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Publication numberUS3069976 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 25, 1962
Filing dateDec 6, 1957
Priority dateDec 6, 1957
Publication numberUS 3069976 A, US 3069976A, US-A-3069976, US3069976 A, US3069976A
InventorsStevens Jr Frederick F
Original AssigneeStevens Jr Frederick F
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Gas-operated semiautomatic pistol
US 3069976 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 25, 1962 F. F. STEVENS. JR GAS-OPERATED SEMIAUTOMATIC PISTOL `3 SheetS-Sheet 1 Filed Dec. 6, 1957 Dec. 25, 1962 F. F. STEVENS, JR

OPERATED SEMIAUTOMATIC msm GAS- 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Dec. 6, 1957 INVENTOR. F/ffoE/e/c/f ESTE VEA/5 Ji?.

HTTORNEY Dec. 25, 1962 F. F. STEVENS, JR

GAS-OPERATED SEMIAUTOMATIC PISTOL 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed Dec. 6, 1957 ANN W i M y a u mk T w Y mw M E R Icrw m H M m E m Y sa@ @1H 3,069,976 Patented Dec. 25, 1962 3,669,976 GAS-SPERATED SEMIAUTMTIC PESTOL Frederick F. Stevens, Ir., Brooklyn, NX. (Lanes Pond Road, Northford, Conn.) Filed Dec. 6, 1957, Ser. No. 701,035 12 Claims. (Cl. S919l) This invention relates to lirearms of the semiautomatic type employing a positively locked breech. More particularly, the invention relates to rearms of the pistol type. Still more particularly, the invention deals with a firearm structure of the character described wherein the several parts of the rearms are quickly and easily assembled and disassembled without the use of screws or other fastening devices of any type or kind.

rl`he novel features of the invention will be best understood from the following description, when taken together with the accompanying drawing, in which certain embodiments of the invention are disclosed and, in which, the separate parts are designated by suitable reference characters in each of the views and, in which:

FIG. l is aside and sectional View of the right side of a pistol made according to my invention, with parts of the construction shown in elevation and with parts broken away and with portions of parts shown in different position in dotted lines.

FIG. 2 is a view similar to FIG. l showing the left side of the pistol and indicating parts of the construction in different position in dotted lines.

FIG. 3 is a sectional detail View similar to FIG. 1 showing the parts in a different position.

FIG. 4 is a bracketed view detailing parts of the mechanism seen in FIGS. 2 and 3 and illustrating the same in different positions. FIG. 5 is a view similar to FIG. 4 showing only a portion of the parts on an enlarged scale.

FIG. 6 is a section on the line 6 6 of FIG. 2 omitting the background showing.

FIG. 7 is a section on the line 7-7 of FIG. 2, omitting the background showing.

FIG. 8 is a side and sectional view of the magazine detached from the pistol and diagrammatically illustrating ay cartridge in dotted lines in the upper portion of the magazine and showing the follower in raised positions in dotted lines.

FIG. 9 is a bracketed view showing the cam unlocking mechanism of the pistol in diierent positions, part of the construction being broken away and in section.

FIG. 10 is a bracketed perspective view of the magazine follower and button detached.

FIG. 1l is a section on the line 11-11 of FIG. 8 omitting all background showing, with the exception of the spring of the assemblage shown in FIG. 8.

FIG. l2 is a section ou the broken line 12-12 of FIG. 2, with part of the construction removed.

FIG. 13 is a partial section on the broken line 13-13 of FIG. 2, with part of the construction removed.

FIG. 14 is a section on the line 14-14 of FIG. 2, omitting the background showing.

FIG. 15 is a section on the line 15-15 of FIG. 2, omitting the background showing.

FIG. 16 is a perspective view of the breech lock, showing parts to be assembled therewith in exploded relationship.

FIG. 17 is a bottom plan view of the slide, with part of the construction broken away.

FIG. 18 is a side elevation of a portion of the slide as seen in FIG. 17.

FIG. 19 is a detailed side and sectional view of a portion of the pistol, illustrating the safety lock in safety position.

FIG. 20 is a bracketed perspective view of a trigger control unit and part of a hammer assemblage which I employ in exploded relationship to each other. Y Y

It should be pointed out, at this time, that the pisto comprises basic parts or assemblages as follows:

the frame or body of the pistol 26 the slide 27 the extractor 2S the extractor spring 29 the tiring pin 30 the firing pin spring 31 the breech lock spring 32 the breech lock 33 the cam follower plate 34 the hammer and cartridge bearing plate 35 the double action spring 36 the double action spring plunger 37 the spring plug at one end of 35 38 the trigger 39 the double action bar 40 the roller bearing 41 the hammer assemblage 42 the hammer control unit assemblage 43 the backstrap assemblage 44 the knurled magazine release 45 the spring guide rod 46 the hammer actuating shoe 47 the safety lock for controlling the tiring mechanism 48 the piston rod assembly 49 the recoil spring 50 the gas diverting plug 51 the trigger guard unit 52 the slide lock assembly 53 the magazine elevator 54 the grip scale assembly 55 the magazine assembly 56 the magazine button 57 the button spring 58 the magazine bottom 59 the magazine bottom lock 60 the magazine spring 61 the magazine catch pivot pin 62 the magazine casing 63 the backstrap casing 64 the hammer shoe actuating spring MAIN FRAME 25 The frame or body 25 comprises a barrel 65, including an offset gas tube 66 at the lower portion thereof, note FIG. 6. At the inner end of the barrel is the main body portion 67 of the frame, into which the barrel is threaded, as seen at `68 in FIG. 3 of the drawing.

Extending downwardly and inclined rearwardly are front and rear frame members 69 and '70 joined at their lower ends in side straps 71. The front frame 69 is of channelled cross-sectional form and the crosshead of this channel is cutout to form a yieldable tongue 72, the cuts forming the tongue being exaggerated in Athe showing at 73 in FIG. 13 of the drawing. In actual practice, there would be substantially no clearance at the cuts 73.

The upper edge of the yieldable tongue 72 includes a catch portion 74, note FIG. 2, the function of which will be later described. The outer or rear surface of the frame 76 has a channel 75 opening into the main body portion 67 and a section through the channel 75 is clearly shown in FIG. l2 of the drawing. The side members of the channel near the lower end thereof have bayonet aper'- tures 76, note FIG. 2, and the crosshead wall of the channel adjacent the bayonet apertures has an elongated aperture, as seen at 77 in FIG. 12 of the drawing. The upper end of the front frame 69 has a forwardly extending lug 78 forming a support for the trigger guard 51.

@ne side of the main body portion of the frame, at the upper portion of the spaced frame members 69, 70, is cutout, as seen at 79, note FIG. 1, 'and the upper wall 80 of this cutout forms a stop, the function of which will be later set forth. It will appear from a consideration of FIGS. 12 and 13 that the width of the frames 69 and 7 0 is less than the width of the main body 67. This is to provide Yreception of the grip scales, one only of which is shown in section and dotted lines at 54 in FIG. 12 of the drawing. Y

The main body 67 has an aperture extending partially, as indicated in dotted lines at 81 in FIG. 1 of the drawing, for reception of the protruding pin of the slide lock 52, which pin is clearly illustrated in sheet A, the pin being an integral part of the slide lock 52.

The side of the pistol, as seen inFIG. 1 and in bracketed views in FIG. 9, has a recess 82 for reception of part of the pistol rod assemblage 43 and partl of the breech lock 32. l v

Now viewing the opposed side of the pistol, as noted in FIG. 2 of the drawing, the recess 83 is provided for part of the breech lock 32'. The recesses S2 and 83 are clearly shown in section in FIG. 13 of the drawing. The side of the main body 67, as viewed in FIG. 2 of the drawing, includes a protruding pin 84 forming a support for the roller bearing 40.

The channel 75 opens through the top of the main body 67 for reception of the hammer 41. The upper rear portion of this channeled part has a transverse bore 85, which opens through only one side of the pistol, as noted in FIG. 7, and is adapted to receivethe pivot pin portion 86 of the safety lock `47, thelpin 86 having an eccentric portion, as' at 87, upon which the backstrap assemblage 43 operates in the aperture 88 at the upper portion of this assemblage, as noted in sheet B. Forwardly of the aper-y ture 85 are large and small diameter opposed apertures 89 and 90 forming bearing supports for the hammer control unit assemblage 42, note FIG. 12.

Starting approximately at the apertures 89,` 90 and extending forwardly along the main body 67, the upper Vsurface of this body has dovetailed side tracks, as at 91, for guide of the slide assembly 26. i

The main body 67 between the rails and extending to a position reasonably adjacent the rear end of the barrel 65 is apertured, as at 92, the forward and rear lend walls of this aperture being in alinement with th-e inner opposed surfaces' of the frame 69 and 70 and at the forward portion of this aperture is an upwardly extending tapered extension, diagrammatically seen at 93 in FIG. 13 of the drawing, for upward guidance of the forward end 94 of an uppermost cartridge, as indicated in dotted lines in FIG. 8 of the drawing, for guidance of the cartridge into the bore or chamber 95 of the barrel 65. y

At the rear end of the aperture 92, the main body ,includes an upwardly directed lug 96, note IFIGS. 12 and 16. The body l67 includes, at one side thereof beneath the barrel 65, an elongated aperture 97 which opens through the side of the body, as seen 'at 98, note FIG.` 14.

Projecting downwardly from the body 67, adjacent the forward end of the aperture 97, is a downwardly directed tapered pin 99, around which the body is recessed, as seen at 100, the recess opening through the side of the pistol, as noted at 101 in FIG. 15.

' The trigger bearing pin 102is mounted in the body 67 and protrudes at the side of the pistol, as noted in FIG. 2 of the drawing, and this pin is diagrammatically shown in exploded FIG. 4.

Below the recess 83, the side of the pistol, as noted in FIG. 3, is recessed, as seen at 103, the recess being of irregular cutout, but includes a rounded portion encircling the yaperture `89 and leaves, at the side of the pistol forwardly of a protruding stock portion 104, shown in cross-section in FIG. 13.

Extending longitudinally through this stock 104 is a bore 105 and opening into the bore 105 at the forward end of the stock is a short elongated slot 106. At the rear portion of the stock 104 and opening through the bottom thereof is another elongated slot 107, as clearly noted in FIG. 2 of the drawing, and also in section in FIG. 13. Opposed sides of the barrel 65 have longitudinally extending grooves 168, note FIG. 14, and opposed sides of the barrel rearwardly of the tube 66 are provided with recessed portions 10,9, one of which is clearly shown in FIG. 1 of the drawing and these recessed portions or the bottom wall thereof are in alinement with the bottom wall of the grooves 108.

The rear surfaces of thesides of the frame 69 have longitudinal grooves 110, one of which is partially seen in FIG. 2 of the drawing, and are also illustrated in FIG. 13 of the drawing. The sides of the frame 70 have transverse recesses, as seen at 111 in FIG. 12 of the. drawing, and the lower portion of the frame 70y has, on inner surfaces thereof, opposed recesses 112, as also indicated in said figure.

The rear end of the barrel, at the upper portion thereof, has a recess, as seen at 113 in FIG. 3 of the drawing.

SLIDE 26 Considering primarily FIGS. 17 and 18l of the drawing, it will appear that the slide comprises a pair of elongated side plates 114 joinedy at the forward end by a transverse strap 115, having an aperture 116 therein, in which the cylinder 66 is loosely tted. The side members 114 include, on inner adjacent surfaces, substantially diamondshaped projecting lugs 117, note FIG. 2 which operate lin the grooves ,108 and are adapted to pass through the recesses 109 inpattachment and detachment of the parts, as later described, p v y At the inner end of the side members 114, the slide includes a top crossplate 118Uwhich has, on Vits upper surface, a transverse dovetailed recess 119 and an elongated aperture 120, the latter opening through ,theY QX ward wall 121 and into the recess 113, the wall being shown in section in FIG. 3 of the drawing. The inner or lower surface of the wall 11 8 has a transverse groove 1272, which transverses the aperture 1720, as clearly noted in FIG. 17. l

Befow the top wall 118, the body portion of 'the slide has a transverse recess, as at 123, the forward portion of which is rounded, as seen at 124, and in the rear portion of which is a transverse stock portion 125. The stock 125 has, at one side of theslide, a` bore 1,26, one side of which is slotted, as seenrat 127, to register with the wall 128 of a recessed portion 129 on the nndersurface of the top wall 1,13. j I

The recess 1,29, adjacent the Vstocl k 125, includes a deep bevelled notch 130 and this bevel or taper extends along one side of the slide to a forward point, as at 131, note FIG. 17. The bevel or taper referred to is prefer,-y ably at right angles to the bevelled forward surface 125 of the stock 125. Y I

That part of the slide having ythe rounded recess 124 therein has, on its lower surface, a longitudinal Vgroove 132 in alinement with a corresponding groove 133in the rearwardly extended portion of the stock 125. The lower surface of this rearwardly extending portion has a more or less L,shaped dovetailed recess 134, partially shown in section in FIG. 17 of the drawing, and the forward portion of the slide, adjacent the groover132, has a rounded dovetailed recess 135, which is also partly shown in section. Y.

Extending longitudinally through the portion of the slide, including the top wall 118 or the spaced stock portions thereof, as illustrated in FIG. 18, is a bore 136 which is enlarged in the stock 125, as seen at 136', note FIG. 3 cf the drawing. The forward end of the'bore 136 terminates short of the wall 121 and V.this wall has a small firing pin aperture 137 communicating with the lower portion of the bore 136. Again, note FIG. 3 of the drawing.

The lower surface of the slide below the wall 118 and extending to the rear portion of the slide is recessed, as seen at 13S, FIG. 17, and the walls of the recess are provided with dovetailed grooves 139 for receiving the dovetailed tracks 91, as clearly noted in FIG. 12 of the drawing.

The stock 125 has the recess 134 on the lower surface of the wall 140 in FIG. 17, to provide clearance for the tongue, later described, on the hammer and cartridge bearing plate 34.

The rear portion of the stock 125 has a rounded bevelled portion at the lower surface thereof, as at 141, as clearly noted in section in FIG. 3 of the drawing.

The slot 142 at the rear portion of the slide is adapted to receive the hammer and is in alinement with the slot 75 of the main body portion. The side of the slide 26, as viewed in FIG. l of the drawing and also clearly shown in FIG. 18, has an outwardly projecting enlargement 143, including a perpendicular cam stop surface 144 and a bevelled stop surface 145 for checking downward movement of the cam follower plate 33.

EXTRACTOR 27 The extractor 27 is shown in partial side elevation in FIG. 3 of the drawing and has a downardly extending hook end 146, laterally extending pivot portions 147 which seat in the transverse recess 122, note FIG. 3, and a rearwardly extending reduced finger 14S shown in section in FIG. 13, the extractor 27 being also diagrammatically shown in the exploded View, FIG. 16. The hook end 146 operates in the recess 113 at the rear end of the barrel, as clearly shown in FIG. 3 of the drawing.

EXTRACTOR SPRING 28 The extractor spring 28 is mounted in the aperture 126 of the slide 26. The spring operates upon the finger 148 positioned in the upper endy of the aperture 126, the spring being held in position by the hammer and cartridge bearing plate 34, as indicated, in part, in FIG. 12 of the drawing. It will be apparent, at this time, that the finger 148 operates in the slot 127 opening into the aperture 126.

FIRING PIN 29 The firing pin 29 has a rounded rear end 149 having a head 150 at its rear end, the outer lower surface of the head being bevelled, as seen at 151. Note, in this connection, the exploded perspective showing of the firing pin in FIG. 16 of the drawing.

The forward part of the pin is substantially half-round in cross-section, as seen at 152, and this portion has, adjacent the rounded part 149, opposed grooves 153, one of which is clearly seen in FIG. 16. A section through the grooved portion of the pin is clearly indicated in FIG. 13. The forward end 154 of the pin is again rounded and the rear surface of the end 154 is rounded, as seen at 155, to lit over the breech lock, as clearly illustrated in FIG. 3 of the drawing. The end 154 includes the projecting tiring pin proper 156 which operates in the aperture 137 in the slide 65.

FIRING PIN SPRING 30 BREECH LOCK SPRING 31 This spring is clearly shown in FIG. l and also in one of the bracketed views in FIG. 9 and comprises a coiled portion 157, having extended curved and laterally tensioned arms 158.

BREECYH LocK sa The breech lock 32 comprises a pair of substantially .V-shaped'side wings or plates 159 and 160 joined and spaced by an intermediate tapered web 161, shown partially in section in FIG. 3 of the drawing. In FIG. 13 of the drawing, a cross-section is illustrated through the breech lock. This section is taken through a pair of upwardly projecting lugs 162 on the web 161; note, in this connection, FIG. 16, and from this ligure it will appear that the side wings or plates 159, 160 extend rearwardly beyond the web 161.

Considering FIG. 13, it will appear that the grooves 163 in the plate 160 receive one end of the spring 31. The pair of lugs 162 operate in the recessed grooves 153 of the firing pin.

The forward end of the web 161 is rounded, as seen at 164, to tit in the rounded portion 124 of the slide. It will also appear that the rounded surface of the tiring pin ts over this rounded portion 164, as 'clearly noted. in FIG. 3 of the drawing, and acts as a stop checking rearward movement of the tiring pin.

On the plate side of the breech lock and in a recessed portion thereof is a projecting pivot pin 166 and at the rear end of the breech lock and extending inwardly from inner adjacent surfaces are projecting shoulders 167 which operate in recesses 168 at sides of the stock or block portion 125 of the slide, one of these recesses being clearly shown in FIG. 18 of the drawing.

The stock or block 125 tits snugly between the shoulders 167 and operates in the` recess rearwardly of the web 161, which recess is clearly shown in FIG. 16 of the drawing.

CAM FOLLOW/ER PLATE 33 The cam follower .plate is Aillustrated in side and sectional view in FIG. .l ofthe drawing and in exploded position in FIG. 16vand in partial section in FIG. 13. The plate has substantially centrally thereof a rounded bearing portion 169 which extends inwardly from the outer surface of the plate and this is mounted on the pin 166 of the breech lock, las will appear from a consideration of FIG.I 16. The plate has a forwardly con tracted nose portion 170, having a rounded cam surface 171, the plate having a rearwardly extending bar portion 172, having a V-groved lower surface, asat 173, to receive the other arm of the spring 31, as clearly noted in FIG. 13 of the drawing. The bar 172 `is arranged directly above the groove 163 and is free to move toward and from the groove- 163. The inner surface of the plate 33 has a projecting flange, forming a stop shoulder 174 which operates upon the stop surface 145 of the slide in checking downward swinging movement of the plate 33. Note FIG. l.

HAMMER AND CARTRIDGE BEARING PLATE 34 .DOUBLE ACTION SPRING 35 The'double action spring 35 is shown best in assemblage 1n FIG. 2 of the drawing and is arranged in the bore 107.

SPRING PLUNGER 36 The plunger 36 is mounted in and also arranged in the bore 107.

PLUG l37 The plug 37 is mounted in the other end of the spring 35 and also operates inl the bore 107, the plug having a projecting lug `176 which operates in the groove 106, as clearly noted in'FIG. 19'of the drawing.

one end of the spring 7 TRIGGER 3s The trigger 38 is shown in diiferent positions in FIGS. 2, 3 and exploded' FIG. 4 and partially in detail in FIG. 5. The trigger includes a curved iingerpiece portion 177, at the upper portion of which is a tubular body 178, note FIG. 4, mounted on the pin 102. The tubular body 178 seats and operates in the recessed portion of the body portion surrounding the pin 102, which opens through the side of the pistol, as noted in FIG. 2 of the drawing. vwThe trigger 38 includes an upwardly extending arm 179, note FIG. 3. This arm has, at its upper end, an outwardly projecting irregular-shaped lug 180, having a forwardly extending recess 1 81, defined by two'upper and ylower dogs 182 and 183, note FIGS. v2, 4 and 5. The dog 182 has a rounded surface 184, the axis of which is common with the axis of a roundedouter surface 185 on the lug 180, this latter structure being clearly illustrated in the enlarged detailed view of FIG. 5 of the drawing. It will also appear from this rligure that the upper surface of the lug 183 is bevelled, as seen at 186.

DOUBLE ACTION BAR 39 The double action bar l39 is shown in vassemblage in FIG. 2 of the drawing but, from the standpoint of detailed reference and to eliminate congestion of reference characters on FIG'. 2, the reference characters, in describing they bar, will preferably be arranged on exploded FIG. 4 of the drawing.

The bar 39 has, at its forward end, an extended hookshaped portion 187 having, at its free end, a -tlat bearing surface 188 and a lower bearing lsurface '189. Spaced from the hook portion is anupwardly extended plate portion ,190, having a vforward bearing surface 191, which is substantially parallel to the surface 188. At the upper end of the plate 190 is a rounded cam follower surface 192 which operates in a `cam surface 193 at one side of the slide, as can be noted in FIG. 2 of the drawing.

At the, rear endA ofthe bar 39 is an upwardly extending double action foot 194 which has, at its rear sur-face, a recess 195 to form a trip sear 196;

Forwardly `of the foot 194 is a raised portion, forming a shoulder 197, against which the plunger 36 operates, as clearly noted in FIG. 2 of the drawing, the plunger being in constant engagement with the shoulder 197. The upper surface @198 of the bar, forwardly of the shoulder, is to provide clearance to clear the L-shaped stock portion 164 in which the spring 35 is housed.

The thickness of the portion 199 of the bar having the shoulder 197 is such -as to t and operate in the slot 107. This yis clearly shown in the section of FIG. l2 of the drawing. The'purp'ose of this is to allow the bar 39 to move forwardly inncompression of the spring 35. Projecting outwardly from the bar, substantially centrally thereof, is a lug 200, the function of which will be later described, I

The lower surface 201 of the bar rides upon the roller 40 in operationl of the bar, asdiagrammatically illustrated in FIG. 4. The portion 199 includes a rounded upper surface 202, the function of which 'will be latex` described.

ROLLER BEARING 40 The roller bearing 40 is simply a tubular bearing which is mounted on the pin 84, as clearly shown in FIG. 2 of the drawing.

HAMMER ASSEMBLAGE 41 Part of thehammer assemblage is illustrated in perspective lin FIG. 20 and compris/es a bearing portion 302, having an irregular cross-sectional key bore 20'4, 'at one side of which is a small diameter bore 205, which is in aryoke-shaped portion `of 203, in which yoke-shaped portion is pivota/lly mounted the upper end of `an arm 206 arranged uponfa pin 207 in the bore 205. `The lower end f the freely pivoted arm 206 is rounded, as seen at 208.

Extending upwardly from the bearing portion 203 is au substantially kL-shaped thumb-piece 209 for manual cocking of the hammer.

HAMMER CONTROL UNIT ASSEMBLY 42 The assembly 42 is also diagrammati-cally illustrated in perspective in FIG. 20 of the drawing and comprise-s a shaft portion, having a central key part 210 fitting in the key aperture 204, the shaft portion having, at one end, a head 211 forming an annular groove 212. At the other end of the shaft portion is a large diameter bearing portion 213 which lits in the aperture 89, as clearly shown in FIG. l2. Y Y

lOutwardly of the portion 213 is an irregular-shaped disc 214, recessed to form a projecting and contracted foot 215. Note, in this connection, FIG. 4 of the drawing, where referencek numerals describing these structures are clearly illustrated.

Pivoted in the disc `214, as at 216, is a pawl 217; the spring 217 normallysupports the pawl 217 in position, diagrammatically shown at the left and right of FIG. 4. This checking of the pawlris controlled by a stop 217" operating in the fork of the pawl, note FIG. 20. The pawl 217 operates in the recess 218 of the disc, as does also the foot 194.

BACKSTRAP ASSEMBLY 4s This assembly comprises the strap casing part 63, the pin 61, the knurled magazine release 44, the guide rod 45, the spring 64 and the hammer actuating shoe 46, note FIG. l.

The backstrap 63 has a rounded outer surface 219 and an upper outwardly and rearwardly extending portion 220 apertured to receive the eccentric portion 87 of the pin 86, as clearly noted in FIG. 7 of the drawing.

The upper portion of the strap includes la projecting plate having a recess, at its upper surface, as indicated at 22%1 in dotted lines in FIG. l of the drawing, where the strap is shown in extended position and this recessed portion ts in the groove 212 of the assembly 42, as noted in FIG. `l2 of the drawing.

The sides of the strap or the forward surface thereof have elongated grooves, lone of which is seen at 222 in FIG. 2 of the drawing and, between these grooves, the strap is recessed for free movement of the spring 64, shoe 46 and rod 45, parts of which structures are shown in FIG. 2 of the drawing.

At -the lower end of the strap are a pair of opposed forwardly projecting bearings 223, in which are elongated laperturesZZ-ll, in which the pin 61 operates, the pin 61 being mounted in the aperture of the knurled magazine release 44, which aperture is shown at 225 in FIG. l2 of the drawing.

KNURLED MAGAZINE RELEASE 44 The knurled magazine release 44 includes a knurled iingergrip portion 226 Vand projecting upwardly from the release 44 yis a thin forwardly arranged plate 227.

sPRrNG GUIDE ROD 4s The spring guide rod 45 has, at its lower end, a yokeshaped portion 228 having slightly elongated apertures 229 therein receiving the pin 61 and this yoke-shaped portion forms a seat for one end of the spring 64. The upper end of the rod has a flanged coupling head 230 for coupling the hammer actuating shoe 46 therewith.

Considering FIG. l of the drawing, it will appear that ythe knurled magazine release 44 has a flat surface normally engaging a corresponding flat surface in the yokeshaped portion 228, as seen at 231, in said figure and, in the manual operation of the release 44, a cam action is provided between lthe surfaces 231 in raising the rod 45 against the action of the spring, as will be apparent.

HAMMER ACTUATING SHOE 46 The shoe 46 is in the lform of a rectangular block 232,

apertured to receive the head 23% through the contracted coupling end 233. The shoe includes, at its upper surface, a rounded socket 234, note FIG. 1, for pivotally receiving the lower rounded end 268 of the bar 206. The shoe 46 includes an upwardly extending plate 235, at its forward side, to provide a long bearing for the shoe in its movement in the groove or channel 75.

SAFETY LOCK FOR FIRING MECHANISM 47 The safety lock 47 is generally of the contour most clearly seen in FIG. 19 and comprises a plate 236 arranged on the side of the pistol, as noted in FIG. 2 of the drawing, and supports, at its rear contracted end 237, the eccentric pin S6, shown in section in FIG. 7 of the drawing.

Forwardly of the contracted end 237, the plate h-as a substantially V-shaped notch 238, note FIG. 19, in which the lower corner portion 159 of the plate 159 is adapted to seat when the breech 32 is in the safe or locked position, as noted in FIG. 19. The forward end of the plate 236 has, on its inner surface, a thin protruding flange 239, indicated in dotted lines in FIG. 19 which seats beneath a side plate portion of the trigger guard 51. The flange 239 is clearly shown in FIG. 3 of the drawing.

The upper forward portion of the plate 236 has an outwardly projecting knurled iingerpiece portion 240, best seen in FIG. 19, by means of which the lock can be manually raised or lowered. The plate 236, as seen in FIG. 19, is modied to the extent of providing a downwardly extended central portion 236', `as noted in FIG. 19. This is to provide a more complete coverage of the tiring mechanism, including the roller 4t);

On the inner surface of the forward end of the plate 236 are grooves or recesses to form stop member 241 and 242, which are shown in section in FIG. 19.

In the normal locked position of the pistol, the lug 200 of the bar 39 is in engagement with the member 241, as noted in FIG. 19. In this position, the pist-ol is locked against tiring. By depressing the safety lock 47 downwardly by hand, the member 241 is moved out of engagement with the lug 200, as seen in FIG. 3 of the drawing, which frees the bar 39 for performing its normal function.

When the bar 39 is in the position illustrated in FIG. 2 of the drawing, the member 242, FIG. 19, is in a position forwardly of the lug 29%. In this position, upward movement of the plate 236 enables the member 242 to be positioned forwardly of and block the lug 200 to check the bar 39 against any possible forward movement.

PISTON ROD ASSEMBLY 48 The rod 243 has a ball and socket coupling, as at 244, with the piston 245 which operates in the cylinder 66, as clearly noted in FIG. 1. The rod 243 passes freely through the strap 115 of the slide 26 and between this strap and the forward part rof the frame the spring 49 is arranged, as seen in FIG. 1. The mounting of the spring 49 on the rod is also illustrated in the combination of the parts 4S and 49.

The rear end of the rod 243 supports an outwardly extending cam plate 246 shown in side elevation in FIG. l of the drawing and, considering FIG. 15, it will appear that the rod 243 is tubular in form and this tubular contour can extend the major portion of the length of the rod.

The plate 246 is of the irregular contour clearly seen in FIG. l and includes an upwardly extending substantially triangular portion 247 which, in the action of the pistol, imparts a slight rearward movement to the slide 26 in engaging the surface 144 of the slide.

The plate 246 has, at its rear end, a cam surface 248 and engages a cam surface 32 on the breech lock 32, as clearly noted in the upper bracketed view of FIG. 9,

I@ to move the breech lock into the raised position shown in the central view of FIG. 9.

Also on the plate 246 is a cam surface 249, which operatively engages the cam surface 171 of the cam follower plate 33, as seen in the lower view of FIG. 9, and the function and operation of these parts will be later set forth.

The plate includes, at the upper end of the cam portion 249 or that part of the plate in which this portion is arranged, a seat 250, upon which the cam follower plate 33 is adapted to rest, as noted in the upper view of FIG. 9.

GAS DIVERTING PLUG 50 The plug 50 is shown in section in FIG. l of the drawing. This plug is arranged in the forward end of the cylinder 66 and has a diverting passage 251 registering with the cylinder and with a bore 66' which opens into the forward end of the barrel of the pistol. The plug includes an lupwardly extending key plate 252 which seats upon the bottom of the lbarrel in controlling the definite positioning of the plug in the cylinder. It will be noted that the bore 66 extends through the cylinder and the lower portion of the bore is sealed by the plug 50.

TRIGGER GUARD UNIT 51 The trigger guard unit 51 is seen in FIGS. l and 2 of the drawing and comprises an elongated rounded channel portion 253 which houses the cylinder and the rod 243, piston 245 and spring 49. The forward wall 254 is apertured to receive a protruding button 50 on the plug 50, as clearly shown in FIG. 1. This definitely retains the plug in position in the cylinder, while, at the same time, supporting the forward end of the trigger guard unit.

At the rear portion of the channel 253 is a downwardly and rearwardly curved guard portion 255 having, at its rear end, a catch 256. This catch 256 engages the catch` portion 74 in retaining the guard in operative position. In this connection, it will be understood that the guard has a slight spring action for snap engagement with the portion 74. To release the guard, the member72 is sprung inwardly, as illustrated in FIG. 2 of the drawing, to release the guard for displacement, as indicated in dotted lines in said ligure.

At the rear end of the channel 253 is lan extension having a tapered aperture 257 to receive the tapered pin 99 of the main frame, as clearly shown in section in FIG. 2 and in FIG. 15.

The guard includes a side plate 258 which overlies the flange 239 in retaining the forward portion of the plate 47, as clearly noted in FIG. 19 of the drawing. This plate 253 also provides a cover for the trigger 3 8 and the forward portion of the bar 39, as indicated, in part, in FIG. 2 of the drawing.

The channel 253 includes just forwardly of the guard 255 a pair of stop shoulders 259, best seen in FIG. 14 of the drawing, and indicated by the line 259 in FIG. 2 of the drawing, which checks rearward movement of the slide, the transverse strap of the slide operatively engaging these shoulders.

SLIDE LOCK ASSEMBLY 52 The slide lock assembly is shown in side elevation in FIG. 1 of the drawing and comprises a bar 260, the forward contracted end of which includes a pin, having a bearing support in the bore or aperture 81 of the frame, as indicated in FIG. 1 of the drawing. This forms a pivot for the slide lock.

On the upper surface of the bar is fixed one end of a spring 261 which operates in a grooved or recessed portion 262 of the frame, the spring tending to normally urge the bar 260 downwardly to a stop position, later described. The rear end of the bar has an outwardly protruding and upwardly extending tingerpiece portion 263 having, at its upper end, a plate with a notch 264 therein. The notch forms an upwardly protruding catch 1 1 265 which operatively engages the surface 144, as clearly noted in FIG. 1 of the drawing.

The inner surface of the bar 260 has, substantially centrally thereof, an inwardly projecting elongated lug 266 shown in section in FIG. 13 of the drawing which engages the wall 80 of the frame, note FIG. 13, when the bar 260 is in its up position, as shown in FIG. 1 of the drawing. The bar 260 is shown in its lower position nFIG. 13.

MAGAZINE ELEVATOR 53 The magazine elevator 53 is shown in perspective bracketed FIG. and comprises a platform 268, having a downwardly projecting tubular portion 269, the bore of which includes opposed lugs 270. At one end of the platform is an upwardly projecting V-shaped tongue 271, forming a seat for the rear portion of the cartridge and this end of the platform having, at is lower surface, a recess 272. The other end of the platform is rounded, as seen at 273, to form a bearing support in the magazine.

GRIP SCALE ASSEMBLY 54 As both assemblies are generally of the same construction, except for being lefts and rights, insofar as the mounting of these assemblies are concerned, the brief description of the assembly portion of one will apply to both.

lThe scales comprise a relatively thin body portion 274 of suitable wood, plastics or the like, on the inner surface of which is suitably fixed a coupling plate 275 attached along the vertical center thereof, as seen at 276, in FIG. 2 of the drawing, to provide free flexure of the front and rear sides of the plate. The rear side of the plate has, at its lower end, a cutout inwardly bent spring catch 277, which engages the notches 111 in the frame, as clearly illustrated in FIG. l2 of the drawing, in checking downward movement of the scales on the frame.

The flexing sides of the plates 275 are bevelled. The forward bevelled sides are adapted to seat in the grooves 'or recesses 110 of the frame 69; whereas, the rear sides t into the grooves 222 of the backstrap. These latter couplings support the scales against displacement from the sides of the pistol.

The upper edge of the plates 35 iits against the lower portion of the sides of the main frame, one of these engagements being illustrated in FIG. 2, and serves to check upward movement of the scales.

The scale, at one side of the pistol, is recessed on its inner 'surface to form a stoprshoulder 278, as shown, in part, in FIG. 13, to check downward movement of the slide lock 52.

The scales also form covers for the magazine and for upper portions of the pistol, as will be apparent.

MAGAZINE ASSEMBLY 55 This assembly is shown in FIG. 8 of the drawing. The assembly includes the elongated casing 62, having an elongated angularly disposed aperture 279 at one side thereof, the opopsed side having an irregular-shaped aperture 280 opening through the lower edge of the casing.

The rear portion of the casing has a slightly enlarged rectangular portion 281, noted clearly in FIG. l1 of the drawing, in which the vspring 60 of the assemblage is arranged and tting and operating in this rectangular portion is the end 271 of the elevator 53.

At the rear lower end of the rectangular portion 281 is a tapered ramp 282, the lower end of the ramp being notched, as seen at 283, and the rear lower end of the rectangular portion 281 has a rear and side projecting flange 284, noted -in FIG. 8 of the drawing. It will also be noted that the forward rounded end of the magazine includes an inwardly extending flange 285.

The upper portion of the magazine casing is more or lessy of standard construction and includes the cartridge escape side openings, as diagrammatically seen at 286 in FIG. 8 of. the drawingl2. MAGAZINE BUTTON 56 AND SPRING 57 The button 56 is shown in perspective bracketed FIG. 10. The button comprises a collar 287 having on one surface thereof, a key portion 288 which fits and operates in the elongated aperture 279. The upper surface '289 of the key portion is adapted to strike the lug 266 in checking upward movement of the button.

The shank portion of the button has a pair of opposed lugs 290 which operatively engage the lugs 279 of the elevator 53. The spring 5'7 is mounted on the shank between the lugs 290 and the collar 287 and serves to maintain the button with the reduced end 291 of the button within the tubular portion 269.

However, by pushing inwardly upon the button with the elevator in its lowermost position, the end 2,91 can be moved into engagement with the aperture 280 to hold the elevator in the lowered position against the action of the spring 69 to facilitate free loading of cartridges in the magazine.

Upon inserting the last cartridge in the magazine, slight downward pressure will move the button downwardly, releasing it from engagement with the wall of the aperture 286, Then the spring 57 will force the button to its normal position, thus freeing the elevator for upward movement.

MAGAZINE BOTTOM 58 The magaizne bottom is shown in section in FIGS. 1 and 8 of the drawing and in elevation in FIG. 2 of the drawing. This bottom comprises a plate fitting over the lower end of the magazine casing and held thereon by a grooved lug 292 engaging the flange 235 and a grooved block 293 engaging the flange 284, as most clearly seen in FIG. 8 of the drawing. This coupling engagement is by sliding movement of the bottom plate from left to right, as views in FIG. 8 of the drawing.

The rear portion of the bottom 58 beyond the block 293 is forked to receive the release 44, as clearly noted in FIG. l of the drawing. The lower surface of the bottom is recessed, as seen at 294, to receive the knurled ngerpiece portion 226. It will appear that the block 293 seats in the notch 283 of the ramp, again as clearly seen in FIG. l of the drawing.

MAGAZINE BOTTOM LOCK 59 The bottom 58 has an aperture 295 to receive a downwardly projecting stud 296 on the lock 59, as clearly noted in FIG. 8 of the drawing. The lock 59 forms a seat for the lower end of the spring 60, the spring retaining the lock in position and this lock retains the magazine bottom 5% against displacement from the magazine casing. To release the bottom 5S, the stud 296 is pushed inwardly to clear the aperture 295.

MAGAZINE CATCH PIVOT PIN 6I The pin 6,1 is clearly shown in its assemblage with the respective parts in FIG. 12 in coupling 44 with 45 and 63 and tits and operates in the bayonet apertures 76, as clearly noted in FIG. 2. This latter engagement is the coupling engagement of the complete assemblage 43 with the frame.

Considering FIG. l, it will appear that the plu-g 50 is seated in an enlarged chamber 297, that is to say, a chamber of greater diameter than the bore of the cylinder 66. This forms a chamber for receiving fouling that may prevail or tend to build up at the forward end of the piston 245. The forward end of the piston actually extends slightly into the chamber 297 when in its forwardmost position and any fouling that may tend to collect ,m on the forward end portion of the piston will automatically be stripped off and collected in the chamber 297. This fouling, while in its loose state, can be automatically discharged through the port 66 and out through the forward end of the barrel. The forward end of the l barrel has, on its upper surface, a usual sight 29S and 13 anotch sight 299 is mounted transversely in the rear portion of the slide or the recess 119. It will be noted, from a consideration of FIG. l, that the bore 66 is formed by drilling through the cylinder, as at the port 31N), which port is sealed by the plug 50. This provides a simple method of forming the bore 66.

In assemblage of the pistol, the following procedure is followed.

The extractor 27 is first dropped into the slide 26 by arranging the pivot portions 147 in the groove 122. Then the firing pin spring 30, arranged on the tiring pin 29, is placed in the bore 136-136 with the pin 137 in the position of FIG. 3. Then the breech lock spring 31 is inserted in the breech lock 32 and the cam follower plate 33 is then mounted on the pin 166 of the breech lock 32, this forming a sub-assemblage which, as a whole, is assembled in the slide 26 by simply placing the rounded end 164 in the recess 124, as clearly noted in FIG. 3.

The spring 23 is then mounted in the bore 126, after which, the hammer and cartridge bearing plate 34 is mounted in the slide 26, as heretofore noted, so that the plate 34 overlies the bore 126 and retains thel spring 2S against displacement.; The slide is now completely assembled. y n The hammer 41is then mounted in the frame in proper alinement with the bore, after which, the hammer control unit 42 is mounted in position and, in this operation, the hammer is oscillated in order to :bring the key portions in alinement.

The double action spring plunger 36 is then inserted in one end of the spring 35 and this assemblage is then mounted in the bore 105 and the plug 37 is then mounted in the bore with the lug 176 positioned in the slot 106 in FIG. 19.

The next operation is to place the trigger on the pin 162. The double action bar 39 is then mounted in the position, as shown for illustration in FIG. 2 of the drawing and, in this assemblage, the. double action spring plunger 36 is forced into the bore against the action of the spring in order to bring it in front of the surface 197 of the bar. Now the roller bearing 4t) is mounted on the pin 84.

The slide lock assembly 52 is then mounted in position on the opposed side of the pistol by placing its pin in the aperture 81. Note FIG. l.

The hammer 41, as assembled in the frame, is now put into cocked position, as illustrated, for example, in FIG. 3, after which, the slide is mounted over the forward end of the piston and barrel with the strap 115 below the barrel and is moved backwardly until the lugs 117 are in position to pass upwardly through the recesses 109 to bring the lugs in operative engagement with the grooves 108; whereupon, the slide is moved backwardly and dropped backwardly to bring the grooves 139 in engagement with the tracks 91; note FIG. l2, whereupon, the slide is moved forwardly and this establishes the coupling engagement of the slide with the main frame and barrel.

The assemblage 48 with the spring 49 thereon and placed in tension on the assemblage is mounted in position by rst putting the piston 245 in the cylinder 66, the ball and socket, as at 244, permitting this assemblage; whereupon, the rear end of the bar is mounted in position with the parts, as seen in the upper view of bracketed FIG. 9.

Now the backstrap assembly, as seen at 43, is completed by first placing the spring 64 on the rod 45.

Y Then the hammer actuating shoe 46 is coupled with the end of the rod 45, as previously stated. Then the magazine release 44 is mounted in the forked end of the rod 45 and the assemblage is then mounted in the back strap between the bearings 223, after which, the pin 61 is placed in position. The assemblage 43 is now coupled with the pistol by alining the aperture 88 with the aper- Cab ture S5 FIG. 7, with the strap extending substantially in alinement with the barrel, after which, the safety lock 47 is mounted in position by placing the pin 86 in position in the bores, the eccentric 87 being free to engage the aperture SS with this position of the parts; whereupon, the plate 236 is properly positioned .on the side of the pistol with respect to associated parts.

Now the strap assemblage is swung downwardly and, in this operation, care is taken to position the arm 206 rearwardly of the upwardly extending plate portion 235 so that the rounded end 298 is positioned in the socket 234. FIGS. 1 and 2.

Now the scales are mounted at each side of the frame, after which, the back strap assemblage 43 is moved into closed position by pushing upwardly on the knurled release 44, in which operation, the coupling engagement is established between the scales and the associated parts, as previously described. n

This operation also retains the backstrap in position on the frame by movement of the pin 61 downwardly into the bayonet recesses 76.

The plug 59 is now mounted in position, as shown in FIG. l, after which, the trigger guard 51 is mounted in position with the snap lock engagement, as at 256 and 74 taking eifect. FIG. 2.

` The magazine assemblage, as at 55, is now completed by first arranging the spring 57 on the button 56 and placing the button in position in the magazine elevator 53. A quarter turn of the button will lock the button by engagement of the lugs 270 and 291?. This assemblage is now placed in the casing 62 and the button depressed.

The spring 60 is now mounted in position in the casing with the smaller end of the spring arranged upwardly. The magazine bottom lock 59 is mounted on the lower end of the spring, after which, the bottom 58 is coupled with the casing and the lock 59, as previously described. Now the assemblage is then placed in the pistol and, in this operation, it is simply forced upwardly.

and, in this upward movement, the knurled release 44 automatically engages the bottom, as shown in FIG. 1, and this retains the magazine in assembled position.

The foregoing completes the assemblage of the pistol parts and, while this assembly could be modified to some extent, the procedure, as noted above, would be a practical procedure to follow.

The pistol is now in the position shown in FIG. 2 of the drawing.

In the operation of the pistol without cartridges in any part thereof, pulling backwardly upon the trigger 38 while in the position of FIG. 3, operates to move the bar 39 forwardly from the position of FIG. 3 to the diagrammatic illustration in the second figure from the left of bracketed FIG. 4. In this operation, the foot 215 is released from 196, freeing 40, 42; thus the hammer 41 will strike the ring pin 29 due to action of spring 64 and will finally rest upon wall 140. Release of pressure upon the trigger allows the trigger to advance to the position of FIG. 2 and the bar 39 will move rearwardly and the foot 194 strikes the pawl 217, moving the same substantially into the position shown inthe third view from the left in bracketed FIG. 4. On further rearward movement of the bar 39, the pawl trips over the foot 194 and the parts will return to the position shown in FIG. 2 of the drawing. The pistol can be actuated without cartridges from the position shown in FIG. 2 of the drawing. This operation can be performed either in what would be termed the single operation or the double operation, the only difference between these operations being that, in the single operation, the hammer is manually cocked; whereas, in the double operation, this operation is dispensed with.

In the double operation, starting with the mechanism in the position, the trigger is moved rearwardly by finger action, causing forward movement of the bar 39 against action of spring 35 from the position of FIG. 2, as bar advances, foot 194 causes a lifting action on pawl 217, resulting in a rearwardly pivoting action of the hammer control unit 42 and the hammer 41 against the action of spring 64, as seen in the left view of FIG. 4. Continued rearward movement of the trigger causes pawl 217 to ride up and over and to be released from foot 194; whereupon, action of spring 64 through parts 46 and 206 moves the parts into the position of the second figure from the left FIG. 4, producing the same result as previously described with regard to movement of the hammer into its firing position.

Upon release of pressure upon the trigger 38, the bar 39 is returned by spring 35 to the position of FIG. 2 which, in turn, re-positions the trigger 38 to the position of said figure, this re-positioning of bar 39 being the. same as previously described and shown, in part, in the third ligure from the left of FIG. 4.

Upon again repeating the finger operation of the trigger 33, the above cycle of operation will be repeated in the second or double action of the pistol.

In the single operation of the pistol from the position of FIG. 2, this is accomplished by first cooking the hammer by manual movement of the hammer into the position shown in FIG. 3.

With the hammer set, it will appear that the contracted foot 215 has been set ink the notch 195 to engage the shoulder 197, as illustrated, for example, in FIG. 3. This operation has moved the trigger rearwardly to a position substantially similar to the position of the trigger, as shown partially in FIG. 3. Also in the aforesaid operation of manually cocking the hammer, the bar 39 has moved from the position shown in FIG. 2 to the position shown in FIG. 3, in which operation the foot 215 operates upon the rear end of the bar and raises to the position of FIG. 3, at which time, the action of the spring 35 moves the bar 39 rearwardly to establish engagement of 215 with 196. From this point, the operation of the pistol will be precisely the same as that previously described in the operation of the pistol from the position shown in FIG. 3.

In the aforesaid operations of the pistol, the slide and other parts of the pistol, with the exception of the firing pin, remain at rest.

With the magazine loaded with cartridges and with a cartridge in the chamber of the barrel, in either cycle of operation,V namely the double action or the single action, the operation of the pistol parts is as follows.

Starting with the pistol in its normal position, as previouslyy described, with no safeties in operation upon pulling the trigger to tire the cartridge, the following actions take place in the other mechanism of the pistol.

After the bullet has passed the aperture 66' in the barrel,` the gas pressure in the barrel passes through the aperture 66', the port 251 into the cylinder 66 and moves the piston 245 rearwardly, in which operation, the cam surface 248 strikes the cam surface 32, and automatically raises the breech to the position in the middle view of bracketed FIG. 9 and the portion 247 strikes the surface 144 and moves the slide rearwardly to a slight extent. Then, the residual gas pressure left in the barrel after the bullet has been discharged working upon the base or head of the empty cartridge shell is suflicient to return the slide to its rearmost position, against the action of the spring 49.

In this rearward movement of the slide, the earn follower plate 33 has moved downwardly over the cam surface 249, FIG. 9, relieving the tension on the spring 31, and this position of the parts is shown in FIG. l, in which last named figure, it will appear that the plate 33 has moved out of engagement with the surface 249.

-In relieving the tension on the spring 31, the breech lock 32 is freed from any frictional engagement with the main frame.

In the aforesaid rearward movement, Vthe extractor holds the shell in engagement with the forward wall 121 and, `in this backward movement, the rim of the shell is tripped by the lug 96, which automatically eiects the shell from the opening in the pistol between the side members 114, as illustrated in FIG. 17 of the drawing.

The rearward motion of the slide is checked by the stops 259, FIG. 14, engaged by the strap 115. At this particular stage, the magazine spring has now moved another cartridge upwardly into a posit-ion substantially as indicated in dotted lines in FIG. 8 of the drawing.

The spring l49 now advances the slide forwardly and, in this operation, the forward wall 121 strikes the upper rim of the cartridge as positioned in FIG. 8, moving the cartridge forwardly, in which operation, it is advanced upwardly over the surface 93 and guided into` and positioned in the chamber of the barrel.

In the aforesaid operation of the slide, the cam snrface 193 on the slide FIG. 2 has effected a downward movement of the plate portion 19t) of the bar 39 through pressure on 192 which downward movement is sufficient to bring the end 188 of the portion 137 in'registering position with the recess 181 of the lug 186, as clearly shown in enlarged FIG. 5 of the drawing.

In this operation the bar 39 is permitted to move rearwardly a sufficient degree to establish the engagement of the foot 215 with the sear 196, as shown in the righthand view of FIG. 4. In this operation, rearward movement of the slide has engaged the hammer and moved the foot 215 into the position shown in said last named figure.

The position of the parts, as shown in FIG. 5, is maintained while nger pressure is applied to the trigger 3S, so that the pistol is automatically checked against full automatic operation. However, upon releasing the finger pressure on the trigger, the forward end of the bar 39 will automatically move upwardly, which action is the result of the rearward pressure of the spring 107 and the spring loading of the hammer which tends to normally rotate the hammer counterclockwise, also applying downward pressure of the foot 215 on the rear end of the bar 39 and, in this operation, the roller 40 acts as a fulcrum. In this upward movement of the forward end of the bar, the now released trigger is moved rearwardly to disengage the surface 18S from the recess 181 and the parts returned to the position seen in FIG. 3, preparatory for the next successive tiring operation of the pistol.

In the aforesaid cycle of operation of the slide, another action takes place in movement of the slide from the rearward position, as shown in FIG. 1, and returning the same to its forward position. This action is as follows.

The breech lock, in this forward movement of the slide, is in the position shown in FIG. 1 and also in the lower view of bracketed FIG. 9 and, in the last named figure, it will appear that the forward end 171 of the cam follower 33 strikes and definitely engages the surface 249 of the piston rod assembly 245 and first moves the assembly forwardly until it is checked by a wall of the trigger guard unit 51,.

The slide continues to move forwardly, in which operation the cam follower plate 33 is actuated to apply tension to the spring 31 and, as soon as the side 159 of the breech lock clears the recess 83 and the plate 160 clears the recess 82, the breech lock is automatically returned to locked position, retaining the slide against any possible rearward movement, in which position, the cam follower plate 33 is seated upon the surface 250.

The aforesaid operation is repeated as long as there are cartridges in the magazine for positioning Vin the chamber of the barrel.

As the last shell is removed from the magazine, the button 56 moves upwardly to strike the lug 266 of the slide lock 5,2 and moves the same into the raised posi tion, as shown in FIG. 1 of the drawing.

In the operation of firing the last shell and, as the slide moves rearwardly,'the slide rides over the hook 26,5 and, then, the hook 255 snaps up in front of the surl? face 144, as clearly noted in FIG. 1 of the drawing, and retains the slide in this position, thus clearly demonstrating that the last shell has 2n tired and ejected.

The magazine can then promptly reloaded with new cartridges and, in this operation, the slide is retained in the position of FIG. l by action of the spring 9, maintaining the slide lock assembly 52 in the position of FIG. l.

To set the pistol for operation, all that is now essenial is to manually depress the slide lock S2 which will automatically release the slide to again pick up the uppermost cartridge in the magazine and advance and position the same in the chamber of the barrel and the pistol is now in position for immediate action, the hammer being remained cocked in this last named movement of the slide. If no immediate operation of the pistol is desired at this time, the hammer can be manually returned to the normal position of FIG. 2 of the drawing, or the safety can be applied.

Viewing the pistol as seen in sheet D and also in FIG. 19, when it is desired to put the pistol in safety or locked position, all that is necessary is to move the safety lock i7 upwardly into the position shown in FIG. 19, in which operation the breech lock 3?. is raised to the position shown in FIG. i9. This operation can be performed with the hammer in the position of FIGS. 2 and 3.

With this position of the parts, it will appear that the member 215i is positioned in front of the lug 2do, as seen in FIG. 19, thus checking the bar 3? against any possible forward motion or, in other words, against action through operation of the trigger 38 with the hammer in the down position, as illustrated in FIG. 19, or in the position of FIG. 3.

However, when the hammer is in the up position, as shown in FIG. 2, the lug 260 is arranged rearwardly of the member 242 and the member 242 functions precisely the same as the member 241 in checking any action of the trigger upon the bar 39.

In addition to locking the bar 39 against actuation, movement of the safety 47 into its operative position and having moved the breech look upwardly, as previously stated, brings the lugs i6?, in a position forwardly of the tiring pin portion A9, as clearly illustrated in FIG. i9 of the drawing, so as to positively block the firing pin against any forward movement, thus no action upon the firing pin directly or through the hammer unit 42 could cause accidental firing of a cartridge which, at the time, may be positioned in the chamber of the barrel.

At this time, it may also be well to point out that, in the normal operation of the pistol, as and when the breech lock 32 moves upwardly on its pivotal mounting, the lugs 162 also operate to positively position the tiring pin or, in other words, to move it rearwardly in the event that, for any reason, the tiring pin should become held in its forward position.

Another feature of the safety lock control resides in the fact that, if the breech lock were raised from the position shown in FIG. 19, it would be impossible to draw the slide rearwardly, as the rounded portion 159 of the breech lock 32 would strike the rounded portion of the raised plate 236, as at 235, 1G. 19, checking the slide against any possible rearward movement.

With the safety lock in its down or inoperative position, the slide is free to move over the upper surface of the plate. In other words, from the foregoing, it will be apparent that the pistol has four different specific safety features, which provide positive assurance of safety control in the handling of the pistol.

Considering FIG. 8, the function and operation of the magazine assembly S should be noted, particularly from the standpoint that the casing is of less width at the lower portion than at the upper portion and the elevator 53 assumes, in its lowermost position shown in full lines in said figure, a greater angularity than when in its fully 18 raised position, as indicated in dotted lines in said figure.

It will thus be seen that, as the elevator 53 moves upwardly with the button 56 in the elongated aperture 279, arranged at a distinct angularity, the elevator 53 is automatically operated to provide a constant change of the angularity of the same, so as to finally assume the dotted line position in support of the last shell in position for delivery to the chamber of the barrel.

The upward flare or taper of the chamber of the cartridge casinfy contributes to the resultant change in shifting position of the cartridges from the full line position of the elevator 53 of FIG. 8 to the dotted line position shown in said figure. In other words, regardless of the number of cartridges in the magazine, the uppermost cartridge would, at all times, assume the angular position, as indicated in dotted lines, by reason of the fact that all other cartridges have been flxedly maintained within the tapered walls of the casing and by positioning of the elevator in their respective positions to each other.

To more clearly understand this action, it will appear that the pressure of the spring 60 upon the elevator tends, at all times, to maintain the surface 273, note FIG. 8, in engagement with the forward wall of the casing and, with the button S6 travelling upwardly in the angularly disposed aperture 279, automatically provides the constant change of angularity of the elevator from the lowest full line position to the raised dotted line position of FIG. 8.

From the foregoing description ofthe pistol assemblage, it will be apparent that all of the parts and/or assemblages identied by reference characters 25 to 64, inclusive, facilitate assembly of the pistol Without the use of screws, bolts or any other type or kind of fastenings, or in the use of tools of any type or kind.

While it will be apparent that the various parts can, in like manner, be quickly and easily disassembled, the only point to bear in mind, in this connection, is that it is essential to first remove the magazine before attempting to disassemble the parts, one reason, in this connection, being to permit free movement of the tongue 72 to release the guard Si and, further, to facilitate removal of the backstrap assemblage 43.

At this time, it would be well to mention that the release 44 is checked against movement in to a position to release the backstrap assemblage 43 by engagement of the plate 227 with the surface of the ramp 282, as can be seen in FIG. l. However, when the magazine is removed, the release 44 is free to perform its full function in disengaging the pin 6l from the bayonet slot 76.

By bevelling the tiring pin head E50, as at 151, a more definite assurance of the blow on the firing pin through the hammer is effected upon the upper portion of the pin, so as to insure a more positive action in the firing of a cartridge. In this connection, it should be kept in mind that the hammer performs a blow action upon the tiring pin and by virtue of the kinetic energy when the pin is advanced sufiiciently to fire the cartridge and is immediately returned by the spring 3f) against the face of the hammer. By reason of this structure, no blow upon the hammer is sutiicient to advance the pin to a firing position, as the surface of the hammer is directly engaging the end of the frame upon which it bears. In other words, the entire length of the firing pin is not sutiicient to reach the cartridge and this will be apparent from a consideration of FIG. 3.

In the present illustration, I have shown my double action mechanism, breech lock and associated cooperating parts as applied to a specific type of firearm. It will be apparent, however, that these mechanisms are applicable to firearms of any type or kind and, as and when repeated action is desirable, these mechanisms can be modified to the extent of eliminating the control factors heretofore 19 described which limit the pistol, as shown, to the semiautomatic operation as defined.

Briey stating the operation of the pistol in a firing operation, the surface 24S of 246 strikes surface T12 in the rearward movement of 2li-d, note in this connection, the upper view of FiG. 9, which raises 32 to clear S2, as noted in middle view of FIG. 9; thus freeing the slide 26 to move from the lower view of FIG. 9 to position of FIG. l, which is the extreme rear movement of the slide. In this rearward movement of the slide 26, the wall Mtl and bearing plate 34 engage and depress hammer 4l which, in turn, operates 39 through 42 to set 39 in position, as in the righthand view of FlG. 4. lt will, thus, be apparent that, when the slide 26 moves forwardly, 39 will move upwardly, positioning 192 in groove 193, thus clearing 200 from 2LH-242, putting the parts in position of FIG. 3. With the parts in this position, the pistol is in position for the next firing operation, assuming that, in the interim, finger pressure has been released from trigger part 177.

The foregoing description is based on the setting of the safety lock 47 in its inoperative position and, further, assuming that additional cartridges remain in the magazine.

As previously stated, after the last cartridge has been tired, the slide locl'. will be moved into operative position,

' thus checking and holding the slide in its extreme rearward position, as noted in FlG. l of the drawing.

My improved firearm or pistol is designed to handle cartridges of exceedingly high power and, in pistols of this type and kind, the use of the breech lock and a main frame or body with the barrel fixed thereto to constitute a part thereof is distinctly new. Another distinct improvement in my improved pistol design resides in employing the barrel as a fixed or more or less unitary part of the main frame assemblage, which results in greater accuracy in the pistol operation.

It is pointed out that the applicant has prepared the drawings and has used in several instances heavy lines intermediate crosshatcbed parts. This was his method of indicating slight clearances for free action.

In describing the general function or operation of the firearm,vthere are what might be termed several starting positions, namely as follows. One, the safety lock is in operative position. This can take place with the hammer in the inoperative position or in the uncocked position. Regardless of what position the hammer is in, the firearm can be actuated upon release of the safety lock by simply pulling upon the trigger. Upon completion of the firing by pulling upon the trigger, the hammer automatically returns to its cocked position; thus to move the hammer to the uncocked position, a manual operation is desired. At this interval, namely the completion of firing, the automatic lock can be moved into position with the hammer in the cocked or uncooked position.

Keeping in mind the foregoing positions of the firearm, the operation of the firearm will be understood from the following description.

Upon applying pressure on the trigger, the double action bar is moved forwardly, discngaging either double or single action sear of the hammer, moving the hammer forwardly into operative position, striking the firing pin firing the firearm.V

Upon passage of the bullet by the gas port, the prevailing gas pressure activates the piston, moving it rearwardly. This results in disengagement of the breach lock with the frame against the action of its spring, allowing residual gas pressure in action upon the shell of the fired bullet to drive the slide rearwardly by engagement of the shell with the breach face of the slide. At this time, the shell is automatically ejected from the firearm.

Rearward motion of the slide is checked by contact with a portion of the trigger guard. This rearward motion of the slide returns the hammer to cocked position.

A spring having been compressed by the rearward motion now returns the slide to its forward position. During the aforesaid rearward movement of the slide, an

Vin the firing chamber.

opening in the slide permits the next successive cartridge given above will leave the hammer in its cocked position, y

at which time the safety can be applied.

lf the firearm is not to be immediately used, the hammer can be moved into the uncocked position and leftl in this position with the safety on in the position asl cocked, or off, as desired. As previously stated, from this position, or with the hammer in cocked position' and assuming that the safety is on, upon releasing the safety,

the trigger can be actuated which will result in operation' of the firearm in the manner previously described. lt will here be apparent that, if the hammer is in the uncocked position, it may be manually cocked before actuation of the trigger, although this operation is not absolutely necessary.

Having fully described my invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is: n

l. In a fierarm comprising a main frame, including a barrel, a trigger and hammer double action mechanism at one Side of the frame, a slide keyed to and movable longitudinally of the frame and barrel, said slide supporting a firing pin, a breech lock, a cam follower plate and an extractor, tensional means mounted in the frame for supporting the slide in normal position, a safety lock movably supported on the first named side of the frame and Y operatively engaging said breech lock and double action mechanism, a slide lock movably supported on the opposed side of the frame, said breech lock andV slide lock. being automatically and manually operable, means detachably mounted on the frame and barrel actuated by' prevailing pressure in the barrel in ring a cartridge for' `actuating the slide against the action of said tensione'- means and in displacement of the case of the first car-` tridge from the frame by said extractor, the breech lock including means operatively engaging the firing pin controlling functioning and position of said pin, a cam on said second named means, said cam follower plate being pivotally supported on the breech lock and operatively engaging said cam, and said extractor operatively engaging the case in displacement of said case.

2. A structure as defined in claim l, wherein'the second named means comprises a cylinder open at one end to the forward end portion of the barrel, a piston assembly operating in said cylinder, and means integral with said cam and at the rear portion of said assembly operatively engaging the breech lock to free the slide for backward movement by existing pressure prevailing in the' barrel directly operating upon the slide.

3. A structure as defined in claim 2, wherein said cam is on the piston assembly and the cam follower plate engages said cam in returning the assembly to normal position in forward movement of the slide by said tensional means. Y

4. A structure as defined in claim 3, wherein the cam follower plate includes an extending bar, and tensional means supported on the breech lock and operatively engaging the bar for movement ofsaid cam follower plate into operative position.

5. A structure as defined in claim l, wherein the safety lock includes means operatively engaging a part onfsaid double action mechanism for blocking operation of said' double action mechanism in either of two positions to definitely lock the firearm against trigger operation.

6. A structure as defined in claim, 1 whereinl said.'

double action mechanism includes means in operative engagement with the hammer and trigger for automatically retaining the hammer and trigger in operative position upon release of finger pressure on said trigger.

7. A structure as defined in claim 6, wherein said double action mechanism includes means engaging the hammer for retaining the hammer inoperative while the trigger is held -by the finger pressure at the completion of an operation of the firearm.

8. A structure as defined in claim 7, wherein the slide includes means actuating said double action mechanism to move the same into said retained inoperative position.

9. A structure as defined in claim 1, wherein the slide and barrel have cooperating means for detachably coupling the slide and parts supported thereby with the frame and barrel. y

10.1A structure as defined in claim l, wherein the rear portion of the frame includes ldepending front and rear frame members, grip scales detachably supported on said front and rear yframe members, a backstrap assembly mounted on the rear frame member, a magazine assembly detachably mounted on said frame members and housed within said scales and backstrap assembly, and said back strap assembly and safety lock having a common pivot mounting in the rear end portion of the main frame.

11. A structure as defined in claim 10, wherein said backstrap assembly supports locking means operatively engaging the magazine assembly in retaining said magazine assembly and backstrap assembly in operative position upon said `frame members.

12. A structure as defined in claim 1, wherein said breech lock comprises spaced side plates, a web joining said side plates, said web having a rounded portion having a pivotal mounting in a rounded seat in said slide, and the means on the breech lock operating the firing pin being positioned on said web.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 817,198 Smith Apr. 10, 1906 2,115,041 Obregon Apr. 26, 1938 2,174,9711 Crockett Oct. 3, 1939 2,468,784 Seagraves May 3, 1949 2,538,940 Henckel Jan. 23, 1951 2,560,292 Kauch July 10, 1951 2,585,738 Chapin et al. Feb. 12, 1952 2,615,370 Koucky Oct. 28, 1952 2,654,175 Hansen Oct. 6, 1953 2,675,638 Crittenden Apr. 20, 1954 2,765,558 Roper et al. Oct. 9, 1956 2,771,819 Morse et al Nov. 27, 1956 2,775,166 Janson Dec. 25, 1956 2,846,925 Norman Aug. 12, 1958

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Classifications
U.S. Classification89/147, 89/196, 42/7, 89/145, 42/70.1, 89/191.1, 42/18, 42/69.3
International ClassificationF41A5/00, F41A17/38, F41A9/00, F41A17/32, F41A5/18, F41A3/00, F41A3/40, F41A19/48, F41A9/65, F41A9/67, F41A19/00, F41A17/00
Cooperative ClassificationF41A19/48, F41A5/18, F41A9/67, F41A3/40, F41A9/65, F41A17/32, F41A17/38
European ClassificationF41A17/32, F41A9/67, F41A5/18, F41A3/40, F41A17/38, F41A19/48, F41A9/65