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Publication numberUS3058391 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 16, 1962
Filing dateDec 19, 1960
Priority dateDec 19, 1960
Publication numberUS 3058391 A, US 3058391A, US-A-3058391, US3058391 A, US3058391A
InventorsLeupold Marcus
Original AssigneeLeupold & Stevens Instr Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Variable power rifle scope
US 3058391 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

1 n y 33-246- XR 3,058,391 SR c8086 EEEULNCF" SEARCH Oct. 16, 1962 LEUPQLD 3,058,391

VARIABLE POWER RIFLE SCOPE Filed Dec. 19, 1960 IN V EN TOR. Marcus Leupold Buck'horn, Cheafham 8 Blore ATTORNEYS Patented Oct. 16, 1962 3,058,391 VARIABLE POWER RHLE SCOPE Marcus Leupold, Portland, Greg, assiguor to Leupold &

Stevens Instruments, Inc., Portland, reg., a corporation of Oregon Filed Dec. 19, 1960, Ser. No. 76,682 Claims. (Cl. 88-32) My present invention comprises a variable power rifle scope, having means whereby the magnifying power of the scope may be changed within design limits by a simple adjustment. The present invention comprises means whereby the power magnification can be variably altered while maintaining a sharp image of an objective in the plane of the reticule at any magnification capable of being effected by operation of the adjusting means.

A further object of the present invention is to provide a rifle scope of the foregoing character which is capable of holding an inert gas charge.

A further object of the present invention is to provide a device of the foregoing character which is relatively simple, made of few, sturdy parts which will not get out of order and which will maintain their adjusted positions in spite of recoil shocks.

The objects and advantages of the present invention will be more readily apparent from inspection of the accompanying drawings, taken in connection with the following specification wherein like numerals refer to like parts throughout, and in which a preferred form of the invention is illustrated and described.

In the drawings,

FIG. 1 is a side elevation, partially broken away, showing a rifle scope manufactured in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged view, in side elevation, partially broken away along a vertical centerline, of the portion of the scope of FIG. 1 embodying the mechanism of the present invention;

FIG. 3 is a plan view, partially broken away, of a portion of the mechanism in position in the rifle scope which is shown in horizontal section;

FIG. 4 is a partial bottom view of the adjusting band of the present invention; and

FIG. 5 is a vertical section taken substantially from the plane of the line 55 of FIG. 2.

The variable power scope of the present invention comprises a tubular assembly including an objective lens assembly at one end, an ocular lens assembly 11 at its other end, and a reticle mounting assembly 12 at an intermediate point along its length. The scope comprises a cylindrical tube portion 13 joining the reticle mounting assembly to the objective lens assembly, and a second cylindrical tube portion 14 joining the reticle mounting assembly to the ocular lens assembly. The ocular lens assembly is internally threaded and screws onto an externally threaded end of the tube portion 14, and is held in proper position thereon by a knurled lock nut 15. The opposite end of the tube portion 14 is threaded and screws into one end of a barrel 16 forming a part of the reticle mounting assembly, and the other tube portion 13 is likewise threaded and screwed into the opposite end of the barrel 16.

The barrel 16 fixedly mounts a first reticle ring guide annulus 20 which is provided with an external flange clamped between an internal flange on the barrel 16 and the end of the tube portion 14. A second reticle ring guide annulus 21 is externally threaded and screws into an internally threaded portion of the barrel 16. A reticle mounting ring 22 is slidably guided between the rings 20 and 21, the ring 22 having an external diameter considerably less than the internal diameter of the surrounding portion of the barrel 16. Elevation adjustment means 25 and lateral adjustment means 26 are included in the reticle mounting assembly 16, the means 25 and 26 being identical so that illustration of the essential deails of the means 25 will suflice for both.

As seen in FIG. 2, each such adjusting means comprises an externally threaded member 30 which screws into an internally threaded well in the barrel 16, and which is provided with a concentric flange projecting through an opening in the barrel. The member 30 is provided with a concentric central bore in which there is mounted an adjusting turret 31 provided with a transverse groove 32 at its upper end. The lower end of the turret 31 is provided with an external flange which engages a countersunk portion of the bore in the member 3t), so that the turret 31 and a locking ring 33 seated thereon may be held in position by a threaded member 34 screwed into the lower end of the bore. The turret 31 is provided with a central, downwardly opening socket, the major portion of which is internally threaded and mounts an adjusting screw 35. The locking ring 33 is keyed to the member 30 (not shown) and a tongue thereon engages a vertical slot 36 in a cylindrical extension of the screw 35. Therefore, when the turret 31 is engaged by a screwdriver or coin and partially rotated, the adjusting screw 35 is prevented from rotation but moves longitudinally toward and away from the axis of the scope. The adjusting turret 31 is provided with a pointer (not shown) and the surface of the member 30 mounts a fixed scale 37, whereby the extent of adjusting movement in either direction may be measured. The two adjusting screws 35 bear on the reticle mounting ring 22 at to each other, and spring means (not shown) mounted between the barrel 16 and the ring 22 hold the ring firmly against the two screws, so that the reticle ring follows the movements of the adjusting screws. One edge of the reticle mounting ring 22 is provided with notches 38 which hold the ends of the filaments of the reticle 40. A gas impervious cap 41 is threaded onto the upper end of the member 30 and the lower edge thereof engages a resilient gasket 42 mounted in and projecting outwardly from an external groove in the member 30, so that the outer peripheral portion of the gasket may be clamped between the portion of barrel 16 surrounding the member 30 and the lower edge of the cap 41. Loss of an inert gas charge through the adjusting means and ingress of water vapor is thereby prevented or held to an insignificant minimum.

It is to be appreciated that the reticle mounting assembly is a conventional mechanism illustrative of various such mechanisms which may be utilized.

The rifle scope is adapted to be mounted in relatively fixed position upon a rifle, the usual such means comprising a pair of mounting bands (not shown) mounted on the rifle and firmly gripping the barrel portions 13 and 14. As a result of the mounting arrangement, the outer tube portion 14 is fixed in use. According to the present invention an inner tube 45 is movably mounted within the fixed outer tube portion 14, the inner tube having a slightly lesser external diameter than the internal diameter of the tubular portion 14 except for snugly fitting lands 46 and 47 at front and rear for maintaining the two tubes in concentric relation without excess friction. The inner tube mounts a field lens assembly 48, including a field lens 49 at its forward end in proximity to the reticle 40. A pair of erector lens assemblies 50 and 51 are mounted concentrically in snug fitting relationship within the inner tube 45, the assemblies respectively comprising erector lenses 52 and 53 in longitudinally spaced relation along the inner tube 45. Each erector lens assembly is slidably guided for movement longitudinally of the inner tube, and is relatively rotatable with respect thereto, being held against rotation, by means to be described, as the inner tube 45 is rotated by means to be described.

'It is to be appreciated that all of the lens assemblies and the reticle are optically aligned along the optical axis of the rifle scope, and are so related to each other that an image of an objective is created at the plane of the reticle for rifle sighting purposes. The field lens 49 gives a magnified image of the erected image created by the erector lenses as is usual in such assemblies, and a field masking flange 54- in the erector lens assembly 50 limits the field of view in a conventional manner.

In accordance with the present invention, a power adjusting band 64) having an externally ribbed surface is concentrically mounted upon the end of the outer tube 14 adjacent the lock nut 15. The adjusting ring is provided with graduations and numerals 61 which may be rotated past a fixed indicator (not shown) on the external surface of the tube portion 14 adjacent thereto, whereby the desired magnification power may be selected. Connecting means for uniting the power adjusting band 60 and the inner tube 45 are provided, comprising a connecting member having an outer, cylindrical head portion *62 seated in an internally threaded socket 63 in the band 60, an intermediate concentric cylindrical portion 64 which passes through a partially circumferential slot 65 in the fixed tubular portion 14, and an inner eccentric portion 66 which is snugly seated in a cylindrical bore 67 in one end of the inner tube 45. The portion 64 has substantially the same diameter as the width of the slot 65, so that the adjusting band and the outer tube 14 are held in longitudinally fixed relation to each other. The slot 65 extends circumferentially around the outer tube 14 for approximately 180" in a scope having variable power from about three to about nine. The slot '65 limits manual adjusting rotation of the adjusting band 60.

The cylindrical head portion 62 of the connecting member is relatively thin and seats in the bottom of the socket 63. The threaded outer portion of the socket 63 holds a locking plug 68 which may be tightened or loosened by means of a screwdriver or coin engaged in a cross slot 69 in its outer surface. The plug 68 is also provided with a central bore 70 extending therethrough, so that when the locking plug is slightly loosened the connecting member may be rotated by means of an hexagonal bar inserted through the bore 70 and engaging an hexagonal socket 71 in the outer end of the connecting member. The eccentric portion 66 may therefore be moved longitudinally within the limits permitted, so as to initially adjust the relative longitudinal position of the inner tube 45. Tightening of the plug '68 thereafter clamps the connecting member in adjusted position, and the in ner tube 45 is thus held in longitudinally fixed relation to the tubular assembly.

A pair of circumferentially extending sealing rings 75- are mounted internally of the adjusting band 69 in grooves provided for the purpose, the sealing rings 75 projecting slightly inwardly of the inner surface of the adjusting band and being thereby compressed and maintained in gas sealing engagement with the outer surface of the fixed tube portion 14. The sealing rings 75 lie on opposite sides of the slot 65, thereby maintaining the gas charge and preventing moisture ingress. The sealings rings 75 also frictionally resist rotation of the band 60, so that a desired magnification may be held during use of the rifle scope.

Each of the erector lens assemblies includes a guide pin 76 and 77, respectively, which guide pins project radially outward from their respective erector lens assemblies and are engaged in snugly fitting helical grooves 78 and 79, respectively, in the inner tube 45. The slots 78 and 79 are longitudinally aligned with each other and with the slot 65. The pins 76 and 77 project beyond the inner tube and into a longitudinal groove 80 in the inner surface of the fixed outer tube portion 14. The guide pins 76 and 77 are thus maintained in longitudinal alignment with each other at all times, holding the pair of erector lens assemblies against rotation while the inner tube may be rotated about them by manipulation of the adjusting band 60. The guide pins engaging the helical slots 78 and 79, respectively, cause th erector lens assemblies to move longitudinally of the tube as the ad justing band 60 is manipulated. The relative pitches and locations of the helical slots 78 and 7 are mathematically designed to maintain correct optical relation of the erecting lenses to each other and to the remainder of the rifle scope so that a clear, sharp image of the objective is created at the plane of the reticle regardless of the degree of magnification effected by manipulation of the adjusting band 60.

A helical spring 81 is compressed between the erector lens assembly 50 and the erector lens assembly 51, the spring being under compression regardless of how far apart the erector lens assemblies may be separated. The spring eliminates any play or backlash in the movements of the erector lens assemblies whereby to maintain sharp definition of the image.

Having illustrated and described a preferred embodiment of the invention, it should be apparent to those skilled in the art that the invention permits of modification in arrangement and detail. I claim as my invention all such modifications as come within the true spirit and scope of the following claims.

I claim:

1. A variable power rifle scope comprising a tubular assembly including an objective lens assembly at one end, an ocular lens assembly at its other end, and a reticle assembly mounting a reticle at an intermediate point along its length, said tubular assembly being adapted to be mounted in relatively fixed position on a rifle, said tubular assembly comprising a fixed, outer tube portion between said ocular lens assembly and said reticle mounting assembly, an inner tube in said outer tube portion and guided thereby for rotation and longitudinal movement therein, a pair of erector lens assemblies concentrically mounted in said inner tube in longitudinally spaced relation to each other, each of said erector lens assemblies being guided by said inner tube for movement longitudinally thereof and for relative rotation with respect thereto, a power adjusting band concentrically mounted on said outer tube portion and guided thereby for rotation about their common axis, said outer tube portion having a partially circumferential slot therethrough, said slot underlying said adjusting band, a connecting member mounted in said adjusting band, extending through said slot and engaging said inner tube whereby manually efiected partial rotation of said adjusting band effects coextensive partial rotation of said inner tube, said connecting member comprising a cylindrical, rotatable body snugly engaging said slot and an eccentric, cylindrical extension seated in said inner tube whereby said inner tube may be longitudinally adjusted within said outer tube portion, said inner tube having a longitudinally spaced pair of helical slots therethrough, said helical slots being in longitudinal alignment with each other, said outer tube portion having a longitudinal groove in its inner surface, and each of said erector lens assemblies having a guide pin mounted thereon and respectively extending radially therefrom through one of said helical slots and into said groove whereby rotation of said inner tube results in longitudinal movement of both said erector lens assemblies, the pitches and relative positions of said helical slots being such that a sharp image of an objective is created at the plane of the reticle at any degree of magnification capable of being effected by operation of said adjusting band.

2. A variable power rifle scope comprising a tubular assembly including an objective lens assembly at one end, an ocular lens assembly at its other end, and a reticle assembly mounting a reticle at an intermediate point along its length, said tubular assembly being adapted to be mounted in relatively fixed position on a rifle, said tubular assembly comprising a fixed, outer tube portion between said ocular lens assembly and said reticle mounting assembly, an inner tube in said outer tube portion and guided thereby for rotation and longitudinal movement therein, a pair of erector lens assemblies concentrically mounted in said inner tube in longitudinally spaced relation to each other, each of said erector lens assemblies being guided by said inner tube for movement longitudinally thereof and for relative rotation with respect thereto, a power adjusting band concentrically mounted on said outer tube portion and guided thereby for rotation about their common axis, said outer tube portion having a partially circumferential slot therethrough for about 180, said slot underlying said adjusting band, a connecting member mounted in said adjusting band, extending through said slot and engaging said inner tube whereby manually efiected partial rotation of said adjusting band effects coextensive partial rotation of said inner tube, said connecting member comprising a cylindrical, rotatable body snugly engaging said slot and an eccentric, cylindrical extension seated in said inner tube whereby said inner tube may be longitudinally adjusted within said outer tube portion, said inner tube having a longitudinally spaced pair of helical slots therethrough, each of said helical slots extending about 180 around the inner tube and said helical slots being in longitudinal alignment with each other, said outer tube portion having a longitudinal groove in its inner surface, and each of said erector lens assemblies having a guide pin mounted thereon and respectively extending radially therefrom through one of said helical slots and into said groove whereby rotation of said inner tube results in longitudinal movement of both of said erector lens assemblies, the pitches and relative positions of said helical slots being such that a sharp image of an objective is created at the plane of the reticle at any degree of magnification capable of being effected by operation of said adjusting band,

3. A variable power rifle scope comprising an hermetically sealed tubular assembly including an objective lens assembly at one end, an ocular lens assembly at its other end, and a reticle assembly mounting a reticle at an intermediate point along its length, said tubular assembly being adapted to be mounted in relatively wed position on a rifle, said tubular assembly comprising a fixed outer tube portion between said ocular lens assembly and said reticle mounting assembly, an inner tube concentrically mounted in said outer tube portion and guided thereby for rotation and longitudinal movement therein, a pair of erector lens assemblies concentrically mounted in said inner tube in longitudinally spaced relation to each other, each of said erector lens assemblies being guided by said inner tube for movement longitudinally thereof and for relative rotation with respect thereto, a power adjusting band concentrically mounted on said outer tube portion and guided thereby for ro tation about their common axis, said outer tube portion having a partially circumferential slot therethrough, said slot underlying said adjusting band, a connecting member mounted in said adjusting band, extending through said slot and engaging said inner tube whereby manually effected partial rotation of said adjusting band effects coextensive partial rotation of said inner tube, said connecting member comprising a cylindrical, rotatable body snugly engaging said slot and an eccentric, cylindrical extension seated in said inner tube whereby said inner tube may be longitudinally adjusted within said outer tube portion, said inner tube having a longitudinally spaced pair of helical slots therethrough, said helical slots being in longitudinal alignment with each other, said outer tube portion having a longitudinal groove in its inner surface, each of said erector lens assemblies having a guide pin mounted thereon and respectively extending radially therefrom through one of said helical slots and into said groove whereby rotation of said inner tube results in longitudinal movement of said erector lens assemblies, the pitches and relative positions of said helical slots being such that a sharp image of an objective is created at the plane of the reticle at any degree of magnification capable of being effected by operation of said adjusting band, and a pair of circumferentially extending sealing rings mounted interiorly of said adjusting band and effecting sealing engagement with the outer surface of said outer tube portion on opposite sides of said circumferential slot.

4. A variable power rifle scope comprising an hermetically sealed tubular assembly including an objective lens assembly at one end, an ocular lens assembly at its other end, and a reticle assembly mounting a reticle at an intermediate point along its length, said tubular assembly being adapted to be mounted in relatively fixed position on a rifle, said tubular assembly comprising a fixed outer tube portion between said ocular lens assembly and said reticle mounting assembly, an inner tube concentrically mounted in said outer tube portion and guided thereby for rotation and longitudinal movement therein, a pair of erector lens assemblies concentrically mounted in said inner tube in longitudinally spaced relation to each other, each of said erector lens assemblies being guided by said inner tube for movement longitudinally thereof and for relative rotation with respect thereto, a power adjusting band concentrically mounted on said outer tube portion and guided thereby for rotation about their common axis, said outer tube portion having a partially circumferential slot therethrough extending about said slot underlying said adjusting band, a connecting member mounted in said adjusting band, extending through said slot and engaging said inner tube whereby manually effected partial rotation of said adjusting band effects coextensive partial rotation of said inner tube, said connecting member comprising a cylindrical, rotatable body snugly engaging said slot and an eccentric, cylindrical extension seated in said inner tube whereby said inner tube may be longitudinally adjusted within said outer tube portion, said inner tube having a longitudinally spaced pair of helical slots therethrough, each of said helical slots extending about 180 and said helical slots being in longitudinal alignment with each other and with said circumferential slot, said outer tube portion having a longitudinal groove in its inner surface, each of said erector lens assemblies having a guide pin mounted thereon and respectively extending radially therefrom through one of said helical slots and into said groove whereby rotation of said inner tube results in longitudinal movement of said erector lens assemblies, the pitches and relative positions of said helical slots being such that a sharp image of an objective is created at the plane of the reticle at any degree of magnification capable of being effected by operation of said adjusting band, and a pair of circumferentially extending sealing rings mounted interiorly of said adjusting band and effecting sealing engagement with the outer surface of said outer tube portion on opposite sides of said circumferential slot.

5. A variable power rifle scope comprising a tubular assembly including an objective lens assembly at one end, an ocular lens assembly at its other end, and a reticle assembly mounting a reticle at an intermediate point along its length, said tubular assembly being adapted to be mounted in relatively fixed position on a rifle, said tubular assembly comprising a fixed, outer tube portion between said ocular lens assembly and said reticle mounting assembly, an inner tube in said outer tube portion and guided thereby for rotation and longitudinal movement therein, a pair of erector lens assemblies concentrically mounted in said inner tube in longitudinally spaced relation to each other, each of said erector lens assemblies being guided by said inner tube for movement longitudinally thereof and for relative rotation with respect thereto, a power adjusting band concentrically mounted on said outer tube portion and guided thereby for rotation about their common axis, said outer tube portion having a partially circumferential slot therethrough, said slot underlying said adjusting band, a connecting member mounted in said adjusting band, extending through said slot and engaging said inner tube whereby manually effected partial rotation of said adjusting band etfects coextensive partial rotation of said inner tube, said connecting member comprising a cylindrical, rotatable body snugly engaging said slot and an eccentric, cylindrical extension seated in said inner tube whereby said inner tube may be longitudinally adjusted Within said outer tube portion, said inner tube having a longitudinally spaced pair of helical slots therethrough, said helical slots being in longitudinal alignment with each other, said outer tube portion having a longitudinal groove in its inner surface, and each of said erector lens assemblies having a guide pin mounted thereon and respectively extending radially therefrom through one of said helical slots and into said groove whereby rotation of said inner tube results in longitudinal move ment of both of said erector lens assemblies, the pitches and relative positions of said helical slots being such that a sharp image of an objective is created at the plane of the reticle at any degree of magnification capable of being effected by operation of said adjusting band, and a helical spring compressed between said erector lens assemblies and maintained under compression regardless of the extent of separation of the erector lens assemblies.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,873,646 Angenieux Feb. 17, 1959 FOREIGN PATENTS 22,766 Great Britain of 1914 422,270 Great Britain Jan. 4, 1935 777,648 Great Britain June 26, 1957 1,013,090 Germany Aug. 1, 1957

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Classifications
U.S. Classification359/422, 42/122
International ClassificationG02B15/04
Cooperative ClassificationG02B15/04, G02B23/145
European ClassificationG02B23/14Z, G02B15/04