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Publication numberUS3061226 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 30, 1962
Filing dateFeb 9, 1961
Priority dateFeb 9, 1961
Publication numberUS 3061226 A, US 3061226A, US-A-3061226, US3061226 A, US3061226A
InventorsKegg Vernon J
Original AssigneeUnited States Steel Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Device for tensioning outside widths of slit strip
US 3061226 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 30, 1962 v. J. KEGG 3,061,226

DEVICE FOR TENSIONING OUTSIDE WIDTHS OF SLIT STRIP Filed Feb. 9, 1961 A Ira may United States Patent ()fifice 3,061,226 Patented Oct. 30, 1962 3,061,226 DEVICE FOR TENSIQNING OUTSIDE WIDTHS GF SLIT STRIK Vernon .I. Kegg, Leechburg, Pa., assignor to United States Steel Corporation, a corporation of New Jersey Filed Feb. 9, 1961, Ser. No. 88,172 3 Qiairns. (t'li. 242-753) This invention relates to a device for tensioning metal strip as it is coiled following a slitting operation.

After a wide metal strip is slit lengthwise to form a plurality of narrow strands, conventional practice is to pass the strands around a tensioning roller, which carries separator plates, and thence Wind them on a single coiling mandrel. Metal strip intended for slitting commonly is rolled on a slightly crowned roll. Pressure on the necks of a crowned roll and consequent deflection of the shaft causes the side edges of a strip to be rolled slightly thinner and more elongated than the remainder of the strip. When the strands are coiled after slitting, the outermost strand on each side, being longer than the others, sags, tends to Weave laterally, and may interfere with winding adjacent strands.

An object of the present invention is to provide a tensioning device which overcomes sagging in the outermost strands as they are coiled following a slitting operation.

A further object is to provide a device for applying extra tension to the outermost strands beyond that applied to the other strands through the regular tensioning means.

A more specific object is to provide, in combination with a tensioning roller and a coiling mandrel, an extra tensioning device which includes a spring-held arm pivoted to the support for the tensioning roller and an additional tensioning roller journaled to the arm and riding against the outermost strand.

In accomplishing these and other objects of the invention, I have provided improved details of structure, a preferred form of which is shown in the accompanying drawing, in which:

FIGURE 1 is an end elevational view of a coiling mandrel and tensioning mechanism equipped with an additional tensioning device of my invention; and

FIGURE 2 is a front elevational view of the structure shown in FIGURE 1.

The drawing shows a mandrel for coiling a plurality of narrow metal strands S and S immediately after they have been cut to width by slitting a single wider strip. The mandrel is journaled in a housing 12 and is power driven by suitable mechanism, not shown. A shaft 13 is pivoted to the housing above the mandrel on the side opposite that from which the strands enter. Shaft 13 carries a tensioning mechanism formed of spaced arms 14 and 14a and a tensioning roller 16 journaled to the free ends of the arms. Roller 16 carries a plurality of separator plates 17. Strands S and S coming from the slitting mechanism (not shown) pass around roller 16 and thence wind on the mandrel. Plates 17 keep the individual strands separated, while the roller aids in tensioning the strands. Shaft 13 has a segment which extends outwardly of the mandrel housing 12 and carries a crank arm 18. A fluid pressure cylinder 19 is pivoted to the housing on trunnions 2t), and contains a reciprocable piston and piston rod 21, which is connected to the crank arm for operating the tensioning mechanism. The structure thus far described is conventional and not of my invention; hence no more detailed showing is deemed necessary.

As already mentioned, the outermost strands S are more elongated than the other strands S and hence tend to sag. In accordance with my invention, a shaft 22. extends across the space between the two arms 14- and 14a parallel with the axis of roller 16. A pair of downwardly curved arms 23 and 23a are pivoted to shaft 22. Arms 23 and 23a are adjustable lengthwise of the shaft but normally are situated near its ends. Retainers 24 hold arms 23 and 23a in adjusted position on shaft 22. Additional tensioning rollers 25 and 25a are journaled to the lower ends of arms 23 and 23a respectively on axes parallel to shaft 22 and extend inwardly from the arms. An angle iron 26 also is fixed to the two arms 14 and 14a and extends across the space between these arms above shaft 22. The angle iron has a leg which lies perpendicular to the upper edges of the arms and has a plurality of slots 27. Flexible resilient members formed of chains 28 and 28a, tension springs 29 and 29a, and clevises 3t) and 30a are connected between angle iron 26 and the respective curved arms 23 and 23a. I can insert different links of chains 28 and 28a in diiferent slots 27 to connect the chains to the angle irons, whereby I can vary the upward force on the curved arms and also can position the chains to correspond with the location of these arms along shaft 22.

In operation I position the curved arms 23 and 23a along shaft 22 so that the additional tensioning rollers 25 and 25a underlie the two outermost strands S ahead of roll 16. Spring tension on these arms supports the outermost strands and applies extra tension thereto and thus prevents their sagging. The tensioning roller 16 moves upwardly as the coils are wound, and my curved arms and additional tensioning rollers of course move with it.

From the foregoing description, it is seen that my invention affords a simple device for applying additional tension to the outermost strands to prevent sagging. The device is readily adjustable for different strip widths and different degrees of sagging. The device can be added to existing installations without otherwise altering their structure.

While I have shown and described only a single embodiment of my invention, it is apparent that modifications may arise. Therefore, I do not wish to be limited to the disclosure set forth but only by the scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

1. The combination, with a mandrel for coiling a plurality of metal strands formed by slitting a strip which is Wider than the individual strands, a housing in which said mandrel is journaled, and a tensioning mechanism which includes a pair of spaced apart arms pivoted to said housing, a tensioning roller journaled to said arms, and a plurality of separator plates carried by said roller, said roller being adapted to have the strands pass therearound between said plates before the strands reach said mandrel, of a device for preventing the outermost strand on each side from sagging comprising a pair of arms pivotally related to said first named arms, additional tensioning rollers journaled to the respective second named arms and adapted to engage the outermost strands ahead of said first named roller, and tensioning means connected between said first and second named arms.

2. The combination, with a mandrel for coiling a plurality of metal strands formed by slitting a strip which is wider than the individual strands, a housing in which said mandrel is journaled, and a tensioning mechanism which includes a pair of spaced apart arms pivoted to said housing, a tensioning roller journaled to said arms, and a plurality of separator plates carried by said roller, said roller being adapted to have the strands pass therearound between said plates before the strands reach said mandrel, of a device for preventing the outermost strand on each side from sagging comprising a shaft extending between said arms, a pair of downwardly curved arms pivoted to said shaft, additional tensioning rollers journaled to the respective second named arms and extending inwardly a therefrom to engage the outermost strands ahead of said first named roller to the exclusion of the other strands, and tensioning means connected between said first and second named arms.

3. The combination, with a mandrel for coiling a plurality of metal strands formed by slitting a strip which is wider than the individual strands, a housing in which said mandrel is journaled, and a tensioning mechanism which includes a pair of spaced apart arms pivoted to said housing, a tensioning roller journaled to said arms, and a plurality of separator plates carried by said roller, said roller being adapted to have the strands pass therearound between said plates before the strands reach said mandrel, of a device for preventing the outermost strand on each side from sagging comprising a shaft extending between said arms, a pair of downwardly curved arms pivoted to said shaft and being adjustable lengthwise of the shaft, additional tensioning rollers journaled to the respective second named arms and extending inwardly therefrom to engage the outermost strands ahead of said first named roller to the exclusion of the other strands, a member extending between said first named arms above said shaft, and tensioning means connected to said second named arms and adjustably connected to said member.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1400827 *Apr 7, 1921Dec 20, 1921 Apparatus for unwinding paper strips from rolls of paper in wrapping machines
US2723085 *Nov 18, 1952Nov 8, 1955American Viscose CorpTension apparatus for a plurality of continuous elements
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3406924 *Jul 9, 1965Oct 22, 1968Stamco IncApparatus for winding coils of metal strip material
US4022151 *May 27, 1975May 10, 1977Windmoller & HolscherApparatus for pivoting a tensioned web of material away from an adhesive applicator roller therefor
US5007272 *Nov 9, 1989Apr 16, 1991Braner, Inc.Tension roller
US5803396 *Feb 19, 1996Sep 8, 1998N.V. Bekaert S.A.Method for spooling a strip of wires, and a spooled strip of wires
US6964392Jun 24, 2003Nov 15, 2005Matsunaga Douglas SVariable strip tensioner
Classifications
U.S. Classification242/419.7, 242/530.1, 242/417.3, 242/525.2, 242/419.8
International ClassificationB21C47/00
Cooperative ClassificationB21C47/006
European ClassificationB21C47/00C