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Publication numberUS3071306 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 1, 1963
Filing dateMay 1, 1961
Priority dateMay 1, 1961
Publication numberUS 3071306 A, US 3071306A, US-A-3071306, US3071306 A, US3071306A
InventorsTrethewey Thomas E
Original AssigneeIdeal Ind
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Carton for connectors and the like
US 3071306 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

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United States Patent Ofifice 3,0?l30h Patented Jan. 1, 1963 ware Filed May 1, 1961, Ser. No. 106,572 1 (Ilaim. (Cl. 229-20) This invention relates to a container suitable for use as a dispenser for small objects such as electrical cn nectors, nuts, bolts or the like.

A primary purpose of the invention is a container of the type described which permits ready access to the contents.

Another purpose is a container of the type described which is easily assembled from flat blanks of foldable sheet material.

Another purpose is a container of the type described which has a simply operated interlock which positively prevents complete separation of the inner and outer sections of the container.

Another purpose is a telescopic container having an inner and outer section, the outer section being slideable relative to the inner section to expose an access opening and permit removal of the contents.

Other purposes will appear in the ensuing specification, drawings and claim.

The invention is illustrated diagrammatically in the following drawings wherein:

FIGURE 1 is a perspective View of a completed container in the closed condition,

FIGURE 2 is a view, similar to FIGURE 1, showing the container sections moved such that the access opening is exposed,

FIGURE 3 is a perspective view showing the inner section of the container with one flap open,

FIGURE 4 is an end view of one side of the container in the closed position,

FIGURE 5 is an end View, similar to FIGURE 4, showing the container in the open position,

FIGURE 6 is a top View of the container in a closed position,

FIGURE 7 is a plan view showing the blank which forms the inner section, and

FIGURE 8 is a plan view of the blank used to form the outer section.

Considering FIGURES 7 and 8 first, the inner section blank 10 may include two somewhat rectangular sections 12 and 14 which form the larger sides of the inner section and two somewhat smaller sides 16 and 18 separated from the sides 12 and 14 by score lines 20, 22 and 24. As shown herein the container is generally rectangular in cross section, but the invention is not limited to this particular shape. The container may be any size and any shape. Rectangular is one satisfactory cross-sectional shape when the container is to be of pocket size. The inner section 10 may be completed by a flap 26 which is separated from side 12 by a score line 28.

When the inner section of the telescopic container is assembled, the blank 10 which is preferably formed of a foldable sheet material, such as cardboard or the like, is bent along the score lines 28, 20, 22 and 24 and then folded to form a hollow section. The flap 26 may be glued or otherwise secured to the side wall 18. After the container has been shaped and glued together, it may be folded back to a substantially fiat form for storage or transportation.

As shown in the drawings, the bottom end of the side 12 and the top end of the side 14 have flaps 30 and 32 which are separated from the sides by score lines 34 and 36. The flaps are conventional as are end flaps 38 adjacent each end of the smaller sides 16 and 18. When the container is assembled, the inner section 10 is opened into its generally rectangular shape. The end fiaps close the end of the container after it has been filled with nuts, bolts, electrical connectors or the like.

The outer section 40, shown in FIGURE 8, has two larger sides 42. and 44 and two smaller sides 46 and 48. There is a flap 50 which is glued to the side 48 after the blank has been bent along score lines 52 and folded into a hollow section. Once the outer section has been glued or otherwise secure-d together, it may be folded into a susbtantially fiat condition for storage and transportation. The cross-sectional area of the outer section 40 is slightly larger than the cross-sectional area of the inner section 10 so that the two sections may be telescoped together, as shown in FIGURES 1 and 2.

One side wall of the inner section 10 may have an access opening 54 which may take a variety of shapes, and as shown herein, is somewhat square with angled corners. The size and shape of the opening will depend upon the type of object in the container. The access opening or window 54 may be positioned in any one of the sides, as what is important is its spacing relative to the end of the container. Spaced upwardly, as shown in the drawings, the access opening 54 is a slit or long narrow opening 56 which may be along the score line 29. The particular lateral spacing of the slit 56 is not important. What is important is the length of the slit relative to the size and position of opening 54.

The outer section 4% may include a notch or the like 58 which may be substantially similar in shape to one side of the access opening 54. Spaced above the notch 58 is a flap or the like 60 which may be hinged along score line 52 and cut out of the side 46. The flap 69 is generally in alignment with the slit 56 as will appear hereinafter.

The slit 56 and the flap 60 form an interlock between the inner and outer sections of the assembled container. The depth of the notch 53 may be generally equal to the distance from the bottom of the opening 54 to the score line 34, or the distance the access opening 54 is spaced from the end of the inner section. The length of the access opening 54 plus the length of the flap 60 may be generally equal to the length of the slit 56. With this relationship, when the inner section is placed in the outer section, as shown in FIGURES 1 and 2, and when the sections are moved relative to each other, the interlock will permit sufiicient relative movement to expose the opening 54, but no more. If the outer section has no notch, then the slit 56 may be lengthened to completely expose the opening 54.

FIGURE 1 shows the container in the closed position in which the access opening 54 is masked by one of the side walls of the outer section. FIGURE 2 shows the container in a similar manner except that the outer section has been withdrawn or moved relative to the inner section to expose the access opening 54.

To form the interlock between the inner and outer container sections, the outer section is slid on the inner section in such a manner that the notch 58 is generally in line with the access opening 54. The flap 60 is then pressed down through the slit 56 such that the flap is beneath the side 16 of the container. FIGURE 3 shows the flap oil in dotted lines as it Will be when the containers are assembled and interlocked. Once the flap is positioned within slit 56, it will permit movement of the outer section relative to the inner section a distance equal to the length of the slit 56 minus the length of the flap. In other words, the flap moves back and forth within the slit until the ends of the flap contact the ends of the slit. Although in the drawings we have shown the interlock opening as being merely a long slit, it may be desirable in some applications to provide slits in the sides 16 and 12 adjacent the ends of opening 56. Such an arrangement may help in positioning the flap 60 in the interlock opening.

The use, operation and function of the invention are as follows:

Shown and described herein are improvements in containers which are formed of folded sheet material, such as cardboard or the like. The containers may be of pocket size and are useful both as a shipping container and as a dispenser for use on the job. For example, nuts, bolts, electrical connectors, etc., may be stored in the container and kept in the pocket of the workman on the job. When he needs one of the objects in the container he merely slides back the outer section and the access opening is exposed. One or more connectors or the like may then be shaken out of the container for use.

Of particular importance is the interlock between the inner and outer sections. The particular slit and fiap arrangement, although shown as positioned on a corner of the container, may be positioned on any one of the sides and at any location. The particular positioning of i the slit and flap is not important as long as the interlock permits sufiicient relative movement to expose the access opening.

The access opening may be positioned in any one of the sides of the container and may be of any shape. What is important about the access opening is its size relative to the interlock parts and its position relative to the end of the container. It should be possible to completely expose the access opening with only a small movement between container sections.

When using the container for electrical connectors or the like, it is desirable to locate the access opening away from the end of one side to strengthen the container or carton. For lighter items, such as cigarettes, small candies etc., the access opening could be at the end.

Whereas the preferred form of the invention has been shown and described herein, it should be realized that there are many modifications, substitutions and alterations thereto within the scope of the following claim.

I claim:

A container formed of foldable sheet material and including an inner section and an outer section of the same approximate size and shape, the inner section having a slightly smaller cross sectional area than the outer section and being telescoped within the outer section, said inner section being slideable relative to the outer section and having end closures and an access opening, said access opening being generally intermediate the ends of the inner section but substantially closer to one end than the other, an interlock between the inner and outer sections permitting suflicient relative movement to expose the access opening including a long thin opening in the inner section extending in the direction of movement of the telescoped sections, said interlock opening being formed along one edge of the inner section, a flap hinged along an edge of the outer section and extending through said interlock opening, said opening having a length substantially equal to the length of the access opening plus the length of the flap, and a notch at one end of the outer section in general alignment with the access opening and having a length generally equal to the distance the access opening is spaced from one end of the container, said notch being aligned with one iside of said access opening when the outer section has been slidably moved to expose the access opening.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2426856 *Aug 21, 1943Sep 2, 1947Marshall I WilliamsonDispensing container
US2426911 *Jul 17, 1943Sep 2, 1947Nat Folding Box Company IncTelescopic container
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3262559 *Aug 18, 1964Jul 26, 1966Monkey Grip Sales CompanyPackage with sliding sleeve
US4420111 *Jul 27, 1982Dec 13, 1983Erwin HamentCup and cover combination
US5249681 *Jan 13, 1992Oct 5, 1993The C. W. Zumbiel Co.Carton dispenser system
US5503268 *Jul 14, 1993Apr 2, 1996Philip Morris IncorporatedContainer for cylindrical articles and method for loading and dispensing
US5505373 *Mar 9, 1995Apr 9, 1996David Hossein Todjar-HengamiFolding package
US6116499 *Jun 1, 1998Sep 12, 2000Todjar-Hengami; DavidPackage design
US6273332May 3, 1999Aug 14, 2001David Todjar-HengamiPackage design
US8668103 *Oct 31, 2011Mar 11, 2014Transparent Container Co., Inc.Package with a sleeve having a self-initializing locking tab
US9096344Mar 4, 2013Aug 4, 2015The C.W. Zumbiel CompanyCarton with corner dispenser
US9149413 *Aug 19, 2011Oct 6, 2015A & R Carton OyPackage
US20100237140 *May 30, 2008Sep 23, 2010Catherine BeckerTwo piece package assembly
US20100252479 *Apr 1, 2009Oct 7, 2010Corroon Kenneth MMedication dispensing systems and methods
US20130105480 *Oct 31, 2011May 2, 2013Transparent Container Co., Inc.Package with a sleeve having a self-initializing locking tab
US20140305832 *Aug 19, 2011Oct 16, 2014A & R Carton OyPackage
WO2000044633A1 *Jan 24, 2000Aug 3, 2000Reckitt Benckiser N.V.Dosing device for pellet-shaped filling bodies
WO2008151018A1 *May 30, 2008Dec 11, 2008Meadwestvaco CorporationTwo piece package assembly
WO2009157809A1 *Jun 22, 2009Dec 30, 2009Sergey Leonidovich PanovA package for a cigarette block
Classifications
U.S. Classification229/122, 229/125.125
International ClassificationB65D5/38, B65D5/72, B65D5/00
Cooperative ClassificationB65D5/38, B65D5/728
European ClassificationB65D5/38, B65D5/72G