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Publication numberUS3059636 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 23, 1962
Filing dateNov 18, 1959
Priority dateNov 18, 1959
Publication numberUS 3059636 A, US 3059636A, US-A-3059636, US3059636 A, US3059636A
InventorsSchwartz Joseph
Original AssigneeIpco Hospital Supply
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Arm rest for intravenous injections
US 3059636 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 23, 1962 J. SCHWARTZ ARM REST FOR INTRAVENOUS INJECTIONS Filed Nov. 18. 1959 e m m H P x w itary condition.

Unite States Patent .Ofiice 3,059,636 r ARM REST FOR INTRAVENOUS INJECTIONS Joseph Schwartz, Brooklyn, N.Y., assignor to Ipco Hospital Supply Corp New York, N.Y., a corporation of New York Filed Nov. 18, 1959, Ser. No. 853,740 7 Claims. (Cl. 128133) The present invention relates to an improved arm rest for support and immobilization of the arm of a patient when an intravenous injection is given.

Objects and advantages of the invention will be set I The accompanying drawings, referred to herein and constituting a part hereof, illustrate an embodiment of the invention, and together with the description, serve to explain the principles of the invention.

In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of an arm rest embodying the present invention, with parts broken away to illustrate the construction thereof;

FIG. 2 is a longitudinal cross-sectional view of the embodiment of the invention shown in FIG. 1, taken along line 22 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a transverse cross-sectional view of the em bodiment of the invention shown in FIG. 1, taken along line 3-3 of FIG. 1; and,

FIG. 4 is a side view of the arm rest shown in the other drawings in which is illustrated the use of the board to support and immobilize the arm of a patient to whom an intravenous solution is to be administered.

The present invention provides an improved arm rest for use in hospitals, doctors oflices, and the like, upon which the arm of a patientis supported and preferably substantially immobilized when an intravenous solution is being administered. The arm rest of the invention is more sanitary, safer, and more eflicient and expeditious to use than the makeshift arrangements which have cusromarily been used for the purpose. The arm rest of the invention is padded for thecomfortof the patient, and the padding is closely held with respect to the board so ,as to prevent any dangerous shifting of the elements of the structure during administration of the solution. The major components of the structure are pre-assembled and ready for immediate and efficient use, and may be re-used again and again with different patients with no danger whatever of cross-infection.

With the foregoing and other advantages in mind, the illustrative embodiment of the invention as herein shown and described comprises a relatively rigid, longitudinallyextending base element for the arm rest, the upper surface of which is covered with a resilient material, providing the comfortable padded area upon which the arm of the patient is to rest. The resilient surface covering is closely held with respect to the rigid base member so that dangerous shifting of the elements in use may be prevented. The combined base and resilient members are preferably closely encased and sealed within an envelope of smooth, relatively non-porous material, which provides for the close and permanent assembly of the elements of the arm rest without the necessity of using an adhesive, easy and effective cleaning and maintaining the structure in a san- Further, a sleeve member is provided to be slipped over the thus encased, padded, rigid arm rest, and said sleeve member is removable, disposable, and is replaced for each patient with whom the arm rest is used.

It will be understood that the foregoing general description and the following detailed description as well are exemplary and explanatory of the invention but are not restrictive thereof.

Referring now in detail to the embodiment of the in vention herein shown for purposes of illustration and example, the arm rest comprises a longitudinally extending, relatively rigid base member 5 which may, for instance, be made of Wood of the kind and about the thickness customarily used for splints. A resilient member 6 is positioned on one of the flat surfaces of the base member 5 and, as shown in the drawings, the dimensions of the resilient member are preferably such that it covers entirely the surface of the base member upon which it is seated, and extends slightly beyond the edges thereof. The resilient member 6 can conveniently be made of a slab of foamed plastic as for instance urethane.

The base member 5 and resilient member 6 assembled therewith as described and shown are closely surrounded by an envelope 7, which preferably is a thin sheet of flexible, thermoplastic material that is relatively nonporous, and can'be heat-sealed to itself as shown at 8 to completely enclose and seal the elements within. The envelope may, for instance, be made of vinyl chlorideacetate copolymer, which is commonly called Vinylite. The close engagement of the envelope 7 about the base member 5 and the resilient member 6 holds those members in firm assembled relationship without slippage and without the necessity of using an adhesive. The overlapped edges of the resilient member 6 with respect to the edges of the base member 5 tends to press the base into the resilient member and retain it in place. Such construction also minimizes engagement of the envelope 7 with the unyielding edges of the base 5, thus protecting the envelope from friction that would wear through and rupture the sealed envelope.

The sleeve member 9 is adapted to be readily slipped over the padded arm rest unit already described, being open at both ends for the purpose. Such sleeve preferably is made of a sheet of multi-ply, embossed paper, turned on itself and affixed along the line 10 by adhesive, so it will closely encircle the padded arm rest unit, but can be readily slipped on and olf. The sleeve is thus a low cost item which may be used over the arm rest unit for one patient only and then slipped off and replaced. The embossed multi-ply paper is advantageous in that it is soft and comfortable to the patients aim, and also readily absorbs perspiration.

FIG. 4 illustrates the use of the arm rest of the invention, showing the arm 11 of the patient comfortably positioned on the padded side of the structure and held thereon by tapes 12, the numeral 13 denoting the tube extending to the patients hand for administration of the intravenous solution.

The invention in its broader aspects is not limited to the specific combinations shown and described but departures may be made therefrom, within the scope of the accompanying claims, without departing from the principles of the invention and without sacrificing its chief advantages.

What is claimed is:

1. An arm rest for intravenous injections, comprising, in combination, a longitudinally extending, relatively nondeformable base member, a resilient pad member positioned upon and covering a flat surface thereof, a relatively non-porous envelope closely enclosing the outer surfaces of said contiguous members to maintain said members in firm assembled relationship and providing a sealed enclosure therefor, and a disposable sleeve open at Patented Oct. 23, 1962,

least one end and adapted to be slipped over the said members and envelope as a removable cover therefor when said arm rest is used whereby said arm rest is maintained in sanitary condition during each use thereof.

2. An arm rest for intravenous injections, comprising, in combination, a longitudinally extending, relatively nondeformable base member, a resilient pad member positioned upon and covering a fiat surface thereof, an ent velope of relatively non-porous, thermoplastic material closely enclosing the outer surfaces of said contiguous members heat-sealed to maintain said members in firm assembled relationship and providing a sealed enclosure about the members within, and a disposable sleeve open at at least one end and adapted to he slipped over the said members and envelope as a removable cover therefor when said arm rest is used whereby said arm rest is maintained in sanitary condition during each use thereof.

3. A device as set forth in claim 2, wherein the resilient pad member is made of urethane, the envelope is made of Vinylite, and the sleeve is made of multi-ply, embossed paper.

4. In an arm rest construction for intravenous injections, in combination, a longitudinally extending, relatively rigid base member, a resilient pad member positioned upon and covering a flat surface thereof and extending beyond the edges of said surface, and an envelope made of relatively non-porous, thermoplastic material closely enclosing the outer surfaces of said contiguous members heat-sealed to maintain said members in firm assembled relationship and providing a sealed enclosure about the members within.

5. A device as set forth in claim 4, wherein the envelope is made of Vinylite.

6. A device as set forth in claim 4, wherein the resilient pad member is made of urethane.

7. A device as set forth in claim 4, wherein the base member is a thin, wood splint.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,007,503 Riordan July 9, 1935 2,704,075 Cherkin Mar. 15, 1955 2,728,450 Haire Dec. 27, 1955 2,868,193 Kreft Jan. 13, 1959 2,896,618 Schaefer July 18, 1959 2,896,631 Block July 28, 1959 FOREIGN PATENTS 552,278 Great Britain Mar. 30, 1943

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2007503 *Jan 26, 1933Jul 9, 1935Riordan Howard CNasal pack
US2704075 *Mar 10, 1952Mar 15, 1955Baxter Don IncFlexible plastic container
US2728450 *Nov 26, 1952Dec 27, 1955Haire Thomas BTransparent jacket for mailing magazines
US2868193 *Jan 18, 1954Jan 13, 1959Aram TashjianEmergency splint compress
US2896618 *Jan 21, 1958Jul 28, 1959Johnson & JohnsonCorrugated dressing
US2896631 *Jul 14, 1958Jul 28, 1959Wilfred Block LesterBrassiere
GB552278A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3242923 *Jul 24, 1963Mar 29, 1966Central States Paper & Bag ComArm-board for intravenous injections
US3295518 *Apr 15, 1964Jan 3, 1967Meda Plast Products CompanyContoured arm board for intravenous injections
US3724456 *May 5, 1971Apr 3, 1973R WaxmanExtremity support attachment for intravenous feeding
US3788307 *May 1, 1972Jan 29, 1974Kistner HOrthopedic splint
US4043330 *Feb 18, 1976Aug 23, 1977Bansal Surinder KArm board for intravenous infusions
US4306549 *Jun 15, 1979Dec 22, 1981Canie Joseph GSplint-cast
US4414969 *Mar 25, 1981Nov 15, 1983Heyman Arnold MWrist restraint
US4928712 *Nov 29, 1988May 29, 1990Mele William DIntravenous boards
US4941479 *Sep 5, 1989Jul 17, 1990Infection Control Products, Inc.Surgical wrap with arm splint
US4982744 *Oct 14, 1988Jan 8, 1991George StanecHand and arm board for use in intravenous administration and other monitoring tests
US20120222684 *Feb 25, 2012Sep 6, 2012Beck Lori RIntravenous therapy site tape and methods of using same
Classifications
U.S. Classification128/877, 128/DIG.600
International ClassificationA61M5/52
Cooperative ClassificationY10S128/06, A61M5/52
European ClassificationA61M5/52