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Publication numberUS3061221 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 30, 1962
Filing dateMay 27, 1958
Priority dateMay 27, 1958
Publication numberUS 3061221 A, US 3061221A, US-A-3061221, US3061221 A, US3061221A
InventorsAulen Walter E
Original AssigneeEddystone Machinery Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Winding machine
US 3061221 A
Abstract  available in
Images(7)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. v3o, 1962 w. E. AULEN 3,061,221

WINDING MACHINE 'Filed May 27. 195s 'r sheets-sheet 1 53 fr z2 l I .v j, g n 57' Q9/ if 700 /ff 4 /f 5f' INVENT? WaQ/er i.' Au

Oct. 30, 1962 w. E. AULEN 3,061,221

WINDING MACHINE Filed May 27, 1958 '7 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENToR Waffel' E'. A @Zen ATTORNEY` Oct. 30, 1962 w. E. AULEN 3,061,221

WINDING MACHINE Filed May 27, 1958 v 7 Sheets-Sheet 3 INVENTOR Wfer E Aaan W. E. AULEN WINDING MACHINE Oct. 30, 1962 7 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed May 27, 1958 INVENTOR Waffe? E /uen/ ATTORNEYJ.

W. E. AULEN WINDING MACHINE Oct. 30, 1962 '7 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed May 27, 1958 4 ATTORNEYS.

W. E. AULEN WINDING MACHINE Oct. 30, 1962 Filed May 27, 1958 '7 Sheets-Sheet 6 W. E. AULEN WINDING MACHINE 7 Sheets-Sheet 7 Filed May 27, 1958 NVENTOR Waer i ,4 @Zai United States Patent Office 3,061,221 Patented Oct. 30, 1962 3,061,221 WINDING MACHINE Walter E. Aulen, Woodstown, NJ., assignor tot Eddystone Machinery Co., Chester, Pa., a corporation of Pennsylvania Filed May 27, 1958, Ser. No. 738,232 6 Claims. (Cl. 242-66) The present invention relates to winding machines `for textile materials. l

A purpose of the invention is to wind rolls of textile material under controlled tension. l

A further purpose is to prevent imprinting the fabric of the back of one layer of material against the plastic face of the other layer of material, when the material being wound is a plastic coating with a fabric back.

A further purpose is to control tension in the windup 011 the roll to allow for shrinkage.

A further purpose is to prevent distortion in the textile material by excessive tension during the winding.

A further purpose is to permit loose winding.

A further purpose is to get a greater range of size of rolls which can be transferred.

A further purpose is to prevent sticking of roll pivots during transfer.

In the drawings I have chosen to illustrate one only of the numerous embodiments in which the invention may appear, selecting the forms shown from the standpoints of convenience in illustration, satisfactory operation and clear demonstration of the principles involved.

FIGURE 1 is a vertical section of a cloth Winder in accordance with the invention on the line 1-41 of FIG- URE 4.

FIGURE 2 is a fragmentary section on the line 2-2 of FIGURE 4 with the transfer arms in rear position.

FIGURE 3 is an enlarged fragmentary right end elevation of the Winder of FIGURE l with the frame broken away to show the new shell, the threading belts and the shell drive.

FIGURE 4 is a fragmentary rear end elevation of the Winder of the invention.

FIGURE 5 is an enlarged fragmentary section of FIGURE 4 on the line 5-5, with the transfer arms in forward position.

FIGURE 6 is an enlarged sectional side elevation of the latch mechanism of FIGURE 5.

FIGURE 7 is a fragmentary section of FIGURE 5 on the line 7 7.

FIGURE 8 is an electric circuit diagram according to the invention.

FIGURE 9 is a hydraulic piping diagram according to the invention.

FIGURE 9a is a simplied hydraulic piping diagram operating without the pilot valves.

Described in illustration but not in limitation and referring to the drawings:

A rear drum is keyed to horizontal shaft 21 journaled in bearings 22 and 23 mounted on frame 24. Shaft 21 is driven by suitable means such as an electric motor (not shown).

The material 25, in the `form of a web, is wound on a shell 26 mounted on a spitzbar 27 free to rotate in journal bearings 2S and 30. A gear 31 is keyed to spitzbar 27 in contact at the beginning of the wind with gear 32 keyed to shaft 33 journaled in arm 34.

A sprocket 35 is keyed to shaft 33 and mounts drive chain 36 which is connected to sprocket 38 mounted and keyed on rear drum shaft 21.

Arm 34 is journaled and mounted on rear drum shaft 21 and is free to pivot on shaft 21.

To start the wrap-up or wind of the material 25 orito a shell 26 consisting of a cylinder with a square hole through the center, which is mounted on spitzbar 27, a splicer, consisting of a threading arm 51 pivoted on a shaft 52 and having mounted on the appropriate end a threading device including a series of triangularly located pulleys 53, 53', 532 with a belt 54 free to travel around the pulleys and being guided by the pulleys with one surface of the belt being free to engage and' conform to the surface of the shell 26, moves into the position of contact with the windup shell only at the beginning of the splice onto the shell. During the windup on the shell, the splicer arm is in position of 51' (forward position of FIGURE 3). The shaft 52 is squared at the middle at 55, but round at the ends. The movement of the threading arm 51 is controlled by the rotation of the shaft 52 journaled in bearings 55 on the frame, which shaft is rotated by arm 56 at the side of the machine, manipulated by hand.

When the material 25 to be wound is brought into contact with shell 26 and held in contact with shell 26 by the threading belt 54, the shell is rotated by the motion of the spitzbar 27 rotating in bearings 28 and 30 by the driving action of the gear 31. The gear 31 is driven by the engaged gear 32 mounted on shaft 33 having sprocket 35 mounted thereon and being driven from the rear shaft 21 by the chain 36.

The swingable arm 34 journaled on shaft 21 and mounting shaft 33 is forced toward the gear 31 by means of an arm 57 mounted on shaft 52 and keyed' thereto. The arm 57 has at its lower end an adjustable bracket 58, the adjustable means being nut and bolt 60` bearing against lug 61 on arm 57 and pivoting on pin 62.

The adjustable bracket 58 is positioned to come in contact with swingable arm 34, which is biased in a rearward position by helical compression spring 63 acting against abutment 64 on the arm, and limited by limiter bolt 65 on the frame, passing through a suitably wide hole in abutment 64. The bracket 58 forces the arm 34 forward until adjustable bolt stop 66 on the arm 34 comes in contact with the frame at point 67. In this position, the gear 32 will be in mesh with gear 31.

The arms 51 and 57 are xed in relation to each other and keyed to shaft 52, so their forward and rearward movement correspond with the movements of the controlling arm 56 keyed to shaft 52.

At the start of windup, the arms 51 and 57 are forward and 4the threading belt 54 is in Contact with the web material 25, both holding the material against the new shell 26. The shell is being driven by drive chain 36 through gears 31 and 32.

After starting to wind the new shell, the operator moves control arm 56 rearward. The spring 63 moves swingable arm 34 rearward, thus moving gear 32 out of contact with gear 31.

The material 25 is now being wound on shell 26 turning with rear dmm 20, which is -being driven through of the lower jaws.

shaft 21. Spitzbar 27 no longer has positive drive, but is free to rotate in bearings 28 and 30 to be described. The frame has upwardly extending portions 68 at the two ends which carry suitably integral therewith guideways for upper and lower jaws 71 and 72 at each side best seen in FIGURE 5. The lower jaw 72 has a square shank 73 extending below it, which slides in guide bearings 74 on the frame. At the lower end of the square shank a stop 74 extends out and in upward limiting position engages the lower guide bearings 74 and prevents further upward motion of the lower jaw bearing. The upper portion of the lower jaw forms a socket recess 75 which receives the pivot in the end of the spitzbar of the rear shell. Fowardly of the socket, the upper face of the lower jaw has a slightly tapering forwardly extending portion 76 and rearwardly the lower jaw has a comparatively high rim 77.

The upper jaw consists of an upper jaw slide 78 of which one is located at each side of the machine, sliding in a guideway 79 at the inside of each frame upright. The jaw slide 78 on each side of the machine supports a pivot 80, located above the jaws, which pivotally supports the upper jaw 71, which normally hangs substantially straight down below the pivot 80. At the lower end, the upper jaw has a lower bearing roller 81, and, displaced rearwardly and upwardly, an upper bearing roller 82, each of which turns on suitable anti-friction bearings, and which together form a bearing support for the pivot end 27 of the spitzbar of the shell. Each of the upper jaws has a rearward extension 83` which mounts a roller 84 which is engaged by one of the transfer arms when in rear position to force and maintain the upper jaws in their rearward relation. The upper jaws however are free to swing in the manner suggested by the dot-anddash lines in FIGURE 5, toward the front drum, so as to release the pivot 27 of the spitzbar of the roll during transfer, and so as to avoid the possibility that the forward component on the roll pivot 27 plus any abnormal condition due to slight unevenness in winding, might tend to make the roll stick and prevent transfer.

Each slide 78 is held in place in its guideway by a bolt 85 riding in a slot 85 which extends vertically in the frame. Each slide has secured at its upper end a rack 86 which meshes with a gear 86 best seen in FIGURE 1 on a shaft S7 supported in suitable bearings `fastened to the frame. The shaft 87 also has keyed thereon a ratchet wheel 87 which is engaged by a pawl 88 pivotally mounted on a girt rod 90 extending across the top portions of the frame.

The pawl allows the jaw bearings to separate but holds the shaft against rotation, which would bring the upper jaw bearings down and thereby holds the upper jaws in their raised position until such time as it is desired to lower the upper jaws into contact with the lower jaws at the time when a new shell is brought into position above the rear drum to start a new roll.

The raising and lowering of the upper jaws is controlled by a suitable hand wheel or other suitable means on the shaft 87 under the control of the man operating the Winder. The tendency of the upper jaw bearing to move upward as the roll winds on the rear drum is desirably retarded by a suitable brake as shown in FIGURE 1 of my U.S. Patent 2,619,298, granted November 25, 1952, for Web Winding. The brake is tightened as well known to regulate the density of the winding of the web.

Spring abutments 91 on the frame engage one end of tension springs 92, the opposite ends of which are engaged on spring abutments 93 extending from the side The springs tend to pull the lower jaws up into position to receive the pivot of the new shell.

The material which is being wound on the rear shell 26 by rear drum 20 causes the diameter of the roll to increase to a predetermined size as shown at 94 (FIGURE l), at which point a switch actuator 95 closes a normally open switch 96 which is mounted on a spring arm 97 from the shaft 52. The switch 96 is normally open and in series with a normally open switch 98 mounted on the frame and having a switch operator 100 which is manipulated by the pawl 88 to close the switch 98 when the pawl is in engagement holding the upper jaws against dropping. When these two switches are closed at the same time the circuit, later explained, energizes solenoid valve 101 (coil 1011) to admit fluid pressure (suitably air) to enter pipe 102 at the side of fluid cylinder 103 causing piston rod 104 to move into cylinder 103. The piston 104 is pivotally connected at 105 to a lever 106 mounted on shaft 108 journaled in the `frame and carrying transfer arms 107. The transfer arms initially rest in position behind the pivots of the spitzbar as shown in FIGURES 2 and 5. Cylinder 103 is pivoted at the end remote from piston 104 on the frame at 110.

When the transfer arms have moved forward far enough to carry the spitzbar pivots of the roll 94 across the space -between the rear drum and the front drum in which they engage with the letdown arms to be described, cam 111 on shaft 108 trips a switch operator 112 of normally open switch 113 mounted on the frame, closing the switch to energize solenoid valve 114 (coil 114- 1) to shift this valve so as to admit iiuid pressure (desirably compressed air) through pipe 115 to air cylinder 116 pivoted at 117 on bracket 118 from the frame, on the side of the air cylinder to force piston rod 120 into cylinder 116. The piston rod 120 is pivotally connected at 121 with a lever 122 keyed to shaft 123 running across and journaled in the frame.

The shaft 123 at opposite ends carries keyed thereon levers 123' (one for each of the letdown arms) which pivotally connect at 124 to adjustable links 125 which pivotally connect at suitable points 126 intermediate the ends of letdown arms 127 which are pivoted at opposite ends on the same shaft 128 but free from interconnection with the front Vdrum 130 keyed on this shaft. The front drum is suitably driven at the same surface speed as the rear drum, in the same direction and preferably by suitable intergearing between the front and rear drums, not shown.

When uid pressure Hows through solenoid valve 114 the letdown arms then gradually and very slowly and gently rotate clockwise in FIGURE l, supporting the roll pivot and allowing the roll to travel forward along the forward surface of the front drum until the pivot ends of the shell on which the roll is Winding are positioned in pivot rollers 132 and 133 positioned at the top of spaced hatching arms 134. The pivot rollers 132 and 133 are on axes parallel to the roll axis. The hatching arms have rearwardly tapering jaws 135 which extend above the pivot rollers and keep the pivot ends of the spitzbar in place.

As the transfer arms 107 move forward and deposit the roll on the front drum where it is carried by the letdown arms 127 into pivotal support on the hatching arms 134, the transfer arms engage latching abutments 136 on levers 137 (best seen in FIGURES l, 5 and 6) which are pivoted at 138 on pivot bearings 140 at the bottom forward ends of track brackets 141 supported at opposite sides of the frame. The track brackets support downwardly extending shell tracks 142 which support and guide the spitzbar pivot ends 27 of a new shell, and with the aid of track transfer portion 143 mounted on the upper jaws, carry the new shell into the bottom jaws.

The tranck transfer portions 143 mounted on the upper jaws are arranged so that they clear from interference with the shell tracks 142 when the upper jaws pivot forward vduring transfer.

The latch levers 137 pivotally connect at 144 with latch pins 145 which extend through latching openings 146 to protrude into the paths of the spitzbar pivots 27 in latching position (FIGURE 6), and are deflected from latching position by the transfer arms as shown in FIGURE 5. The latches are urged toward latching position by helical tension springs 147 which are anchored at one end on spring abutments 148 on the track bracket and at the other end engage spring ahutments 150 on the latching levers.

When the transfer arms reach the limit of their stroke, the rearwardly extending portion engages switch operator 151 (FIGURE 1) of normally open transfer return switch 152, to close this switch, energizing solenoid operated valve 101 (coil 101-2) in the ldirection to introduce high pressure fluid through pipe 153 to energize double acting transfer cylinders '3 in the direction to retract the transfer arms, and the transfer arms then begin to retract. The closing of switch 152 also energizes solenoid valve 154 (coil 154-2) in the direction to admit low pressure hydraulic fluid from pipe 155 into pipes 166, 161 and 162 on the side of hatching arm cylinders 163 which tends to give resilient pressure of the hatching arms against the win-ding drum to control the pressure under which the drum is wound.

The hatching arm-s 134, instead of being supported from above as in prior practice, are pivoted at the bottom at 7 forward of the position at which the tops are located, so that when the hatching amis receive the roll in the position 158 of FIGURE 1 they are leaning perceptibly rearward.

AIt will be evident that there is a lateral component of the Weight of the roll tending to hold the roll against the forward drum due to the fact that the axis of the roll iS rearward of the hatching arm pivots 157, and this in many cases will assure adequate tightness of rolling of the material. However, it is preferred in many instances to urge the hatching arms rearwardly as just described during the winding of the roll. The hatching arm hydraulic cylinders 163 are pivoted on the frame at 164, and in the position of valve 154 just described piston rods 165 are urged into the hatching arm cylinders to retract the hatching arms. The piston rods 165 pivotally connect to the hatching arms at 166. i

'In some cases it is preferable to apply fluid pressure by manually energizing solenoid valve 154 by closing normally open manually operated switch 1'67.

The roll now gets bigger by winding on the front drum until it achieves a size at which it must be doffed or taken off. The lower jaws when do-wn shift double pole double throw switch 168 (FIGURES 1 and 9) from its position connecting one side -of line 170 with line 171 which feeds switches 96, 98, 113, 152 and 167 across to the opposite side of the line 172. Switch 168 is shifted into a position which connects line 170 with line 173 at which subsequent operations can be performed.

When the man operating the winding machine pushes the threading lever 51 into the solid line position of FIG- URE 3 bracket 58 on the threading lever closes normally open switch 1'75 (FIGURES 5 and 8) so that solenoid valve 178 is energized, which connects high pressure hydraulic fluid pipe 180 with pipe 181 which goes to the side of knife operating cylinder 182 which moves the piston 183 out of the cylinder and raises the gate, as well known in the art. The gate rising brings knife blades 185 into the cloth or other material which is passing over the space between the front drum and the rear drum, and lthreading fingers 186 of a character well known in the art pivoted on the gate at 137 spring out and guide the cut forwardly traveling end of the material around the new shell. The threading belts assist in threading the cut end on the new shell.

As soon as the man operating the machine shifts threading arm 51 rearward, switch 175 opens, deenergizing solenoid valve 178 an connecting hydraulic uid through pipe 184 tothe opposite side of gate cylinder 182 to lower the gate.

On the downward movement of the gate, normally open gate switch 188 (FIGURES 1 and 8) closes, energizing solenoid valve 190 (coil 1911-1) so as to connect high pressure hydraulic fluid from pipe 180 into pipe 191 and pipes 192 and 193 in a direction to move the pistons of hatching arm` cylinders 163 out to the dot-and-dash position of FIGURE 1- at which the fully formed roll 194 iskready to he taken olf by a suitable hoist, truck. or the li e.

As the new roll begins to wind, it increases in size and permits the lower jaws to rise until the circuit selector switch 168 can return to normal position, as shown in FIGURE 8. After the circuit selector switch 168 has returned to normal position due to increase in the size of the new roll and raising the lower jaws, the man operating the device closes normally open switch 195 of FIG- URE 8 which energizes solenoid valve 154 (coil 154-1) to allow high pressure hydraulic fluid (air) from pipe 180 to pass through valve 114 and pipe 156, and valve 154 to pipes 160, 161, and 162, which return the hatching arms to their receiving position. At the same time solenoid valve 190 (coil 1911-2) is energized, which shifts the solenoid valve into normal position where it is cut off from high pressure and opened to exhaust. Also solenoid valve 114 is energized (coil 114-2) which, as already explained, admits high pressure fluid through pipe 196 and pipe 156 to solenoid valve 154 which energizes the hatching arms. This `also actuates letdown cylinder 116 to return the letdown arms to their receiving position.

The roll now gets bigger by winding on the front drum, until it achieves a vsize at which it must he doffed or taken oir'. The bringing in of the new shell lowers the lower jaws, which then shifts double pole double throw switch 168 from its automatic position connecting one side of line 170 with line 171, which feeds switches 96, 98, 113, 152 and 167 across to the opposite side of the line 172, into a position which connects line 170 with line 173 at which cutting and doiing operations can he performed. In this position the operating lever 174 of normally open switch 175 (FIGURES l and 9) engages abutment 176 on gate 177 holding switch 175 closed, so that solenoid valve 178 is energized, which connects high pressure hydraulic Huid pipe 130 with pipe 181 which goes to the side of knife operating cylinder 182 which moves the piston 183 out of the cylinder and raises the gate, as well known in the art. The rotary cutters on the gate are then driven, as well known. As Isoon as cylinder 182 becomes energized, switch 1715 opens, and hydraulic pressure is connected by pipe 184 yto the opposite end of knife cylinder 182, tending to retract the knives, but before the knives can retract, the gate has raised so that knife blades 185 engage the cloth or other material 25 which is passing over the space between the front drum and the rear drum, and threading fingers 186 of a character well known in the art pivoted on the gate at 187 spring out and tend to guide the cut forwardly travelling end of the material around the new shell.

In FIGURE 8 it will he evident that when circuit position switch 168 is in the position to connect line 171) with line 171, then the various circuit branches are disposed as follows:

Normally `open switch 98 in series with normally open switch 96 is in series with one side of solenoid valve 101 lacross to the other side 172 of the line.

Normally open switch 152 is in series with the other side of solenoid valve 101 across to the other side of the line 172 and also in series with one side of solenoid valve 154 separately across to the other side 172 of the line.

Normally open switch 167 is in series with said other side of solenoid valve 101 across to the opposite side 172 of the line and also separately in series with said one side of solenoid valve 154 across to the other side 172 of the line.

Normally open switch 113 is in series from line 171 with one side of solenoid valve 114 across to the other side 172 of the line.

Normally open switch is connected from line 171 across to the other side 172 of the line through parallel branches consisting of the other side of solenoid valve 154, one side of solenoid valve 190 and the other side f solenoid valve 114.

When circuit position switch 163 is shifted to the position in which line 170 is connected with line 173, then the following arrangements prevail. Normally open switch 175 is in series with single acting solenoid valve 17S across to the other side 172 of the line. Normally open switch 188 is in series with the other side of solenoid valve 190 across to the other side 172 of the line.

The hydraulic system of FIGURE 9 is as follows: High pressure hydraulic fluid 180 is connected separately to solenoid valves 114, 178, 190 and 101. Low pressure hydraulic fluid from pipe 155 is connected to solenoid valve 154. Solenoid valve 114 in its opposite positions connects with opposite sides of cylinder 116. Solenoid valve 178 in its opposite positions connects with opposite sides of cylinder 182. Solenoid valve 190 connects with one side of cylinders 163. Solenoid valve 101 in its opposite positions connects to opposite sides of cylinder 103.

Solenoid valve 154 in one position connects to solenoid valve 114 and in its other position connects with the opposite ends of cylinders 163, from those to which solenoid valve 190 connects.

The valves in FIGURE 9 are standard pilot operated valves, and their construction is shown according to JIC Standards adopted in the industry.

In order to provide extra operating force for the valves they are preferably pilot operated, using pilot valves well known in the art illustrated according to IIC Standards in FIGURE 9. For each valve the following nomenclature is used, illustrated on valve 101:

Main valve 101 Solenoids 101-1 and 101-2 Pilot air valves 101-3 and 101-4 operated by the solenoids Air cylinders 101-5 and 101-6 operated by the pilot valves through the main valve 101 Exhaust E.

Each of the main valves as well known shifts when the pilot valve opens one air cylinder (or one end of the air cylinder in the case of valve 178) to exhaust (E), allowing the opposite cylinder (or opposite end of the cylinder) to shift the valve. The pilot valves are spring loaded to return to normal position. In one position they open the high pressure air to exhaust and in the other position they prevent escape of high pressure air.

FIGURE 9a shows a simplified hydraulic diagram omitting the pilot valves, where the solenoids act directly on the main valves.

I-t will be evident of course that while compressed air is a desirable hydraulic Huid, hydraulic liquid such as oil or water may be used as desired.

Considering now the winder with a new shell which has started to wind on the rear drum 20 after cutting the cloth or other material and doing the roll 194, the new roll is allowed to wind on the rear drum until it reaches `a predetermined diameter -suitably of the order of ll or l2 inches in preferred practice. At lthis position pawl 88 engages in single tooth ratchet 87, which prevents the upper jaws from dropping, while permitting the upper jaws to raise as the roll increases in size, and thus closing pawl switch 96. When the roll reaches a predetermined size, limit switch 98, best seen in FIGURES l and 9, closes to energize solenoid valve 101 to cause the transfer cylinders to manipulate the transfer arms counterclockwise in FIGURE l, The letdown arms are raised from previous operation, and the hatching arms are positioned rearward ready to receive the pivots on the spitzbar of the roll.

An important feature of the invention is that the upper jaws are pivoted so that they are free and swing forwardly and release the roll as soon as the transfer arms begin to move forwardly and cease to engage the rollers on the upper jaws. This is very beneficial in preventing the possibility that the pivot of the roller could bind and fail to release from the upper jaws. This is particularly desirable because the line of centers of the rollers of the upper jaws extends upwardly and rearwardly before the upper jaws swing, thus resisting any component of the winding force which tends to push the roll forward.

As the transfer arms move counterclockwise in FIGURE l, the roll is carried forward to the front drum with its pivots against the letdown arms. Switch 113 closes, which energizes solenoid valve 114 which shifts hydraulic pressure from one side to the other of the letdown arm cylinders. The roll continues winding on the front drum and the letdown `arms begin to move slowly down, carrying the new roll gently into position with its pivots supported on the pivotal supports of the hatching arms 134.

The batchng arms as already explained are pivoted below the front drum instead of above the front drum as in prior practice. As the new roll winds on the hatching arms, due to the fact that the center of the roll cornes progressively closer to a position above the hatching arm pivots, the horizontal component of the weight of the roll 15S pressing the roll against the front drum gradually reduces, so that one compensates for the other and a substantially uniform pressure is applied to the roll against the front drum for winding purposes.

Where adequate frictional engagement between the cloth or other material being wound, and the front drum occurs, no additional pressure need be exerted, but where there is `a tendency to slip, by closing switch 167 while the circuit selector switch 168 is in the automatic position connecting line to 171, the pressure can be maintained by the batching arms urging the roll against the front `drurn from the 10W pressure fluid source, thus biasing the roll under -a predetermined winding pressure, and supplementing the effect of the weight of the roll. Thus the roll pressure can be regulated to any desired condition within predetermined limits.

Returning now to the transfer arms, after they have deposited the roll against lthe letdown arms `and the -roll has moved down so that its pivots are below the transfer arms, the transfer arms continue to move counterclockwise in FIGURE l until they engage `and trip the latching abutments 136 and release the new shell that lies at the upper end of track 142 so that it rests -against the transfer arms. Further slight clockwise motion of the transfer arms in FIGUREI causes switch 152 (FIGURES l and 9) to close, energizing solenoid valve 101 to provide hydraulic fluid to the end of the 4transfer arm cylinder 103 which retracts the transfer arms, moving the new shell downward along tracks 142 until it enters the lower jaws. The operator lat this time releases the pawl 38 and lowers lthe upper jaws into engagement with the top of the spitzbar pivots of the new shell.

When the operator decides that the winding of the roll is complete and the cloth or other material should be cut, he moves the threading arm 51 so that the threading belt 54 engages the rear of the new shell, the cloth then passing over the rear drum and under the new shell. The resul-t is to bring the driving gear 3S into engagement with the driving gear on the new shell so that the new shell is positively driven. In many cases the new shell is driven at a surface speed which is slightly greater than the surface speed of the rear drum, for example 2%, 3% or 4% greater, in order to tighten up on any looseness in the first few turns of the new roll.

The circuit selector switch 168 is now in the position connecting line 170 with line 173. Switch 175 is closed by the threading arm and solenoid valve 178 opens to energize fluid cylinder 182 and raise the gate -at the same time transfer arms 51 are pressed Iagainst the rear of lche new shell, bringing threading belt 54 against the new shell and pressing the positive driving gearing 32 into engagement with the gearing 31 on lthe end of the new shell, so 'as -to positively drive the' new shell. When the gate rises :it cuts the cloth or other material by lcutters 185 engaging the cloth and the forwardly directed cut end 'isV carried around the new shell into engagement with the threading belts by threading ngers 186 on the gate as Well known in the art.

The positive drive of the new shell during the period of starting to wind the new roll assures tightness of winding and this assurance is increased by employing la slightly greater surface speed on the new shell rather than on the rear drum as already explained.

After the new shell begins to wind, the threading arm is released and retracted -to the position of FIGURE 3 yand positive driving of the new shell ceases. Switch 175 opens, releasing solenoid valve 178` to its normal position at which fluid is admitted to the end of gate cylinder 182 which retracts Ithe gate to the position of FIGURE l. The new shell lbegins 'to turn under the intiuence of the rear drum, which of course is engaging the bottom of the cloth.

The gate in moving down closes dofling switch 188 which moves the hatching arms to the dot-and-dash position to the right in FIGURE l, and the man operating the Winder employs a hoist or fork-lift truck to remove the roll 194 from the hatching arms. The roll of course ceases to turn when the hatching arms move to the right in FIGURE 1. As the new roll Winds, circuit selector switch 168 moves to the position in which line 170 is in circuit with line 171. The man operating the Winder then closes return push button switch 195 which brings the letdown arms into their upper position, and brings the hatching arms into their retracted position.

In View of my invention and disclosure, variations and modifications to meet individual whim or particular need will doubtless become evident to others skilled in the art, to obtain all or part of the benefits of my invention without copying the structure shown, and I, therefore, claim all such insofar as they fall within the reasonable spirit and scope of my claims.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. In a Winder for cloth or the like, a front drum pivoted to rotate on a horizontal axis, a rear drum pivoted to rotate on an axis adjacent to and parallel to the axis of the front drum, said drums rotating in the same direction, a shell having a spitzhar for pivoting the same, said shell being adapted to cooperate with said drums for winding a roll of cloth during which winding the cloth is in contact with one or the other of said drums, letdown arms having an operating position in which the spitzhar is held while the roll of cloth is in contact with the upper portion of the front drum and having a transfer position at which the let-down arms are at approximately the same horizontal level as the pivot of the front drum, hatching arms for holding the spitzhar with the roll of cloth engaging the front drum, said hatching arms providing pivotal support for the spitzhar at approximately the same horizontal level as the pivot of the front drum, pivotal support for the bat-ching arms below and forward of the pivot of the front drum, and means for carrying the let-down arms from their raised position in which they support the spitzhar while the roll is winding on the front drum to their lowered position in which they place the spitzhar in the pivotal support on the hatching arms.

2. In a Winder for cloth and the like, a front drum turning on a horizontal pivot, a rear -drum turning on a horizontal pivot adjacent to the pivot of the front drum and turning in the same direction as the front drum, the pivots of the front and rear drums being parallel, a shell 10 on which a roll of cloth is adapted to be wound and having a spitzhar for pivoting the shell, means for supporting the spitzhar while winding the roll of cloth on the front drum, means for lowering the roll of cloth While pivotally engaging the spitzhar to a position in which the spitzhar is yforward of and at substantially the same horizontal level as the pivot of the `front drurn, and hatching arms having pivots which engage and receive the spitzbar at a position forward of and at approximately the same level as the pivot of the front drum, said hatching arms being pivoted below and forward of the pivot of the front drum, whereby a roll of cloth when being wound on the shell with the spitzhar supported by the hatching arms as it increases in size approaches progressively closer to a position in which the spitzhar lies above the pivots of the hatching arms so that thereby the pressure which the roll exerts against the front drum diminishes to compensate for increase in roll size.

3. A Winder for cloth and the like having front and rear drums for contacting a roll of cloth being wound, said drums turning on parallel axes, a shell on which a roll is adapted to he wound and having a spitzhar, jaws positioned abo-ve the rear drum and engaging and pivotally supporting the spitzhar while a roll of cloth is wound by the rear drum, and means for positively driving the shell while the spitzhar is pivoted on the jaws and while the roll of cloth is being wound by the rear drum, said shell being driven at a linear speed which is greater than the linear speed of the rear drum.

4. A Winder having front and rear drums for contacting a roll of material being wound, said drums turning in the same direction on parallel axes, a shell having a spitzhar on which the shell is mounted to rotate with said spitzhar, the shell being adapted to wind a roll of cloth, jaws mounted above the rear drum and adapted to support and pivot the spitzhar of the shell, a threading arm pivotally supported above the rear drum and having a threading device mounted thereon and adapted to engage the outside of the shell and of the roll as it begins to wind, in combination with drive means for positively driving the shell, gear means rotatable with the shell and adapted to be driven by the drive means, and clutch means movable with said threading arm for bringing the drive means into driving engagement with the gear means as the threading device is moved toward said shell about the pivot of said threading arm.

5. A Winder having front and rear drums for contacting a roll of material being wound, said drums turning in the same direction on parallel axes, a shell having a spitzhar rotatable therewith on which said roll is wound, jaws above the rear drum for rotatably supporting the spitzhar, in combination with gear means rotatable with the shell for driving the shell and supported by the spitzhar, a lever pivotally supported remote from the rear drum, a pivot arm extending upward of the rear drum, a gear on the pivot arm adapted to mesh with the gear means and means for driving the gear on the pivot arm, the lever by forward motion engaging the pivot arm and bringing the gear on the pivot arm into driving engagement with the gear means supported on the spitzhar.

6. A Winder, including front and rear drums for contacting a roll of material being wound turning in the same direction on parallel axes, a shell on which material is wound into a roll, guideways for upper jaw slides extending above the rear drum, upper jaw slides vertically guided in the guideways, upper jaws adapted to pivot the said shell and transfer arms having a forward position adjoining the Ifront drum and a rearward position adjoining the rear drum, in combination with means for pivoting the upper jaws on the upper jaw slides, and abutments on the upper jaws engaged by the transfer arms in their rearward position to hold the upper jaws against pivoting forwardly.

(References on following page) 11 References Cited in the le of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Cameron Mar. 8, 1927 Sheppard Dec. 25, 1934 5 Berry et al. Dec. 28, 1943 Clem et al. July 5, 1949 Stone Feb. 21, 1950 Aulen Nov. 25, 1952 Aulen July 21, 1953 10 12 Henry Aug. 11, 1953 Carter Aug. 25, 1953 Aulen Apr. 27, 1954 Piper et al June 29, 1954 Phelps Aug. 25, 1959 Phelps Dec. 1, 1959 FOREIGN PATENTS Great Britain Sept. 16, 1959

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3614010 *Sep 3, 1969Oct 19, 1971Eddystone Machinery CoCloth winder having cutter and pressure bar
US4512528 *May 2, 1983Apr 23, 1985Kuhn Klaus GDevice for exchanging a winding mandrel
US5507450 *Oct 12, 1992Apr 16, 1996Warburton Holgate LimitedApparatus for the winding of continuous webs
Classifications
U.S. Classification242/542.3, 242/533.2, 242/532
International ClassificationB65H19/22
Cooperative ClassificationB65H19/2238
European ClassificationB65H19/22B