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Publication numberUS3057027 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 9, 1962
Filing dateMay 9, 1960
Priority dateMay 9, 1960
Publication numberUS 3057027 A, US 3057027A, US-A-3057027, US3057027 A, US3057027A
InventorsBugge Erling P
Original AssigneeBugge Erling P
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Paper clip
US 3057027 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 9, 1962 E. P. BUGE 3,057,027

PAPER CLIP Filed May 9. 1960 IN VEN TOR.

EELINC? I? B UG'G'E United States Patent Ofiice 3,057,027 Patented Oct. 9, 1 962 The present invention relates generally to fasteners and more particularly to an improved paper clip.

An object of my invention is to provide a paper clip having a greatly improved clamping action whereby to firmly and releasably secure papers together and also to more effectively resist lateral or longitudinal sliding movement of the clip on a clamped array of papers.

Another important object of the invention is to provide a paper clip of improved clamping efficiency but without any increase in the danger of tearing any of the clamped papers during removal of the clip, and as a matter of fact, greatly reducing the danger of such tearing.

It is also an object of the invention to provide a paper clip of th character described having portions adapted to positively inhibit the danger of any tearing of the clamped papers upon removal of the clip, such portions also being adapted to improve a clamping efficiency of the clip.

Yet another object of the invention is to provide a very attractive paper clip of this character having all its portions arranged in a substantially common plane and to achieve improved efficiency without any increase of dimension whereby the volume and weight of a package of my improved clips is no greater than in the case of conventional clips.

Another important object of the invention is to achieve the above enumerated and other advantages entirely as a result of a novel and improved configuration for a paper clip of the resilient wire one piece type. The utilization of my invention does not entail the use of any additional material and, as a matter of fact, can achieve greater efficiency than a conventional clip of similar overall size from a piece of lesser length and also of lesser diameter, if desired. My novel paper clip configuration also has the advantage of avoiding relatively complex forming operations. Thus, what is gained in e-fficiency of clamping and in the possibility of saving material is not lost as a result of increasing the complexity of forming the clip.

These and other objects and advantages of the invention will be apparent from the following description of a presently preferred embodiment thereof when taken in conjunction with the annexed drawing wherein:

FIGURE 1 is a perspective View of a paper clip embodying the invention;

FIGURE 2 is a plan view of the paper clip as it appears in use and showing the configuration of one of the clamping arms of the clip;

FIGURE 3 is a view similar to FIGURE 2 but illustrating the opposite arm of the paper clip;

FIGURE 4 is a view similar to FIGURE 2 but one a larger scale;

FIGURE 5 is a sectional view taken along the line 5-5 of FIGURE 4 and particularly illustrating the cooperative relationship of the primary clamping portions of the clip;

FIGURE 6 is a sectional view along the line 6--6 of FIGURE 4;

FIGURE 7 is a sectional view along the line 7-7 of FIGURE 4; and

FIGURE 8 is a sectional view taken along the line 8-8 of FIGURE 4.

As presently constructed, the preferred embodiment of my paper clip is made of a single length of resilient wire or like material. Th clip comprises two clamping portions, the free ends of which can be separated to admit the papers to be clipped together between the clamping portions. These clamping arms or portions are of unequal length and the shorter of these is designated generally by the numeral 10 and the longer is designated generally by the numeral 11.

More specifically, the clamping portions 10 and 11 are joined in a common U-shaped loop portion 12, which 'is normally the upper end of the clip. Referring to FIG- URE 4, this loop portion has a neutral axis or axis of symmetry 13 which may be thought of as defining a separation or division of that part of the loop comprising a portion of the longer clamping member 11 and the shorter clamping portion 10. Thus, the axis 13 intersects the loop portion 12 at 14 and has a leg 15 which is a portion of the longer clamping member 11 and that is parallel to another leg 16 of the loop which comprises a portion of the shorter clamping member 10.

The remainder of the shorter clamping member 10 comprises a continuation or downward extension of the leg 16 and, similarly, the remainder of the longer clamping member 11 comprises an extension of the other leg portion 15. Thus, the lower end continuation of the shorter clamping member 10 is U-shaped comprising a terminal leg 17 joined to a parallel leg 18 by a semi-circular portion 19. Similarly, the lower end continuation of the longer clamping member 11 is also U-shaped and comprises a terminal leg 20 that is parallel to another leg 21 to which it is joined by a semi-circular portion 22. The U-shaped lower end portion of the shorter clamping member 10 is connected to the upper end loop portion 12 by a joggle 23, intermediate the leg 16 and leg 18. Similarly, the lower end U-shaped portion of the longer clamping member 11 is joined to the upper end loop 12 by a joggle 24, intermediate the leg 15 and the leg. 21.

It will be noted from FIGURE 4 that the width included by the U-shaped lower end portion of the clamping member 10 is such as to permit it to be nested within the parallel legs 20, 21 of the other clamping member 11. Accordingly, in normal unstressed configuration all of the parts of the paper clip lie within a substantially common plane. It is particularly to be noted that the legs Y15 and 16 of the upper end loop portion 12 are in alignment, respectively, with the legs 17 and 20. The joggles 24 and 23 have an offset dimension which is substantially the same as the diameter of the wire material from which the clip is made and the joggles are disposed in confronting relationship to the end faces 25 and 26 of the legs 17 and 20, respectively. These end faces 25 and 26 are spaced apart longitudinally of the paper clip as a whole although they may be positioned directly opposite one another, as may also the preferably offset joggles 23 and 24.

In the drawing, the paper clip is shown as applied to a single sheet of paper 27, rather than to several sheets of paper, in order to clearly illustrate the mode of operation of the paper clip. It will be seen that the clip may be applied in the usual manner by spreading apart the lower end U-shaped portions of the clamping members 10 and 11, thereafter slipping the paper 27 between the spread apart portions. The clip is then pushed longitudinally inwardly until the edge of the paper has passed beyond the joggles 23 and 24 and has passed into the upper end U-shaped portion 12.

For any given thickness of papers to be held together, my paper clip will exert a clamping force more than double that of a conventional clip. This result is due to the concentration of the clamping forces on the paper in the vicinity of the joggles 23 and 24, in opposition to the ends 25 and 26. Moreover, for any given thickness of papers, my improved clip will be deformed more or to a greater extent than a conventional clip of comparable size, whereby a greater clamping force is exerted by the wire material of the clip.

Due to the joggle 24, the leg 15 of the upper end loop 12 is brought closer to the leg 18. This will be clear if an upward prolongation of the leg 18 is visualized and the normal distance between such prolongation and the leg 15 then measured. Such measurement would correspond to the normal distance between the legs 17 and 18. It is this spacing which determines the extent to which the paper clip is deformed. As compared to a conventional paper clip this distance is less by a dimension approximately equal to the diameter of the wir stock from which the paper clip is made.

Referring now to FIGURE 8, it will be noted that a line 30 has been drawn between the longitudinal axis of the leg 18 and the longitudinal axis of the leg 15. This line 30 defines an angle relative to the normal plane of the paper 27 which is greater than an angle similarly defined by the use of a conventional paper clip. Thus, a greater torsional shear stress is imposed at 14 than in a conventional clip whereby greater clamping force is brought to bear in the vicinity of the paper clip end 25 and joggle 24.

This increase in force in the vicinity of the clip end 25 and joggle 24 also causes a greater exertion of force at the other paper clip end 26. This end 26 thus has a greater tendency to dig into the paper than the corresponding end of a conventional clip. Therefore, in order to cause a smooth flowing of the paper over the end 26 without tearing, the joggle 23 is provided. Thus a portion of paper 27 in the region of the joggle 23 and the end 26 and also in the region of the end 25 and joggle 24, is caused to assumea compound curvature as shown at 28. This curvature is more pronounced between the legs 20 and 18, for example, than between the end face 26 and joggle 23. As is shown in FIGURE 7, this latter curvature is relatively gentle and, due to the spacing between the end 26 and the joggle 23, the paper is guided and has time to flow out of abutting relationship to the end 26 when the clip is moved to the right as shown in FIGURE 7. The joggles 23 and 24 thus not only serve to concentrate the clamping force of the paper clip but also ensure a smooth flowing of the paper through the compoundly curved running sections 28 so that the paper is positively inhibited from tearing.

It should also be pointed out that the terminal leg portions 17 and 20 are somewhat shorter than the comparable leg portions of a conventional paper clip. This serves to save material since a clip of my improved design can be made from a shorter length of wire or other suitable material than a conventional clip, while yet 'retaining the same over-all dimensions as to width and length. The shortening of the terminal leg sections 17 and 20 also serves to give a greater clamping force at the clip ends 25 and 26.

As has been pointed out, the clip ends 25 and 26 and the joggles 24 and 23 may be positioned directly opposite to one another, rather than being ofl-set longitudinally of the paper clip. However, I prefer the posi tioning of these elements shown in the drawing in order to avoid wrinkling of the paper captured within the clip, such wrinkling being avoided by maintaining the distance, measured normally, between the joggles 23 and 24 at substantially the same distance as the normal spacing between the legs 21 and 18 and the legs 15 and 16. With this arrangement, creasing of the paper in the running sections 28 is avoided to ensure a smooth flow without tearing any sheets of paper around the ends 25 and 2 While I have disclosed and described a presently preferred embodiment of paper clip configuration, it will be apparent to those skilled in the art that changes may be made without departing from the spirit of the invention. It will be obvious that the clip may be made of other than a wire material and of other than circular section. I do not mean to be limited to the specific clip herein disclosed and described but only by the spirit and scope of the following claims.

I claim:

1. In a paper clip, a pair of substantially U-shaped clamping arms of unequal length integrally joined together by an upper end loop of inverted U-shape configuration, the shorter one of said arms being normally nested within the longer one of said arms, both of said arms having straight terminal leg portions and other straight leg portions connected to the legs of said upper end loop, all of said leg portions and legs being substantially parallel to each other, each of the legs of said end loop being coaxially aligned with the terminal leg portion of one of said clamping arms and connected to the other leg portion of the other clamping arm by a joggle confronting the end of the terminal leg portion with which the leg of the loop is aligned.

2. In a paper clip, a pair of substantially 'U-shaped clamping arms of unequal length integrally joined together by an upper end loop of inverted U-shape configuration, the shorter one of said arms being normally nested within the longer one of said arms, both of said arms having straight terminal leg portions and other straight leg portions connected to the legs of said upper end loop, all of said leg portions and legs being substantially parallel to each other, each of the legs of said end loop being coaxially aligned with the terminal leg portion of one of said clamping arms and connected to the other leg portion of the other clamping arm by a joggle confronting the end of the terminal leg portion with which the leg of the loop is aligned, said joggles being offset in the same direction so that one is offset internally of said upper end loop and the other externally of said loop, said joggles having an otfset dimension relative to the legs of said loop substantially equal to the thickness of the material of the clip.

7 3. In a paper clip, a pair of substantially U-shaped clamping arms of unequal length integrally joined together by an upper end loop of inverted U-shape configuration, the shorter one of said arms being normally nested within the longer one of said arms, both of said arms having terminal leg portions and other leg portions connected to the legs of said end loop, all of said leg portions and legs being substantially parallel to each other, the legs of said loop being of unequal length, with the shorter of the legs of said loop being substantially coaxially aligned with the terminal leg portion of the shorter clamping arm and the longer of the legs of said loop being substantially coaxially aligned with the terminal leg portion of the longer clamping arm, the legs of said loop being joined to the other leg portions of said clamping arms by joggles offset from the axes of the legs of the loop and confronting the ends of the terminal leg portions of said clamping arms.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 742,892 McGill Nov. 3, 1903 747,761 Pollard Dec. 22, 1903 850,185 Roberts Apr. 16, 1907 1,516,294 Hubeny et al. Nov. 18, 1924 2,095,735 Dunbar Oct. 12, 1937

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US742892 *Jun 1, 1903Nov 3, 1903George W McgillSpring-clip.
US747761 *Aug 4, 1902Dec 22, 1903George H PollardIndexing device.
US850185 *Mar 14, 1905Apr 16, 1907Richard W RobertsClip.
US1516294 *Mar 21, 1923Nov 18, 1924Herman A FrahmPaper clip
US2095735 *Feb 27, 1937Oct 12, 1937Dunbar HarryPaper clip
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3261932 *Mar 5, 1965Jul 19, 1966Shlesinger Jr Bernard EdwardMultiple contact switch with sinusoidal wave form operator
US4918789 *Aug 29, 1988Apr 24, 1990Chen Haw RennTripod clip
US5481784 *May 10, 1994Jan 9, 1996Sinaiko; Edwin S.Clip apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification24/67.9, 24/547, 29/705, 29/821
International ClassificationB42F1/00, B42F1/08
Cooperative ClassificationB42F1/08
European ClassificationB42F1/08