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Publication numberUS3067301 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 4, 1962
Filing dateFeb 26, 1960
Priority dateFeb 26, 1960
Publication numberUS 3067301 A, US 3067301A, US-A-3067301, US3067301 A, US3067301A
InventorsMititaka Yamamoto
Original AssigneeMititaka Yamamoto
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Tumbler switches
US 3067301 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 4, 1962 MITITAKA YAMAMOTO TUMBLER SWITCHES Fiied Feb. 26. 1960 INVENTOR Mititaka Yamamoto W TTRNEY United States Patent O 3,067,301 TUMBLER SWTCHES Mititaka Yamanoto, 17 Gotandacho, Ryuanji, Ukyoku, Kyoto, Japan Filed Feb. 26, 1960, Ser. No. 11,211 3 Claims. (Cl. 200-67) This invention relates to tumbler switches of small, compact precision type.

The Object of the invention includes the provision of an improved compact electric snap switch which is simple and economical in construction, easily assembled, and reliable and precise in operation. This type of switch operates in response to slight motion and pressure.

The invention will be better understood as reference is made in the following description to the accompanying drawings, in which FIG. 1 is a side view of the thin leaf spring constituting the snap member of the tumbler switches according to this invention,

FIG. 2. is a plan view of the same,

FIG. 3 is a sectional view of the tumbler switch,

FIG. 4 is a sectional view of a modification, and

FIG. 5 is a side view of the other modification.

The snap member 1 employed in the tumbler switches according to this invention consists of a thin leaf spring, a portion (BC) thereof being bent at an obtuse angle (O) to the remaining portion (AB) and compressed to a bow shape (BEC) to store up the energy to snap. A movable double faced contact 9 is attached to the unbent portion (AB).

In the tumbler switch shown in FIG. 3, 2 is a case of molded, arc resisting, insulating material, 6 is a swing piece of insulating material pivoted at 7 within the opening 5 formed in the case 2, 1 is a snap member as shown in FIGS. `1 -and 2, one end of which being fixed to a terminal 26 while the other end of the bow shaped portion is disposed in a recess 8 formed in the inner side of the swing piece 6. 10 and \11 are station-ary contacts arranged to cooperate with the movable contact 9 attached to the leaf spring 1.

The operation of this tumbler switch is as follows: In the drawing, the movable contact 9 is shown in contact with the stationary contact 11 and the swing piece 6 inclined to the right. DoWnwar-d pressure is now exerted on the left side of the swing piece 6 and pivotal movement of the swing piece 6 causes the increase of the compression as well as an increase in the curvature of the bow shaped portion of the leaf spring until the leaf spring snaps suddenly from the position shown in full line to the dotted line position whereby the movable contact 9 is brought into contact with the other stationary contact 10.

The swing of the piece 6 is limited by shoulders 3 and 4 formed in the case 2.

As is well understood, the snap member 1 is simple but very Sensitive to respond to slight motion and pressure. Further, electric current flows through only the portion between the end (A) and the movable contact 9 but not through the bow shaped portion whereby the delicate curved portion of the leaf spring is effectively kept from the effect of the heat generated by electricity. Due to the arrangement of the spring 'member 1, the curvature in the area between B and C never reverses "ice itself, but always curves in the same direction. As a result, a loss of springiness does not occur to the extent which takes place With curved Springs often used in switches and with which a reversal of curvature occurs during movement of the spring from one position to the other. Moreover, the range of movement of the described spring member is relatively small and as a result a switch incorporating the present improvements can be made much smaller than can many of the switches in which Springs that require a reversal of curvature are used.

-In a modification shown in FIG. 4, the housing has a body *12 and a cover 13 seated over the body. Through said cover, two reciprocating plungers 14 and `15 are inserted, each of said plungers abutting on each side of the swing piece 16 pivoted at 17 within the body. The base of the swing piece 16 is provided with an anchor 18 which engages with the end of the bow shaped portion of the leaf spring 1. The function of this tumbler switch will be self-evident; i.e. by depressing the plungers 14 and 15 alternately, the movable contact 9 will be brought into contact in turn with the stationary contacts lt) or 11.

In the other modification shown in FIG. 5, a swing piece 20 of a T-form is pivoted at 22 in the case 19. At the inner end of the T piece 20, an anchor 23 and an L-shaped piece 24 are fixed. The anchor 23 engages l the end of the bow shaped portion of the leaf spring 1 while the L-shaped piece 24 abuts on a himetal 25.

The function of this tumbler switch is as follows: By temperature rise, the himetal 25 will warp to the left whereby the piece 20 is forced to swing to the right causing the leaf spring to snap.

Not only is this tumbler switch operated thermally as mentioned above, but also it can be operated manually.

Having thus described the invention, what is claimed as new is:

1. Tumbler switch comprising a case, a swing piece pivoted to the case, two reciproc-ating plungers inserted through the cover of said case, the lower ends of said plungers abutting on the sides of a swing piece, a snap member consisting of a thin leaf spring, a portion thereof being bent at an obtuse angle to the remaining part and compressed .to a bow shape and always remaining bowed in the same direction, the end of said compressed portion being engaged by an anchor fixed at the inner surface of the swing piece, the engagement of the end of the compressed portion With said anchor tending to maintain the bow shaped part under compression and in such bow shape and stationary contacts to cooperate with the novable contacts carried by the snap member.

2. Tumbler switch comprising a case of insulating material, a swing piece pivoted to the case, a snap member consisting of a thin leaf spring, a portion thereof being bent at an obtuse angle to the remaining part and compressed to a bow shape, an anchor fixed to the swing piece to engage with the end of the bow shaped portion of the leaf spring, the engagement of the end of the compressed portion with said anchor tending to maintain the bow shaped part under compression and in such bow shape, and an L-shaped piece fixed also to the swing piece on -a himetal strip within the case, said L- shaped piece abutting against the himetal strip, and stationary contacts arranged to cooperate with the movable contact carried by the leaf spring.

3. A tumbler switch comprising, a case composed of insulating material, a swing piece pivoted to the case, a snap member consisting of a thin leaf spring, a portion thereof being bent at an obtuse angle to the remainder of the spring, and being in a compressed boW shape and always remaining bowed in the same direction, one end of said compressed bow shaped portion being engaged by the swing piece and the other end of said bow shaped portion being fixed to the case, spaced stationary contacts, and movable contacts attached to the straight and unbowed portion of the spring and adapte-d for contact With one or the other of the spaced contacts.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Klein Aug. 21, 1906 Klein Oct. 10, 1922 Thomas May 3, 1932 Arnold Oct. 10, 1933 Sargrove July 5, 1949 Green Nov. 13, 195 1 Xenakis Oct. 8, 1957 Edwards July 8, 1958 Nelson Feb. 2, 1960

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US829162 *Aug 6, 1904Aug 21, 1906Ralph A SchoenbergCircuit maker and breaker.
US1431235 *Feb 14, 1917Oct 10, 1922Cutler Hammer Mfg CoElectric switch
US1856600 *Mar 26, 1927May 3, 1932Thomas Adolph AThermostat
US1929545 *Sep 21, 1932Oct 10, 1933Harold A ArnoldSnap switch and actuator
US2474988 *Aug 16, 1944Jul 5, 1949Sargrove John AdolphMethod of manufacturing electrical network circuits
US2574869 *Dec 9, 1948Nov 13, 1951Pye LtdSwitch
US2809261 *Apr 3, 1956Oct 8, 1957Xenakis James JMomentary contact switch
US2842632 *Nov 30, 1956Jul 8, 1958Edwards William RMiniature snap switch
US2923787 *Apr 4, 1957Feb 2, 1960Nelson Oscar LSwitches
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3277257 *Aug 28, 1963Oct 4, 1966Benjamin DoktorColumn-spring type snap-action electrical switch
US3983349 *May 2, 1974Sep 28, 1976General Electric CompanyElectrical switch
US4190751 *Oct 21, 1976Feb 26, 1980Roth Jac MElectrical contact switch with an extremely small actuating movement
US4300025 *Dec 10, 1979Nov 10, 1981General Electric CompanyRefrigerator door switch
US4322700 *Dec 21, 1979Mar 30, 1982Bell Telephone Laboratories, IncorporatedElectrical relay apparatus
US4496802 *Apr 15, 1983Jan 29, 1985Amp IncorporatedSingle in-line package switch
US4504712 *Nov 7, 1983Mar 12, 1985Carlingswitch, Inc.Plunger switch with pivoted actuator
US4599497 *Nov 30, 1984Jul 8, 1986Amp IncorporatedSingle and dual in-line package switch
US4612422 *Nov 15, 1984Sep 16, 1986Amp IncorporatedSingle in-line package switch
DE1229615B *Mar 28, 1963Dec 1, 1966Marquardt J & JElektrischer Schnappschalter
DE3035781A1 *Sep 23, 1980May 7, 1981Itt Ind Gmbh DeutscheElektrischer schnappschalter
EP0638916A1 *Jul 28, 1994Feb 15, 1995BITRON S.p.A.A quick tripping switch for controlling an electric device
Classifications
U.S. Classification200/451
International ClassificationH01H13/26, H01H13/38, H01H23/20, H01H23/00
Cooperative ClassificationH01H23/20, H01H13/38
European ClassificationH01H13/38, H01H23/20