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Publication numberUS3066425 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 4, 1962
Filing dateFeb 20, 1962
Priority dateFeb 20, 1962
Publication numberUS 3066425 A, US 3066425A, US-A-3066425, US3066425 A, US3066425A
InventorsKoley John J
Original AssigneeKoley John J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Shoe spike construction
US 3066425 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 4, 1962 J. J. KoLi-:Y 3,066,425

SHOE SPIKE CONSTRUCTION Filed Feb. 2o, 1962 Ffa; 6 2l 5| fr ll 'l' :1:: 5?/ 27 INVENTOIL h l x JOHN J. KOLEV .Y v BY 13 r6 MA. c/cmwf..

llnited States This invention relates to shoe spikes or calks of the type adapted for use on golf shoes, football shoes and the like.

Because of the relatively large amount of wear to which golf shoe spikes and the like are subjected, it has been customary to make such spikes replaceable. This is ordinarily accomplished by providing an internally threaded socket member that is iixedly secured to the sole of the shoe and an externally threaded base on the spike. Several disadvantages exist in this construction.

First, the fact that threads are relied on to retain the spike in the socket member results sometimes in the spikes backing out during use and being lost. More often the threads gall or stick to an extent that it is diflicult if not impossible to remove the worn spike.

Second, since the load on the spike is transferred to the sole of the shoe through the threads of the socket the twisting action that results from normal use of the shoe tends to loosen the securement of the socket to the sole so that the socket becomes detached from the sole. In such a case it is impossible to replace the old spike.

Third, the operation of replacing an old spike with a new one is time consuming and it is diilicult to achieve the desired degree of tightness.

The main object of this invention is to provide a shoe spike construction that overcomes the above noted disadvantages of present shoe spike construction.

Another object of the invention is the provision of a shoe spike construction which permits the load on the spike to be transferred directly to the sole of the shoe thereby obviating any twisting action on the socket member tending to loosen it as is the case when threads are relied on to make the connection between the spike and the socket.

Still another object of the invention is the provision of a shoe spike construction that permits more speedy replacement of the spikes than is possible with the threaded type of connection.

Yet another object of the invention is the provision of a shoe spike construction in which the socket is secured to the sole of the shoe in an extremely eifective maner so that there is no danger of the socket becoming loose and falling out thereby making it impossible to replace the spike.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will be apparent from the following specication and the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a perspective of a portion of a shoe showing several spikes and their associated sockets in accordance with the invention,

FIG. 2 is an exploded perspective showing the socket, the split washer and spike.

FIG. 3 is an enlarged sectional view of the invention assembled with the sole of a shoe and as taken along a plane indicated by lines 3 3 of FIG. 1.

FIG. 4 is a front elevation of a modified form of split washer.

FIG. 5 is an edge view of the washer of FIG. 4 showing the manner in which a portion thereof is offset from the plane of the washer.

FIG. 6 is a side elevation of a modified form of socket member partially broken away and in section to show internal structure and indicating schematically how the axially extending flange is bent to secure the socket to the sole of the shoe.

arent FIG. 7 is a sectional view similar to FIG. 3 but showing the socket of FIG. 6.

In detail, and rst with reference to FIG. l, the invention is adapted to be employed with a shoe generally designated 1 that includes a sole usually formed by an outer ply 2 and an inner ply 3.

The outer ply 2 is formed with a plurality of holes 4, (FIG. 3) therethrough each of which is adapte-d to receive therein a socket member generally designated lil of steel or the like and which includes a circular bottom wall 11 and cylindrical sidewalls 12 and which is open at its side opposite the bottom wall 11 to provide a recess into which the spike is received.

Adjacent the open outer side of the socket the same is provided with an annular flange 13 which is adapted to overlie the marginal portion of the outer ply 2 of the sole that is adjacent hole 4.

The inner cylindrical face 15 of the sidewalls 13 is provided with a radially inwardly opening groove 16 that is adapted to receive therein a resilient split ring generally designated 29 (FIG. 2) for the purpose of retaining the spike in the socket 10.

The spike, generally designated 21, includes an elongated frustoconical shank 22 and an enlarged circular base 23. The base 23 is slightly smaller in diameter than the cylindrical inner face 15 of sidewalls 12 of socket 10 so that said base may be received against the outwardly directed circular face 27 of bottom wall 11. At this point it will be noted that any load on spike 21 will be transferred to the sole of the shoe through bottom wall 1l so that there is no portion of the assembly that might tend to become overstressed.

The resilient split ring 2t) is somewhat similar to split ring 30 of FIG. 4 which includes a generally annular body portion and a pair of adjacent but spaced apart terminal portions 31, 32 that are somewhat enlarged in width compared to the remainder of the ring and provided with holes 33, 34 respectively. By means of a tool (not shown), resembling a pair of pliers having extensions adapted to be received in holes 33, 34, the diametral extent of ring 30 may be compressed to permit the same to be passed through the open side of socket 1t) and received in groove 16. The normal diametral extent of ring 30 is sufficiently great to retain the ring in groove 16 without any danger of it falling out.

Resilient split rings of a type shown in the drawings at 20, 3h are commercially available and one type is known by the trademark Truarc No claim is made herein to such a resilient split ring except in combination with the other elements of the invention and except to the extent that the same is modified for special application to the invention in a manner to be subsequently described.

Referring again to FIG. 2 the resilient split ring 2t) is received in groove 16 formed in the sidewalls 12 of socket 10 (FIG. 3) so as to retain the base 23 of the spike 21. within the socket 19.

The width of groove 16 is preferably somewhat greater than the thickness of the material from which the split ring 2t) is made to permit the split ring 2) to readily snap into the groove 16. However, it is desirable that the spike 21 be retained in the socket 11B so that there is no shifting of the spike relative thereto. To this end the retainer ring 2d is preferably formed to provide a portion 49 (FIG. 2) that is oiset from the plane of the remainder of the ring so that the total thickness of the ring is greater than the width of groove 16. By this structure a slight axially inwardly directed force on ring 29 as the same is being inserted causes the ring to be compressed axially as well as radially so that when it is received in groove 16 the base 23 of spike 21 is yieldably urged against face 27 of bottom wall 11 of socket member 10, thereby preventing rattling of the spike in the socket and insuring that the base 23 of spike 21 is rmly engaged against said bottom wall.

When it is desired to remove the spike from the socket it is merely necessary to compress the ring 20 radially by means of the aforementioned tool and withdraw it. The spike 21 is then free to fall out of the socket.

The above described structure of the socket member 10 lends itself to rigid securement to the sole of the shoe. One method of eectin'g such securement is shown in FIG. 3 wherein a thin steel plate 42 is interposed between the outer and inner plies 2, 3 of the sole of the shoe. The bottom wall 11 of the socket member 10 may then be spot welded as indicated at A43 to the plate 42 as the sole is being assembled. Y

Another method of securement of the socket member is shown in FIGS. 6, 7 wherein the socket member 50, similar to socket member 10 in all other respects, is provided with a skirt portion 51 in continuation of sidewalls 12. Said skirt portion is adapted to be swaged over the inner side of the outer ply 2 of the sole of the shoe to provide an annular flange 52 (FIG. 7) which, at assembly, is interposed between the outer and inner plies 2, 3 of the sole of the shoe. Even if the skirt portion 51 splits as it is swaged over onto outer ply 2 the strength of the connection is not affected to any great degree.

The form of resilient split washer 30 of FIG. 4 is slightly different from Washer 20 (FIG. 2) in that the spaced end portions 31, 32 are coplanar with the portion of the Washer that is diametrally opposite, and the two intermediate portions 37, 38 are oiTset as indicated in FIG. 5. The resilient split ring of FIG. 4 is axially compressible in like manner as ring 20 of FIG. 2 and functions in a similar manner to hold base 23 of the spike against bottom wall 11. However the construction of FIG. 2 is preferred in that the spaced end portions 35, 36 which are provided with the tool receiving openings are, at assembly, spaced from the base 23 of the spike so that any dirt that is received in the small openings in the ring may be pushed through by the tool into the space between the ring and the base 11 of spike 21.

It will be understood that the thickness of base 23 of spike 21 is slightly greater than the distance between the groove 16 and the outwardly directed face 27 of bottom wall 11 so that the resilient split ring engages the base and not the inner side of the groove.

I claim:

1. In a removable spike construction for shoes:

a socket member provided with an outwardly opening recess adapted to receive the base of a spike therein, means for Iixedly securing said member to the sole of a shoe,

a spike formed with an elongated shank and an enlarged base at one end thereof,

the recess in said socket member being formed with a bottom wall adapted to receive the base of said spike thereon for transferring the load on said spike to said sole through said bottom wall,

said socket member being formed with a radially inwardly opening groove intermediate said bottom wall and the open side of said recess, and

a resilient split vwasher received in said groove for hold# ing said base in said recess,

said washer being radially compressible against its own resiliency to permit removal and insertion of the same through the open end of said member.

2. A device according to claim l wherein said securing means comprises an inner ply of metal above said sole and said socket is secured to said metal ply.

3. A device according to claim l wherein said securing means comprises an inner ply of metal above said sole and said socket is secured to said metal ply by welding.

4. A device according to claim 1 wherein said securing means comprises a radial outwardly extending ange on said socket projecting over said sole.

5. A device according to claim l wherein said split washer is formed to provide a portion offset from the plane of said washer to increase the etective thickness of said washer for yieldably urging said base against said bottom wall when said washer is in said groove.

6. In a removable spike construction for the sole of a shoe,

a socket member formed with a circular open side, a circular bottom wall opposite said open side, and a cylindrical sidewall connecting said bottom wall and open side to form an outwardly opening recess in said member,

means for xedly securing said socket member to saidl sole with said open side substantially ush with the outer Walking surface of said sole,

a spike formed with an elongated shank and an enlarged base at one end thereof,

said base being formed generally complementary to said bottom Wall whereby said base may be passed through said open side and received against said bottom wall for transferring the load in said spike to said sole through said bottom wall,

said sidewall being formed with a radially inwardly opening annular groove intermediate said opposite sides,

a split washer having a greater diametral extent than said circular open side and received in said groove for holding said base in said recess,

said washer being radially compressible against its own resiliency to permit removal and insertion of the same through said open end.

7. A device according to claim 6 wherein the base of said spike is thicker than the depth of the portion of said recess between said groove and said bottom wall, and said washer is provided with a portion offset from the plane of said washer to increase the effective thickness of said washer whereby said washer is compressed axially when inserted into said groove to hold said base against said bottom wall by the resiliency of said washer.

References Cited in the tile of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,658,050 Karlson et al Feb. 7, 1928 2,207,476 Bernstein July 9, 1940 2,421,072 Kramer May 27, 1947 2,607,134 Langer Aug. 19, 1952

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1658050 *Nov 12, 1926Feb 7, 1928Spalding & Bros AgCleat for sport shoes
US2207476 *Jun 1, 1938Jul 9, 1940Joseph R BernsteinShoe stud
US2421072 *Jun 28, 1946May 27, 1947Daniel KramerRemovable spike for golf shoes
US2607134 *May 27, 1949Aug 19, 1952Claude HarmonCalk for footwear
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3133363 *Dec 10, 1962May 19, 1964Howard Robert CReceptacle for athletic shoe cleat or spike
US3577663 *Aug 11, 1969May 4, 1971Mershon Howard BruceAthletic shoe and cleat
US3977096 *Nov 11, 1975Aug 31, 1976Murray John CAthletic shoe
US4445288 *Mar 23, 1982May 1, 1984Froer WernerSport shoe with a studded sole
US5932336 *Apr 18, 1997Aug 3, 1999Acushnet CompanyShoe sole
US5940993 *Feb 26, 1998Aug 24, 1999Ronci; Fernando F.Golf cleat
US5987783 *Jun 5, 1995Nov 23, 1999Acushnet CompanyGolf shoe having spike socket spine system
EP0061715A2 *Mar 24, 1982Oct 6, 1982Werner FrörSports shoe with a sole provided with cleats
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/127, 36/59.00R, 36/67.00D
International ClassificationA43C15/00, A43C15/16
Cooperative ClassificationA43C15/161
European ClassificationA43C15/16A