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Publication numberUS3059695 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 23, 1962
Filing dateMar 7, 1960
Priority dateMar 7, 1960
Publication numberUS 3059695 A, US 3059695A, US-A-3059695, US3059695 A, US3059695A
InventorsAdelbert Barry, Mounce Whitman D
Original AssigneeJersey Prod Res Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Drill stem testing device
US 3059695 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 23, 1962 DRILL STEM TESTING DEVICE ELECTRICAL CABLE CABLE HEAD SWABBING SECTION swAB cupsd IIIIII CHECK VALVE ff l LII I l||| l anemona- PRESSURE TRANSDUCER LATCH OVER SHOT FIG. 2A.

5 Sheets-Shedl 1 SWABBING SECTION FIG. 2C.

IIIIIIIIIIIIIII "5 r DRILL `25| STEM i lo l 233 t 7E 5V] i @W E .j VALVE I ssc-Hon ff'z ji PACKER SECTION I3 FORMATION T0 BE TESTED ATTORNEY.

A. BARRY ETAT DRILL STEM TESTING DEVICE Oct. 23, 1962 s sheets-sheet 2 Original Filed May l, 1957 ATTORNEY.

OC- 23, 1962 A. BARRY ETAL 3,059,695

DRILL STEM TESTING DEVICE Original Filed May l, 1957 5 Shets-Sheet 3 Patented Oct. 23, 1962 3,059,695 DRILL STEM TESTiNG DEVCE Adelbert Barry and Whitman D. Monnce, Houston, Tex., assignors, by mesne assignments, to .lersey Production Research Company, Tulsa, Ukla., a corporation of Delaware Continuation of application Ser. No. 656,341, May 1, 1957. This application Mar. 7, 1966, Ser. No. 13,390

12 Claims. (Cl. 16d-3) This invention relates to apparatus for determining the nature of subsurface geological strata and more particularly to apparatus for use in connection with the sampling of fluids in earth formations.

This application is a continuation of patent application Serial No. 656,341, led May l, 1957, now abandoned.

In connection with the drilling of boreholes through the earth for the purpose of finding petroleum deposits therein, it is often desirable to periodically obtain samples of fluid existing in particular formations of the earth through which drilling operations are progressing. For this purpose it is necessary to seal off the lower portion of the borehole by means of a well packer. Formation fluids will often flow to the surface through the drill pipe. Sometimes, it is necessary to pump drilling mud out of the lower portion of the borehole until a relatively pure sample ofthe formation fluid can be obtained. In the past it was common practice to remove all of the drilling mud from the interior of the well pipe and to flow or pump formation fluids from the bottom of the borehole until fluids of sufllcient purity appeared at the top of the well pipe. Manifestly, this procedure is time-consuming and inevitably results in the loss of appreciable amounts of drilling mud even though attempts are made to` conserve drilling mud l insofar as is possible.

Additionally, it is to be noted that the valving means for controlling flow of hydraulic fluid to and from the well packer known to the prior art have not been satisfactory in all respects in connection with the sampling of formation fluids. One of the most satisfactory well packer actuating systems that has been known to the prior art is that described in U.S. Patent No. 2,813,587, W. D. Mounce.

This invention is an improvement over the drill stem tester described in the aforementioned W. D. Mounce patent, particularly relating to the elimination of the requirement for obtaining sampling fluids at the earths surface by swabbing, hailing, or by retracting the entire length of well pipe from the borehole, and to the provision of an unrestricted passageway for the flow of well fluids and for the use of wireline tools.

A general object of this invention is to provide an improved system that may be used in connection with downwell testing operations during drilling, wherein it is possible to seal off the bottom of the borehole without removing drill pipe from the hole.

Another object is to provide an improved well packer actuator system that will permit a virtually unrestricted central opening in the drill pipe.

Still another object is to provide an improved well packer actuating system that will permit the use of wireline tools in connection with drilling operations.

Still another object is to provide an improved systemy samples of earth formation fluids directly from the bottom of a borehole.

Yet another object is to provide apparatus for obtaining samples of earth formation fluids while interrupting drilling operations for a minmum amount of time.

`Other objects and features of the invention will become apparent upon consideration of the following description thereof when taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, wherein:

FIG. 1 is a simplified front elevation of a portion of a drilling string incorporating a well packer such as is used vin connection with the present invention;

PEG. 2A is an elevational View of apparatus adapted to be suspended from a wireline, which apparatus is used in connection with the practice of the present invention;

FIG. 2B is a sectional view of a check valve apparatus such as is used in connection with the apparatus shown in FIG. 2A;

FiG. 2C is a cross-sectional View of a portion of the apparatus shown in FIG. 2A, illustrating certain details of the construction thereof;

|FIGS. 3 and 4 taken together illustrate a preferred embodiment of the invention;

FIG. 5 is a view of the portion of the apparatus shown in FIG. 3 with certain of the component parts thereof in an actuated position;

yFIG. 6 is a view looking upwardly along section VI-VI of FIG. 3;

FIG. 7 is a sectional view looking downwardly along section VII-VII;

FIG. 8 is a sectional View showing certain details of valving apparatus illustrated in FIG. 3;

FIG. 9 is a sectional view of fluid sampling apparatus illustrated in FIG. 3; and

FIG. l0 is a sectional View of the same apparatus shown in FiG. 9, partially in cross-section with certain lcomponent parts thereof in an actuated position.

According to one aspect of the present invention, a well packer is actuated from a compressible fluid reservoir positioned between the inner and outer surfaces of a well pipe. The reservoir is coupled to the well packer through a valve centrally located between the inner and outer surfaces of the well pipe. The valve is actuated by a piston which is latched in the actuated position thereof by a latching member which has a portion extending into the interior of the pipe when in its latched position. The valve and reservoir are in fluid communication with the interior of the pipe so that fluid pressure within the pipe will simultaneously compress the reservoir and actuate the piston and valve. Fluid pressure is brought about by sealing the pipe below the valve by means of a godevil (which also contains a fluid sampling apparatus) sent down from the surface, and thereafter subjecting the interior of the pipe to mud pump pressure. Retraction of the go-devil from the pipe by a suitable retraction device on a wireline will trip the latch, returning the valve to its original position so that packer fluid will return to the reservoir and deflating the packer so that normal drilling operations may continue.

A feature of the invention lies in the construction of the sample chamber. The interior of the sampling cham.- ber contains a valving arrangement that is actuable by the same device that withdraws the sampling apparatus from the well pipe. After the packer has been inflated, the retraction apparatus is lowered into the well. The retraction apparatus includes a set of swabs so that mud may be pumped from the well pipe and formation fluids wil flow into the pipe to replace the mud. The sampling apparatus acts as a check valve, permitting flow of fluid Y up the drill pipe, but not down the pipe into the bottom of the borehole. Also included with the retraction devise 'and swabs is a fluid resistivity detector and a pressure gauge so that the nature of the iluids around the apparatus may be readily determined when the swabs have pumped sufficient fluids from the well so that a certain amount of `formation fluid may occupy the space in the vicinity of the sampling apparatus, The resistivity detector will indicate at the surface the resistivity of the fluid around it. When the resistivity detector indicates the presence of formation iluid, the retraction apparatus is lowered to actuate the valve within the sampling apparatus so that fluids will flow into the sampling chamber. Thereafter, the sampling apparatus may be retracted from the well, tripping the latching mechanism as described above.

With reference now to the drawings, and in particular to FIG. 1, reference numeral 9 represents a borehole which has been drilled into subsurface formations. Drill stem 10, in addition to component parts which are not shown, includes a swabbing section 11, a valve section 12, a packer section 13, a drill collar 5, and a drill bit 3, coupled serially together progressing in the order named to the bottom of the drill stern. The swabbing section 11 is provided with as smooth a bore as is possible to facilitate most effective action of the swabbing assembly to be described. Valve section 12 contains many component parts which will be described in connection with the other figures of the drawings; generally described, valve section 12 functions to regulate the flow of intlating fluid to and from packer section 13. The drill collar couples drill bit 3 to the rest of the assembly.

With reference now to FIGS. 2A2C, there is shown suspended at the end of a cable 35 apparatus for use in connection with the other component parts of the invention to be described. Serially connected in the order named are a swabbing section including a plurality of swab cups 32, fluid resistivity detector 33, a pressure gauge 31, and an overshot (or go-devel coupling member) 30, the apparatus being coupled to the cable 35 by means of a cable head 34. The cable may also include electric conductors for transmitting the output signals from pressure gauge 31 and tluid resistivity detector 33 to apparatus at the earths surface.

The function of the fluid resistivity detector 33 is to measure the resistivity of drilling mud, formation iluids and other fluids that may occupy the immediate vicinity thereof. The resistivity detector comprises a tubular pipe 237 on which the swabs are mounted (or as shown) a separate tubular member 225 screw-threaded to pipe 237) a brass or copper annular member 229 and an insulator 227 of rubber or rubber-like material for separating and electrically insulating member 225 from the electrode. The electrode is electrically connected to conductor 233 by means of connector 231 which is electrically insulated from the annular member 225. The electrical conductor 233 is connected to `suitable resistance measuring apparatus at the earths surface, which electrical measuring apparatus is also connected to the drill pipe so as to measure the electrical resistance of the iluid between electrode 229 and the drill pipe.

The function of swabs 32 is to pump lluids from the bottom of the drill stem 1t) toward the surface. The swabs are arranged so that downward movement will affect the fluid within the drill stem very little but upward movement will move a considerable quantity of the tluids toward the surface of the earth. When the swabs are moved downwardly, fluids will ilow through ports 241 (see FIG. 2B) up through ports 251 past a check valve including an annular valve member 247 and valve seat 249 and outwardly through ports 245. When the swabs are moved upwardly, valve member 247 will seat on valve seat 249 so as to prevent fluid from passing through the interior of the pipe. The function of the tube 239 is to provide a passageway for the conductors A 4 233 and 235 through the check valve section. Electrical connectors 251 and 253 are provided to connect the electrical conductors 233 and 235 to other conductors going up through cable member 35.

Pressure gauge 31 may be a gauge such as model 101, manufactured yby Byron-Jackson Services, Inc., of Long Beach, California. A single electrical conductor 235 is provided to transmit electrical output indications therefrom to the earths surface, the other electrical conductor Ibeing connected through the pipe including sections 225 and 237 and the casing of the pressure transducer. Overshot 30 may be of the nature described in the aforementioned U.S. Patent No. 2,813,587.

With reference now to FIGS. 3 and 4 taken together, there is shown in detail the apparatus for use in valve section 1.2 and packer section 13 of drill stern 10. Valve section 12 includes an outer housing member 16 having its upper section threadedly engaging swabbing section 11 and its lower section threadedly engaging the upper part of packer section 13. Within housing 16 forming a portion of the drill pipe is a tubular mandrel 17 having its upper end seated in and sealed to the lower end of swabbing section 11 and its lower end seated in and sealed to the upper end of packer section 13. In this manner, a hollow space is formed between outer housing 16 and mandrel 17. Between outer section 16 and mandrel 17 is positioned a slide valve assembly 2t), a latch mechanism 26 and a deflatable fluid reservoir bag 21. The fluid reservoir bag is sealed at its upper end to mandrel 17 by means of a sealing clamp 43. A plurality of openings 37 in mandrel 17 between the upper end of reservoir bag 21 and the lower end of swabbing section 11 permits the entry of drilling mud between the reservoir packer and the inner surface of housing y16 so that the bag may be deilated when the drilling mud is under pressure. The `lower end of reservoir bag 21 is sealed to annular shoulder 47 by means of sealing clamp 49.

g i The annular shoulder is secured to mandrel 17 by means of set screw 51.

Valve 20 is coupled to reservoir 45 by means of conduits 115 and 127 (see FIGS. 3 and 8), valves 22a and 22h, conduit 57, coupling 55 (which couples conduit 57 to passageway 53 `within annular shoulder 47), and

passageway 53. The details of valve 20 will be described with reference to FIG. 8.

Valve 20 is further coupled to the inner surface of eX pansible packer 103 by means of conduits 131 and 137 (see FIG. 8), check valves 23a and 23b, and passageway against the valve stern to bias the stem in its normal non-actuated position. The valve stem 123 has atlixed to its upper end an extension rod 73 which projects through an opening in the upper end of valve housing 113. Connected to the upper end of rod 73 is a latch arm 71 which is adapted to operably engage with latch 26. Arranged about rod 73 is a coil spring 72 which like spring 143 biases the valve stem 123 to its uppermost or normal position. Sealingly arranged about rod 73 and spring 72 is a deformable seal bag 75 which is illled with a liquid such as oil. As can be seen, fluid pressure exerted against the exterior of bag 75 will cause valve stem 123 to move downwardly or toward its actuated position. The oil within bag 75 affords a lubricant for the valve element 123. In its normal position, as shown in FIG. 8, the valve permits fluid flow from the packer section through one-way check valve 23:1 to conduit 131 and through port 13'3, central valve bore 121 and out port 120, through conduit 115 and check valve 22a, conduit 57 and passageway 53 to reservoir 45. When the valve is in its down or actuated position, iuid yflow is possible from reservoir 45 through passageway 53 and conduit 57, through check valve y22]), conduit 127 and inlet port 129, through central valve bore 121 and outlet port 139 to conduit 137, through check valve 2311 to conduit 91 and packer 103.

As mentioned above, the valve is biased upwardly into its normal position Iby coil spring 143. 'Ihe coil spring is seated within a well drilled in nipple 145, which is screwthreaded into the bottom of the valve housing 113; the spring biases against plug 141, which is screw-threaded into the bottom of valve stem 123. As shown clearly in FIGS. -3 and 8, expansible sealing member such as bag 149 is seated into nipple 145 so as to surround the opening of relief port 147, which is drilled through nipple 145. Bag 149 and the base of valve housing 113 below valve stem 123` is also filled with oil. The purpose of the seal bags 149 and 75 is to prevent liquids such as drilling mud from coming into direct contact with valve element 123 whereby its actuation could be impaired. Bag 149 is positioned in passageway 89 which is in fluid communication with bore 99 of packer section 13. As the valve stem 123 moves` down, the oil below valve stem 123 is forced into the expansi-ble bag 149. Latch 26 comprises a generally triangular shaped pivot arm 69 having a latching projection 76 at the lower corner thereof and hingedly affixed to an angle member 63 secured to annular collar 47 by seat screw 61. The pivot arm 69 is spring biased against latch arm 71 by a spring 65 attached to pivot arm 69 by a screw 6-4 and biased against a projection 68 on pivot arm 69. As shown more perspicuously in FIG. 5, application of mud pressure forces valve 20 down into its actuated position. When valve element 123 has moved down to its actuated position, pivot arm 69 swings to the left and latching projection 70 engages with the upper end of latch arm 71. This affords a positive mechanical hold-down for the valve element 123 even when the mud pressure within the drill pipe is released. As will be seen in FIGS. 3 and 5, a plurality of openings 58 are provided in mandrel 17 adjacent the latch 26. When the pivot arm 69 swings to the left as shown in FIG. 5, a portion of the arm extends through one of these openings and into the central bore of mandrel 17. With valve element 123 mechanically held down in its lowermost position, the packer fluid from reservoir 45 is forced to remain in packer member 103 so that the lower section of the borehole remains sealed off even though mud pressure within the drill stem is released.

The arrangement of check valves 22a and 22b, annular member S0, valve member 20, and uid conduits 115 and 127, each with respect to the other, is shown in FIG. 6. Fluid conduits 115 and 127, respectively, couple check valves 22a and 22b to fluid ports 117 and 129, respectively. Similarly in FIG. 7, the arrangement of check valves 23a and 23h, fluid conduits 131 and 137 and valve member 20 are shown and, as will be noted, conduits 131 and 137, respectively, couple check valves 23a and 231) to ports 133 and 139, respectively.

As has been discussed above, the actuation of valve 20 and the compression of flexible bag 21 are dependent upon the existence of a substantial fluid pressure within mandrel 17. This fluid pressure manifestly must be substantially greater than the mud pressure existent within mandrel 17 during normal drilling operations. For the purpose of allowing mud pumps at the earths surface to build up sutlicient pressure to compress flexible bag 21 and to actuate valve member 20, the flow of drilling mud through the mandrel must be plugged at a point below the juncture of housing 16 and packer section 13. This function is accomplished by check valve apparatus comprising go-devil or sample assembly means 28 sitting on valve seat 1S. Valve seat 13 is a part of mandrel 17 near the lower extremity thereof and comprises a tapered surface sufficiently large to stop downward movement of go-devil 28, but as small as practicable in order to restrict the central opening of the mandrel as little as possible.

The details of the construction of go-devil 2S and valve seating surface 18 are shown more perspicuously in FIG. 9. Go-devil 28 comprises four main sections, which will be termed top-section 153, middle section 165, lower section 193, and sampling chamber 27, which are arranged in the order named progressing from top to bottom, and which are screw-threaded together.

rTop section 153 and middle section 165 are provided with central bores in order to receive valve piston 152. The central face of top section 153 has two diameters as shown so that annular member 157 of valve piston 152 will abut against the top thereof to stop upward movement of the piston. Within the chamber 163 of top member 153 is a coil spring 159 abutting against annular member 157 so as to restrain valve piston 152 in its normal non-actuated position. Chamber 163 is filled with oil by means of port 161 to provide lubrication for the valve piston, longitudinal holes being drilled in annular member 157 so as to provide a means for fluid communication between the opposite faces thereof. Member 157 and the oil within chamber 163 serve as a dash-pot or shock absorber to prevent sudden shock stroking of piston valve 152.

The central bore of middle section 165 is provided with a port at the lower extremity thereof. This port is provided with an annular filtering screen 176 to prevent the entry of solid material into the sampling chamber. Another chamber 183, within middle section 165 at the lower extremity thereof, is coupled to central bore 173 by means of passageway 179, which is ported to central bore 173 by means of port 167. `Chamber 133 is coupled to sample chamber 27 by means of check valve 189 and the lower coupling member 193 of the valve assembly. Coupling member 193 has tapered surface 196 which matches the tapered surface 18 of mandrel 17 to cut olf the flow of drilling muds through the drilling string. If desired, an O-ring 197 can be secured to tapered surface 196 so as to provide a more effective fluid seal.

At the lower extremity of valve piston 152 is a coupling passageway 171. This passageway intercouples port 175 and passageway 179 when piston 152 is actuated; i.e., when it is moved downwardly as far as possible. Downward movement of valve piston 152 is stopped by shoulder 154 thereof abutting against top member 153 of the valve casing. lIn the non-actuated or normal position of piston 152, uid communiaction by the chamber 183 and port 175 is cut olf by the dead-ending of passage- Way 171 against the surface of bore 173.

The actuated position of piston 152 is shown most perspicuously in FIG. 10. To actuate the piston, it is only necessary to lower the assembly shown in FIG. 2A onto the top of piston 152 so that overshot 30 abuts against annular stop 150 of piston 152. The overshot 30 positively couples to the top of the valve piston by coupling dogs 199 so that the go-devil can be retracted from the drilling string when desired.

The operation of the apparatus described above is as follows: Let it be assumed that drilling bit 3 has penetrated a subsurface stratum resulting in a Iloss of drilling fluids, a change in the rate'of flow of drilling fluids, or a substantially faster rate of drilling, a showing of petroleum inthe drilling mud, or other lindications that a test of the formation fluids is desirable or advisable. Godevil 28 is dropped into the drill string, and the main channel for drilling mud is plugged. Mud pressure is applied by the mud pump at the surface forcing valve element 123 to its down or packer inflating position. Mud

pressure on the flexible bag 21 will tend to compress the bag so that fluid will be transferred from reservoir 45 to the internal packer member 103 through passageway 53, check valve 22h, port 129, valve 2G, check valve 231:, and passageway 91. The packer will inflate and will press against the side of the borehole to prevent fluids from flowing upwardly from the borehole. Mud pressure is released and the apparatus shown in FIG. 2A is lowered into the well pipe. Note that release of mud pressure will not alect valve inasmuch as latch mechanism 25 prevents the upward movement of valve piston 123.

The apparatus shown in FIG. 2A is lowered within the well pipe until swabs 32 are within swabbing section 11, but not low enough to permit overshot to engage go-devil 28. The swabs are reciprocated upwardly and downwardly, thereby pumping drilling mud from the lower end of the borehole through the drill bit 3, drill collar 5, packer section 13, past go-devil 28 (which functions as a check valve, opposing iluid ow downwardly but not upwardly through the well pipe), and through valve section 12. Since the mud above the well packer 103 cannot flow downwardly to replace the mud that has been pumped out of the lower end of the borehole, formation fluids must replace the mud. In due course, formation uids will be pumped past swabs 32 so that fluid resistivity detector 33 will indicate their presence. At this point the swabbing is discontinued and the assembly of FIG. 2A is lowered until overshot 30 engages the upper end 59 of valve piston 152 and the weight of the swabbing unit pushes the piston `152 to its down position as shown in FIG. 10. The formation uids around the go-devil 28 will flow through port 175, passageway 171 and 179, and check valve 189 of the sampling chamber 27. After an appropriate interval, the apparatus of FIG. 2A is withdrawn along with the go-devil 28. The go-devil will strike the portion of latch arm 68 that protrudes into the interior of mandrel 17, thereby tripping latch 26 to return valve 20 to its non-actuated position. Since packer 103 is distorted outwardly from its normal shape, it will force the packing fluid upwardly through valve 20 and check valves 23a and 22a of the reservoir 45. If desired, normal drilling operations may again commence.

Manifestly, the objects set forth above have been achieved by this invention. In locating the iiuid reservoir, the valving apparatus, and other equipment that must be carried by the drilling string between the inner and outer surfaces of the drill pipe, it is necessary to restrict the diameter of the central bore of the drill pipe at only one point and there only by an amount suicient to provide a seating surface for the go-devil. As a result of this very slight restriction in the available diameter of the drill pipe, the use of wire-line tools in connection with other drilling operations is virtually unimpeded. The invention further permits obtaining samples of fluids directly from `the bottom of the borehole by means of the sampling chamber within the go-devil and the cooperation of the go-devil with the other elements of the invention. Drilling operations need be interrupted for only a very short time to obtain a sample of formation iiuids inasmuch as very little drilling mud need be pumped by the swa-bs in order to obtain a sufficiently pure sample of formation uids.

Although the embodiment disclosed in the preceding description and drawing is preferred, other modifications will be apparent to those skilled in the art which do not depart from the broadest aspects of the scope of the invention.

What is claimed is:

1. In a well packer including a well pipe for insertion in a borehole, said well pipe including a section with an inner member and an outer member defining an annular space therebetween; a huid-actuated expansible packer member atixed to said well pipe, and an expansible fluid reservoir located above said packer member and between the inner and outer members of said well pipe section; first port means in said inner member for permitting fluid pressure from the well pipe to be applied to said annular space; uid coupling means coupling said iluid reservoir to said packer member; said uid coupling means including first valve means between said inner and outer members of said well pipe section having an actuated position and a non-actuated position; said valve means permitting duid flow only from said packer to said reservoir while in said non-actuated position, and permitting fluid tlow only from said reservoir to said packer while in said actuated position; said valve means having a stationary valve body and a movable valve stem spring-biased into said non-actuated position; second port means in said inner member; actuating means between said inner and outer members of said well pipe section for said valve stem, said actuating means including piston means movable responsive to fluid pressure of a given magnitude within said drill pipe and latch means for latching said piston means in said valve in the actuated position of said valve including a pivoted spring-biased arm having a portion projecting through said second port means into the bore of said well pipe when said pivoted arm latches said piston means, said arm being spring-biased into the latching position thereof; second valve means for closing the bore of said well pipe at a given location between said packer means and said reservoir means and below said latch means to permit the building up of fluid pressure in said pipe above said given location, said second valve means including a valve seat including a portion of `the inner surface of said pipe, and a uid sampling member slidable through the interior of said pipe down to said given location and adapted to seat on said valve seat to close said bore; said fluid sampling member including a iluid sampling chamber, and third valve means coupling the exterior of said tiuid sampling member to said sampling chamber through check valve means connected to said fluid sampling chamber; said third valve means having a piston spring-biased to normally close said third valve means and adapted to be opened by valve opening means suspended by a wireline from the top of said borehole; said valve opening means being further adapted to couple to said fluid sampling means to withdraw said iiuid sampling means from said borehole, said fluid sampling means upon being withdrawn from said borehole being adapted to strike said pivoted arm to unlatch said latching means.

2. In a well packer including a well pipe for insertion in a borehole, said well pipe including a section with an inner member and an outer member defining an anular space therebetween; a Huid-actuated expansible packer member aiiixed to said well pipe, and an expansible uid reservoir located above said packer member and between the inner and outer members of said well pipe section; first port means in said inner member for permitting iiuid pressure from the well pipe to be applied to said annular space; fluid coupling means coupling said iluid reservoir to said packer member; said fluid coupling means including first valve means between said inner and outer members of said well pipe section having an actuated position and a non-actuated position; said valve means permitting iluid ow only from said packer to said reser voir while in said non-actuated position, and permitting uid flow only from said reservoir to said packer while in said actuated position; said valve means having a stationary valve body and a movable valve stem movable between said actuated position and said non-actuated po sition; second port means in said inner member; actuating means between said inner and outer members of said well pipe section for said valve stem, said actuating means including piston means movable responsive to iiuid pressure of a given magnitude within said drill pipe and latch means for latching said piston means in said valve in the actuated position of said lvalve including a pivoted spring-biased arm having a portion projecting through said second port means into the bore of said well pipe when said arm latches said piston means, said arm being spring-biased into the latching position thereof, second valve means for closing the bore of said well pipe at a given location between said packer means and said reservoir means and below said latch means to permit the building lup of fluid pressure in said pipe above said given location, said second valve means including a valve seat including a portion of the inner surface of said pipe, and a fluid sampling member slidable through the interior of said pipe down to said given location and adapted to seat on said valve seat to close said bore; said fluid sampling means upon being withdrawn from said borehole being adapted to strike said pivoted arm to unlatch said latching means.

3. In a well packer including a well pipe for insertion in a borehole, said well pipe including a section with an inner member and an outer member defining an annular space therebetween; a fluid-actuated expansible packer member affixed to Said well pipe, and an expansible fluid reservoir located above said packer member and between the inner and outer members of said well pipe section; first port means in said inner member for permitting fluid pressure from the well pipe to be applied to said annular space; fluid coupling -means coupling said fluid reservoir to said packer member; said fluid coupling means including first valve means between said inner and outer members of said well pipe section having an actuated position and a non-actuated position; said first valve means permitting fluid flow only from said packer to said reservoir while in said non-actuated position, and permitting fluid flow only from said reservoir to said packer while in said actuated position; said first valve means having a stationary valve body and a movable valve stem normally biased into said non-actuated position; second port means in said inner member; actuating means between said inner and outer members of said well pipe section for said valve stem, said actuating means including piston means movable responsive to fluid pressure of a given magnitude within said drill pipe and latch means for latching said piston means in said Valve in the actuated position of said valve including a pivoted spring-biased arm having a portion projecting through said second port means into -the bore of said well pipe when said arm latches said piston means, said arm being spring-biased into the latching position thereof, check valve means for closing the bore of said well pipe at a given location between said packer means and said reservoir means and below said latch means to permit the building up of fluid pressure in said pipe above said given location, said check valve means including a valve seat including a portion of the inner surface of said pipe, and a fluid sampling member slidable through the interior of said pipe down to said given location and adapted to seat on said valve seat to close said bore; said fluid sampling member including a fluid sampling chamber, and third valve means coupling the exterior of said fluid sampling member to said sampling chamber; said third valve means having a piston spring-biased to normally close said third valve means and adapted to be opened by valve opening means suspended by a wireline from the top of said borehole; said valve opening means being further adapted to couple to Said fluid sampling means to withdraw said fluid sampling means from said borehole, said fluid sampling means upon being withdrawn from said borehole being adapted to strike said pivoted arm to unlatch said latching means.

4. In a well packer including a well pipe for insertion in a borehole, said well pipe including a section with an inner member and an outer member defining an annular space therebetween; a fluid-actuated expansible packer member affixed to said well pipe, and an expansible fluid reservoir located above said packer member and between the inner and outer members of said well pipe section; first port means in said inner member for permitting fluid pressure from the well pipe to be applied to said annular space; fluid coupling means coupling said fluid reservoir to said packer member; said fluid coupling means including first valve means between said inner and outer members of said well pipe section having an actuated position and a non-actuated position; said first valve means permitting fluid flow only from said packer to said reservoir while in said non-actuated position, and permitting fluid flow only from said reservoir to said pac-ker while in said actuated position; said first valve means having a stationary valve body and a movable valve ste-m normally biased into said non-actuated position; second port means in said inner member; actuating means between said inner and outer members of said well pipe section for said valve stem, said actuating means including piston means movable responsive to fluid pressure of a given magnitude within said drill pipe and latch means for latching said piston means in said valve in the actuated position of said Valve including a pivoted spring-biased arm having a portion projecting through said second port means into the bore of said well pipe when said arm latches said piston means, said arm being spring-biased into the latching position thereof, check valve means for closing the bore of said well pipe at a given location between said packer means and said reservoir means and below said latch means to permit the building up of fluid pressure in said pipe above said given location, said check valve means including a valve seat including a portion of the inner surface of said pipe, and a fluid sampling member slidable through the interior of said pipe down to said given location and adapted to seat on said valve seat to close said bore; said fluid sampling member including a fluid sampling chamber, and third valve means coupling the exterior of said fluid sampling member to said sampling chamber; said third valve means having a piston spring-biased to normally close said third valve means and adapted to be opened by valve opening means suspended by a wireline from the top of said borehole; said valve opening means being further adapted to couple to said fluid sampling means to withdraw said fluid sampling means from said borehole, said fluid sampling means upon being withdrawn from said borehole being adapted to strike said pivoted arm to unlatch said latching means; said valve opening means being integral with swabbing means for pumping fluids upwardly past said check valve means into said well pipe above said valve seat; a fluid resistivity measuring devi-ce lowerable with said swabbing means operable to transmit electrical signals to the earths surface indicative of the nature of the fluids thereabout.

5. Apparatus for making a drill stem test, including: a drill pipe for insertion in a borehole; a packer member axed to said drill pipe for sealing off a lower portion of said borehole; a valve seat on the interior of said drill pipe adapted to receive a fluid sampling means insertable into said drill pipe so as to seal the pipe against fluid flow downwardly therethrough and to per-mit fluid flow upwardly therethrough; fluid sampling means including a sample chamber insertable into said drill pipe to land on said valve seat; fluid coupling means in said sampling means for controllably coupling said sample chamber to the exterior of said sampling means to permit flow of fluids into said sample chamber, said fluid coupling means including a yvalve having an actuating member; said valve being responsive to engagement of said actuating member by swabbing means to permit the flow of fluids into said sample chamber; and swabbing means insertable into said drill pipe for swabbing said pipe to pump fluid up past said valve seat and fluid sampling means, said swabbing means including means adapted to engage said actuating member for actuation thereof and to lock onto Il' said tluid sampling means for withdrawal of said tluid sampling means from the drill pipe.

6. Apparatus for making a drill stem test, including: a drill pipe for insertion in a borehole; a packer member aixed to said drill pipe for sealing oil a lower portion of said borehole; a valve seat on the interior of said drill pipe adapted to receive a tiuid sampling means insertable into said drill pipe so as to seal the pipe against iluid ow downwardly therethrough and to permit iluid liow upwardly therethrough; tluid sampling means insertable into said drill pipe to land on said valve seat, said luid sampling means comprising a housing enclosing a sample chamber, a port opening to the exterior of said housing, and means including valve means hydraulically coupling said port to said sample chamber when said valve means is in a iirst position thereof and isolating said port from said sample chamber when said valve means is in a second position thereof; spring means biasing said valve means to said second position thereof; and swabbing means insertable into said drill pipe for swabbing said pipe to pump fluids up past said valve seat and iluid sampling means, said swabbing means including means adapted to engage said valve means to force said valve means to said first position thereof and to lock onto said fluid sampling means for withdrawal of said luid sampling means from the drill pipe.

7. Apparatus for making a drill stem test, including: a drill pipe for insertion in a borehole; a packer member aixed to said drill pipe for sealing ott a lower portion of said borehole; a valve seat on the interior of said drill pipe adapted to receive a iluid sampling means insertable into said drill pipe so as to seal the pipe against t'luid iow downwardly therethrough and to permit uid ilow upwardly therethrough; iluid sampling means insertable into said drill pipe to land on said valve seat, said fluid sampling means comprising a housing enclosing a sample chamber, a port opening to the exterior of said housing, and means including valve means hydraulically coupling said port to said sample chamber when said valve means is in a tirst position thereof and isolating said port from said sample chamber when said valve means is in a second position thereof; spring means biasing said valve means to said second position thereof; swabbing means insertable into said drill pipe for swabbing said pipe to pump fluids up past said valve seat and fluid sampling means, said swabbing means including means adapted to engage said valve means to force said valve means to said rst position thereof and to lock onto said iiuid sampling means for withdrawal of said iluid sampling means from the drill pipe; said swabbing means further including means for measuring the electrical resistivity of iiuids within said drill pipe.

8. Apparatus for making a drill stem test, including: a drill pipe for insertion in a borehole; a packer member aixed to said drill pipe for sealing oi a lower portion of said borehole; a valve seat on the interior of said drill pipe adapted to receive a fluid sampling means insertable into said drill pipe so as to seal the pipe against fluid tlow downwardly therethrough and to permit fluid flow upwardly therethrough; a retrievable iluid sampling means insertable into said drill pipe to land on said valve seat; said fluid sampling means including a sample chamber, means including valve means, for controlling iluid ow into said sample chamber from the exterior of said fluid sampling means, and actuating means for said valve means connected to said valve means and adapted to open and close said valve means responsive to engagement of said actuating means by retrieving means; retrieving means adapted to engage said actuating means for actuation of said valve means, and further adapted to lock Onto said sampling means for withdrawal of said fluid sampling means from said drill pipe; and fluid pumping means operatively associated with said drill pipe for pumping iluid up said drill pipe,

9. Apparatus for making a drill stem test, including: a drill pipe for insertion in a borehole; a packer member aflixed to said drill pipe for sealing off a lower portion of said borehole; a valve seat on the interior of said drill pipe adapted to receive a fluid sampling means insertable into said drill pipe so as to seal the pipe against iluid flow downwardly therethrough and to permit tiuid ilow upwardly therethrough; a retrievable Huid sampling means insertable into said drill pipe to land on said valve seat; said lluid sampling means including a sample chamber and means, including a valve, for controlling tluid llow from the exterior of said fluid sampling means to said sample chamber; said valve including a valve housing comprising a portion of said tluid sampling means, a valve piston in said valve housing, a spring connected to said valve piston for urging said valve piston to a position whereat said valve is closed, and an actuating means connected to said piston for opening said valve when said piston is engaged by a retracting means lowerable into said drill pipe for withdrawal of said fluid sampling means; and pumping means operatively associated with said drill pipe for pumping fluids up said drill pipe.

l0. Apparatus for use in a well comprising: a multisection tubular drill pipe including a section comprising an outer housing member and an inner perforated mandrel coaxially arranged between adjacent drill pipe sections to define a chamber; a hydraulically inflatable packer af- Iiaed to said drill pipe; a uid reservoir aflixed to said mandrel in said chamber, said tluid reservoir having resilient walls adapted to be compressed by pressure in said drill pipe; a valve seat in said drill pipe below said reservoir, adapted to seat a go-devil to form a valve for preventing tluid ow downwardly through said drill pipe past said seat; a go-devil adapted to seat on said valve seat; hydraulic coupling means including a control valve having an actuated position and a non-actuated position, said hydraulic coupling means being connected to said packer and to said reservoir and being adapted t0 permit fluid ow from said reservoir to said packer only when said control valve is in said actuated position, said hydraulic coupling means being further adapted to permit fluid flow from said packer to said reservoir only when said control valve is in said non-actuated position; means operatively associated with said control valve for urging said control valve to said non-actuated position; actuating means connected to said control valve and in hydraulic communication with the interior of said drill pipe above and below said seat, responsive to differential lluid pressure across said seat to move said control valve from said non-actuated position to said actuated position; a latch for said actuating means comprising a pivoted arm pivotally affixed to said drill pipe within said chamber and a catch ailixed to said actuating means for latchingly engaging said arm when said control valve is in said actuated position so that said control valve is held in said actuated' position; means operatively associated with said arm for urging said arm toward the latching position thereof; said arm having a portion projecting into the interior of said mandrel above said go-devil when said go-devil is seated in said valve seat, said portion being adapted to be stricken by said go-devil when said godevil is moved up said drill pipe to swing said arm away from the latching position thereof so as to releace said actuating means.

ll. A method of drill stem testing in a borehole comprising: isolating a portion of the borehole including the lower end of the drill stem; inserting a check valve in the drill stem near the lower end thereof to prevent Huid ilow down the drill stem while permitting iluid tlow up the drill stem; swabbing the drill stem above the check valve to pump fluid up the drill stem; measuring the electrical conductivity of the fluid in the drill stern at a given level above the check valve and near the swabbing level; and,

when the measured electrical conductivity is indicative of 13 substantially uncontaminated earth fluids, capturing a sample of the fluid below the given level.

12. A method of drill stem testing in -a borehole comprising: isolating a portion of the borehole including the lower end of the drill stem; inserting a check valve in the drill stem near the lower end thereof to prevent fluid flow down the drill stem while permitting fluid flow up the drill stem; swabbing the `drill stem above the check valve to pump fluid up the drill stern; measuring the electrical conductivity of the fluid in the drill stern at a given level above the check valve and near `the swabbing level; When the measured electrical conductivity is indicative of substantially uncontaminated earth fluids, capturing a sample of the fluid below the given level; and removing References Cited in the le of this patent the check valve to permit continuation of drilling opera- 15 2,959,226

tions.

UNITED STATES PATENTS Rusler et al. Oct. 15, 1940 Reistle Feb. 14, 1950 Silverman Aug. 8, 1950 Kirby May 8, 1951 Elkins Aug. 14, 1951 Lane Aug. 19, 1952 West Oct. 14, 1952 Sewell Dec. l0, 1952 Maly etal. Feb. 19, 1957 Miner Jan. 5, 1960 Blood Nov. 8, 1960

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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Classifications
U.S. Classification166/264, 166/187, 73/152.19, 277/333, 166/100, 324/324
International ClassificationE21B37/10, E21B33/12, E21B49/08, E21B33/127, E21B49/00, E21B37/00
Cooperative ClassificationE21B49/082, E21B37/10, E21B33/127
European ClassificationE21B49/08B2, E21B33/127, E21B37/10