, and desirably the cord E is run through a glue bath, with the excess glue being removed before it is applied to the sheet H in the manner shown in FIG. S.

The outer kraft sheet J is fed parallelly with the sheet H and with the batting being in two sections, the section 21 being separated from the section 22 by the space L corresponding to the position of the tear cord E and to the position of the corner or edge F.

The batting will also terminate short of the edge 23 in FIG. by a distance indicated by the double headed arrow 24 in FIG. 3 so that the terminal portions 25 and 26 may be superimposed, as indicated at 27 in FIG. 3, without any batting therebetween.

' The batting portion 22 will terminate at 27, just short of the edges 28 and 29 so that there Will be only a short overlap at 30 without batting, whereas there will be substantial batting at 31 opposite the `overlap at 27.

When the back is formed into a tube and adhesively connected along the overlap plies at B and then flattened, the edge G will be formed with batting in position as indicated at 32, while the edge F will be without batting and with 'a space between the inner sheet H and the outer sheet J so that the rip cord E adhesively connected to the inside sheet H on its inside f-ace may readily rip through both layers.

The ysheets of paper H and I, the sheets of batting K, and the adhesive wetted string E will all be fitted together as indicated at 20 and then assembled first to form the tube A and cut off in two lengths with one end turned in as indicated at C and stapled, and the other end left open and only stapled or `sealed after the object has been placed therein.

Although staples are shown at 40 and 41 to form the closures, it is apparent that glue and other connections may also be made.

As indicated in FIG. 4 at the end D, the rip cord E will terminate as indicated at 42 at the position of the ends of the edges 43 and 44 of the inside and outside plies.

However, at the other end C there will be a short extension `45 of the rip cord beyond the edges `46 and 47. At the same time the reversely turned portion 48 Will have a partial slit, as indicated at 49, to form :a tab 50, which may be used to enable one end of the tear string to be gripped between the fingers and used to rip the side of the tube A open, as indicated at 51.

Itis usually desirable to print directionsas indicated at 52 to indicate Where the rip string is available and may be `grasped by the tab 50 to rip open the side of the bag.

In the embodiment of FIGS. 6 to 9 there is shown an outer facing sheet 70, an inside facing sheet 71 which come in close contact with each other at 72 and having extension tabs 73 and 74. The sides 75 and 76 on each side of the contacting portion 72 may be filled with batting or other protective filler material as indicated at 77 and 78.

The flap 73, `as shown in FIG. 7, may be turned inwardly to rest against the inner ply 71 and then the ap 74 may be turned over the top line 70 so that the adhesive indicated at 79 will form a permanent connection at 80.

The rip cord string or strip 81 is attached by means of glue as indicated at 82 and when the complete assemblage is formed, as indicated in FIG. 8, the rip cord 81 will be at a relatively thin portion indicated at 83 -adjacent the end of the batting material, as indicated at 8'4.

As shown in FIGS. 9' and l0 the ends of the sleeve of FIG. 9 may be turned inwardly as indicated yat 85 and 86 and 4the end of the rip string 81 may be provided with a pull tab 87.

When the string 81 is pulled out as indicated in FIG. l() it will only have to rip through two plies of material as indicated at 83 and the bag or enclosure may be readily `opened without ripping through the batting 77 or 78 and without ripping through extra layers of material.

If desired, the entire corner at 88 may be scored so that it may be removed `or pulled apart from the flap 86 to form the connection 87 to the rip cord.

In the embodiment shown in FIGS. ll to 14 the outer cover may be attached to the inner cover 101 by adhesive connections 102 and 103 beyond the batting or other loose filling 105. The filling material 105 extends around the bend 106 and at the other side as indicated at 107 to the points 108 and 109 where it terminates.

The outside ply 100 may extend beyond the inside. ply 101 as indicated at 110 and both surfaces 111 and 112 may be provided with adhesive outside of the rip strip 113 which is adhesively attached at 114 to the inside of the flap 103.

'Ihe complete enclosure which is shown in FIG. 12 has two adhesive attachments, one `at 115 for the extension portion 110 and another one at 116 for the adhesive portion 111 and these will form a firm grip on the outer face 110.

The two layers of paper as indicated at 117 may be readily ripped through by means vof the rip `strip 113 which is embodied inside of the flap 103 when the complete enclosure is formed as indicated in FIGS. 13 and 14 with the end flaps 118 and 119.

The corner as indicated at 120 may be provided with a suitable rip tab for the end of the s-trip 113, as is indicated at 87 in FIG. l0 or 50 in FIG. 2, for ripping open the side of the bag.

It will be noted that in all of the embodiments of FIGS. 1 5, FIGS. 6-l0 and FIGS. ll-l4, it is only necessary that the rip cord E or the rip cord 81 or the rip strip 1'13 rip through the two inside and outside facings of the complete enclosure without ripping through the filling or batting material.

It will be further noted that the rip cord is carried by the inside facing. Desirably the inside facing, for example 28 of FIG. 5 and the outside facing 29 of FIG. 5 may be so arranged that the grain desirably extends with the direction of the rip cord E so that the rip cord Will readily separate or tear through this double ply materiaL' at its thinnest point where there is no batting, through the inner ply and the outer ply. Furthermore, the inner ply is desirably made somewhat thinner than the outer ply so as to actually tear through both plies. Although the rip cord is desirably at the corner as indicated at F in FIG. 3 or at 81 in FIGS. 6-10, it may be along one of the closure flaps as indicated at 113 in FIG. l2.

Desirably the tear string is always glued to the inside of the enclosure or bag the full length thereof and the inner and outer layers should both be water-proof with the flaps at the end being glued so that one flap will be inside of the tear string or strip as indicated, for example, in connection with the flaps 73 and 102 in FIGS. 8 and 12 With the longer flap being on the outside of the tear string and with said longer flap carrying the tear strip.

Normally, the turned-over ends 86 and 119 may be closed at the factory with the ends 85 and 118 being left open so that the bag may be filled by the user thereof or by the shipper where articles are to be inserted in the bags and the bags are to be protected against rippage 01' tearing.

These bags permit ready tearing without disturbance of the bag and Where loose batting is utilized the ripping open of the bag does not release the bag and does not cause any unnecessary dirt or loose material to fall out and require cleaning up afterwards.

It is thusV apparent that the -applicant has provided a novel tubular `padded bag construction which may be lreadily assembled :and which may be readily opened after usage and which is desirable to mass production.

As many changes could be made in the above bag construction, and many widely dilferent embodiments of this invention could be made without departure from the scope of the claims, it is intended that all matter contained in the above description shall be interpreted as illustrative land not in a limiting sense.

The present application is a continuation in part of application Serial N o. 465,359, tiled October 28, 1954, now Patent No. 2,923,457, dated February 2, 1960.

Having now particularly described and ascertained the nature of the invention, and in what manner the same is to be performed, what is claimed is:

1. A flattened padded tubular bag construction having an inner paper liner and an outer paper sleeve and batting positioned therebetween, said liner and sleeve overlapping at one side of the ilattened bag construction and having a tear cord inserted inside of one of the -side edges, said liner and said -sleeve consisting of rectangular paper sheets having a rectangular thin piece of batting positioned therebetween, said batting having substantially less width and length than said paper sheets so as to leave unpadded double ply paper portions when the combined liner batting and sleeve are folded into the tubular bag and overlapped longitudinally along one side of the tubular bag and said tear cord being adhesively :attached to the inside face of the liner and extending longitudinally along said liner at an overlap double ply portion devoid of batting.

2. A ilattened padded tubular bag construction having an inner paper liner fand an outer paper sleeve and batting positioned therebetween, said liner and sleeve overlapping at one side of the ilattened bag construction and having a tear cord inserted inside of one of the side edges, said tear cord being saturated with glue and positioiied inside of the inner paper liner and said batting being omitted at said longitudinal side edge at the position of said tear cord so that there will be an open space at `said side edge between the paper lining and the paper sleeve devoid of batting, said liner and said `sleeve consisting of rectangular paper sheets having a rectangular thin piece of batting positioned therebetween, said batting having substantially less width and length than said paper sheets so `as to leave unpadded double ply paper portions when the combined liner batting and sleeve are folded into the tubular bag and overlapped longitudinally along one side of the tubular bag land said tear cord being adhesively attached to the inside face of the liner and extending longitudinally along said liner at an overlap double ply portion devoid of batting.

3. A flattened padded tubular bag construction having an inner paper liner and an outer paper sleeve and batting positioned therebetween, said liner and sleeve overlapping at one side of the ilattened bag construction and having a tear cord inserted inside of one of the -side edges, said inner paper lining being substantially weaker and lower in weight than said outer paper sleeve and the grain of said paper lining and said paper sleeve extending in opposite directions with the paper sleeve extending longitudinally of the tube and the grain of the liner extending transversely of the tube, said liner and said sleeve consisting of rectangular paper sheets having a rectangular thin piece of batting positioned therebetween, said batting having substantially less width and length than said paper sheets so as to leave unpadded double 6 ply paper portions when the combined liner batting and sleeve are folded into the tubular bag and overlapped longitudinally along one side of the tubular bag and said tear cord being adhesively attached to the inside face of the liner and extending longitudinally along said liner at an overlap double ply portion devoid of batting.

4. A ilattened padded tubular bag construction having an inner paper liner and an outer paper sleeve and batting positioned therebetween, said liner and sleeve overlapping at one side of the ilattened bag construction and having a tear cord inserted inside of one of the side edges, the batting being omitted at the overlap between the liner and the sleeve on the outside of the overlap and being in position on the inside of the overlap, said liner and `said sleeve consisting of rectangular paper sheets having a rectangular thin piece of batting positioned therebetween, said batting having substantially less width and length than said paper sheets so as to leave unpadded double ply paper portions when the combined liner batting and sleeve are folded into the tubular bag and overlapped longitudinally along one side of the tubular bag and said tear cord being adhesively attached to the inside face of the liner and extending longitudinally along said liner 4at an overlap double ply portion devoid of batting.

5. A flattened pa-dded tubular bag construction having an inner paper liner and an outer paper sleeve and batting positioned therebetween, said liner and sleeve overlapping at one side of the flattened bag construction and having -a tear cord inserted inside of one of the side edges, the ends of -said tube being folded inwardly and the tear cord extending beyond said ends at one end of the tubular bag construction, said liner and said sleeve consisting of rectangular paper sheets having a rectangular thin piece of batting positioned therebetween, said batting having substantially less width and length than said paper sheets so as to leave unpadded double ply paper portions when the combined liner batting and sleeve are folded into the tubular .bag and Ioverlapped longitudinally `along one side of the tubular bag and said tear cord being adhesively attached to the inside face of the liner and extending longitudinally along said liner at an overlap double ply portion devoid of batting.

6. A flattened padded tubular bag construction having Ian inner paper liner and an outer paper sleeve and batting positioned therebetween, said liner and sleeve overlapping at one side of the flattened bag construction and having a tear cord inserted inside of one of the side edges, the ends of said tube being folded inwardly and the tear cord extending beyond said ends -at one end of the tubular bag construction, said end being partly slit so as to form a tab for grasping of the projecting end of the tear cord so that there will be a double layer of paper on each side of Ithe `tear cord consisting of the projecting portion of the liner and the projecting portion of the sleeve, said liner and said sleeve consisting of rectangular paper sheets having a rectangular thin piece of batting positioned therebetween, said batting having substantially less width and length than said paper sheets so as to leave unpadded double ply paper portions when the combined liner batting and sleeve are folded into the tubular bag and overlapped longitudinally along one side of the tubular bag and said tear cord being adhesively attached to the inside face of the liner and extending longitudinally along said liner at an overlap double ply por-tion devoid of batting.

7.`A padded rip cord bag construction composed of -a trilarninate consisting of two rectangular inside and outside sheets of paper of the same dimension with an intervening rectangular pad of batting positioned therebetween and terminating substantially -short of Iand inside of the side edges of the sheets, leaving wide double paper ply unpadded peripheral lbilaminate portions and said bag consisting of an elongated longitudinally extending ilattened tube of said trilaminate with the bilaminate peripheral portion-s being interiorly and exl teriorly overlapped on the interior and exterior faces of the trilaminate and an elongated rip member extending longitudinally of `and parallel to the axis of the flattened tube and adhesively connected to the inside face of the inside sheet `along the bilaminate portion thereof adjacent to the portion of the `bilaminate which overlaps the exterior face of the trilaminate.

8. The bag construction of claim 7, said elongated rip member consisting of va wide strip of material positioned between two overlapping bilaminates along one face of the flattened lbag and adjacent the edge of the flattened bag.

elongated rip member terminating inside of the ends 0f the tube and the ends of the tube being folded inwardly 9. The bag construction of claim 7, the ends of the to conceal the ends of the elongated rip member to conceal the ends of the rip member.

References Cited in the le of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,942,917 Deste et al. Jan. 9, 1934 1,993,394 Bangs et al. Mar. 5, 1935 2,106,475 Brandwein Jan. 25, 1938 2,565,622 Orr Aug. 28, 1951 2,625,695 Nicholson Jan. 20, 1953 2,923,457 Gerard Feb. 2, 1960 FOREIGN PATENTS 561,268 Canada Aug. 5, 1958

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1942917 *Jul 25, 1931Jan 9, 1934Jiffy Pad And Excelsior IncHeat-insulated paper bag and method of making the same
US1993394 *Jul 24, 1931Mar 5, 1935Forest Wadding CompanyPaper bag
US2106475 *Apr 20, 1936Jan 25, 1938Crystal Tube Mfg CoContainer for cigars or the like
US2565622 *Oct 6, 1945Aug 28, 1951Howard H OrrValve bag
US2625695 *Jun 12, 1950Jan 20, 1953James W NicholsonSleeping bag made of paper
US2923457 *Oct 28, 1954Feb 2, 1960Jiffy Mfg CompanyRip string heavy duty paper bag
CA561268A *Aug 5, 1958Thomas Bonar And Co Canada LtdPadded packaging materials
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3162353 *Jul 27, 1962Dec 22, 1964Amsco Packaging Machinery IncPerforated heat sealable bag, and method of use
US3241739 *Oct 5, 1964Mar 22, 1966Anaconda Aluminum CoRipping opener for a container
US3426959 *Jan 16, 1967Feb 11, 1969Jerome H LemelsonPackaging assembly
US3592380 *May 28, 1969Jul 13, 1971Jiffy Mfg CoCushioned shipping bag
US3655120 *Mar 20, 1970Apr 11, 1972Jason L SternSelf-opening envelope
US5273361 *Nov 2, 1992Dec 28, 1993Jillson & RobertsZip wrap mailers
US5639523 *Jan 20, 1995Jun 17, 1997Ellis; Dana R.Decorative sheet material
US5662420 *Jul 8, 1996Sep 2, 1997Astro-Valcour, IncorporatedCushioned macerated paper dispatch package
US6193040Jan 21, 1999Feb 27, 2001Tesma International Inc.Electromagnetic clutch and pulley assembly
US8562216Apr 13, 2004Oct 22, 2013Pac Worldwide CorporationTear away opening for multi-layer plastic pack
DE2255767A1 *Nov 14, 1972May 30, 1973Veikko Ilmari JanhonenVerpackung und verfahren zu ihrer herstellung
WO2011003174A1 *May 27, 2010Jan 13, 2011Michel JauvinDisposal system and method for disposable items
Classifications
U.S. Classification383/206, 383/109, 383/84
International ClassificationB65D75/52, B65D75/68, B65D30/08
Cooperative ClassificationB65D75/68, B65D31/04
European ClassificationB65D75/68, B65D31/04
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Oct 23, 1981ASAssignment
Owner name: JIFFY PACKAGING CORPORATION,
Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNOR:JIFFY MANUFACTURING COMPANY;REEL/FRAME:003920/0767
Effective date: 19800606