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Publication numberUS3061994 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 6, 1962
Filing dateOct 18, 1960
Priority dateOct 18, 1960
Publication numberUS 3061994 A, US 3061994A, US-A-3061994, US3061994 A, US3061994A
InventorsMylting Lauritz E
Original AssigneeAllen Sherman Hoff Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Dust collector device
US 3061994 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 6, 1962 MYLTING DUST COLLECTOR DEVICE Filed Oct. 18. 1960 United States Patent Office 3,061,994 Patented Nov. 6, 1962 3,061,994 DUST CGLLECTOR DEVICE Lanritz E. Myiting, Ardmore, Pa., assignor to The Allen Sherman Hoff Company, Wynnewood, Pa., a corpora-v tion of Pennsylvania Filed (ict. 18, 196), Ser. No. 63,288 3 Claims. (Cl. 55-346) outer tubes, it has been customary to provide a lower deck which carried the outer tubes and which was carried by the upper end of the solids collecting hopper, a conduit to carry gases to and from said tubes, and, between the inlet and outlet of the gas carrying duct, to provide an upper deck which suspended the inner tubes with their lower end portions projecting into the outer tubes. It has been proposed to provide tubes with flanges which were to be welded together to form the lower deck.

These prior devices possessed certain disadvantages. For example, when a lower deck plate was used it was dimcult and expensive to align the tube receiving openings in the upper and lower decks so closely that the inner and outer tubes would be concentric. If the flanges of the outer tubes were to be welded together, the aligning problem would be aggravated by the tendency of the welded flanges to warp, distort or shift the position of the outer tubes out of alignment with the inner tubes. Moreover, the assembly of the tubes in the two decks or replacement of any of the tubes could not be carried out effectively or efficiently in the field.

The present invention aims to overcome those disadvantages and achieves that aim by means of a new simplied and less expensive construction.

The entire steel deck which supported the outer tubes in prior devices is eliminated together with the aligning problem inherent therewith, and the new combined inner and outer tube units may be more easily installed either in the shop or in the field and individual tube units may be easily replaced without disturbing adjacent tube units. Also the new tube units can be nested more closely than in prior devices and hence more tubes and more gas cleaning capacity is provided in a given space. These advantages are novel and afford considerable economies in construction and operation.

The present invention will be better understood from the following specification and the accompanying drawings in which:

FiGURE 1 is a fragmentary, vertical sectional view of one form of apparatus embodying the present inven tion;

FiGURE 2 is a fragmentary plan view taken on line 2--2 of FIGURE 1; and

FIGURE 3 is a fragmentary side elevational View of one of the flanged tubes of FIGURES 1 and 2.

The drawings show a cyclone unit including a collecting hopper 1 which is rectangular in horizontal section in its upper portion and has a bottom discharge opening (not shown), a conduit 2 for conducting gases to and from the hopper and a bafe 3 which is spaced above the top of the hopper and which divides the conduit 2 into an inlet chamber 5 and an outlet chamber 6.

Means is provided in the upper part of the hopper for separating line solids from gases flowing through conduit 2 and chamber 5. This means includes a plurality of tube units, each consisting of an inner tube 10 and an outer tube 11. Each inner tube extends down through the bale 3 and at its upper end is supported thereby, as by ring 12, and at its lower end projects into the upper end of the outer tube 11 and is connected thereto. Thus each tube unit is supported solely from baille 3.

The inner tube is of smaller diameter than the outer tube and thus an annular space is provided between the tubes of each unit through which gases and solids may flow downwardly. Preferably, means is provided in each annular space for giving the descending gases a swirling motion to facilitate the separation of the solids from the gases. The illustrated means for producing this swirling action is the spiral vane 13 which is connected to the inner tube, spans the annular space and is connected to the outer tube. The lower ends of the outer tubes 11 are preferably frusto-conical, as indicated at 14.

Means is provided for insuring that substantially all flow of gases into or out of the hopper will take place through the tube units. This means, as illustrated, comprises llanges 16 attached to, and extending outwardly from, the upper ends of the outer tubes 11, a filler 17 closing the upper end of the hopper around the several tube units and resting on ange 18 of the hopper; and packing filling the spaced between the adjacent flanges and between the flanges of the outermost tube units and the ller. Each flange 16 is provided with an encircling groove 19 in which suitable packing 20, such as asbestos rope and the like, is disposed and a corresponding groove is provided in the filler to cooperate with the grooves in the adjacent flanges. When the tube units are assembled in filler 17, and the packing 20 lills and is compressed in the opposed grooves 19 of the flanges and filler, the flow of gases between the several flanges and between the flanges and the filler will be substantially prevented.

Preferably, the flanges 16 are hexagonal and the filler 17 is rectangular to lit the top of the hopper, as shown in FIGURE 2, but the flanges may be of any desired configuration, and the hopper may also be of any desired horizontal cross sectional shape.

Having thus described this invention in such full, clear, concise and exact terms as to enable any person skilled in the art to which it pertains to make and use the same, and having set forth the best mode contemplated of carrying out this invention, I state that the subject matter which I regard as being my invention is particularly pointed out and distinctly claimed in what is claimed, it being understood that equivalents or modifications of, or substitutions for, parts of the above specifically described embodiment of the invention may be made without departing from the scope of the invention as set forth in what is claimed.

What is claimed is:

1. Apparatus for removing line solids from gases comprising a collecting hopper, a conduit for conducting gases to and from the upper end of said hopper, a baille spaced from the top of the hopper and dividing the conduit into inlet and outlet chambers, means including a plurality of tube units in the upper part of the hopper for separating iine solids from gases flowing through said inlet chamber, each of said units including an inner tube supported by and extending down through said baille and into said hopper, and an outer tube secured to the lower end portion of the inner tube and defining an annular space about the inner tube, and means for insuring that substantially all the gases flowing through the conduit will pass through said units, said flow-insuring means including flanges extending outwardly from the upper end portions of the outer tubes, a gas impervious filler closing the upper end of the hopper and surrounding the tube units and packing between the several anges and between the filler and the flanges adjacent thereto.

2. Apparatus for removing fine solids from gases comprising a collecting hopper, a conduit for conducting gases to and from the upper end of said hopper, a bale spaced from the top of the hopper and dividing the conduit into inlet and outlet chambers, means including a plurality of tube units in the upper part of the hopper for separating fine solids from gases tlowing through said inlet chamber, each of said units including an inner tube supported by and extending down through said bale and into said hopper, an outer tube around the lower end portion of the inner tube and defining an annular space about the latter, and a spiral vane spanning said space and connecting the two tubes together, and means for insuring that substantially all the gases owing in the conduit will pass through said units, said flow-insuring means including anges extending outwardly from the upper end portions of the outer tubes, a gas impervious filler closing the upper end of the hopper and surrounding the tube units and packing between the several anges and between the iller and the anges adjacent thereto.

3. Apparatus for removing tine solids from gases comprising a collecting hopper, a conduit for conducting gases to and from the upper end of said hopper, a bale spaced from the top of the hopper and dividing the conduit into inlet and outlet chambers, means including a plurality of tube units in the upper part of the hopper for separating ne solids from gases owing through said conduit, each of said units including an inner tube supported by and extending down through said bale and into the hopper and an outer tube in the hopper, secured to the lower end portion of the inner tube and defining an annular space about the latter, flanges extending outwardly from the upper ends of said outer tubes and having peripheral grooves for packing, a gas impervious l'ler closing the upper end of the hopper, surrounding the tube units and having a groove in its inner periphery, and packing filling said grooves and serving to prevent ow of gases between the flanges and between the flanges and ller.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,909,184 Lissman May 16, 1933 2,662,610 Heinrich Dec. 15, 1953 2,904,130 Chapler Sept. 15, 1959

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1909184 *Dec 8, 1930May 16, 1933Int Precipitation CoCentrifugal separator
US2662610 *Aug 4, 1950Dec 15, 1953Oswald X HeinrichApparatus for centrifugal separation of suspended particles
US2904130 *Oct 24, 1956Sep 15, 1959Western Precipitation CorpConstruction of multiple tube cyclone dust collector
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3279156 *Dec 21, 1964Oct 18, 1966Svenska Flaektfabriken AbGas-cleaning apparatus
US3365058 *Jul 6, 1965Jan 23, 1968Universal Oil Prod CoParticle classifying-separating apparatus
US3401506 *Apr 27, 1967Sep 17, 1968Universal Oil Prod CoCentrifugal separators
US3425192 *Dec 12, 1966Feb 4, 1969Mitchell Co John EVacuum cleaning system
US3572015 *May 23, 1968Mar 23, 1971Sulzer AgWater separator for saturated-steam generators
US3940331 *Nov 1, 1974Feb 24, 1976Rastatter Edward LVortical cyclone cluster apparatus
US3984308 *Jan 19, 1976Oct 5, 1976Rastatter Edward LVortical cyclone cluster apparatus
US4146469 *Oct 11, 1977Mar 27, 1979Clark & Vicario CorporationMounting of cleaners in papermaking system
US4273565 *Feb 15, 1980Jun 16, 1981Exxon Research & Engineering Co.Cyclone support
US5690709 *Aug 6, 1996Nov 25, 1997Barnes; Peter HaddonSeparation apparatus to remove particles from a gas stream
US6174339Mar 16, 1999Jan 16, 2001Uop LlcMultiple separator arrangement for fluid-particle separation
US7931718 *Apr 9, 2009Apr 26, 2011San Ford Machinery Co., Ltd.Oil mist separator
US7938872 *Sep 20, 2007May 10, 2011Mann + Hummel GmbhDevice for separating particles from a gas stream
US8025706 *Jul 2, 2007Sep 27, 2011Shell Oil CompanyFluid separating vessel
US8439206 *Jun 4, 2008May 14, 2013Merpro Tortek LimitedCyclone apparatus
US8707511 *May 11, 2012Apr 29, 2014Dyson Technology LimitedSurface treating appliance
US8707512May 11, 2012Apr 29, 2014Dyson Technology LimitedSurface treating appliance
US8806708May 11, 2012Aug 19, 2014Dyson Technology LimitedSurface treating appliance
US8826492May 11, 2012Sep 9, 2014Dyson Technology LimitedSurface treating appliance
US8932472Oct 25, 2011Jan 13, 2015National Oilwell Varco, L.P.Separator system and related methods
US9044125May 11, 2012Jun 2, 2015Dyson Technology LimitedSurface treating appliance
US9044126May 11, 2012Jun 2, 2015Dyson Technology LimitedSurface treating appliance
US9204771May 11, 2012Dec 8, 2015Dyson Technology LimitedSurface treating appliance
US9282863May 11, 2012Mar 15, 2016Dyson Technology LimitedSurface treating appliance
US20100011961 *Jul 2, 2007Jan 21, 2010Edwin PoorteFluid separating vessel
US20100139633 *Sep 20, 2007Jun 10, 2010Mann+Hummel GmbhDevice for Separating Particles from a Gas Stream
US20100258008 *Apr 9, 2009Oct 14, 2010Mao-Nan ChengOil mist separator
US20110259819 *Jun 4, 2008Oct 27, 2011Stephen BeedieCyclone apparatus
US20120284952 *May 11, 2012Nov 15, 2012Dyson Technology LimitedSurface treating appliance
DE2439648A1 *Aug 19, 1974Jan 29, 1976Asizawa Tekko KkMulti-cyclone dust suppressor with even distribution of crude gas - for cyclone units with waste gas cylinders of varying length
EP0003594A1 *Feb 7, 1979Aug 22, 1979STEIN INDUSTRIE Société anonyme dite:Jonction device for parallel tubes of a cyclone separator
Classifications
U.S. Classification55/346
International ClassificationB04C5/00, B04C5/28
Cooperative ClassificationB04C5/28
European ClassificationB04C5/28