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Publication numberUS3062542 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 6, 1962
Filing dateMar 6, 1961
Priority dateMar 6, 1961
Publication numberUS 3062542 A, US 3062542A, US-A-3062542, US3062542 A, US3062542A
InventorsCharles Evancha
Original AssigneeCharles Evancha
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Balancer-bouncer exercising device
US 3062542 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 6, 1962 c. EVANCHA BALANCER-BOUNCER EXERCISING DEVICE 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed March 6, 1961 INVENTOR. Erancka flTTORNEY Nov. 6, 1962 c. EVANCHA 542.

BALANCER-BOUNCER EXERCISING DEVICE Filed March 6, 1961 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 IN VEN TOR.

Char/es Evanc/za BY 435 4016. Mal ing;

l7 TT'ORNE'Y Nov. 6, 1962 c. EVANCHA BALANCER-BOUNCER EXERCISING DEVICE 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed March 6. 1961 INVENTOR. Clrarks francba BY 3 P. WM

6'. 12M TORNEY States My invention relates to a balancer-bouncer exercising device useful either alone or in competition for recreational purposes, for developing skill in balancing and for exercising.

An object of my invention is to provide a balancerbouncer type exercising device which is simple and durable in construction, not expensive to manufacture, portable and easily transported from place to place, and one that is entertaining to the user.

Another object is to provide a balancer-bouncer exercising device comprising a frame part capable of resting on a floor or like horizontal support and a balancing beam associated with said frame part and resiliently supported above the floor for up and down movement, said beam forming a vertically movable spring support on which a person can stand with one foot and balance and bounce up and down.

Another object is to provide, in a balancer-bouncer, a two-piece springboard construction which occupies a minimum amount of space and does not require the use of heavy parts and which is capable of being used in such a manner as to impart an exhilarating bouncing action to a user and to call for the exercise of a high degree of skill on the part of the user in maintaining his balance on the device.

Another object is to provide a balancer-bouncer exercising device which has a resiliently supported vertically movable beam to stand on and which further has tally or indicating means to record visually the extent of the bouncing accomplished by a user at one turn on the beam.

Another object is to provide a balancer-bouncer exercising device which has a resiliently mounted vertically movable beam for a person to stand on and which further has means to support a toy balloon and means to inflate said balloon by vertical movement up and down of the beam.

Other objects of my invention will be apparent from the following description taken in connection with the accompartying drawings.

In the drawings FIGURE 1 is a view in side elevation of a balancer-bouncer exercising device constructed in accordance with my invention, parts being broken away to reveal other parts.

FIG. 2 is an end view of the same looking in the direction indicated by line 2-2 of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a detached perspective view, on a smaller scale than FIGS. 1 and 2, showing a bouncer board assembly forming part of my invention.

PEG. 4 is a fragmentary sectional view taken substantially on broken line 44 of FIG. 1.

FIG. 5 is a fragmentary sectional view taken substantially on broken line 55 of FIG. 1.

FIG. 6 is a fragmentary sectional view taken substantially on bro-ken line 66 of FIG. 1.

FIG. 7 is a detached elevational view, on a larger scale than FIG. 2, showing parts of tally or indicator means shown in said FIG. 2.

FIG. 7A is a side elevation, on a smaller scale than FIG. 1, showing an example of the balancer bouncer device of FIG. 1 with an upright frame part omitted.

FIG. 8 is a view in side elevation of balancer-bouncer exercising devices of modified form embodying my invention.

FIG. 9 is an end view of the device shown in FIG. 8,

Patented Nov. 6, 1962 looking in the direction indicated by broken line 9-9 of FIG. 8.

FIG. 10 is a top plan view of another balancer-bouncer of modified form embodying my invention and showing two balancer-bouncer units in adjacent end-to-end relation for competitive use.

FIG. 11 is a view in side elevation looking in the direction indicated by broken line 11-11 of FIG. 10.

Like reference numerals refer to like parts throughout the several views.

FIGS. 1 to 7 inclusive show a balancer-bouncer exercising device comprising two spaced apart side frame members 15 and 16 of generally triangular shape having narrower end portions which are secured by suitable fastening means, such as screws 17, to the lower end of a tubular upright member 18 of approximately square cross section. The upright member 15 is not subjected to heavy strains and it is preferably made of fairly thin light weight plywood. The bottom edges of the side frame members 15 and 16 are adapted to rest on the floor 14, FIG. 2, and preferably these side frame members are made from fairly strong plywood. Preferably a transverse frame piece 19 rigidly connects the two ends of the side frame members shown at the right in FIG. 1.

For the purpose of this description the end of this device shown at the left in FIG. 1 is referred to as the inner end and that shown at the right as the outer end.

A balaneer-bouncer assembly, shown detached in FIG. 3, is made up of two flat resilient members 21} and 21 and is adapted to be disposed between the two side members 15 and 16, as shown in FIGS. 1 and 2. The dimensions of the members 21) and 21 and the material of which they are made can be varied. Satisfactory results are obtained if these members 20 and 21 are each formed of a good grade of resilient hard wood about five inches wide and three fourths of an inch thick and about four feet long. The two inner ends of the resilient members 20 and 21 are rigidly secured together by means such as flat metal plates 22 and bolts 23. The inner ends thus secured together are positioned in the lower portion of the upright tubular frame 18. Said resilient members 20 and 21 diverge toward their outer ends and they extend a substantial distance beyond the wider ends of the side frame members 15 and 16.

The lower resilient member 21 normally rests on the floor when there is not any load on the upper resilient member 20. Two transversely aligned pivot members 24 and 24', which can be wood screws, pivotally connect the lower resilient member 21 with the outer and wider end portions of the respective side frame members 15 and 16. These pivot members 24 and 24 prevent longitudinal displacement of the resilient members 211 and 21 relative to the frame parts 15, 16 and 18 and also prevent relative up and down movement of the resilient member 21 and wider end portions of the frame parts 15 and 16 but they are not subjected to heavy strains. A transverse stabilizer bar 21 of a length greater than the width of the lower resilient member 21 can be secured to the outer end of said member 21 flush with the bottom surface thereof so that it rests on the floor and provides greater stability against tipping sidewise. Also this same result can be accomplished by making the outer end portion of the member 21 wider.

A reinforcing and stiffening plate 25 is rigidly secured to the upper side of the lower resilient member 21 and extends from the outer end of said member 21 inwardly to a point beyond the pivot members 24 and 24. A cross rod 26, FIGS. 1 and 6, having knobs or sleeves 27 on its outer ends, extends crosswise of the side frame members 15 and 16 adjacent the inner end of the reinforcing plate 25. This cross rod 26' is positioned so that it is a short distance above the top side of the resilient member 21 when said member 21 rests flatly on the floor. The cross rod 26 serves as a fulcrum about which the lower resilient member 21 can be flexed. Providing for this small clearance between the cross rod 26 and the resilient member 21 when member 21 is in its lowermost position permits some up and down movement of the member 21 and wider outer ends of the frame members and 16 at this intermediate location relative to the length of the device. If this intermediate up and down movement is not provided for it has been found that the inner ends of the frame members 15 and 16 and the outer end of the resilient member 21 are liable to lift off of the floor when the device is in use. Providing for this intermediate up and down movement insures that both ends of the device will maintain contact with the floor at all times.

A longitudinally extending beam 28, on the outer end of which a person can stand with one foot while balancing and bouncing up and down, is provided on the upper side of the outer end portion of the upper resilient member 20 medially thereof and is rigidly attached to said member 20. The beam 28 can overhang the outer end of the member 20 and it acts as a stiffening member for the outer end portion of said member 21). The reinforcing plate 25 similarly stiifens the outer end portion of the lower resilient member 21. The result is that most of the flexing of the members 20 and 21 occurs inwardly from the ends of the reinforcing member 25 and beam 28.

A rolling contact fulcrum member or rod extends crosswise of the side frame members 15 and 16 underneath the upper resilient member 21 Preferably metal track strips 31 are secured on the inclined upper edges of the side frame members 15 and 16 for the fulcrum rod 30 to roll on. Said rod 31 is readily adjustable along the inclined track strips 31 but will not ordinarily change its position substantially while the device is being used. However, it will roll slightly and in so doing provides greater freedom of movement than a fixed and non-rotatable fulcrum will. The fulcrum rod 30 is adjusted lengthwise of the resilient member 20 to compensate for variable weights of users of the device. Preferably two spaced apart guide and positioning members 32 and 33 of disc or cylindrical shape are fixedly mounted on each end portion of the fulcrum rod 30 and receive therebetween the adjacent side frame member 15 or 16. These members 32 and 33 keep the fulcrum rod 311 at right angles to the side frames 15 and 16 and further help to prevent sidewise movement of the resilient member 20.

To better adapt this exercising device for use by children I preferably provide a handle member 35 which is adapted to have its lower end portion pivotally connected with the beam 28 by a readily removable pivot pin 36. A transverse hand hold bar 37 is provided at the upper end of the handle 35. As a substitute for handle 35 I may use a handle 35a of the form shown in FIG. 7A and hereinafter described and which connects with suitable perforations 3617, one of which is shown, in the wider outer ends of the side frame members 15 and 16. Also for convenience of children who use one of the above mentioned handles I provide, alongside of the outer end portion of the resilent member 211, two footplate extensions 38 rigid with said member 21) affording more room for the feet of a child using the device. The handles 35 and 35a are not intended for use by adults. Also for use by children, a seat 39, a fragment of which is shown in FIG. 1, can be provided for quick and easy attachment to and removal from the outer end portion of the beam 28. As illustrative of one way for detachably applying the seat 39 to the beam 28 said seat is provided with two pins 39a and 39b which fit into suitable holes 3% and 3%! in the end portion of the beam 28. Obviously other types of seat attaching means can be used.

To balance and bounce on this device the user stands with one foot on the outer end of the beam 28 and bounces up and down in synchronism with the resilient parts of the device and endeavors to maintain his balance on the beam 28 as long as possible. When the device is 4 thus used the upper resilient .member 21) flexes, chiefly between the fulcrum 30 and its inner end, and the lower resilient member 21 flexes, chiefly between the fulcrum member 26 and its inner end. The inner end portions of both ,of the resilient members 20 and 21 move up and down when this flexing occurs. Spring action is thus derived from both of the resilient members 20 and 21 and said members 20 and 21, being positioned one above another, make it possible to minimize the total over-all length of the resilient assembly. Both of the fulcrum members 30 and 26 can rotate, thus providing free pivotal movement and minimizing binding at the locations of these fulcrum members. The spring action of the resilient members 20 and 21 can be varied to suit different weights by adjusting either or both fulcrum members 30 and 26 longitudinally of the device. Adjustment of the upper fulcrum member 30 only is often suificient to compensate for differences in weights of users. When a downward pressure on the outer end of the beam 28 flexes the upper resilient member 20' about the fulcrum member 30 the inner ends of both of the resilient members 20 and 21 will be lifted above the floor and both resilient members will be flexed and an upward force will be applied to the lower fulcrum member 26 but the forces will be balanced in such a way as to cause both the narrower inner ends of the side frames 15 and 16 and the rear end of the lower resilient member 21 to remain in contact with the floor. Positioning the lower fulcrum member 26 so that it allows the frame members 15 and 16 and resilient member 21 to lift at the location of said fulcrum member 26 overcomes substantially all tendency of the narrower inner ends of frame members 15 and 16 and the outer end of the lower resilient member 21 to lift off of the fioor when the device is in use.

The up and down movement of the connected ends of members 20 and 21 is utilized to operate a pump 40 by which a balloon 41 on a balloon adapter conduit 42 can be inflated. The adapter conduit 42 is preferably removably supported by a notch 48 in the upper end of an upright member 43, see FIG. 2, the balloon being omitted in this figure. A flexible conduit 44 connects the adapter conduit 42 with the pump 40. The pump 40 is disposed within the upright frame 18 and is attached to a plate 45. The plate 45 is connected with the frame 18 by a pivot member 46. This allows for a slight rocking movement of the plate 45 and pump 4%). The pump 40 has a pump operating rod 47 which is connected with the vertically movable inner ends of the resilient members 20 and 21. Each upward movement of the pump operating rod 47 will cause the pump to force some air into the balloon 41. A suitable check valve V prevents back flow of this air. Thus a person using the device may endeavor to balance and bounce on the beam 28 for a long enough time, without falling off, to burst the balloon 41. Means can be provided for puncturing the balloon, as hereinafter described.

Preferably tally or indicating means is provided to indicate visually to the user the extent of bouncing he is able to accomplish at one turn and without losing his balance on the beam 28. One suitable indicator means comprises a disc 50 rotatively supported from the upright frame member 43 by bearing means 51. The disc 58 can be made of non-warping material, such as fiber board. The face of the disc 50 is marked with graduations, which can be numerals and can be read relative to a fixed reference mark 52. Ratchet and pawl type devices are provided for advancing the disc 59. Satisfactory de vices of this type comprise a roller 53 mounted for rotation on a bearing 54 and having on it a rubber periphery or tire 49. The tire 49 engages frictionally with the periphery of the disc 58 and drives said disc. A pawl 55 is mounted by a pivot member 57 on a rocker plate 58 and has a tip portion 56 which is adapted to contact the periphery of the tire member 49. A spring 61 yieldingly urges the pawl 55 in the proper direction to cause the tip 56 thereof to engage with the tire 49 and advance the roller 53 as the pawl moves in one direction. As the pawl 55 moves in the opposite direction the tip member 56 rides over the tire 49 without turning the roller 53. The rocker plate 58 is mounted on a pivot member 59. A connecting rod 62 connects the rocker plate 58 with the upper resilient member 21). Spaced apart holes 63 in the rocker plate 58 provides for adjustment of the point of connection of the rod 62 with said plate 58.

As a user bounces on the beam 28 he will intermittently advance the disc 50. If said disc 50 is set with the zero mark thereof coincident with the reference mark 52 before a turn at balancing and bouncing starts then the number indicated by the disc 56 at the end of the turn will indicate the score of the user. In practice this indicator device has been found to be accurate enough to correctly record the number of bounces made by a contestant. Thus the bouncing of two contestants may by scored by the disc 50.

A balloon perforator wire 65 can be secured to the disc 50 and positioned so that, as the disc 50 rotates, a pointed outer end portion 66 of said wire is moved in a suitable path so that a sharp point on the end portion 66 will, if it is exposed, contact and perforate the balloon 41. Preferably a guard tube 67, which can be of rubber, fits telescopically and adjustably on the end portion 66 of wire 65 and can be moved to expose a sharp point for perforating a balloon or to shield said sharp point so that the wire will merely rub over the balloon without perforating it as the disc 50 moves progressively. A lighter than air balloon together with means for controlling upward and downward movement of the same, as hereinafter described in connection with FIGS. 8 and 9, can be used connection with FIGS. 1 and 2.

The upright frame 16 supports the indicator means and the balloon and balloon inflating means but is not essential to the operation of the balancing and bouncing parts of my device and FIG. 7A shows a balancerbouncer device in which the upright frame parts carried thereby are omitted. Parts shown in FIG. 7A which are identical with those shown in FIGS. 1 to 6 inclusive are similarly numbered. The structure shown in FIG. 7A differs from the structure of FIGS. 1 to 6 in that the upright frame 18 is omitted and a transverse connector and bumper member 68 is rigidly connected between the two spaced apart narrower inner ends of the frame members and 16. The inner end of the side frame member 15 is broken away to show this cross member 68. The uppermost part of the cross member 68 carries resilient means, which may be a rubber pad 6 for the inner end portion of the lower resilient member 21 to engage with and be stopped by. Obviously springs can be used in place of the rubber pad 69.

If a user subjects the device of FIGS. 1 to 6 to rough usage by jumping up and down on it rather than bouncing in synchronisrn with it the lower resilient member 21 and the wider outer end portions of the side frame members 15 and 16 may slap against the floor hard enough to make an unpleasant noise. This condition is corrected in the FIG. 7A structure by providing the cross member 68 having the resilient -burn er part 69. This cross bar 68, 6? minimizes noise by preventing the inner end portion of the member 21 and the outer end portions of the side frames 15 and 16 from slapping against the floor. However, the structure shown in FIG. 7A is operative if the cross bar 68, 69 is omitted or is positioned so that it is not under the inner end of the resilient member 21.

FIG. 7A also shows a reinforcing or stiffening plate 12 positioned between the upper resilient member 26 and the fulcrum 30 on which it rests. One or more dowel pins 13 are rigid with the reinforcing member 12 and seat within suitable holes in the resilient member 26. These dowel pins 13 facilitate quick and easy insertion and removal of the reinforcing member 12 and they prevent relative movement of the members 12 and 26 while the device is in use. The reinforcing member 12 is also applicable to the device of FIG. 1. It can be used to reinforce a member 26 which has less than average stiffness or one that is to be subjected to unusually heavy Weights, or it can be used under ordinary conditions to obtain stiffer action of the member 26.

A handle, shown in FIG. 7A, comprises two spaced apart uprights 35a having their respective lower ends connected by pivots 36a with the side frames 15 and 16 and having their upper ends rigidly connected with each other by a hand hold member 37a.

For competitive use two of the devices shown in FIG. 1 may be positioned end to end, as hereinafter described in connection with FIGS. 10 and 11, or more than two of said devices may be similarly positioned radially about a common center.

FIGS. 8 and 9 show a balancer-bouncer of modified form which differs from those shown in FIGS. 1 to 7 and 7A in that it has a base 70 and the remaining mechanism is mounted on said base. An upright tubular frame 71 is secured, as by screws 72, to the inner end portion of the base 70 and an upright 73 capable of supporting an indicator disc and balloon is secured to the front side of frame 71.

Two upright spaced apart side frames 74 and 75 are secured to the respective sides of the base plate 70 about medially of its length. A resilient balancer-bouncer assembly is disposed between the side frames 74 and 75 and rests on the base 70. This balancer-bouncer assembly comprises an upper resilient member 76, similar to previously described member 20, and a lower resilient member 77, which is shorter than previously described member 21 and rests on the base 76 and functions similarly to member 21. The inner ends of the members 76 and 77, shown at the left in FIG. 8, are secured together by means including a bolt 78. The resilient assembly comprising members 76 and 77 is attached to the frame parts of the device by a cross pin 8%) which extends through the two side frame members 74 and 75 and lies in a transverse groove 81 in the top side of the lower resilient member 77.

Each side frame member 74 and 75 is provided with a plurality of longitudinally spaced apart perforations 82 for the reception of a transverse fulcrum member 83. The fulcrum member 83 extends across the lower resilient member 77 immediately above said member 77 and deter mines the effective length, for bending or flexing purposes, of said member 77. Adjustment of the fulcrum 83 toward the cross pin 86 will allow for more and easier bending of the member 77 and adjustment of the fulcrum 83 in the opposite direction will provide less bending and stiffer action of said member 77.

The upper resilient member 76 diverges from the lower resilient member 77 and is inclined upwardly from left to right, FIG. 8, and the outer end portion of said upper resilient member has a longitudinally extending balancing beam 76' rigid therewith. The outer end of the beam 76 is normally positioned at a convenient height for a person to step up onto with one foot. The upper edges of the side members 74 and 75 are inclined at approximately the same angle as the upper resilient mem ber 76 and are provided with spaced apart notches 84 for the reception of bearings 86 which are carried on and cooperate in supporting a transverse fulcrum rod 85. The rod 85 is free to rotate in the bearings 86 and adjustment of said rod 85 lengthwise of the side frame members 74 and 75 will adjust the device for persons of different weights.

The balanced-bouncer shown in FIGS. 8 and 9 is provided with bounce indicator devices similar to the bounce indicator devices shown in FIGS. 1 to 7 and previously described and these devices are similarly numbered.

The balloon and balloon perforating means shown in FIGS. 1 and 2 can be used in connection with the bal- 7 ancer bouncer shown in FIGS. 8 and 9 and parts of the air compressing devices and conduits are shown in FIG. 8 and similarly numbered.

Also I provide for using, in connection with any of the embodiments of my invention herein disclosed, a balloon which is filled with gas lighter than air and which is buoyant and will rise. A fragment of such a buoyant balloon 87 is shown in FIG. 9. When used in this manner the buoyant balloon 87 is tied by a pliable cord 88 to a pin 89 on the face of the disc 50. As the disc 50 rotates the buoyant balloon will move up and down. The cord 88 to which the buoyant balloon '87 is attached is preferably guided by passing it through a hole in a guide member 8% which is supported from the upper end portion of the frame part 73:. A balloon perforate-r 89b is secured to the member 73 and positioned so it will perforate the buoyant balloon 87 when said balloon is drawn down to its lowermost point. It will be noted that the balloon 87 is a short distance above the perforator 89b in FIG. 9. The disc 89 will move counterclockwise letting the balloon rise and then drawing it down on the perforator.

The balancer-bouncer disclosed in FIGS. 8 and 9 operates in a manner similar to the one shown in FIGS. 1 and 2 except that it has a little more tendency to lift up at the inner or left end when in use.

Balancer-bouncer devices of further modified form are shown in FIGS. and 11. In each of said FIGS. 10 and 11 two duplicate balancer-bouncer units are shown in end-to-end aligned relation. Like parts of the two units shown in each of FIGS. 10 and 11 are similarly numbered and it will be understood that these units are duplicates and that the following description applies equally well to either of said units. Each of said units comprises a base 90 having at one end a rigidly attached upright frame which includes two fairly strong spaced apart upright parallel beam supporting panels 93 and 94 secured to the base 90 by blocks 95 and braces 96. An upright hollow extension frame 97 formed of lighter material than the panels 93 and 94 is supported by said panels 93 and 94 and extends upwardly therefrom to support indicator and balloon inflating devices.

A balancer-bouncer beam 98 is positioned in spaced relation above the base 90. One end portion of said beam 98, herein referred to as the inner end, extends bea tween the support panels 93 and 94 and is pivotally mounted on a cross bolt 99. The other or outer end portion of the beam 98 rests on a compression spring 1% which is supported on the base 90 and is adjustable lengthwise of the beam 98. A plurality of spaced apart spring retainer discs 101 of correct size for the bottom end of the spring 106 to fit over are secured to the base 9% to hold the bottom end of the spring 100 in adjusted positions. The upper end of the spring 100' has a flanged insert 102 disposed therein and said insert 102 has an upwardly projecting pin 103 adapted to fit into spaced apart holes 164 in the lower edge of the beam 98. The spring 100 can be manually set in diiferent adjusted positions along the beam 98 and base 90 to adjust the device for use by persons of different weights.

The device of FIGS. 10 and 11 is provided with indicator means of the form shown in FIGS. 1 to 7 and hereinbefore described. The connecting rod 62 of this indicator means is adjustably connected with the beam 98 by means of spaced apart holes 105 in said beam.

Devices for supporting and inflating a toy balloon are provided in connection with each balancer-bouncer unit of the form shown in FIGS. 10 and 11. These devices comprise an L-shaped balloon adapter 1% supported from the upper end portion of the extension frame 97. An inflatable toy balloon 41 can be connected with each adapter 106. Preferably each balloon 41' is of the conventional type which, when it is inflated, will be long and cylindrical and will extend outwardly toward the person who is balancing on the beam 93. The adapter 1% is 0 connected by an air hose 187 with an air pump 1% on the base member 96*. If two of these units, positioned as shown in FIGS. 10- and 11 are used competitively, then the air conduits 197 are preferably crossed, as shown in F ll. When this is done the balloon 41' which is being inflated by each contestant will be progressively elongated toward the competing contestant and will have a tendency to cause him to lose his balance.

The air pump 1% is connected by a piston rod 189 with a slide member which is guided in a block 111 on the base 9%). The outer end of the slide member 1119 has an upwardly extending part 112 which is connected by a pivot 113 with a short link 114. A longer link 115 is connected by one pivot member 116 with the short link 114 and by another pivot 117 with the beam 98. A tension spring 118 exerts an outward pull on the slide member 11%. The two links 114- and 115 are obliquely positioned relative to each other and are disposed with their acute angle outwardly directed and upward movement of the beam 98 is restricted so that the common pivot 115 of said two links can never cross the center line passing through the two pivots 113 and 117. As the beam 98 moves downwardly it moves the slide 110 and piston rod 109 toward the pump 108 and delivers air to the balloon 41. As said beam 93 moves upwardly the spring 118 retracts the slide 116 and piston rod 109. The common pivot 116 of the two links 114 and 115 can be engaged in different holes 119 in the shorter link 114- to adjust the length of stroke of the piston rod 169.

The operation of the balancer-bouncer shown in FIGS. 10 and 11 is similar to the operation of the balancerbouncer devices shown in the preceding figures and hereinbefore described.

Obviously changes in the devices herein disclosed may be made within the scope of the following claims.

I claim:

1. In a balancer-bouncer exercising device, a normally horizontal frame structure of substantial length; an upright support secured to one end portion of said frame structure; a resiliently movable balancing beam associated with said frame structure providing a vibratory support whereon a person can balance with one foot while synchronously moving vertically with said beam; indicator means carried by said upright support visible to a person on said beam; indicator means operating devices connecting said indicator means with said beam. adapted to indicate the extent of reciprocating movement imparted to said beam at a turn of balancing-bouncing movement thereon; an inflatable toy balloon supported by said upright support; an air pump connected with said balloon; and air pump operating means connecting said air pump with said beam providing operation of said air pump in response to vertical reciprocation of said beam.

2. In a balancer-bouncer exercising device, a normally horizontal frame structure of substantial length; an upright support secured to one end portion of said frame structure; a resiliently supported balancing beam connected with said frame structure providing a vibratory support whereon a person can balance with one foot while bouncing vertically with said beam; an inflatable toy bal loon supported by said upright support; an air pump connected with said balloon; and air pump operating means connecting said air pump with said beam providing operation of said air pump in response to vertical movement of said beam.

3. In an exercising device, two resilient members disposed in divergent relation one above another with two ends thereof adjoining and secured together and the other two ends thereof spaced apart; and two fulcrum members extending across the uppermost side of the lower resilient member and the lowermost side of the upper resilient member respectively intermediate the length of said resilient members and at a substantial distance outwardly from the secured together ends thereof.

4. In an exercising device which is adapted to rest on a fixed horizontal support, two resilient members of substantial length disposed in divergent relation one above the other with their two inner ends adjoining and secured together and their two outer ends spaced apart and with at least the outer end portion of the lowermost resilient member resting on the fixed support; and two rigidly supported fulcrum members extending across the uppermost side of the lower resilient member and the lowermost side of the upper resilient member respectively intermediate the length of the resilient members and at a substantial distance from both ends thereof, whereby the presence of a load on the outer end portion of the upper resilient member will flex the portions of both of said resilient members inwardly from said fulcrummembers.

5. An exercising device for use on a fixed horizontal support comprising two resilient members of substantial length disposed in divergent relation one above another and having their two inner ends adjoining and secured together and their two outer ends spaced apart and having at least the outer end portion of the lowermost resilient member resting on the fixed support; upright frame means positioned at the sides of said two resilient members; and two fulcrum members supported by said frame means and extending across .the uppermost side of the lower resilient member and the lowermost side of the upper resilient member respectively intermediate the length of the resilient members and at a substantial distance from both ends thereof, whereby the parts of said resilient members inwardly from said fulcrum members will yield resiliently in response to the presence of a load on the outer end portion of said upper resilient member.

6. The apparatus as claimed in claim in which the uppermost fulcrum member is supported for longitudinal adjustment relative to the uppermost resilient member.

7. The apparatus as claimed in claim 5 in which the resilient members are flat pieces of wood, and a medially disposed longitudinally extending balancing beam of narrow width and substantial length is rigidly secured to the upper side of the uppermost resilient member and extends from a location adjacent the position of the uppermost fulcrum member to a location adjacent the outermost end of said upper resilient member.

8. An exercising device comprising two spaced apart upright side frame members; a lower straight flat resilient member disposed between said side frame members and extending beyond an outer end of said side frame members, an inner end of said lower resilient member being vertically movable relative to said side frame members; transverse pivot means pivotally connecting said lower resilient member with the outer end portions of said side frame members; a lower fulcrum member supported by said side frame members and extending across the upper side of said lower resilient member inwardly from said pivot means; an upper straight flat resilient member positioned above and diverging from said lower resilient member and having an inner end adjoining and secured to an inner end of said lower resilient member; and an up- 10 per fulcrum member supported by said side frame members and extending across the lower side of said upper resilient member at a substantial distance from both ends thereof.

9. The apparatus as claimed in claim 8 in which a balancing beam is secured on the upper side of the outer end portion of said upper resilient member, said balancing beam being capable of functioning as a resiliently supported footpiece for balancing and bouncing purposes.

10. The apparatus as claimed in claim 8 in which the upper edges of the side frame members are straight and are inclined downwardly from the outer toward the inner ends of said frame members thereby forming inclined trackways, and in which the uppermost fulcrum member is straight and externally cylindrical and has rolling contact with said inclined trackways and with the lower side of said upper resilient member.

11. An exercising device whereon a person can balance and bounce up and down comprising a long flat horizontal base; a lower resilient member having an outer end fixedly attached to said base and having an inner end which is vertically movable; an upper resilient member positioned above and diverging from said lower resilient member and having an inner end adjoining and secured to the vertically movable inner end of said lower resilient member, the outer end of said upper resilient member being spaced above said base and being capable of receiving and resiliently supporting a load; two spaced apart upright side frame members rigid with said base and disposed alongside of said resilient members; and two fulcrum members supported by said side frame members and extending across the uppermost side of the lower resilient member and the lowermost side of the upper resilient member respectively at a substantial distance inwardly from the outer ends of said resilient members, whereby the parts of said resilient members inwardly from said fulcrum members will be flexed if a load is placed on the outer end portion of said upper resilient member.

12. The apparatus as claimed in claim 11 in which an upright frame is supported from the inner end of said base; indicator devices are carried by said upright frame; and indicator device operating mechanism is connected between said indicator devices and the vertically movable inner ends of said two resilient members.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,024,028 Dahlberg et al Dec. 10, 1935 2,764,413 Wisner Sept. 25, 1956 2,953,376 Thornton Sept. 20, 1960 FOREIGN PATENTS 227,726 Germany Oct. 26-, 1910 1,055,180 France Oct. 14, 1953

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2024028 *Apr 20, 1934Dec 10, 1935Harold DahlbergDiving device
US2764413 *Feb 15, 1954Sep 25, 1956Wisner Kenneth MDiving board
US2953376 *Mar 3, 1958Sep 20, 1960Thornton Joseph HChild's toy and exerciser
*DE227726C Title not available
FR1055180A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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Classifications
U.S. Classification482/34, 273/449, 482/30, 273/458, 446/483, 446/220, 482/112
International ClassificationA63B5/00, A63B5/08, A63B24/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63B2208/12, A63B24/00, A63B5/08
European ClassificationA63B24/00, A63B5/08