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Publication numberUS3063167 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 13, 1962
Filing dateJun 16, 1960
Priority dateJun 16, 1960
Publication numberUS 3063167 A, US 3063167A, US-A-3063167, US3063167 A, US3063167A
InventorsScholl William M
Original AssigneeScholl William M
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Sandal strap holding means
US 3063167 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

NOV 13, 1952 WJM. scHoLL 3,063,167

SANDAL STRAP HOLDING MEANS Filed June 16, 1960 IN VEN TOR. Wai/am M Jaa/ nite States This invention relates to improvements in sandal strap holding means, and more particularly to means for holding `foot engaging straps to the sole portions of sandals in a secure as well as decorative manner.

In the past, many and various ways and means of attaching sandal straps to the sole portion of a sandal or thev like have been developed. Where the sole portion of the sandal is fabricated from various layers of material, the straps may of course be attached in a manner to conceal the ends of the straps entirely from view, disposed between layers of the sole, and secured in various other ways. However, where the sole portion of a sandal is in effect a single piece of material, such as a single block of wood or plastic the strap ends have been attached to the sides ofthe sole by spaced securing means. Frequently, a nail or screw passed through a washer and secured through the strap into the side of the sole portion was utilized. Not only were such fastening means objectionable because of a lack of decorative appearance, but also the spaced securing means did not eilectively hold the strap to the sandal sole portion, and after relatively short usage permitted the entry of mud and dirt between the strap end and sole in the spaces between the securing elements. In a relatively short time, therefore, the sandal was not only unsightly since it was virtually impossible to remove embedded dirt from between the strap and the sole, but the securement of the strap was not desirably eective. Even when new, spaced securing means on a sandal strap were incapable of keeping the entire strap end in close contact with the side of the sandal sole so as to avoid the possibility of the entrance of mud and dirt inside the strap end. Further, spaced securing means with the use of a nail or screw and a washer added objectionably to the cost of production of the sandal.

With the foregoing in mind, it is an important object of the instant invention to provide sandal strap holding means by which a Vstrap end throughout its entire width may be rmly held against the side of the sandal sole in a manner to prevent the entrance of mud or dirt inside the strap.

Another object of this invention is the provision of sandal strap holding means whereby a holding element extends the full width of the end of a strap holding the entire end lof the strap tightly against the sandal sole.

Itis also a feature of this invention to provide sandal strap holding means which bind the end of the strap to the sole portion of the sandal more irmly'than was heretofore customary, and the use of washers is completely eliminated.

Also an object of this invention is the provision of sandal strap holding means that are decorative in character and may be made of the same material as buckles or other ornamental elements utilized with the straps for securing the sandal to a foot, giving the entire sandal an extremely pleasing appearance.

Still a further object of this invention resides in the provision of strap holding means embodying a holding element in the form of a strip of rigid material having a length substantially equivalent to the width of the strap end, and through which element a plurality of relatively small and economical securing means may be connected with the sandal sole, the striplike element exerting pressure on the strap end against the sandal sole the full width of the strap.

atent pfv lCC Another feature of the invention resides in the provision of sandal strap holding means for a strap having a scalloped end and a tread on the sole portion of the sandal having alternate elevations and depressions, the strap holding means retaining the strap in position with each scallop in the edge thereof opposite an elevation in the sole, whereby the strap ends are not prematurely scuffed and worn and the sandal retains its pleasing appearance throughout a long life.

Still another feature of the invention resides in the provision of sandal strap holding means of a type more quickly and economically applied than strap holding means heretofore used, and yet which even more positively retain the strap end connected with the sandal sole.

While some of the more salient features, characteristics and advantages of the instant invention have been above pointed out, others will become apparent from 5 or equivalent means.

the following disclosures, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawing, in which:

FIGURE l is a plan view of a sandal equipped with strap holding means embodying principles of the instant invention;

FIGURE 2 is a side elevational view of the structure of FIGURE l;

FIGURE 3 is a greatly enlarged fragmentary transverse vertical sectional View taken substantially as indicated by the line Ill-III of FIGURE 2, looking in the direction of the arrows; and

FIGURE 4 is an enlarged fragmentary bottom plan View of the sandal.

As shown on the drawings:

The illustrated 'embodiment of the instant invention embodies a sandal including a sole part 1 which may satisfactorily -be a single piece of wood shaped to define a forward tread portion and a rear heel definition, and preferably contoured on its upper face in keeping with the plantar surface of a normal foot. Secured to the underside of the sole 1 by adhesive or in any other suit* able manner is a tread 2 which may satisfactorily be made of some resilient material such 4as rubber, synthetic rubber, or the equivalent.

The sandal is held on the foot of the wearer by means of a pair of straps?, and 4 attached to opposide sides of the sole 1 in a manner to be later described, and which may be connected together by means of ornamental buckles In the illustrated instance, the straps 3 and 4 are relatively wide and located to embrace the foot in the region of the metatarsal arch. Obviously, additional strap elements may be utilized if desired, particularly in the heel region of the sandal, but such are not necessary herein to properly set forth the instant invention. Both straps are attached to the sandal sole in identically the same manner.

With reference now more particularly to FIGURES 2 and 3, it will be seen that the holding means for the end of the strap 4 embody a relatively narrow and thin strip 6 of relatively rigid material, metal being entirely satisfactory. The element 6, if made of metal, can also be relatively thin, and it is of a length approximately equal to the Width of the strap. The strip 6 may be colored to conform with or contrast to the buckles 5 and any other ornamentative elements that may be provided on the sandal, thereby adding materially to the decorative and pleasing appearance of the sandal as a whole.

The strip 6 may be retained in place quite positively with the use of relatively tine small headed nails '7 driven through suitable apertures in the strip, through the strap end, and into the side of the sandal sole 1, as seen in FIGURE 3. Should the sandal sole be of plastic material, relatively small screws could be substituted for the nails 7. From the showing in FIGURE 3, it will be noted that when the strip 6 is attached over the strap end and nailed in position, it is partially embedded in the strap as indicated at 8 so that there is an extremely tight area 9 of contact between the strap and the side of the sole 1 and this is throughout the width of the strap, so that mud and dirt cannot enter between the end of the strap and the side of the sole.

A further feature of the strip `6 is the fact that it is slightly curved lengthwise thereof; that is, the upper edge 10 of the strip is slightly concave, while the lower edge 1l is equivalently convex. The curvature of the strip 6 is in keeping with the curvature of the sole in this re gion. It is customary for the sole of a sandal, shoe or other article of footwear to curve slightly beneath the metatarsal heads. In other words, the tread face of the sole is not precisely flat. In this instance, also, the upper face of the sole 1, being shaped in keeping with the plantar surface of a foot also has a curvature in the same region. Consequently, the lengthwise curvature of the holding strip 6 conforms to the curvature of the sole and the strap edge and holds the strap end more positively eliminating possible distortion of the strap during use by locating the pull directly away from the nails 7 and not forwardly or rearwardly at an angle to them.

Where a tread design is utilized on the tread member 2, for better appearance it may be preferable to provide the strap end with a series of scallops as indicated at 12. In this instance the tread is also shown as comprising alternate ridges 13 and grooves or valleys 14. From the showing more particularly in FIGURE 2 it will be noted that each scallop 12 may be disposed opposite a ridge 13 and the indentation between scallops is disposed opposite a groove or valley 14. With the aid of the strip 6 the strap end may be rmly retained in that position and since each scallop is opposite a high point of the tread, the strap edges will not become prematurely sculfed or Worn and the pleasing blending appearance of the scallops with the ridges and valleys of the tread remains throughout a long sandal life.

It will be further noted that the use of the strip 6 and the relatively small nails holding it in position is far more economical during manufacture of the sandal than the formerly known studs or screws utilized with washers, which studs or screws were spaced apart and necessarily rnuch larger in size than the nails 7. The formerly known structure also necessitated punching holes in the ends of the straps through which the studs or screws passed in order to avoid strap distortion or possible rupture. Not only does the instant invention provide greater economy in the initial cost of materials, and greater economy in the assemblying of the sandal, but the strap ends are also more positively held with definite pressure throughout substantially the entire widths of the strap ends preventing the entrance of mud and dirt between the strap and sandal sole. In addition, the use of the strip 6 adds to the decorative appearance ofthe sandal as a whole since it may blend with or contrast to other ornamental features or buckles utilized on the sandal.

It will be understood that modifications and variations may be elected without departing from the scope of the novel concepts of the present invention.

I claim as my invention:

1. In a sandal, the combination, comprising:

(a) a relatively thick rigid sole part having a slightly concave upper surface, a lower surface generally parallel thereto, and a slightly convex edge surface adjacent to said surfaces;

(b) a transversely disposed strap having an end portion overlying said convex edge of said sole part and having a lower edge portion with a curvature similar to that of said lower surface;

(c) a narrow rigid elongated strip laterally curved complementally to said convex edge portion of said sole part, and further curved vertically complementally to said lower edge portion of said strap, and substantially coextensively overlying said lower edge portion and partially embedded therein; and

(d) securing means tightly anchored in said sole part through said rigid strip and said lower edge portion of the strap, and retaining the partially embedded relation of said strip throughout its length.

2. In a sandal, the combination, comprising:

(a) a relatively thick rigid sole part having a slightly concave upper surface, a lower surface generally parallel thereto, and a slightly convex edge surface adjacent to said surfaces;

(b) a separate tread secured to the underside of said sole part having alternate ridges and valleys extending to said convex edge surface of said sole part;

(c) a transversely disposed strap having an end p0rtion overlying said convex edge of said sole part and having a lower edge portion with a curvature similar to that of said lower surface, said curvature being defined by a series of scallops with a repetition equal to that of said ridges;

(d) a narrow rigid elongated strip laterally curved complementally to said convex edge portion of said sole part, and further curved vertically complementally to said lower edge portion of said strap, and substantially coextensively overlying said lower edge portion and partially embedded therein adjacent to said scallops; and

(e) securing means tightly anchored in said sole part through said rigid strip and said lower edge portion of the strap, and retaining the partially embedded relation of said strip throughout its length, and further retaining said scallops in registry with said ridges for protecting the same.

References Cited in the le of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,341,498 De Marmels et al. May 25, 1920 1,964,364 Pellkofer June 26, 1934 1,964,406 Pellkofer June 26, 1934 1,964,705 Pellkofer June 26, 1934 2,072,785 Wulff Mar. 2, 1937 2,266,732 Babinchak Dec. 23, 1941 2,517,472 Fathauer Aug. l, 1950 2,711,033 Dick June 21, 1955

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1341498 *Apr 8, 1919May 25, 1920Albert WinklerWooden shoe or sandal
US1964364 *Mar 9, 1934Jun 26, 1934Charles M HartmanSandal
US1964406 *Jan 10, 1931Jun 26, 1934Andrews Pellkofer Sandal CompaSandal
US1964705 *Mar 9, 1934Jun 26, 1934Joseph PellkoferSandal
US2072785 *Mar 2, 1936Mar 2, 1937Wulff Herman AFootwear
US2266732 *Apr 25, 1940Dec 23, 1941Stephen BabinchakBeach sandal construction
US2517472 *Dec 5, 1947Aug 1, 1950Fathauer Ralph WSandal with hinged wooden sole with spacer rivets therein
US2711033 *Feb 18, 1952Jun 21, 1955Dick Raymond PHinged clogs
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3323233 *Jul 6, 1964Jun 6, 1967William M SchollArticle of footwear and method of making the same
US3698108 *Mar 6, 1970Oct 17, 1972Semperit AgSandals and methods and machines for their manufacture
US4355473 *Sep 29, 1980Oct 26, 1982Ilitzky Zelik MMolded shoe
US4461102 *Jun 16, 1982Jul 24, 1984Devincentis Cheryl AShoe with interchangeable shoe straps having spring connectors
US4495715 *May 14, 1981Jan 29, 1985Fredrickson James CFoot appliance
US5926975 *Feb 3, 1998Jul 27, 1999Goodman; Michael C.Hinged shoe sole assembly for working boots
US6772539 *Mar 28, 2003Aug 10, 2004Treasury Co., Ltd.Shoes
US7878200Feb 13, 2006Feb 1, 2011Carefusion 2200, Inc.Infant headgear for supporting a patient airway interface device
WO2007095268A2 *Feb 12, 2007Aug 23, 2007Allegiance CorpInfant headgear for supporting a patient airway interface device
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/11.5, 33/27.3
International ClassificationA43B3/10
Cooperative ClassificationA43B3/103
European ClassificationA43B3/10B1A