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Publication numberUS3063388 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 13, 1962
Filing dateMay 12, 1960
Priority dateMay 12, 1960
Publication numberUS 3063388 A, US 3063388A, US-A-3063388, US3063388 A, US3063388A
InventorsBeemer Paul K, Magarian Gerald M
Original AssigneePreco Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Load dividers for goods containing compartments, such as those of carriers
US 3063388 A
Abstract  available in
Images(6)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 13, 1962 G. M. MAGARIAN ETAL 3,063,388

LOAD DIVIDERS FOR GOODS CONTAINING COMPARTMENTS, SUCH 6 Sheets-Sheet 1 AS THOSE OF CARRIERS Filed May l2, 1960 NOV- 13, 1962 G. M. MAGARIAN ETAL 3,063,388

LOAD DIvIOERs FOR GOODS CONTAINING COMPARTMENTS, SUCH As THOSE OF CARRIERS Filed May 12, 1960 6 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENToR EQALD Al. MA/Je/AA@ Nov. 13, 1962 G. M. MAGARIAN ETAL 3,063,388 y LOAD DIVIDERS FOR @ooms CONTAINING coMPARTMENTs, SUCH AS THOSE OF CARRIERS 6 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed May 12, 1960 IN V EN TORS BY 541%# 9 mf I @5,941.0 M MA//AM, v ,PAUL se-MEQ,

a ...54 5 m w M 00, w

Nov. 13, 1962 G. M. MAGARIAN ETAL LOAD DIVIDERS FOR Goons CONTAINING COMPARTMENT 3,063,388 S, SUCH 6 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed May 12, 1960 20a ./H. MAAP/AM INV EN TORS BY www NOV- 13, 1962 G. M. MAGARIAN ETAL 3,063,388

LOAD DIVIDERS RoR Goons CONTAINING coMPARTMENTs, SUCH As THOSE oF CARRIERS Filed May 12, 1960 e sheets-sheet 5 ,Bw/L IJ. 55445?, INVENToRs,

N'OV- 13, 1962 G M. MAGARIAN ETAL 3,063,388

LOAD DIVIDERS FOR GOODS CONTAINING COMPARTMENTS, SUCH AS THOSE OF' CARRIERS Filed May l2, 1960 v 6 Sheets-Sheet 6 Maf/5. Maag. M5212 L WF, ffl/Eff;

$41,- F 22a irl/M g4 224 226 q 224 224 f "162 M2 I fe lf2) /TL EQALD M, MAG/WMM P/:UL JL. ,HSE/mag,

' INVENToRs,

United States Patent C) assess LOAD DIVIDERS FR GOODS .CONTAINING CGM- PARTMENTS, SUCH AS THGSE QF CARRIERS Gerald M. Magarian, Long Beach, and Paulf'K. Iueemer, Laguna' Beach, Calif., assignors to Preco Incorporated,

Los Angeles, Calif, acorporation' of vCalilr'I'lia' 'Enea May i2, retaper. Ne. 28,793

is Claims. (ci. 1057-376) This invention relates to movable load dividers generally applicable to the interiors of freight carrying" vehicles `such as railway freight cars, automobile truck. or trailer vans, or freight carryingvessels or aircraft, or, in fact, to any goods containing compartments. Although its applicability is general,` the invention will be described in a preferred illustrative embodiment as applied to railway freight cars. i i v i i The general objective of the invention is to provide a simple, strong and strongly vsupported structure'easily movable to various positions tol forr'n" whleur partial dividing walls or bulkheads vand storable when not'in` use against a wall or walls of the car. The general features of an illustrative'embodiment,accomplishing thosearnd other desired objectives, are typically deseribed.V

`As applied to a railway car orsirnilr carrier having a generally elongate lfreight compartment Venclosed by oor or deck, side and end walls, and usually butnot necessarily by a roof or ceiling, the invention utilizes upper and lower longitudinal Vrail structures at one'or both side walls having longitudinal gear-rack formations. A vertical carrier shaft extends between the upperand lower rail structures, carrying two fixed gears of equal pitch diameters meshing with the racks; The `carrier shaft is movable along the lengths of the rails, and Vthe meshing gears maintain it parallel to itself in its various longitudinal positions-.in the instancel of a railway car with vertical side walls, maintain it alwaysin vertical position.

A vertical wall or bulkhead member, here calleda gate, is pivotally hung at one vertical edge on the 'carrier shaft by journalling which allows the gate to swing about and preferably to move vertically on the shaft, and allows shaft rotation for movement of the shaft 4and gate longitudinally of the rails. Although a single gate may, in transverse position, extend clear across the freight'cornpartment, it is preferred for reasons such as gate strength against load impact and'versatilityof load dividing lpositions, that a single gate extend only part wayfacross the compartment, with' a similarly hung gate at theopposite wall.

In any selected transverse position, the swinging edge of the gate is locked againstV longitudinal displacement. That locking may be at both its upper and lower edges; but for purposes of simplicity is at only one of those edges and preferably at the lower edge where it is locked to the licor. That preferred locking arrangement also makes the present divider structures applicable' to opentopped carriers of all types. `ln any such position, the pivoted edge of the gate is locked'to one or both wallrails. lf'locked only to one, the carrier shaft, then held longitudinally immovable at that one rail, holds the whole pivoted gate edge immovably. It is preferred, however, to lock the pivoted edge to both rails so as not to depend on the torsional strength of the carrier shaft yfor lhcvilding the, eg., upper part Aof the pivoted edgeif, say, only the lower part is locked to its rail.

In preferred form, the gate in its transverse wallor bulkhead-forming position is thus lockedat three corners. That makes for simplicity in `the locking mechanism, in comparison, for instance, with lockingat the upperswinging corner as well asv at the lower.

3,063,388 Patented Nov. 143., 196g lCe In the preferred illustrative embodiment described in the following and shownin the accompanying drawings, the gate, as before stated preferable, is vertically movable on thecarrier shaft 'and has'I its lower edge locked in either operative 'transverse or stored positions by simply lowering it. I'ts'upperfr edge is thenU locked, preferably only at the pivoted corner,'by a projectible locking pin actuated in conjunction with the mechanismby which the gate is raised andlowe'red.y To move the gate, it is raised to 'clearthe -floor and' then moved and swung to any desired'position where itis again lockedrby the simple operation'ofzlowering'-it;

Many'other detailed features and accomplishments of the invention will appear from the .following detailed descriptions'of the present preferred and illustrative embdiment 'shown in tliewaccompanying" drawings, 'where FIG. lis a schematic plan showing typical positions of the load divider gates in a`c`ar;

' FIG; 2 is an enlarged crossfsection taken asindicated by line 2 2 on FIG. `1; i

"FIG `2a "is a' schematic fragmentary elevation inthe aspect indicated byline .2a- 12d on lFIG. 1; 1FIGI 3 is a" further enlargedhorizontal section on line s sef F162;l t' FIG. YA4 is a further enlarged fragmentary section, on a vertical plane, of the upper parts shown in FIG.A 2 and in the same aspect asin that figure;

` .FIG.`5 is'a section on line 5-f5 of FIG. 4;

FIG. v6 is a detail section on lirie 6-16 of FIG. 44;

FIG. 7 `is adetail section on line .7-;7 of FIG. 4;

FIG. 8 is an exploded perspective of the parts shown inFIG. 7;

EIG.9 is a-fragmentary section, like that ofFIG. 4, showing thel medial parts'shown in FIG.- 2;

FIG. 'l0-isa detail section ont line "l0- 10 of FIG. 9;

FIG. 1,1 is a detil"section on line 11-1'1 of FIG. 9;

FIG. 11a i's an exploded perspective'of certain of the parts'showninF-IGSSand l1; '-FIG. 12 is a fragmentary section, similar to those of FIGS. .4 and 9, showing the lower parts shown in FIG. 2;

` FIG. 13 is afragmeiitary horizontals'ection on line 13-13 of FIG. lf2;

FIG. 14 is a fragmentary elevation in the cated by line 14-14 on FIG. 12;

FIGS. 1'5, 16 and 17 are schematic sectional elevations in an aspect from the left in FIG.` 2 and showingoperating parts Vin their different typical positions; and

FIGL 1 8 is a viewv similarto FIG. 13 showing the gate ina position such as at Din FIG. 1. i

FIG. 1 shows in plan, more or less schematically, the various po'sitlions'into which the gates of the load divider may be placed. 'The gates, `each preferably ofl approximate half car interior width, are carried to beraised and lowered and to swing on vertical carrier shafts that are carried on upper and lower railsl at the vcar side walls. FIG. 1 indicates thelower pairV of those side-wall rails itl and the central floor 'railftifV to which Vthe lower corners'of the swinging'edges ofthe gates' are locked'w'hen in their aspect indi- 'positions transverse of the car length. VAlthough at present it is contemplated Ithat`a 'full -complement of gates `the. following y dc'scriptions of'oneapply to all.

FIGS. 2 and 3 show the 'general relation of a gate A lto its carrier,rails'andzvertical carrier shaft 45,0..Shar`t 50 extends vertically between upper longitudinal rail 52 and lower longitudinal rail 40, located respectively under the car roof 54 and on or recessed into the car lloor structure 56, close to side wall 44. The floor structure as here shown includes a lading floor or rack 58 above the car floor proper 60, and lower rail 40 is mounted on floor 60 with its upper surface flush with the lading rack. The rack is commonly made up of sections that may be hingedly pivoted to lower rail 40, as indicated at 62, to be swung up against the side wall, or against a gate in position D, for floor cleaning. The location of hinge pivot 62 at the inside of rail 40 is such that the floor rack sections may be swung up to vertical position against the then inside face of a gate or gates stored in position D against the side wall. As shown more particularly in FIG. 12, the location of hinge pivot 62 relative to rack 58 is such that when the rack is swung up its then vertical outer surface lies in a plane somewhat inward of the inner face 66 of rail 40. And, as will be explained later, the inner face of a gate, in position D against the car side wall, lies outward of rail face 66.

Carrier shaft 50 has upper and lower toothed gears or sprockets 70 and 72, of equal pitch diameters, rigidly aflixed at its upper and lower ends. These sprockets meshingly engage, respectively, in longitudinally spaced gear-rack openings 74 and 76 (FIGS. 4, 5 and l2, 13) in the outer side flanges 78 and 80 of upper and lower rails 52 and 40. It will be understood that upper rail 52 with its spaced gear-rack formation extends longitudinally of the full interior length of the car, as does the lower rail 40 with its gear-rack formation. Carrier shaft 50 may be moved longitudinally through the whole length of the car interior and its rail meshing gears maintain it at all times in a vertical position.

Carrier shaft 50 is supported, preferably by suspension at its upper end, by a thrust bearing unit 90 (FIG. 4) attached to the shafts upper end and having a freely rotatable flange 92 that rides the outer edge 95 of rail flange 94. The under face 93 of flange 92, preferably hardened, is conical at an angle of about 4 or 5 degrees to a normal of its axis and that of shaft 50; that face riding the upper surface of 95, as shown in FIG. 4. As here shown upper rail 52 is made up of an outer angle section 96, with its gear-rack flange 78, an inner angle section 100, and the horizontal flange plate 94, all welded together and secured to the car roof structure as by the bolts shown at 102. Flange plate 94 projects laterally inwardly of the flange 101 of angle section 100 and has, throughout its length, longitudinally spaced openings 104 outward of flange '1, for purposes that will presently appear. Flange 92 is formed as a part of the freely rotatable member 91 that forms the outer cylindric casing for thrust bearings 89 mounted in supporting relation on shaft 50. That rotatable casing 89 rides the outer edge of flange portion 95, holding gear 70 in mesh 'with its rack formations 74. It also functions, along with the lower gear 72 to take the weight couple of the gate when the latter in a transverse position is not otherwise supported at its swinging edge, as it is not when, for instance it is raised from the position of FIG. 2. The couple resulting from the fact that the gate is then only supported on shaft 50, is then taken by 91, at the upper end of shaft 50, bearing against 95, and by the lower gear 72 bearing against its rack formation flange 80 as a roller taking a horizontal load. With the gate in any raised transverse poistion, lower gear 72 is thus held in mesh. In any gate position, such as D in FIG. 1, where gear 72 is not thus pressed into mesh, shaft 50 riding the outer edge of lower rail flange 111 holds it sufllciently well in mesh.

Lower rail 40, as here shown (FIG. 12) is made up of a lower channel section 106 and upper angle sections 108 and 110 welded to the channels upwardly extending flanges. The upper horizontal flange 111 of angle 110 has, throughout its length, longitudinally spaced perforations 112 (FIGS. 3, 12 and 13). FIG. 2a shows, schematically, that the spacings of upper rail perforations 104 and lower rail perforations 112 are equal, and that the several pairs of upper and lower perforations are in vertical alinement. The longitudinal gap or slot 113 between the opposed edges of the upper flanges of angles 108 and not only allows shaft 50 to be moved longitudinally of the car but also has other functions to be explained.

The general features of structure and suspension of a gate A are shown in FIGS. 2 and 3. The body of the gate structure is made up of a series of vertical channel elements welded together at their over-laps shown in FIG. 3 and welded to an upper horizontal element 122 and a lower element `124 indicated in FIG. 12. The swinging vertical gate edge (to the right in FIGS. 2, 3 and l2) is finished off with a welded channel formation 126, and the vertical pivoted edge (left in those gures) also has a welded vertical channel formation 128 and a boxing or housing formation 130 that encloses certain operating parts, to be described.

The gate is freely pivoted on carrier shaft 50 to be swung about its vertical axis. As here shown the gate has an upper journal block 134 at its upper edge, and a lower journal block 136 at its lower edge, freely journalling the gate to be swung and raised and lowered on the shaft and freely allowing shaft rotation, regardless of the position of the gate, when the gate and carrier shaft are moved longitudinally along the upper and lower rails. Further details, particularly those associated with the lower journal block will be later described. The gate journallings on shaft S0 not only allow those freedoms of gate swinging and shaft rotation, but also allow the gate to be shifted vertically on the shaft between a lowered and a raised position.

FIGS. 2, 4 and l2 show the gate in lowered position extending transversely of the car-in such a position as at A, B or C in FIG. 1. The lower foot structure 142 that carries the bearing block 136 carries a fixed locking pin projecting below the gate foot 142 which, in that lowered position, rests on the upper apertured flange 111 of rail angle 110. In that position the projecting pin 140 enters a rail perforation 112.

Center rail 42 (FIGS. 1, 2, 3 and l2) has two longitudinal series of spaced perforations 143 and 144 in its upper flange 146 which is also flush with the car floor formation (with the lading rack as shown here). As indicated in FIG. 1 and shown in FIG. 3, the spacings of 143 and 1'44 are the same as the spacings of apertures 112 in the lower side rails 40, and the pairs of those several apertures are in transverse alinement. With the gate in transverse lowered position, another projecting locking pin 150 at the swinging edge of the gate, enters the center rail perforation 143 or 144 that is in transverse alinement with the side rail perforation that pin 140 enters. Pin 150 projects below a gate foot 152 which then rests on the upper surface of rail 42.

With the gate in the lowered, transverse position, a third locking pin (FIGS. 2 and 4) is projected up from the upper edge of the gate in proper spaced relation to carrier shaft 50 to enter the upper rail perforation 104 that is vertically alined with the lower rail perforation 112 that pin 140 has entered. As FIGS. 5 and 13 indicate, the gate thickness is centered on carrier shaft 50 and pins 140, 150 and 160 are centered on that thickness.

Upper locking pin 160 is formed as the upper end of a locking bar 162 vertically slidable in guides 163 on the gate. Bar 162 has a lower extension 164 coupled to it at 166 (FIGS. 4, 7 and 8) by a coupling involving a T-head 168 in slot 170; that coupling allowing a small amount of mis-alinement of 162 and 164 so that 162 and the mechanism 174 at the lower end of 164 will be free from binding during their vertical sliding movement on the gate.

Referring now more particularly to FIGS. 9-1l, the lower end of extension 164 carries a unit 174 that has a block 178 that is externally grooved as at 182 to engage 130. A turnbuckle adjustment at 194 provides for lengthv adjustment'of link ISS to adjust the elevations of 174 and locking. bar 162 and its pin 166 relativeto the gate.

As shown .in FIGS. 9 and 11, block 178fhas a bore carrying a tubular ferrule 200 which projects its end beyond the block-to the left-in those figures. The hub end of handle184, at 202, encircles the projectingend' ofthe ferrule and preferably has a roller bearing mounting 204 on it. A plunger 206 is pressed outwardly in` the ferrule by a spring203 and has a rounded head 210 that projects out through a cap plate 212r that holds the handle hub on the ferrule and the plunger in the ferrule.

IIn the lowered gate position shown in the figures sofar referred to, handle 184 hangs` down fromblock 178; In`

that position of the parts, with the pin` connectionz186 directly below the. axis of'174 and plungerv 206, it hearl`210E is spring pressed outwardly into. an` anglewalled groove` formation 214 carried by thelower end of supportinglink. 188. In FIG. 9, handle 184v swingsin a plane normal to that of the figure-normal to the' plane of the gate. With. the handle down, plunger head 2101s pressed into groove formation 214, yieldingly locking the' parts in that position. When the handle is swung up, formation 214 is moved laterally relative to 210, forcing 210v back out of 2114. The handle then can be swungfreely through 180.. in either direction, about the axis of 174, movingthe pin. connection 136 to a point above that aXis and consequently moving block 174, and its connected parts 164, 162 and 16), down relative to the gate. On return of the handle to the depending position of FIG. 9, sloping wings 216 of the grooveforrnation force plunger head 210 back',r

to enter 214 as it moves to that final position. In that handle position, 174 and locking pin 160 are in their raised position relative to the gate.

Carrier shaft 50 (see FIG. 4) carries a collar unit 220 made up of a supporting collar 222 iixedly mounted on the shaft, and an upper unit 224 rotatably supported by bearing 226 onl 222. In the position of the parts shown in FIG.y 4, with locking bar 162 up, a foot member 228 carried by 162 is at a predetermined distance above 224. Downward movement of 162caused by upward swinging of handle 184, first moves locking pin 161D down out` of the upper track perforation 104. When 160 has moved down to clear ange 94 by a suitable distance, foot '228 moves down on support collar 224. Further downward movement of 162. and22t relative to the gate, then raises the gate, which is then suspended on carrier shaft 51)-, via 22S, 162 and 164 etc.

Those movements of the handle, the upper locking pin 160, and the gate, are illustrated in FIGS. -17. FIG. 15` shows the parts in the positions of FIG. 2, with the gate down resting on the floor rails, its lower locking pins engaging in the perforations of those rails, and with upper locking pin 161i in its upwardly projected position engaging a perforation in upper rail 52. Handle 184 is in its depending position where it is yieldingly locked as shown in FIGS. 9A and 11.

It is to be noted that the handle can be swung up in either direction from its depending position where it is completely housed within the gate structure between the two opposite gate faces. FIGS. 9- and l1 show the spacing, in the nature of a vertical slot, 236, at each face of the gate between housing 130 and channel 128, allowing manual access to handle 184 from either side of the gate and allowing the handle to be swung up in either direction. Thus, whichever face of the gate may be against a car wall, or against another gate, the handle may be swung up at the other gate face.

FIGS. 15-17 show the handle being swung up in one of 6 those directions; As the handle is swung from the posi'- tion of FIG. 15 to that of FIG. 16, the downward movef ment of the unit 174, and bars 164 and 162, moves upper locking pin 160 down to clear. flange 94 of upper track 52, and moves foot228 down onto support collar 224.

lIn this position the gatestill rests on the lower floor. railsy with its lower locking pins` still engaging those rails, as is shown for locking pin 140in FIG. 16. In that position upper locking, pin 160 has been withdrawn. fromv perforation 104 in upper` trackiiange 9.4,. and clears. that flange by a distance designatedv a in FIG. 16. That' clearancedistance ris'v greater than the distance, designated b inFIG. l6,.that the lower: locking pins, as 140, have to vbe raised-toV rise out ofthe lower track perforations and to clear the upper surfacesof-:thezlower floor tracks andv the car floor.

Further upwardiswinging of handle 184 toward vertical position,\.asindicated in FIG. 17, with foot 228` resting onl support collar 224, then raises the whole gate and withit'thelocking bar1612 and pin 160,to such a position.

as shown in FIG.` 1'7, with the lower flxedilocking pins, as 140, clearing the lower lloortracks, andiwith the upper` pin:v 160. still; clearing the perforated flange 94. of; upper track5'2;

In that position the. gate is supported solely on can rieti, shaft' 50. The carrier: shaft, calrying. the gate, may then bemovedlongitudinally offthe car; along the uppery andi` lower, walll tracksfto any desiredposition. And; inir any sucht positiona of the carrier shaft, the gate. may be` swung around the shaft' t'o lie against the car side wall, as in position: DfofFIG. 1'. The gatemay` then be lowered by returning handle 184r to its dependingiandlocked position of FIG. 15. If the gate isv still in transverse position` it willi then, be lockedf. as has'beenV described..

Onlowering they gateinposition D, its two fixed lower locking pins 140,1andfenter the longitudinal slot 113v of lower rail; Asv has been. remarked, the carrier shaft- 501 and: the; two lower locking pins 140 and 150 are located in one vertical plane-the central vertical plane of the gate. And, as comparison of FIGS. 12 and 13 (to the same. scale) will'show, the gate half-thickness, designated c in` FIG. 13, is less. than the lateral distance. fromv they center of rail slot 113 to the inner face 45 of side wall 44, and also less than the lateral distance from the slot center to the inner face 66 of rail 40. FIG. 18` also shows that directly. Consequently, the lower gate pins 140 and 150 can enter railV slot 113 when the gate is lowered in position D. The gate willl then be supported by its feet resting on the upper face of lower rail 40, and held from swinging; and, with its then inner face outward of rail face 66, the floor racks 58 may be thrown up against it. When handle 184 is finally thrown to its lower locked position with the gate in position D upper locking pin is again projected upwardly freely into the open, downwardly facing channel of upper track S2;

To lock the gate from movement longitudinally of the tracksin position D, twoother locking pins 240 are provided, as shown inr FIGS. 13, 14 and 18. These are mounted in the foot structure 142 which carriesthe bearing block 136 and the xed locking pin 140. Pins 240 are mountedv to slide vertically in 142, their downward projection below that foot member being limited to a projection approximately equal tothat of xed locking pin 140. As here shown, pins 242 limit that downward projection.

In the: transverse position of the gate, pins 2404 may ride the upper surface of rail 40, as shown in |FIGS. 13A and 1:4. In such a. position as that of D in FIG. 1., one or the other of pins 240, depending on the direction in which the, gate projects horizontally from carrier shaft 50 may drop into one of the spaced perforations 112 of rail 40. FIG. 18 illustrates that, with one of those pins, 240:1, dropping into a track perforation 112 and with fixed pin.140 riding in the track slot 113. That figure also shows how the then outer face A1 of the gate lies not outward of track 40, while the gate inner face A2 is outward of the inner face 66 of the track.

Raising the gate to free it from such a position as D involves the same raising operations as have been explained in connection with FIGS. -17. The gate may then be moved and swung to any desired transverse or other position. In any such selected position, lowering and locking the gate involves operation in reverse of the raising operations. The elevated gate, put in the desired transverse location, is then as shown in FIG. 17, with handle 184 up. On lowering the handle to the position of FIG. 16, the whole gate assembly is lowered, the gate then resting on the lower tracks with its lower locking pins in the lower track perforations.

Further lowering of handle 184 then projects upper locking pin 160 nally to its position of FIG. l5 with the pin engaging in the appropriate upper track perforation. Pin 160 is tapered, as shown in other views, so as to enter the perforation without having to be accurately alined with it. The upper end of locking bar 162 is shouldered at 163 at the base of pin 160. Supporting link 188 is adjusted at 194 to such length that, on final movement of handle 184 to the latched position of FIG. 15, shoulder 163 is forced up against the under face of track flange 94. Due to the fact that connecting pin 186 is then approaching dead center with relation to the axis of 174 and the extentsv of 164 and 188, shoulder 163 is easily forced up with considerable pressure on the track flange. With the handle then finally latched in its position of FIG. 15, the gate is securely locked down with all its locking pins fully engaged.

The gate can only be held in its raised position by manual force. In any position of handle 184 between the position of FIG. 16 and the ultimate position beyond that of FIG. 17, the handle must be held up to hold the gate up. In the ultimate gate raising position the handle comes up against the bracket 192 that supports the upper end of link 188, with the handle then in such a position as indicated in broken lines at 184a in FIG. 17. Hand-holds such as indicated at 250 in FIGS. l7 and 2, are located between the opposite faces of the gate in such positions that the handle may come up against or close to them. With the handle close to vertical in its upper position the weight of the gate is then easily supported by one-handed grasping of the handle and handhold, and the gate is then easily swung or moved. But the gate cannot be carelessly left in its raised position to swing freely and be liable to damage by car swaying, etc. If an operator releases the handle in any gate position, the gate will immediately drop to rest its lower edge or locking pins on the car oor if not into rail apertures, so that it then cannot swing freely. That automatic dropping action is insured by the fact that the handle in its upper position cannot reach the vertical, dead center, position with relation to the pivots at 174, 186 and 190.

The several tracks are conveniently made up of sections of convenient length, which may be secured together endwise in any suitable manner, as by the lugand-bolt connection 2.50 shown in FIG. 3. To accommodate variations of interior car lengths, the track apertures at their ends at the car end wall, or bunker wall, may be somewhat elongated, as is shown at 142a in FIG. 3, to allow a gate to be stored directly against the wall.

We claim:

l. In load-divider structure for goods containing compartments that are defined by a fioor and a side wall; the combination of rail means including upper and lower rail structures extending lengthwise adjacent the side wall in parallelism to the floor, a carrier shaft extending between and longitudinally translatable on said rail structures in vertical position, a vertically and horizontally extending gate structure having one vertical edge pivoted on said carrier shaft, said lower rail structure having a. longitudinal series of spaced recess formations and also alongitudinal upwardly opening slot, said carrier shaftY being cooperatively received at its lower end by said slot,- another series of spaced recess formations carried by the floor on a longitudinal line parallel to and laterally spaced from said lower rail structure, locking elements carried at the lower edge of the gate structure, one near its pivoted edge and another outwardly spaced from its pivoted edge, said locking elements adapted to enter respectively the first and second mentioned recess formations when the gate structure is in a transverse position, and said outwardly spaced locking element adapted to enter said .lower rail slot when the gate structure is in longitudinal position over said lower rail.

2. The combination defined in claim l and also including a third locking element carried at the lower edge of the gate and adapted to enter a lower rail recess when the gate is in longitudinal position over said lower rail.

3. In load-divider structure for goods containing cornpartments that are defined by a floor and a side wall; the combination of rail means including upper and lower rail structures extending lengthwise adjacent the side wall inparallelism to the floor and each embodying a longitudinally extending gear-rack formation, a vertically extending carrier shaft extending between the upper and lower rail structures, gears of equal pitch diameters fixedly mounted on the carrier shaft and held by the rail structures in meshing engagement, respectively, with the rack formations of the two rail structures, a vertically and horizontally extending gate structure having one vertical edge journalled on the carrier shaft to allow rotation of that shaft and vertical translative and swinging movements of the gate on and about said shaft, longitudinally spaced recess formations associated with the floor, a projection on the lower edge of the gate structure adapted to engage in said recess formations upon lowering of the gate structure, a locking bar mounted on the journalled edge of the gate structure for vertical movement thereon, a series of longitudinally spaced recess formations associated with said upper rail structure, a locking pin on the upper end of the locking bar adapted on upward projection to enter said recess formations, a manual operating handle mounted on the journalled edge of the gate for swinging movement in a plane normal to that of the gate, and connective means whereby swinging operation of said handle conjunctively causes vertical movement of the gate on said shaft and vertical movement of said locking bar and pin on the gate.

4. In load-divider structure for goods containing compartments that are defined by a floor and a side wall; the combination of rail means including upper and lower rail structures extending lengthwise adjacent the side wall in parallelism to the floor and each embodying a longitudinally extending gear-rack formation, a vertically extending carrier shaft extending between the upper and lower rail structures, gears of equal pitch diameters xedly mounted on the carrier shaft and held by the rail structures in meshing engagement, respectively, with the rack formations of the two rail structures, a vertically and horizontally extending gate structure having one vertical edge journalled on the carrier shaft to allow rotation of that shaft and vertical translative and swinging movements of the gate on and about said shaft, said upper and lower rail structures each having a series of longitudinally spaced recess formations and said lower rail structure having a longitudinally extending and upwardly open slot, there being a series of longitudinally spaced recesses associated with the floor on a line spaced from said lower rail structure, a pair of projections on the lower edge of the gate adapted to enter the recesses of the lower rail formation and of the floor upon lowering of the gate on said shaft with the gate in a transverse position, at least one of said projections being adapted to enter said lower rail slot upon lowering the gate in a longitudinal position over said lower rail, an upwardly projectible locking pin on the upper edge of the gate adapted to be projected up into the recesses of the upper rail structure, arid manually operable means carried by the gate structure adapted to cause vertical movement of the gate on said shaft and vertical movement of said locking pin on the gate.

5. The combination defined in claim 4 and also including a third projection on the lower edge of the gate adapted to enter the lower rail recesses upon-lowering the gate Ain said longitudinal position over said lower rail.A`

6. In load-divider structure for goods containing cornpartments that are defined by aI oor and a` side:y wall; the combination of rail means including upper and lower structures extending lengthwise adjacent the side wall in parallelism to the floor and each embodying a" longitudinally extending gear-rack formation, a vertically extending carrier shaft extending between the upper and lower rail structures, gears of equal pitch diameters fixedly mounted on the carrier shaft V and held by the rail structures in meshing engagement, respectively, with the rack formations of the two rail structures, a vertically and horizontally extending gate structure having one vertical edge journalled `on vthe carrier shaft to allow rotation of that shaft and vertical translative and swinging movements of the gate on and about said shaft, said lower rail structure having a series of longitudinally spaced recess formations and having a longitudinally extending and upwardly open slot, there being a series of longitudinally spaced recesses associated with the floor on a line spaced from said lower rail structure, a pair of projections on the lower edge of the gate adapted to enter the recesses of the lower rail formation and of the floor upon lowering of the gate on said shaft with the gate in a transverse position, at least one of said projections being adapted to enter said lower rail slot upon lowering the gate in a longitudinal position over said lower rail, and a third projection on the lower edge of the gate adapted to enter the lower rail recesses upon lowering the gate in said longitudinal position.

7. In load-divider structure for goods containing cornpartments that are defined by a floor and a side wall, the combination of rail means including upper and lower rail structures extending lengthwise `adjacent the side wall in parallelism to the floor and each embodying a longitudinally extending gear-rack formation, -a vertically extending carrier shaft extending between the upper and lower rail structures, gears of equal pitch diameters fixedly mounted on the carrier shaft and held by the rail structures in meshing engagement, respectively, with the rack formations of the two rail structures, a vertically and horizontally extending gate lstructure having one vertical edge journalled on the carrier shaft to allow rotation of that shaft and vertical translative and swinging movements of the gate on and about said shaft, a series of longitudinally spaced recess formations associated with the iioor, a projection on the lower edge of the gate structure adapted to enter said recess formations on lowering of the gate on said shaft, the upper rail formation having a series of longitudinally spaced recess formations, an upwardly projectible shouldered locking member mounted for vertical movement on the gate and adapted to enter said rail recesses with its shoulder in upward contact with said upper rail formation, and manually operable means carried by the gate adapted to cause vertical movement of the gate on said shaft and to force said locking member up in shouldered engagement with said upper rail formation to thus forcibly hold the gate down with its lower projection in a iioor recess formation.

8. ln load-divider structure for goods containing compartments that are defined by a Iiioor and a side wall; the combination of rail means including upper and lower rail structures extending lengthwise adjacent .the side wall in parallelism to the floor, a carrier shaft extending between and longitudinally translatable on said rail structures in vertical position, a vertically and horizontally extending gate stu'cture having one vertical edge pivoted on and vertically movable on saidV carrier shaft, longitudinally spaced'r'e'cess formation-s associated with the floor, a projection on the lower edge ofthe gate adapted to'engage in saidc recess formations upon lowering of the gate, and means carriedl by'thef gate and operable-to cause raising andI lowering of the fgate'ion said shaft', an upwardly projec'tible' locking pin mounted on the upper edge of the g'at'e,v said rail means having' aseries of longitudinally spaced recess formationsy adapted to be engaged by said locking' pinX when projected@ and means connecting said locking pin with the gate raising and lowering means and operating to project said locking pinin conjunction with lowering 'of the=gate- 9. In load-divider' structurev for goods containing oompartments that 'ar-'e definedl by a floor and a side wall; the combination of ra-il means including upper andlower rail s'truct-uresf extending lengthwise' adjacent the' sid'ewall in paralleli-sm tothe floor, la carrier stiaft` extending between' and longitudinally'translatable ony said rail structures in vertical position,y a vertically and horizontally extending gate structure having one? vertical edge pivoted on and vertically movable-on said carrier `sha-ft, said lower rail structure having a Aseries of longitudinally spaced recess formations and a longitudinally extending and upwardly open slot, there being a series of longitudinally spaced recess formations associated with the floor on a line spaced from the lower rail structure, a pair of projections on the lower edge of the gate adapted to enter the recesses of the lower rail formation and of the floor upon lowering of the gate on said shaft with the gate in a transverse position, at least one of said projections -bcing adapted to enter said lower rail slot upon lowering the gate in a longitudinal position over said lower rail, and a third projection on the lower edge of the gate adapted to enter the lower rail recesses upon lowering the gate in said longitudinal position over said lower rail.

l0. In load-divider structure for goods containing compartments that are defined by a floor and a side wall; the combination of rail means including upper and lower rail structures extending lengthwise adjacent the side wall in parallelism to the floor and each embodying a longitudinally extending gear-rack formation, a vertically extending carrier shaft extending between the upper and lower rail structures, gears of equal pitch diameters iixedly mounted on the carrier shaft and held laterally by the rail structures in meshing engagement, respectively, with the rack formations of the two rail structures, a vertically and horizontally extending gate structure having one vertical edge journalled on the carrier `shaft to allow rotation of that shaft and for swinging and vertical translative movement of the gate relative to the shaft, the shaft being vertically supported by said rail means, operable means for supporting and for raising and lowering the gate structure on the shaft, and means for releasably locking the gate structure against swinging movement about the shaft, said means embodying a longitudinal series of recess formations carried by the floor and a projection at the lower edge of the gate structure adapted to engage with the recess formation when the gate is lowered, said raising and lowering means being adapted to raise the gate structure to a position where its lower projection clears the oor and said recess formations to allow free swinging of the gate structure.

ll. The combination defined in claim l() in which said series of recess formations is located on a line laterally spaced from the lower rail structure, said lower rail structure also carrying a second longitudinal series of recess formations, and a second projection at the lower edge of the gate structure adapted to engage one of the last mentioned recess formations when the gate structure is lowered and adapted to clear said lower rail structure when the gate structure is raised.

l2. The combination defined in claim ll, and including 'a second longitudinal rail structure mounted on the fioor and laterally spaced from said lower rail structure, and in which said tirst mentioned recess formations are in said last mentioned, oor mounted, rail structure.

13. The combination defined in claim l0 and also including an upwardly projectible locking pin mounted on the upper edge of the gate structure, said upper rail formation having a series of longitudinally spaced recess formations adapted to be engaged by said locking pin when projected, and means connecting said locking pin with the gate raising and lowering means and operating to project said locking pin in conjunction with lowering of the gate structure.

14. The combination defined in claim 10, in which said lower rail structure is carried by the floor and has a series of longitudinally spaced recess formations and a longitudinally extending and upwardly opening slotand said tirst mentioned floor-carried series of recess `formations embodying a series of longitudinally spaced recesses on a longitudinal line laterally spaced from said lower rail formation, there being a second projection at the lower edge of the gate structure adapted to engage with the recess formations of the lower rail when the gate structure is lowered, and one of said projections adapted to enter said rail slot when the gate structure is lowered in longitudinal position over said lower rail.

l5. The combination defined in claim 14, and also including a third projection on the lower edge of the gate structure adapted to enter a lower rail recess upon lowering the gate structure in said longitudinal position over said lower rail.

16. 'I'he combination defined in claim l0, and in which said means for lowering and raising the gate includes a linkage embodying three pivotal connections and a manually operable lever, and means for limiting the gate raising movement of said linkage against reaching a stable position.

References Cited in the iile of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,155,463 Angell Apr. 25, 1939 2,360,029 Wieden Oct. 10, 1944 2,474,563 Wieden et al. June 28, 1949 2,517,823 Angell Aug. 8, 1950 2,674,207 Kerbaugh et al. Apr. 6, 1954 2,752,864 McDougal et al. July 3, 1956

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Referenced by
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US3144839 *Aug 14, 1962Aug 18, 1964Pacific Car & Foundry CoLading separator for railway cars and other vehicles
US3241502 *Aug 22, 1963Mar 22, 1966Preco IncLoad divider mechanism
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Classifications
U.S. Classification410/131, 410/134
International ClassificationB61D45/00
Cooperative ClassificationB61D45/001
European ClassificationB61D45/00B