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Publication numberUS3067813 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 11, 1962
Filing dateJun 19, 1953
Priority dateJun 19, 1953
Publication numberUS 3067813 A, US 3067813A, US-A-3067813, US3067813 A, US3067813A
InventorsReynold Henatsch
Original AssigneeReynold Henatsch
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Sidewalk canopy
US 3067813 A
Images(5)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 11, 1962 R. HENATSCH SIDEWALK CANOPY 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed June 19, 1953 INVENTOR.

REYNOLD HENATSCH Dec. 1 1, 1962 R. HENATSCH SIDEWALK CANOPY 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed June 19, 1953 &

Nh/ Mm INVENTOR.

REYNO D HENATSCH Dec. 11, 1962 R. HENATSCH SIDEWALK CANOPY 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed June 19, 1953 INVENTOR.

'REYNOLD HENATSCH BY 04/ Dec. 11, 1962 R. HENATSCH SIDEWALK CANOPY 5 sheets-sheet 4 Filed June 19, 1955 INVENTOR.

REYNOLD HENATSCH Dec. 11, 1962 R. HENATSCH SIDEWALK CANOPY 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed June 19, 1953 +2 ob E NNQE INVENTOR.

REYNOLD HENATSCH have it stored in some remote place.

Ti assists Patented Dec. 11, 1962 3,067,823 SIDEWALK CANGPY Reynold Henatsch, 301' 'E. 61st St, New York, NIY. Filed June 19, 1953, Ser. No. 362,783 11 Claims. (Cl. 16tl3 2) This invention relates to sidewalk canopies for buildings and has for its principal object the provision of a novel canopy which can be quickly retracted into a storage opening in a frame or housing located above the door opening and which can also be quickly moved to extended position for use during inclement weather.

Among the many novel features of the present invention, in its several embodiments illustrated herein, there are two basic features, which depart completely from the prior art, namely, in providing means for storing the canopy in an area directly over the building entrance, and a structure for ejecting and retracting the complete canopy unit directly from and into this area by means of a movable beam of cantilever-like construction.

Many of the better restaurants, apartment buildings and other structures are provided with canopies for the convenience of the patrons and tenants during periods of rain and snow but local ordinances in most cities require these canopies to be folded back or completely removed when the weather is fair, with appropriate fines for violations.

As a result, unless the owner is willing to risk the penalty for non-compliance with the law, he is required to dismantle the entire canopy, including the framework, and This requires the efforts of several workmen, with resulting commotion and inconvenience at the entrance. If the canopies are left out the year round, they become mis-shapen, faded, dirty and torn, detracting from the appearance of the building and becoming a fire hazard in dry weather.

An important object of the present invention is to provide an improved canopy which can be wholly retracted into the building in a matter of seconds, especially if the unit is motor driven. The small amount of storage space required is normally not used for any other purpose. It can be easily provided for in the design of a new building, but space can also be provided in most types of buildings already constructed, without requiring extensive alterations or remodeling of the entrance.

Another object of the invention is to provide a temporary canopy which can be quickly retracted, frame and all, and thus eliminate the hazard of injury caused by the vertical pipes which support the outer ends of the usual frame. The canopy of the present invention employs such vertical supports but these are hinged at the outer end of the retractible structure and are moved along with the telescopic elements, into the housing disposed within the building when the canopy is retracted.

Yet another object of the invention is to provide a manually driven or a motor-driven assembly controlled by a simple two-pole switch and thus eliminate the use of workmen for the task.

A further object is to provide a canopy that can be formed entirely of durable fire-proof materials, but canvas may be used for the covering if desired. Because this canopy can be so easily retracted into storage position, the fire hazard of dry canvas is eliminated. Because the basic features are so flexible this canopy can become a well-designed necessary adjunct to a building, rather than a make-shift addition put together and erected as an afterthought.

FIGURES 1 through 15 are submitted to show one complete installation in detail. FIGURES 16 through 27 illustrate some of the varieties of design that are possible within the scope of what is claimed without departing from the spirit of the invention.

In the drawings:

PEG. 1 is a perspective View of a canopy embodying the present invention, shown in fully extended position across a sidewalk, portions being cut away to show internal supporting structure;

FIG. 2 is similar to FIG. 1 but shows the canopy in partially retracted position;

PEG. 3 shows a building entrance with the canopy in fully retracted position, entirely concealed from view;

PEG. 4 is a side elevation, partially broken away, of the supporting beam structure in extended position, the canopy sections being absent;

PEG. 5 is an end elevation of the power driven cable drum for moving the beams to extended and retracted positions;

FIG. 6 is similar to FIG. 4 but showing the beam structure in retracted position;

PEG. 7 is similar to FIG. 5 but showing the retracting cable wound on the drum;

FIG. 8 is an exploded view of the several beams;

FIG. 9 is an exploded diagrammatic view in perspective showing the cable and pulley arrangement for extending the beams;

FIG. 10 is a perspective view from the rear showing the beams as extended;

FIG. 11 is a perspective view of the entire canopy unit including the frame and showing the canopy unit with the canopy sections extended;

FiG. 12 is a perspective view of the entire canopy unit with the canopy sections fully retracted;

FIG. 13 is a broken perspective view of the frame with the canopy sections completely removed;

FiG. i4 is an exploded view showing how moistureproofing is accomplished where roof sections overlap;

FIG. 15 is a broken perspective view from below of the forward section of the extended canopy section;

H6. 16 is a side elevation of a modified beam structure showing how the canopy can be moved to extended and retracted position by the use of racks and pinions as well as by cables and pulleys;

FIG. 17 is an enlarged detailed view showing the beam sections almost retracted, the view also showing the use of manual means for moving the beam;

FIG. 18 is a front elevation of the beam structure showing the beam sections fully retracted;

FIG. 19 is a side elevation of a beam structure in extended position, suitable for an installation where ample storage space is readily available;

FlG. 20 is a side elevation showing the entire canopy retracted into storage space;

PEG. 21 is a cross-section showing an arch-shaped roof adequately braced and supported by a simplified beam structure;

MG. 22 is a side elevation of a beam structure suitable for installation where a shorter storage space is available;

FIG. 23 shows the entire unit retracted into storage position;

FIG. 24 is a side elevation of the beam structure shown in FIG. 19 adapted for use with a canvas covering;

FIG. 25 is a side elavation showing the entire unit in storage position, the front rigidly shaped half of the canopy having retracted within the rear half, which is shown turned inside out;

FIG. 26 is a detail drawing, side view, of the point where the canvas is joined to the frame;

FIG. 27 is the same cross-section view shown in FIG. 21, modified for use with canvas.

The self-contained extensible canopy unit of the present invention, when in retracted position, is enclosed Within a generally rectangular frame 8 structure shown in some detail in FlGS. 11, 12. and 13. The frame includes a lower wall 9 formed preferably of heavy gauge sheet metal frame members 10, forward side wall sections 11, a forward top wall section 12 and a front wall section 13 having a lower edge 14 which is shaped to fit the upper contour of the innermost retractible canopy section. The entire front of the frame is retained in closed position by means of a cover 15 hinged at 16 to the lower front edge of the frame and a spring (not shown) retains the cover in closed vertical position when the canopy sections are retracted.

The frame is received within an opening in the building, shown at 10, the opening being located just above the front door and extends inwardly from the front wall a sufiicient distance to accommodate the full length of the frame. The building is shown as having a front entrance provided with a door frame 20 and a revolving door 21.

The canopy includes a plurality of telescopic sections, two being shown although if the sidewalk is wider than usual three or more sections may be used. Similarly, if the space requirements for the storage frame are limited the canopy sections may be reduced in length and increased in number. The roof of the canopy sections can be constructed of any suitable lightweight metal or plastic sheeting or combinations of materials which may be stamped, molded or otherwise shaped. If sheet metal is used the several blanks may be welded together to form a rigid unit. The particular external shape of the roof sections of the canopy can be varied considerably to harmonize with the architecture of the building. In the illustrated embodiment the outermost section 22 includes inclined upper walls 23, a forward inclined wall 24, vertical side walls 25 and a front wall 26. The rear edge underlies the second or inner section 31 which includes inclined upper walls 32, vertical side walls 33 and an upstanding vertical flange 34 spaced from its inner end and which contacts the inner surface of front wall 13 of the frame, acting as a stop to limit outward movement of the inner canopy section and also forming a Weatherstrip member.

The canopy supporting structure includes a fixed beam secured to the lower wall 9 of the frame and one or more beams which are slidable outwardly therefrom by means of cooperating trackways which keep the movable sections aligned with the fixed section and permit free sliding movement of the former relative to the latter. The cross-sectional contour of the several beams shown in FIG. 8 is suggestive only of the principle of operation and is not offered in any limiting sense.

The beam structure illustrated includes a fixed beam 35 which is rigidly mounted centrally of the lower wall 9 of the frame, a first movable beam 36 slidably mounted thereon, and a second movable beam 37 carried on beam 36. Beam 35 includes a lower wall 41 and upper wall 42 having a longitudinal slot 43 and vertical walls 44 connecting the upper and lower walls. It further has a stop 45 for limiting inward movement of the first movable beam. The latter beam includes a generally C-shaped lower wall 46 having inwardly turned flanges 50 which receive the opposed edges of upper wall 42, which latter act as tracks.

Beam 36 further includes an upper wall 51 having inwardly turned flanges 52 and vertical connecting walls 53. Upper and lower walls 51 and 46 have longitudinal slots 54 and 55 respectively.

Beam 37 has a lower wall 56 whose opposed edges are received in flanges 52, a central vertical wall 59 and an upper peaked wall 60 whose upper surfaces are parallel with wall section 23 of outer canopy section 22 which is supported thereby. The several beams may have roller bearings or other means to facilitate their sliding movement. The means for rigidly securing the fixed beam to the frame may include bolts 61 which pass through lower wall 41 of the beam and through lower wall 9 of the frame. Beam 35 has a pulley 62 journalled adjacent its forward end and beam 36 has a pulley 63 adjacent its rear terminal and a pulley 64 adjacent its front terminal. The beam further has a vertical stop 65 to limit inward travel of beam 37. This stop also has a forwardly extending horizontal flange 66 to which the rear end of canopy section 31 may be secured. This flange may be considerably wider than shown in order to provide additional lateral support to the roof section.

A cable drum 67 having a shaft 70 is journalled in bearings '71 at the inner end of frame 8 and has two separate cable sections, one for beam-extending cable 72 and another for beam retracting cable 73.

Cable 72 extends from drum 67 outwardly and around pulley 62, around pulleys 63 and 64 and is fixed to beam 37 at 74. The cable passes through the slots in beams 35 and 36. Beam retracting cable 73 is secured to beam 37 at 75. The drum is driven by a reversible motor (not shown) or by a motor having reversing gears. It will be seen that as cable 72 is wound on its drum beams 36 and 37 move outwardly.

The outer canopy section 22 is provided with legs hinged at 81 (FIG. 15) to the forward end of the canopy section. These legs, when the canopyis to be retracted, are folded upwardly and are received in opening 82 in a transverse wall 83 secured at the inner end of the canopy section. Suitable means (not shown) are employed for securing the legs in such position. This outer section is further provided with side channels 84 for water drainage purposes as shown in FIG. 13. Roof section 22 should have a free sliding fit with reference to roof section 31 and in order to prevent relative movement between the roof sections when in extended position, due to wind currents or otherwise, a thumb screw 88 may be turned to lock the parts together. The front section may be rendered more rigid by the use of transverse reinforcing ribs 89.

Inner section is formed with upwardly inclined flanges 85 (FIG. 15) along its lower edges which receive the lower edges of side walls 25 of the outer section. If it is desired to provide weatherproofing means between the upper walls of roof sections 22 and 31 a Weatherstrip 86 may be secured to section 22 and another strip 87 to section 31.

No positive stop means are required to limit outward movement of the roof sections since sections 36 and 37 continues to move outwardly until pulley 63 is immediately over pulley 62 at which time there is no more driving action. On inward travel, cable 73 first draws beam 37 inwardly until its inner end contacts stop 65 at which time both movable beams travel conjointly until beam 36 contacts stop 35 at which time the three beam sections are substantially vertically aligned in superimposed relationship. The two roof sections enclosed completely within the housing and door closes automatically due to the action of the spring.

In the modified arrangement shown in FIGS. 16, 17 and 18, the innermost beam section 92 is secured to lower wall 93 of the frame 94 and the other beam sections 95 and 96 are movable outwardly. The frame is secured within an opening in the building 100, directly over the front entrance. Beam sections 95 and 96 each have a pair of rack bars 101 and 102, respectively secured on their lower walls.

Pinion 116 is keyed to shaft 117 journalled in beam section 92. Also keyed to this shaft is a cable drum 121 to which one end of cable 122 is secured. The cable passes over pulleys 123 and 124 journalled on the fixed beam and the opposite end of this cable is secured at 125 to outermost beam 96.

Beam section 95 supports a second cable drum keyed to shaft 131, to which there are also keyed pinions 132. The diameter of cable drum 136 is one-half that of drum 121. A second cable 133 is secured at one end to ldrum 133 and at the other end is fixed at 134 to the lower earn.

Referring to FIG. 16 showing the beam sections in extended position it will be seen that when force is applied to the shaft 117 of pinion 116 causing it to rotate in a clockwise direction, beam section 15 will be moved inwardly. Since the diameter of drum 121 is twice that of drum 130, cable 122 moves outer beam section inwardly twice as fast as beam section 95 is moved inwardly and since the former has twice the distance to travel, the movable beam sections are fully retracted at the same instant. In travelling inwardly beam 96 rewinds cable 133 on drum 130. The extending action is similar. As beam section 95 moves forwardly, the unwinding of cable 133 causes pinion 132 to move in a counter-clockwise direction, sending beam section 96 forward.

Although this type of construction permits the canopy to be motor-operated, opportunity is used in FIGS. 17 and 18 to illustrate how the canopy may be manually operated by means of a cranking device. Handle 106 is attached to beveled gear 103 in bearing 105 on the outer wall of the building. Gear 1113 engages another beveled gear 104 which is attached to the lower end of shaft 110 which runs up to the front corner of the storage frame, which in this installation projects a few inches from the building for easier installation of the cranking device. Beveled gear 112 attached to the top of the vertical shaft engages in beveled gear 113 attached to the end of horizontal shaft 114. A pinion 115 located at the other end of this shaft engages with pinion 116, transferring the cranking action to the moving beams of the canopy as previously described.

In the modified form of the invention shown in FIGS. 19 and 20 the building 136 has a relatively long opening 137 extending inwardly from the front entrance and the base Wall 138 of the frame 139 receives and supports a fixed beam section 1411 which provides trackways for a sliding beam section 141. The sliding section has a canopy 142 and folding supports 143 at the outer end of the canopy section. The beam is retracted by means of a cable 144, secured thereto at 145, and this cable is received on one section of a two-section cable drum 146. The other section of the drum supports cable 150, which passes around a pulley 151, and the cable is secured at 152 to the movable beam section. Thus the canopy can be moved from the fully extended position of FIG. 19 to the fully retracted position of FIG. 20 and when in the latter position door 153 closes the opening as in the first embodiment of the invention.

FIGS. 22 and 23 show the application of the invention to a situation where a relatively wide sidewalk is located at the front of the building and wherein more than two movable beam sections are required to span the sidewalk. In this instance the fixed section 154 is located within frame 155 and the movable sections are shown at 156, 157 and 158. Again the sections are retracted by means of retracting cable 161, which is received on one position of cable drum 162, and a second cable 163 passes around pulleys 164 and is secured to the outermost section at 165. The structure is otherwise similar to the first embodiment of the invention. The roof coverings for the several sections may be made of canvas stretched over light frame structures.

The structure illustrated in FIGS. 24 to 27 inclusive is largely similar to that shown in FIG. 19 in that it includes a single movable beam 171 which is supported by fixed beam section 171 and which is drawn inwardly by cable 172, carried on cable drum 173.

The specific construction of the covering for the canopy is different from those shown earlier in that a frame 174 is secured to the outer half of the movable beam section and this frame is covered by canvas at 175. The rear half of the canvas covering is flexible and is shown at 176. Hinged arms 177 are secured at 178 to the flexible canopy section and a spring, not shown, urges the arms inwardly.

' These arms are hinged at 180 just inside the opening for the canopy section.

FIG. 24 shows the canopy section in fully extended position and when the canopy is retracted to the position of FIG. 25, the flexible section 176 is drawn inwardly as shown.

While five forms or embodiments of the invention have been shown and described herein for illustrative purposes, and the construction and arrangements incidental to five specific applications thereof have been disclosed and discussed in detail, it is to be understood that the invention is limited neither to the mere details or relative arrangement of parts, nor to its specific embodiments shown herein, but that extensive deviations from the illustrated forms or embodiments of the invention may be made without departing from the principles thereof.

What I claim is:

1. A. retractible sidewalk canopy for a building having an opening above its entrance and extending inwardly therefrom, said canopy including a plurality of telescopic roof sections which nest, one within the adjacent roof section when the canopy is retracted, a frame secured within the building opening and having a front wall opening' through which the roof sections move from a retracted position wherein the roof sections lie wholly within the frame to an extended position, a beam structure for supporting the roof sections including a plurality ofv superimposed beam sections which are longitudinally slidable one to the other and which are provided with trackways and cooperating flanges which ride on the traclrways to permit said sliding movement while retaining the beam sections in aligned relationship, the lowermost beam se tion being secured to the frame, and each roof section being secured to a movable beam section.

2. A retractible sidewalk canopy for a building having an opening above its entrance, said canopy includinga plurality of telescopic roof sections which nest, one within the adjacent roof section when the canopy is retracted, a housing secured within the building opening and having a front wall opening through which the roof sections move from extended to retracted positions, a hinged front door for said opening and a spring urging the door to closed position, a beam structure for supporting the roof sections including a plurality of superimposed beam sections which are longitudinally slidable relative to each other and which are provided with cooperating trackways to permit said sliding movement while retaining the beam sections in aligned relationship, one beam section being fixed and being secured to the frame, and each roof section being secured to a movable beam section.

3. A retractible sidewalk canopy for a building having an opening above its entrance and extending inwardly therefrom, said canopy including a plurality of telescopic roof sections which nest, one within the adjacent roof section when the canopy is retracted, a frame secured within the building opening, a beam structure for supporting the roof sections including a plurality of superimposed beam sections, which are longitudinally slida'ble relative to each other and which are provided with cooperating trackways to permit said sliding movement while retaining the beam sections in aligned relationship, one of said beam sections being secured to the frame, each roof section being secured to a movable beam section, legs hinged at the outer end of the outermost roof section which are movable from a vertical, roof supporting position to a horizontal folded position within the roof section.

4. A retractible sidewalk canopy for a building having an opening above its entrance and extending inwardly therefrom, said canopy including a roof section, a frame secured within the building opening and having a front wall opening through which the roof section moves from retracted to extended positions, a beam structure for supporting the roof section including a plurality of super-. imposed beam sections which are longitudinally slidable one to the other and which are provided with cooperating traekways to permit said sliding movement while retaining the beam sections in aligned relationship, one beamsection being secured to the frame, the outermost portion of each roof section being secured to a movable beam section and the innermost portion being flexible and being secured inside the front wall opening.

5. A retractible sidewalk canopy for a building having an opening above its entrance, said canopy including at least one roof section, a frame secured within the building opening and having a front wall opening through which the roof section moves from retracted to extended positions, a hinged closure for said opening and a spring urging the door to closed position, an extensible beam for sup porting the roof section including a plurality of beam sections which are longitudinally slidable one to the other and which are provided with cooperating trackways to permit said sliding movement while retaining the beam sections in aligned relationship, stop means limiting inward and outward movement of a movable beam section, one beam section being secured to the frame, and the roof section being secured to said movable beam section.

6. A retractible sidewalk canopy for a building having an opening above its entrance, said canopy including a plurality of roof sections, a frame secured within the building opening and having a front wall opening through which the roof sections move from retracted to extended positions, a beam structure for supporting the roof sections including a plurality of superimposed beam sections which are longitudinally slidable one relative to the other and which are provided with cooperating trackways to permit said sliding movement while retaining the beam sections in aligned relationship, the beam sections including an inner section, at least one intermediate section and an outer section, the inner beam section being secured to the frame, each roof section being secured to a movable beam section, pulleys at the outer ends of the inner and the intermediate sections and at the inner end of the intermediate section, a cable anchored at the inner end of the outer section and passing around the pulleys, and means for drawing the opposite end of the cable inwardly to move the beam sections outwardly.

7. The combination with a building having an opening above its entrance and extending inwardly therefrom, of means for providing overhead coverage of suflicient width to afford protection for a plurality of persons passing from the building entrance to a point near the adjacent curb, and an extensible beam structure constructed and arranged to support the means for overhead coverage at suitable height and move it alternately forward and backward in a substantially horizontal plane, said beam structure including a plurality of beam sections which are longitudinally slidable, one relative to the other, and

-Which are provided with complemental trackways to permit said sliding movement while retaining the beam sections in aligned relationship, one beam section being rigidly secured within the building, and at least one of said beam sections being longitudinally slidable relative to the rigid beam section.

8. A retractible sidewalk canopy including a means for providing overhead coverage of sufficient width to afford protection for a plurality of persons passing from the building entrance to a point near the adjacent curb, a separate frame into which the overhead coverage wholly moves when the canopy is retracted, said frame cooperating with the overhead coverage to provide protection from the elements, and a beam structure for supporting the overhead coverage and moving it alternately forward and backward in a substantially horizontal plane, said beam structure including a plurality of superimposed beam sections which are longitudinally slidable, one relative to the other, and which are provided with complemental trackways to permit said sliding movement while retaining the beam members in aligned relationship, one beam section being secured to the frame and the overhead coverage being secured to a movable beam section.

9. A retractible sidewalk canopy for a building having an opening above its entrance and extending inwardly therefrom, said canopy including means for providing overhead coverage of suflicient width to afford protection for a plurality of persons passing from the building entrance to a point near the adjacent curb, a separate frame secured within the building opening and constructed and arranged to cooperate with the means for overhead coverage to provide protection from the elements, said frame having a front wall opening through which the overhead coverage moves from a retracted position wherein the overhead coverage lies wholly within the frame, to an extended position, and a beam structure for supporting the overhead structure at a suitable height and moving it alternately forward and backward in a substantially horizontal plane, said beam structure including a plurality of superimposed beam sections which are longitudinally slidable one to the other and which are provided with trackways and cooperating flanges which ride on the trackways to permit said sliding movement while retaining the beam sections in aligned relationship, the lowermost beam section being secured to the frame, and the overhead coverage being secured to a movable beam section.

10. A retractible sidewalk canopy including means for providing overhead coverage of sufiicient width to afford protection for a plurality of persons passing from the building entrance to a point near the adjacent curb, said means comprising a plurality of telescopic roof sections which nest, one within the adjacent roof section when the canopy is retracted, a separate frame within which the roof sections wholly move when the canopy is retracted, said frame being constructed and arranged to cooperate With the roof sections to provide protection from the elements, and a beam structure for supporting the roof sections and moving them alternately forward and backward in a substantially horizontal plane, said beam structure including a plurality of superimposed beam sections which are longitudinally slidable one relative to the other and which are provided with complemental trackways to permit said sliding movement while retaining the beam members in aligned relationship, one beam section being secured to the frame and each roof section being secured to a movable beam section.

11. A retractible sidewalk canopy including a plurality of telescopic roof sections, which nest, one within the adjacent roof section when the canopy is retracted, a housing having a front wall opening through which the roof sections move from retracted to extended positions, a beam structure for supporting the roof sections including a plurality of superimposed beam sections which are longitudinally slidable one to the other and which are provided with cooperating trackways to permit said sliding movement while retaining the beam sections in aligned relationship, one beam section being secured to the frame, while the remaining beam sections are slidable relative thereto, each roof section being secured to one of said movable beam sections, a beam retracting cable and a beam extending cable, both secured to the outermost beam section, pulleys on the beam section lying inside the outer beam section and around which the latter cable passes. and a rotatable drum for the cables.

- References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 405,475 Hohorst June 18, 1889 405,549 Greenwald June 18, 1889 758,016 Mudd Apr. 19, 1904 1,796,564 Firguson Mar. 17, 1931 2,001,224 Tames May 14, 1935 2,205,015 Lowry et a1. June 18, 1940 2,423,402 Olsen July 1, 1947 FOREIGN PATENTS 411,223 Great Britain June 7, 1934 482,911 Great Britain Apr. 7, 1938

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3292971 *Mar 17, 1965Dec 20, 1966Zucker Saul JTruck unloading all-weather guard
US3299570 *Dec 3, 1964Jan 24, 1967Radcliffe Richard SCanopy
US3348602 *Jan 17, 1966Oct 24, 1967Goetaverken AbHatch covers
US3487449 *Apr 25, 1968Dec 30, 1969Maidl Virgil MCamper with extensible canopy
US3502132 *Mar 18, 1968Mar 24, 1970Hager Mark HConcealed,extensible and contractible,drapery supporting structure
US3705468 *May 13, 1971Dec 12, 1972United States Steel CorpCantilever slide gate
US3845591 *Jun 11, 1973Nov 5, 1974Stine JExpandable cover system
US3977123 *Jun 25, 1975Aug 31, 1976Whiting Roll-Up Door Mfg. CorporationUpwardly-acting door structure
US6032420 *Jun 25, 1998Mar 7, 2000Lucent Technologies Inc.Internally mounted retractable weather shield
US6076309 *Jun 25, 1998Jun 20, 2000Lucent Technologies Inc.Retractable weather shield
US6079163 *Jun 25, 1998Jun 27, 2000Lucent Technologies Inc.Rear mounted retractable weather shield
US7987891 *Dec 14, 2008Aug 2, 2011Bathman Shanghai Bathroom Equipment Co., Ltd.Triple layer folding door
WO2008000034A1 *Jun 28, 2007Jan 3, 2008Leo CastelluccioExtendible roof
WO2008096337A2 *Nov 7, 2007Aug 14, 2008Oded YerushalmiApparatus for roofing a pedestrian crossing area
Classifications
U.S. Classification160/32, 160/202, 160/193, 160/197
International ClassificationE04F10/00, E04F10/10
Cooperative ClassificationE04F10/10
European ClassificationE04F10/10