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Publication numberUS3066928 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 4, 1962
Filing dateOct 28, 1958
Priority dateOct 28, 1958
Publication numberUS 3066928 A, US 3066928A, US-A-3066928, US3066928 A, US3066928A
InventorsKenneth B Lawrence, Jr Joseph A V Turck
Original AssigneeReeves Bros Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Resilient cushion structure
US 3066928 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 4, 1962 K. B. LAWRENCE ETAL RESILIENT CUSHION STRUCTURE 2 Sheets-Sheet l Filed Oct. 28, 1958 n. m, m

INVENTOR. KENNETH 5. .LAWRENCE JSEPH Ay TURCK, JR.

AGENT Dec. 4, 1962 K. B. LAWRENCE ETAL 3,066,928

RESILIENT CUSHION STRUCTURE Filed Oct. 28, 1958 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INV ENT OR. KENNETH B. LAWRENCE JOSEPH A.l/. TURCK, Jl?.

BY ADW P WQZZW- AGENT Patented Dec. 4l, 1962 free 3,066,928 RESlLlENT CUSHION STRUCTURE Kenneth E. Lawrence, Philipsburg, and Joseph A. V.

Torch, Jr., Clearfield, Pa., assignors, by mesne assignments, to Reeves Brothers, Inc., New York, N.Y., a

corporation of New York Filed Oct. 28, 1958, Ser. No. 770,105 8 Claims. (Cl. 267-1) This invention relates to resilient cushion structures such as seat cushions, mattresses, pillows, and the like, which may :be formed of foamed organic polymer material, preferably `foamed polyurethane, but also including other foamed plastics, foam rubber, and similar materials.

When such material is used in a solid piece as a comfort cushion, it lacks sumcient initial or touch softness, that is, the rate of change of the deliection under moderate load is less than under heavier loads. Hence it is desirable to provide a cushion structure of such designs as to overcome this diiculty. The material is also deficient -in breathing qualities, that is, it is insufliciently permeable to air, owing to the fact that passage of air through the tortuous channels of the foanied polymer is necessarily slow.

It is therefore `an object of this invention to provide a cushion structure formed of foamed organic polymer having increased softness.

It is a `further object to provide a cushion structure of foamed organic polymer having an internal air reservoir.

It is another object to provide such a cushion structure having walls with relatively thin portions between the exterior surface and an internal air reservoir.

A still further object of this invention is to provide a cushion struc-ture having an internal air reservoir with means for re-expanding the reservoir after compression.

Yet another object of the invention is to provide a cushion structure having a pumping action for ventilating and cooling.

These objects and others ancillary thereto will lbe `better understood on reading the following specification, taken in conjuction with the drawings, in which like numerals are used for like elements, and in which:

FIGURE l is a perspective view, partially cut away, of one embodiment of the invention;

FIGURE 2 is a fragmentary cross-section in elevation of an embodiment similar to that of FIGURE l;

FIGURE 3 is .a diagram showing one orientation of the corrugations of the cushion structures;

FIGURE 4 is a perspective view, partially cut away, of another embodiment of the invention;

FIGURE 5 is a fragmentary cross-section in e-levation of the embodiment of FGURE 4; and

FIGURE 6 is a cross-section similar to FIGURE 5 of a slightly modified embodiment.

Referring more particularly to FlGURE l, there is shown a cushion structure il formed of five elements -to give maximum softness. yFor convenience of illustration the structure is shown as rectangular in shape, although it may equally well be of any other desired configuration. Two similar external layers l2 and i3 of foamed organic polymer are formed with ra plurality of resilient zigzag corrugations ld on the inner face of each layer. Positioned between the external layers is a central core layer 16 having corrugations: idr: on both sides; the corrugations of the core may have the crests on one side staggered with the troughs of the corrugations on lthe other side, as shown in FIGURE l, or they may have their crests opposed, as shown in FIGURE 2. The core layer is spaced apart from external layer l2 by a relatively thin, flat first stabilizer sheet l7, and from external layer i3 by a second stabilizer sheet i8.

The crests of the corrugations i4 and 14a on all layers are joined `to adjacent elements by any suitable adhesive 19, or by self-adhesion produced by hea-ting the material at the juncture. The external layers l2 and 13 are greater in area than any of the inner elements, and each external layer has had the corrugations removed from the inner `face around the periphery thereof to provide a peripheral hat surface. These peripheral hat surfaces are inturned and their edges joined together in a seam 21, leaving a peripheral air channel 22 surrounding the inner elements. In lassembling the cushion structure the corrugations 14 of the external layers may be oriented congruent with corrugations 14a of the core, or they may be displaced half `a wavelength, as schematically illustrated in FIGURE 3,

The resulting product provides a cushion structure having air channels between adjacent corrugations, all such channels Ibeing interconnected by the peripheral channel 22 to forman internal air reservoir. This structure gives greater resiliency and softness than a solid block of the foamed material, owing to the fact that the corrugations are more easily eoinpressible, and to the partial compression of air in .the reservoir of interconnected yair spaces. When weight is removed the cushion lstructure restores itself to its original sha-pe more rapidly than the solid material, since the compressed corrugations immediately expand and thereby restore the air reservoir to its original capacity. Breathing characteristics are improved by having only the relatively thin web of material at the troughs of the corrugations separating the exterior surfaces from the inner air reservoir, which allows fresh air 4to be drawn in on recovery from compression. The internal air channels provide a pumping action yfor cooling and ventilation.

FIGURE 2 shows `an embodiment differing from that of FIGURE l only in havinU corrugations 14a on opposite sides of core i6 disposed with their crests directly opposed, rather than staggered as in FIGURE l.

FIGURE 4 shows another embodiment 23 of the invention, where some degree of `softness may be dispensed with in favor of simpler construction, and Where a stiffer edge is desired. in this embodiment there is provided a ylayer 24 having zigzag corrugations i4 on its inner face, and a second layer 2.5 of dat material of like area abutting the corrugations and adhered thereto at it). The crests of the corrugations are removed around the periphery of layer 24 to a depth sufficient for the insertion of reinforcing strip Z7 to give a solider edge to the cushion structure. ln this embodiment the edges may be left raw, or maybe finished olf with a strip of trim 2d covering the edges around the entire periphery, as shown. All elements are adhered together at t9 by any suitable adhesive or by self-adhesion.

FIGURE 5 shows a cross-section in elevati-on of a portion of the embodiment of FIGURE 4. It will be observed that in layer 24 the eorrugations are of surbn 4, stantially the same height as the thickness of web between corrugations, and that layer 26 is thicker (some what exaggerated in the drawing) than the web thickness of layer 24. Owing to the small area of Contact between the crests of the corrugations and layer 26, if -it were no thicker than the web of layer 24 the outer surface of layer y26 would in time show the conforma- Ition of the internal corrugations; makinfy it somewhat thicker therefore preserves its smooth outer surface.

FIGURE 6 shows an embodiment of the same general form as that of FIGURES 4 and 5, the only differences being that both the fiat and the corrugated layers have been tapered in thickness at the edge in order to reduce the edge thickness of the cushion structure as a unit, and a narrower trim strip is used. In FIGURE 6 the altered elements have been given numerals having the amx a to distinguish them from the similar elements of FIGURES 4 and 5.

It will be understood that this invention is not limited to the specific details of construction and arrangement herein shown and described, and that various modifications may tbe made without departing from the spirit of the invention. It is intended to cover all Such modifications in the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

l. A resilient cushion structure comprising in combination a central core formed of foarned organic polymer material and having a plurality of resilient corrugations of generally sinusoidal cross-section extending from pposite sides thereof and across the surface of each side, a first flat stabilizer sheet formed of foamed organic polymer and adhered to the crests of said corrugations on one side of said core, a second fiat stabilizer sheet formed of foarned organic polymer and adhered to the crests of said corrugations on the opposite side of said core, a first external layer formed of foamed organic polymer and having a plurality of resilient corrugations of generally sinusoidal crossfsection extending vertically from one side and horizontally across the surface thereof, the crests of said corrugations on said first layer being adhered to said first stabilizer sheet on the side opposite to said core, a second external layer formed of foarned organic polymer and having a plurality of resilient corrugations of generally sinusoidal cross-section extending vertically from one side and horizontally across the surface thereof, the crests of said corrugations on said second layer being adhered to said second stabilizer sheet on the side opposite to Said core, the edges of said first and second layers being adhered in a peripheral seam and defining a peripheral channel.

2. A resilient cushion structure as defined in claim l, wherein said foarned organic polymer material is foamed polyurethane.

3. A resilient cushion structure comprising in combination a central core formed of foamed organic polymer material and having a plurality of resilient zigzag corrugations of generally sinusoidal cross-section extending from opposite sides thereof, a first fiat stabilizer sheet formed of foarned organic polymer and adhered to the crests of said corrugations on one side of said core, a second fiat stabilizer sheet formed of foarned organic polymer and adhered to the crests of said corrugations on the opposite side of said core, a first external layer formed of foamed organic polymer and having a plurality of resilient zigzag corrugations of generally sinusoidal crosssection extending from one side thereof, the crests of said corrugations on said first la 'er being adhered to said first stabilizer sheet on the side opposite to said core and displaced one-half wavelength from the corrugations of said core, a second external layer formed of foamed organic polymer and having a plurality of resilient zigzag corrugations of generally sinusoidal cross-section extending from one side thereof, the crests of said corrugations on said second layer being adhered to said second stabilizer sheet on the side opposite to said core and displaced one d. half wavelength from the corrugations of said core, the edges of said first and second layers being adhered in a peripheral seam and defining a peripheral channel.

4. A resilient cushion structure as defined in claim 3, wherein said foarned organic polymer material is foamed polyurethane.

5. A resilient cushion structure comprising in combination a central core formed of foamed organic polymer material and having a plurality of resilient corrugations of generally sinusoidal cross-section extending from opposite sides thereof and across the broad extent of each surface, a first flat stabilizer sheet formed of foamed on ganic polymer adhered to the crests of said corrugations on one side of said core and defining therewith a first plurality of air spaces between said corrugations, a second fiat stabilizer sheet formed of foamed organic polymer and adhered to the crests of said corrugations on the opposite side of said core and defining therewith a second plurality of air spaces between said corrugations, a first external layer formed of foamed organic polymer and having a plurality of resilient corrugations of generally sinusoidal cross-section extending from one face thereof and across the broad extent of its surface and having a peripheral fiat area on said corrugated face surrounding said corrugations, the crests of said corrugations on said first layer being adhered to said first stabilizer sheet 0n the side opposite to said core and defining with said first sheet a third plurality of air spaces between said corrugations, a second external layer formed of foamed organic' polymer and having a plurality of resilient corrugations of generally sinusoidal cross-section extending from one face thereof and across the broad extent of its surface and havingra peripheral flat area on said corrugated face surrounding said corrugations, the crests of said corrugations on said second layer being adhered to said second stabilizer sheet on the side opposite to said core and dei fining with said second sheet a fourth plurality of air spaces between said corrugations, said fiat areas of said first and second layers having their edges adhered together and defining a peripheral channel interconnecting said first, second, third, and fourth pluralities of air spaces.

6. A resilient cushion structure as recited in claim 5, wherein said foamed organic polymer material is foarned polyurethane.

7. A resilient cushion structure comprising in combination a first external ,layer formed of foarned organic polymer and having a plurality of resilient corrugations of generally sinusoidal cross-section extending from one face thereof and having a peripheral fiat area on said corrugated face surrounding said corrugations, a stabilizer sheet formed of foamed organic polymer and adhered to the crests of said corrugations on said first layer and defining a first plurality of air spaces between said corrugations, a second external layer formed of foamed organic polymer and having a plurality of resilient corrugations of generally sinusoidal cross-section extending from one face thereof and having a peripheral flat area on said corrugated face surrounding said corrugations, the crests of the corrugations on said second layer being adhered to said stabilizer sheet and defining a second plurality of air spaces between said corrugations, said flat areas of said first and second layers having their edges adhered together and defining a peripheral channel interconnecting said rst and second pluralities of air spaces.

8. A resilient cushion structure comprising in combination a first layer formed of foamed organic polymer and having a plurality of zigzag resilient elongated corrugations of generally sinusoidal cross-section extending from one face and across the surface thereof, a stabilizer sheet of foamed organic polymer having one surface adhered to the crests of said corrugations throughout their lengths and defining a first plurality of air spaces between said corrugations, a second layer formed of foamed organic polymer and having a plurality of zigzag resilient elongated corrugations of generally sinusoidal cross-section extending from one face and across the surface there of, the crests of the corrugations on said second layer being adhered throughout their lengths to the other surface of said stabilizer sheet and defining a second plurality of air spaces between said corrugations, the peripheral edges or" said rst and second layers being joined together and forming a peripheral channel interconnecting said rst and second pluralities of air spaces.

2,619,659 Futterknecht Dec. 2, 1952 6 McGregor et a1 Mar. 19, Pedrocchi Apr. 9, Dahle May 27,

FOREGN PATENTS France July 8, France Dec. 16, France Feb. 7, France Sept. 15, France Apr. 13, Great Britain Aug. 13, Great Britain Nov. 5,

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4323231 *Nov 7, 1980Apr 6, 1982Jump For Joy Ltd.Jumping board
US4799275 *Dec 7, 1987Jan 24, 1989Sprague Jr William BShock-absorbing pillow
US4975996 *Oct 3, 1989Dec 11, 1990Evans Alan GMattress
US5138730 *May 6, 1989Aug 18, 1992Nihonkenkozoshinkenkyukai Co., Ltd.Mattress having core material between protective plates
US20110016635 *Jul 21, 2010Jan 27, 2011Nook Sleep Systems LLC.Systems, components and related methods
DE2935438A1 *Sep 1, 1979Mar 20, 1980Poly Saks ApsEine matratze oder ein polster aus schaumstoff
EP0519322A1 *Jun 11, 1992Dec 23, 1992Siegfried Dipl.-Ing. HeerklotzFlat upholstered article, in particular a mattress
EP0734669A1 *Feb 22, 1996Oct 2, 1996Recticel LimitedA foam cushion
EP2353453A1 *Jan 14, 2011Aug 10, 2011Breckle GmbH MatratzenfabrikFoamed mattress base
Classifications
U.S. Classification267/145, 297/DIG.100, 5/652.1
International ClassificationB32B27/00, A47C27/15
Cooperative ClassificationA47C27/144, B32B27/00, Y10S297/01, A47C27/15, A47C27/16
European ClassificationA47C27/14C2, A47C27/16, A47C27/15, B32B27/00