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Publication numberUS3060339 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 23, 1962
Filing dateNov 14, 1960
Priority dateNov 14, 1960
Publication numberUS 3060339 A, US 3060339A, US-A-3060339, US3060339 A, US3060339A
InventorsMiyata Moriya Saburo
Original AssigneeInternat Patent Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Means for ionizing fluids
US 3060339 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct 23, 1962 sABUR-o MIYATA MoRlYA 3,050,339

MEANS FOR IONIZING FLUIDS Filed NOV. 14, 1960 N.s. r4.5.

58 v INVENTOA l Sfzyaaa/lfo/y a.

AGENT United States Patent O 3,060,339 MEANS FOR IONIZING FLUIDS Saburo Miyata Moriya, Yokohama, Japan, assigner to International Patent Corporation, Hong Kong Filed Nov. 14, 1960, Ser. No. 69,041 9 Claims. (Cl. 313-153) This invention relates to a means for ionizing fluids by the application of very strong magnetic flux to flowing fluids. The invention is particularly adapted to be used in the fuel line of an internal combustion moto-r for wholly or partially ionizing the fuel flowing therethrough.

An object of this invention is the provision of means for creating an area of intense magnetic iiux in the path of a flowing fluid used as fuel in an internal combustion motor.

A further object of this invention is the provision of means for ionizing a flowable fluid by subjecting it to the effects of a very strong magnetic ux in its path of movement.

An additional object of this invention is the provision of a relatively simple magnetic ionizer adapted for insertion in the fuel line of an internal combustion motor.

Another object of this invention is the provision of means for producing a very stro-ng magnetic ilux which includes annular magnets which are preferably magnetized along a diameter.

These and other objects will appear upon consideration of the following specification taken with the accompanying drawings, which taken together form a complete disclosure of my invention.

In the drawings:

FIG. l is a longitudinal sectional View through a preferred form of my invention;

FIG. 2 is a perspective View of one of the magnets in FIG. l;

FGS. 3-1l show other forms of magnet assemblies which may be used in lieu of that shown in FIG. l, wherein:

FIG. 3 is a perspective view, partly in section, of an annular magnet, magnetized on its interior face having its N. and S. poles spaced from the ends of the annulus;

.FIG. 4 is a perspective view of a rod magnet;

FIG. 5 is a sectional view showing the magnets of FIGS. 3 and 4 in assembled position for use in the device in lieu of the magnets shown in FIG. l;

FIG. 6 is a part sectional View showing the use of a different type of rod magnet;

FIG. 7 is a perspective view of an annular magnet magnetized on a diameter;

FIG. 8 is a perspective view of a rod magnet magnetized on a diameter;

FIG. 9 is `a sectional view of and 8 in assembled position;

FIG. l0 is an elevation of a different core arrangement;

FIG. l1 is a sectional view of the magnets of FIGS. 7 and l0 in assembled position for use in the device in lieu of the magnets shown in FIG. l.

Referring now to FIG. l, the ionizing device is represented as a whole by the numeral 10, and comprises a casing 12 of non magnetic material, preferably brass. End caps 14 and 16 are mounted on the casing 12. The end cap 14 has a dome 18 and a side tap 20 which constitutes the fluid inlet. A flange 22 engages a stainless metal wire screen 24 and clamps same against the end of the casing 12. The end cap 16 is similar in all respects to the cap 14, and the side tap1 26 constitutes the outlet. The flange 2S clamps the tube and holds the magnet assembly in place. The end cap 14 is provided with a `drain plug 30', and the end cap 16 is provided with a clean out plug 32.

Inside the casing 12 the magnets of FIGS. 7

I place the magnet assembly,

Patented Oct. 23, 1962 ice which comprises a plurality of ring magnets 34 of like dimensions, spaced apart and from the end caps by means of non magnetic spacer rings 36. Each of the magnets 34 is formed of ysintered ferrite and is magF netized on a diameter as best indicated in FIG. 2. The axes of magnetization are preferably staggered along the length of the assembly. A core magnet 38 is placed in the axis of the assembly. The magnet 38 is preferably a rod of sintered ferrite, and is preferably magnetized on a diameter. A spiral of non magnetic spring material 40 surrounds the core magnet 318 as shown in FIG. l0. A spring 42 presses against the clean out plug 32 and the end of the core magnet 38 to hold the latter in assembled position, the other end of said core magnet 3S engaging the screen 24. The spiral 40 causes fluids to pass in a helical path about the core magnet 3S between it and the ring magnets 34. The size of the core magnet 33 is such that the gap between it and the magnets 34 is quite small, but not small enough to materially impede the uid flowing therein. In its passage the fluid is subjected to intense magnetic flux, and to a rapidly changing of the direction of such linx paths, to produce ionization of the uid.

FIG. 3 shows an annular magnet 42 which may be substituted for the annular magnets 34. This magnet 42 is formed of sintered -ferrite and is magnetized on its interior with its N. and S. poles spaced from the ends of the annulus, and the main area of ux F on the inside of the annulus as shown in FIG. 3, FIG. 4 shows a bar magnet 44, magnetized at its ends and which may be substituted for the core 38. The magnets 40 and 42 are shown assembled in FIG. 5. FIG. 6 shows the annular magnet 42 with a diierent core 46. The core '46 comprises a bar or rod magnet 48 having end pieces 50, 52. These end pieces enable the use of a powerful, small bar magnet, but provide a very small air gap 54.

In FIG. 7, I show another annular magnet 56 which may be substituted for the magnets 34. This magnet comprises an annulus 50 formed of sintered ferrite and magnetized on a diameter, as shown by the placement of the letters N. and S. In FIG. 8 there is illustrated a core magnet 60 which may be used with the magnet 56, and which is likewise formed of sintered ferrite and is magnetized longitudinally on a diameter, as indicated by the N. and S. lettering on this ligure.

The use of any of the magnets of FIGS. 3 to 8 in lieu of the magnets 34 in FIG. 1 will produce a device which will subject fluids passing therethrough to an intense magnetic ux. The combined effect of the flux and the movement of the fluid will produce an ionization. When used in the fuel line of an internal combustion motor, the combustion is more complete, Improved combustion and a reduction in smog forming gases results from such operation.

`.This invention is an improvement over the device claimed in U.S. Patent No. 2,926,276, issued to Moriya and Asakawa, on February 23, 1960.

Having described my invention in several forms, I desire it to be understood that other forms may be employed within the skill of the art and the scope of the appended claims.

I claim: i

1. A device for ionizing uids comprising a non magnetic cylindrical casing having a uid inlet at one end and a uid outlet at the other end, a plurality of axially arranged, annular magnets arranged within the casing, means for spacing the magnets from each other, a rod magnet passing axially through the annular magnets and spaced therefrom a short distance to leave a small gap, means within said gap for causing the uid to take a spiral path in its passage through the casing.

2. The structure as defined in claim l, wherein the means for spacing the annular magnets comprises a plurality of annular members of non magnetic material.

3. A device for ionizing fluids comprising a cylindrical casing having a fluid inlet at one end and a Huid outlet at the other end, at least one annular magnet within the casing, a rod magnet passing axially through the annular magnet and spaced a short distance therefrom to form a small gap to subject the Huid passing therethrough t a very strong magnetic iiux.

1. The structure as defined in claim 3, wherein the annular magnet is magnetized principally on its interior and wherein the N. and S. poles thereof are spaced inwardly from the ends of the annulus, and wherein the rod magnet is magnetized along its axis.

5. The structure as deiined in claim 3, wherein the annular magnet is magnetized along a diameter, and wherein the rod magnet is also magnetized along a diameter.

6. The structure as dened in claim 1, wherein the means causing uid to travel in a spiral path comprises a spiral spring having spaced apart coils and surrounding the rod magnets.

7. The structure as defined in claim l, including a spring between one end of the 'casing and the rod magnet to hold the assembly in proper position, and a non corrodible filter Ameans at the other end against which the rod magnet rests.

8. The 'structure as dened in claim 3 wherein the annular magnet is formed of sintered ferrite.

9. The structure as defined in claim l, wherein the annular magnets are formed of sintered ferrite and are magnetized along a diameter, the axes of magnetization being staggered along the length of the casing.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2926276 *Jun 2, 1959Feb 23, 1960Moriya Saburo MApparatus for the ionization of electrons of flowable materials
US2942141 *Jun 6, 1957Jun 21, 1960Bell Telephone Labor IncMagnetic structures for traveling wave tubes
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4460516 *Nov 28, 1980Jul 17, 1984Kapitanov Boris ADevice for magnetizing the fuel mixture of an internal combustion engine
US4461262 *Jan 16, 1981Jul 24, 1984Edward ChowFuel treating device
US4716024 *Jun 25, 1986Dec 29, 1987Goliarda Mugnai TrustMagnetizing hydrocarbon fuels and other fluids
US4933151 *Dec 16, 1988Jun 12, 1990Song Ben CDevice for magnetically treating hydrocarbon fuels
US5248437 *Dec 19, 1990Sep 28, 1993Forrest Scientific Research LimitedMethod for the magnetic inhibition of protista
US5749145 *May 20, 1997May 12, 1998Baukloh; HorstEgg cutter
US5997812 *Aug 1, 1996Dec 7, 1999Coolant Treatment Systems, L.L.C.Methods and apparatus for the application of combined fields to disinfect fluids
EP0056570A1 *Jan 5, 1982Jul 28, 1982Edward ChowFuel treating device
EP0073077A2 *Aug 4, 1982Mar 2, 1983S.B.H. Trading S.A.Process and device for treating a liquid fuel with a magnetic field
WO1982001918A1 *Nov 28, 1980Jun 10, 1982Boris A BlatovDevice for magnetic treatment of fuel mixture for an internalcombustion engine
Classifications
U.S. Classification313/153, 313/157
International ClassificationF02M27/00, F02M27/04
Cooperative ClassificationF02M27/04
European ClassificationF02M27/04