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Publication numberUS3070167 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 25, 1962
Filing dateJul 30, 1959
Priority dateJul 30, 1959
Publication numberUS 3070167 A, US 3070167A, US-A-3070167, US3070167 A, US3070167A
InventorsLindsey William C, Loy Iii Samuel E, Mcstravick Peter R
Original AssigneeJersey Prod Res Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Device for pumping tools into wells
US 3070167 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 25, 1962 s. E. LoY nl, ETAL DEVICE FOR PUMPING TOOLS INTO WELLS 2 Sheets-Shea?I 1 Filed July 30. 1959 Dec. 25, 1962 s. E. LoY nl', ETAL 3,070,167'

DEVICE FOR PUMPING TooLs INT0 WELLS Filed July 30. 1959 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 SAMUEL E. LoY,u;r

PETER R, McsRAvmK, By WILLIAM c, LlNnsEY,

EMA E, TML@ ATTORNEY.

ilnited diaree Patent O 3,070,167 Dill/EE FR PUMIBING T0013 INTO WELLS Samuel E. iiloy lill lieter R. Mcn'avieit, and William C.

Lindsey, Houston, Tex., assignors, by mesne assignments, to .ersey Production Research Company, Tulsa,

lsla., a corporation ot Delaware Filed .lnly 30, 1959, Ser. No. 830,672 Claims. (Cl. 166-153) This invention relates to oil and gas wells. More particularly, this invention relates to tools for performing workover operations in oil and gas wells.

When using certain tools in performing workover operations, it is often necessary that the friction be minimized as the tool is removed from the well. This is particularly so when pumping tools are used to pump other members such as tubular extension members to an offshore well from an onshore location. After the extension member has been properly located within the oshore well, the tool used to pump the extension member into the well must be removed by wireline. In currently used pumping tools, cup packers are used to permit the pumping of the tool into the well. Mowever, if the tool is removed by wireline, these cup packers are in continuous engagement with the tubing. The resulting riction is often undesirable.

The tool to be described herein includes nat least one collapsible cup-shaped packer which is mounted about a plurality of elongated spring members which are normally biased outwardly to engage the side of the tubing as the tool is pumped from the onshore location to the offshore well. Means are provided for collapsing the springs and the cupshaped packer mounted upon the springs, prior to the removal of the tool from the well by wireline. With the springs and packer in the collapsed position, the friction during removal of the tool from the well is kept to a minimum,

The operation of the device, as well as the many other advantages, will be further understood by reference to the following detailed description and drawings in which:

FIG. l and FIG. lA `are schematic elevational views showing the tool being used to pump an extension member into a Well from the shoreline;

FIG. 2 is a schematic elevational view showing the tool being removed after an extension member has been locked into position within the well;

FIG. 3 is an elevational view partly in section showing the relative positions of the parts of the new tool as it is being pumped into the well;

FIG. 4 is an elevational view partly in section showing the position of the parts as the tool of FIG. 3 is removed from the well;

FIG. 5 is an elevational view partly in section showing another embodiment of the invention with the parts in the position as the tool is pumped into the Well;

FIG. 6 is an elevational view partly in section showing the embodiment of FIG. 5 with the parts in the positions assumed as the tool is being removed from the well;

FIG. 7 is an elevational view partly in section showing still another embodiment of the invention with the parts in position assumed as the tool is pumped into the well; and

FIG. 8 is an elevational view partly in section showing the relative positions of the parts, as the embodiment of FIG. 7 is removed from the well.

Referring to FIGS. l, 1A, and 2, a borehole is shown penetrating the earth and traversing subsurface formations il) and 1l. The borehole includes the usual casing 12 which is cemented to the side of the borehole by means of cement 14.

Production tubing 16 extends into the well and ter- 3,970,167 Patented Dec.. 25, 1962 minates at a point above the bottom of the well. The production tubing 16 extends through a wellhead 18 and connects with a short radius bend pipe 2li. The short radius bend pipe 20 is coupled to a laterally extending conduit 22 by means of a coupling means 24. The well, short radius bend -pipe 20, and laterally extending pipe 22 are all below the water line 26.

Pipe 22 extends to the shore 28. A lubricator 30 is connected to the pipe 22. Valves 32 and 34 are provided at the extremities of lubricator 30.

Extending from the lubricator 36 is `a conduit 36. Fluid may be pumped into the lubricator 3i), laterally extending pipe 22, bend 20, and production tubing 16 by means of pump 38.

Extending through the packing means 4d is a circulating flow line 41. The flow line 41 extends up to the wellhead 18 where it is attached to a laterally extending conduit 43 which leads to a pump 45 located onshore.

FIG. 1A shows a tubular extension member 42 which is being pumped into position Within the Well. The tubular extension 42 includes an extension hanger 44 containing locking dogs 46. A packer 43 is also included about the extension hanger 44. The extension member 42 is locked into position within the production tubing 16 by the provision of a landing nipple 5l) provided in the production tubing 16.

The landing nipple 5d includes a recess 52 for receiving the locking dogs 46. The extension member 42 is made of exible material so that it can be passed through the short radius bend pipe 2?.

The ilexible extension member 42 has been pumped into the desired position by use of the new and novel pumping tool indicated generally by the numeral 54.

FIG. 2 shows the new tool S4 being removed from the production tubing 16 after the flexible extension member 42 has been securely locked in position Within the production tubing 16.

The new and novel tool 54 includes at least one collapsible cup-shaped member indicated generally by the numeral 56. In the iigures shown there are two spaced-apart collapsible members 56.

The collapsible members 56 include a plurality of elongated springs 58. The number of springs may vary and usually ranges in number from 4 to l0 and forms a basket about the pumping tool 54.

The cup-shaped packer 6tl is mounted upon the lower half of the elongated springs 5S. Springs 58 are normally biased outwardly into contact with the inside of the tubing 16. This provides a piston-like means so that the tool 54 can be pumped through the laterally extending tubing 22, the short radius bend pipe Ztl, and the tubing 16.

As stated above, it is highly desirable that the friction be eliminated as the tool is removed from the well to the earths surface. Thus, means are provided in this new tool to collapse the elongated springs 58 and the cupshaped packer 60 mounted upon the springs 58, prior -to the removal of the tool 54 from the well.

One collapsing means is illustrated in FIGS. 3 and 4. Referring to these gures, it is seen that the tool 54 includes a plurality of members connected together by knuckle joints 62. The knuckle joints 62 are provided to permit the tool to be pumped past bends in the tubing system such as short radius bend 20. Each of the elongated springs 58 has one end mounted about a rst elongated member 64 and the other end mounted to a second member 66.

A shoulder 68 is provided on the outside surface of the elongated member 64. A metal ring 7 0 is .also provided about the outside surface of member 64 and spaced above the shoulder 68. Thus, the shoulder 63 and the metal ring 70 provide a groove into which is iitted a collar member 72 to which the upper portion of each elongated spring S is connected.

The lower extremity of each of the springs 58 terminate in a collar member 74 which is threadedly connected on the upper outside surface of the lower member 66 by mating threads 76.

The elongated member 64 has a chamber 78 formed therein. The chamber 78 receives an upper portion of the lower member 66. The upper portion Sil of member 66 is of smaller diameter than the lower portion of member 66.

A compression spring 32 is mounted within the chamber '78 and adapted to exert a force against the top portion of member 80.

Mounted within a groove 84 formed within the inside portion of elongated member 64 and extending laterally therein is a split-ring 86. Groove 84 is of such size as to permit outward movement of the split-ring 86 when a predetermined force is exertedagainst the split-ring 86.

Mounted about the smaller diameter portion 80 and above the split-ring S6 is a member S8 having angular portions resting upon the split-ring S6 and a flat upper edge 90. The particular member shown in FIGS. 3 and 4 is frusto spherical. However, it is to be understood that other shapes can be used having angular sides and a at top. For example, a frusto-conical shaped member can be used.

In operating the embodiment shown in FIGS. 3 and 4, the tool 54 is pumped from the shoreline into the tubing 16. In this manner, the tubular extension member 42 is properly located. The springs 58 are biased outwardly in Contact with the inside surface of production tubing 16. After the extension member 4t2 has been properly located, the elongated member 64 can be held stationary or moved upwardly by means of the wireline 92 connected to the fishing neck 94.v At the same time, hydraulic pressure is exerted against the inside of the cupshaped packer ott. When the predetermined pressure is obtained, member 88 is passed through the split-ring member S6. The compression spring 82 aids in forcing member 88 through the split-ring 86. Thus, the lower member 66 is slidably moved longitudinally with respect to the upper elongated member 64. This collapses the elongated spring members 58 and cup-shaped packer 60 as shown in FIG. 4.

The tool 54- may then be removed to the earths surface without friction. The flat surface 90 of member 88 locks the members in the collapsed position. An O-ring uid seal 96 and uid by-pass 98 are provided to ffacilitate the removal of the tool 54.

FIGS. 5 and 6 show a second embodiment of means for preventing the collapse of the springs and packer until the application of a predetermined pressure and means for holding the collapsed members in the collapsed position.

In FIGS. 5 and 6, the means for holding the elongated springs SS'and cup-shaped packer 66 in the collapsed position includes a plurality of vertically spaced rachet teeth 166 formed on the outer periphery of the smaller diameter portion 80 of member 66. Spring biased pawls 102 are mounted in Ithe upper elongated member l64 and extend into the chamber 1104 below the ratchet teeth 100.

When the tool 54 is held stationary or moved upwardly by the wireline 92 and uid pressure applied against the cup-shaped swab, the shear pin 106 is broken. Member 66 and the smaller diameter portion 80 are then moved downwardly by the force of compression spring 32 to collapse the collapsible members. Slidable member 66 is held in its lower position by the spring biased pawls 102 which engage the upper flat portions of ratchet teeth 103;

FIGS. 7 and 8 show still another means for preventing the movement of member 66 until the application of a predetermined pressure and means for holding the cupshaped packer in the collapsed position. Like members referto like parts ofthe previous figures.

In FIGS. 7 and 8, an elongated hole il@ is formed through the axis of the tool 54. Extending through the hole llt) is a conductor wire cable H2.

In this embodiment, the upper end of the smaller diameter portion titl is securely connected to the top of the chamber 78. A small cavity is formed in the upper portion of the smaller portion 86 in which is deposited a charge of powder M4 which can be exploded by the application of an electrical current through the cable M2.

A transverse shoulder 116 is provided about the smaller diameter portion 8Gl above the rachet teeth lill). The compression `spring 32. exerts a force against the shoulder 116.

When it is desired to collapse the elongated springs 53 and cup-shaped packer 6%, an electrical current is fed through the conductor wire cable MZ to explode the powder charge lid. The explosion fractures the extreme upper portion of member 89. Thereafter, by holding the tool 54 stationary or moving it upwardly by wireline while applying fluid pressure to the packer 60, the lower member 66 can be moved downwardly to collapse the elongated springs 58 and cup-shaped packer 6G. These members are held in the collapsed position by the spring biased pawls .to2 which engage rachet teeth mit.

Although this invention is of particular utility in the reworking of submarine wells, it could also have application as a swabbing assembly in any other type of well with slight modification. For example, it has been common prac-tice to stimulate production by hydraulic fracturing. Swabbing of sand-laden iiuid subsequent to fracturing sometimes causes sticking of the swab in the well. This invention prevents sticking of the swab and possible breaking of the swab line by collapsing the swab cup, permit- 4tin the sand to fall past the swab. When the tool is used for this purpose, the knuckle joints may not be necessary and can be eliminated.

We claim:

vl. A -tool for use in performing workover operations in wells comprising: an upper elongated member having an elongated chamber formed therein; a lower member having an upper smaller portion, said smaller portion telescopically extending into said elongated chamber; a plurality of arcuately spaced outwardly biased elongated springs, each spring having one end mounted about the upper elongated member and the other end mounted to the lower member; a cup-shaped packer connected to the lower member and covering approximately half the length of each of the elongated springs, whereby the elongated springs and cup-shaped packer can be collapsed by the application of pressure against the cup-shaped packer to move the lower member when the upper eongated member is held relatively stationary; and means for holding the elongated springs and cup-shaped packer in the collapsed position.

i12. A tool for use in performing workover operations in wells comprising: an upper elongated member having an elongated chamber formed therein; a lower member having an upper smaller portion, said smaller por-tion telescopically extending into said elongated chamber; a compression spring mounted within the chamber and exerting a force downwardly upon lthe top of said smaller portion; a shear pin mounted through the upper portion of the smaller diameter portion of the lower member and connected to the inside surfaces of the upper elongated member which `form said chamber; a plurality of arcuately spaced outwardly biased elongated springs, each spring having one end mounted about the upper elongated member and the other end mounted to the lower member; a cup-shaped packer connected lto the lower member and covering approximately half the length of each of the elongated springs, whereby upon the application of a predetermined force against the cup-shaped packer, the shear pin is sheared and the lower member is moved to collapse the elongated springs and cup-shaped packer when the upper elongated member is held against movement;

and means for holding the elongated springs and cupshaped packer in the collapsed position.

3. A tool in accordance with claim 2 wherein the means for holding the elongated springs and cup-shaped packer in the collapsed position includes ratchet teeth formed on the outer periphery of the smaller diameter portion of the lower member, and spring biased pawls mounted in the upper elongated member and extending into the chamber below the rachet teeth whereby the lower member can be moved downwardly only with respect to the upper elongated member.

4. A tool for use in performing workover operations in wells comprising: an upper elongated member having an elongated chamber formed therein; a lower member having an upper smaller portion, said smaller portion extending into said elongated chamber; a plurality of arcuately spaced outwardly biased elongated springs, each spring having one end mounted about the upper elongated member and the other end mounted to the lower member; a cup-shaped packer connected to the lower member and covering approximately half the length of each of the elongated springs; a split-ring resiliently mounted transversely in the vertical inside surface of the upper elongated member; a split-ring actuating member having angled sides and a at upper edge forming a part of the smaller diameter portion and adapted to pass through the split-ring upon the application of a predetermined force against the cup-shaped packer; and a compression spring within the chamber exerting a force against the top of said smaller diameter portion, whereby upon the application of said predetermined force against the lower member, the elongated springs and cup-shaped packer are locked in a collapsed position.

v.5. A tool for use in performing workover operations in wells comprising: an upper elongated member having an elongated chamber formed therein; a lower member having an upper smaller portion, said smaller portion extending through said elongated chamber and connected to the upper elongated member; a plurality of arcuately spaced outwardly biased elongated springs, each spring having one end mounted about the upper elongated niember and the other end mounted to the lower member; a cup-shaped packer connected to the lower member and covering approximately half the length of each of the elongated springs; an electrical conductor extending through the upper member; a powder charge embedded in the upper portion of the smaller diameter portion and exploded by the application of an electrical current through the conductor cable; a compression spring mounted in the upper part of the chamber exerting a force against the smaller diameter portion tending to separate said upper and lower members; rachet teeth formed on the outer periphery of the smaller diameter portion of the lower member, and spring biased pawls mounted in the upper elongated member and extending into the chamber below the rachet teeth whereby upon detonation of the powder the extreme upper section of the smaller diameter portion is broken so that the application of fluid pressure against the cup-shaped packer locks the elongated springs and cup-shaped packer in a collapsed position.

References Cited in the tile of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,035,994r Mueller Aug. 20, 1912 1,241,386 Hutton Sept. 25, 1917 1,700,325 Mack Jan. 29, 1929 1,828,838 Hampton et al Get. 27, 1931 1,979,802 Kinley Nov. 6, 1934 2,064,429 Hudson Dec. 15, 1936 2,618,345 Tucker Nov. 18, 1952 2,799,351 Osmun June 16, 1957 2,810,440 Kenneday et al Oct. 22, 1957 2,906,342 Russell et al Sept. 29, 1959

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3163226 *Nov 14, 1960Dec 29, 1964Shell Oil CoSand removal from wells
US3308880 *Jan 28, 1963Mar 14, 1967Shell Oil CoThrough-the-flowline tool installation system
US3332493 *Oct 20, 1964Jul 25, 1967Cameron Iron Works IncApparatus for guiding a well tool being pumped out of a well into a laterally branching flow line
US3346045 *May 20, 1965Oct 10, 1967Exxon Production Research CoOperation in a submarine well
US3361206 *Aug 6, 1965Jan 2, 1968Baker Oil Tools IncOffshore well bore apparatus and method of operating the same
US3378080 *Sep 13, 1965Apr 16, 1968Otis Eng CoFluid pressure operated actuated operator tool for well tools
US3395759 *Sep 9, 1966Aug 6, 1968Mobil Oil CorpWell tool pumpable through a flowline
US3496998 *Dec 28, 1967Feb 24, 1970Pan American Petroleum CorpBearing means for reducing wireline friction in flow line loops
US3965978 *Nov 6, 1974Jun 29, 1976Continental Oil CompanySubsurface transient pressure testing apparatus and method of use thereof
US4524324 *Jan 28, 1983Jun 18, 1985Dickinson Iii Ben W ODownhole instrument including a flexible probe which can travel freely around bends in a borehole
US4557327 *Sep 12, 1983Dec 10, 1985J. C. Kinley CompanyRoller arm centralizer
US4729429 *Dec 30, 1985Mar 8, 1988Institut Francais Du PetroleHydraulic pressure propelled device for making measurements and interventions during injection or production in a deflected well
US4844155 *Apr 28, 1988Jul 4, 1989Magyar Szenhidrogenipari KutatoFejlesztoProcess for increasing the yield of oil reservoirs
US4860825 *Feb 1, 1989Aug 29, 1989Institut Francais Du PetroleDevice for positioning a tool or instrument in a duct
US5180009 *Oct 28, 1991Jan 19, 1993William SneedWireline delivery tool
US5209304 *Aug 16, 1991May 11, 1993Western Atlas International, Inc.Propulsion apparatus for positioning selected tools in tubular members
US5667015 *Jan 16, 1996Sep 16, 1997Bj Services CompanyWell barrier
US7234533 *Jan 23, 2004Jun 26, 2007Schlumberger Technology CorporationWell packer having an energized sealing element and associated method
US7347274Jan 24, 2005Mar 25, 2008Schlumberger Technology CorporationAnnular barrier tool
EP0187599A1 *Dec 24, 1985Jul 16, 1986Institut Francais Du PetroleApparatus driven by hydraulic pressure for conducting logging and work-over operations in a deviated well during injection or production
Classifications
U.S. Classification166/153, 166/172, 166/196, 166/98, 166/155
International ClassificationE21B23/00, E21B23/08
Cooperative ClassificationE21B23/08
European ClassificationE21B23/08