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Publication numberUS3071872 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 8, 1963
Filing dateMar 21, 1960
Priority dateMar 21, 1960
Publication numberUS 3071872 A, US 3071872A, US-A-3071872, US3071872 A, US3071872A
InventorsWilliam F Hart
Original AssigneeWilliam F Hart
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fire training structures
US 3071872 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 8, 1963 w. HART v FIRE TRAINING STRUCTURES Filed March 21, 1960 INVENTOR.

William E Hart United States Patent Ofifice 3,ii7l,872 Patented Jan. 8, 1963 Filed Mar. 21, 1969, Ser. No. 16,457 3 Claims. (Cl. 35-8) This invention relates to new and useful improvements in fire training structures; for example fire department drill towers, which are used by fire fighting personnel to learn fire fighting techniques. To train personnel to control fire hoses under high pressure and to develop their accuracy with respect thereto as well as to familiarize men with the various types of nozzles and other fire fighting equipment, particularly with reference to structures, it is necessary to actually spray water into the interior of the structure. Also, it is common practice for fire departments to store materials and equipment in the drill tower, thus precluding the spraying of large quantities of water into the interior thereof. Moreover, the high cost of water in many areas prohibits the use of large quantities of water in training.

Hence, one of the objects of my invention is to provide a fire training structure, such as a drill tower, with a system to allow water to be sprayed into the interior thereof under high pressure without damaging the interior of the structure or property contained therein.

Another object of my invention is to provide a fire training structure, such as a drill tower, with a system which will allow water sprayed therein to be captured and returned to its source making it available for re-use.

Another object of my invention is to provide a fire training structure, such as a drill tower, with a system which may be utilized in conjunction with various openings in the structure and at various elevations so that water spraying techniques may be perfected from different angles and at different elevations.

Another object of my invention is to provide a fire training structure, such as a drill tower, with a system which will allow fire fighting personnel to develop accuracy and control in spraying water under high pressure using different nozzles.

Further objects and advantages of my invention will appear as the specification proceeds, and the novel and useful features thereof will be fully defined in the claims attached hereto. 1

The preferred embodiments of my invention are illustrated in the accompanying drawings, forming parts of this application, in which:

FIGURE 1 is a diagram of a drill tower.

FIGURE 2 is a side view of the funnel and reservoir employed in my invention, a portion of which is broken away to show the interior of the reservoir.

FIGURE 3 is a view of a portion of a drill tower and a diagram showing an alternative conduit from the reservoir.

FIGURE 4 is a cross section of an alternative form of funnel and reservoir.

While I have shown only the preferred forms of my fire training structure, it should be understood that various changes and modifications may be made within the scope of the claims attached hereto, without departing from the spirit of my invention; also, it is to be understood that the system herein defined may be constructed with the fire training structure or installed in an existing structure.

Referring to the drawings, in FIG. 1, the numeral 11 indicates a drill tower having one or more Windows 12. The numeral 31 indicates a sump with a hose 32 extending therefrom so as to provide a means for pumping water from the sump 31 into the suction side of a pumping device which is shown by the numeral 33. Numeral 45 represents a hose leading from the pressure side of the pumping device 33. Numeral 20 indicates a vertical standpipe positioned in the drill tower 11 and running to the top floor thereof. As shown the vertical standpipe empties into the sump 31.

The numeral 13 designates a funnel having open ends 14 and 16. One open end 14 of said funnel 13 is constructed to correspond with the size and shape of the window opening 12. The opposite open end 16 of said funnel 13 is cylindrical. The taper of the inner walls 17 of the funnel 13 is toward the cylindrical open end 16. I have found that a spray of water in the magnitude of 600 gallons per minute can be satisfactorily captured in the funnel 13 if the length thereof, measured along its longitudinal axis is in the range of from 44 inches to 60 inches and the taper of the inner Walls 17 is in the range of from 50 to 70 with reference to the longitudinal axis of the funnel 13, and the diameter of the cylindrical open end 16 thereof is in the range of from 21 inches to 25 inches.

The funnel 13 is positioned adjacent to the window opening 12 with its cylindrical open end 16 distant therefrom, and it is secured to the inner wall of the drill tower 11 by the turnbuckles 18.

The numeral 21 designates a reservoir having an open end 22 and a closed end 23 with a small opening 24 extending through said closed end 23. The reservoir is curved so as the longitudinal axis extending through the open end 22 thereof is in the range of to with relation to the longitudinal axis extending through the closed end 23.

The numeral 26 indicates a screen positioned transversely to the longitudinal axis extending through the closed end 23 of the reservoir 21. The screen 26 is secured to the inner walls of the reservoir 21 at a point intermediate the bent portion of the reservoir 21 and its closed end 23. I have found that the screen eliminates turbulence of water rushing into the reservoir 21, thereby increasing its emptying characteristics.

The numeral 27 indicates handles on the outer wall of the reservoir 21 to be used in moving or adjusting the reservoir 21.

The open end 22 of the reservoir 21 is connected at an angle to the cylindrical open end 16 of the funnel 13 so as to provide a water tight union which is maintained by the turnbuckles 19. This connection is made so as water emptying out of the reservoir 21 through the opening 24 in the closed end 23 thereof will be most aided by the force of gravity.

I have found that if the capacity of the reservoir 21 is in the range of from 65 to 75 gallons, water entering the reservoir 21 at the rate of 600 gallons per minute will empty through a 4 inch opening in the closed end 23 thereof without washing back into the funnel 13.

The numeral 29 indicates a pipe which is connected to the reservoir 21 at the opening 24 in the closed end 23 thereof.

The numeral 28 indicates a horseshoe shaped stand which is positioned around the pipe 29 so as to support the reservoir 21.

Numeral 45 shows a hose leading from the pressure side of the pumping device 33.

In FIGURE 3, showing an alternative means for transmitting water emptying out of the reservoir, the numeral 34 indicates a hard suction hose connected at one end to the closed end of 23 of the reservoir 21, its opposite end being connected directly to the suction side of the pumping device 33.

FIGURE 4 shows an alternate embodiment of the funnel 13 and the reservoir 21. The numeral 35 indicates the funnel and numeral 43 shows the reservoir which is integral with the funnel 35, the two being interconnected by the open area 42. The funnel 35 and the reservoir 3 43 are separated by the lower wall 41 of the funnel 35. One end of the lower wall 41, which is indicated by the numeral 46, projects at an angle into the open area 42. The opposite end of the lower wall 41 intersects the resservoir wall 46 at an angle. Numeral 33 is a flange extending from the point of intersection of the lower wall 41 and the reservoir wall 4% into the funnel opening 14.

The numeral 3% indicates a screen disposed betwee the lower wall 41 of the funnel 35 and the floor 43 of the reservoir 48, thus forming a compartment 47 with respect to the reservoir in the area below the lower wall 4 The numeral 23 indicates the main pipe leading from the reservoir 43 at a point within the compartment 47. The pipe 2 enters the standpipe at a point lower than that shown in FIG. 4.

The numeral 36 represents an opening in the wall of the reservoir 43 adjacent to the top of the reservoir 43. Numeral 49 is an overflow pipe interconnecting the upper area of the reservoir 43 through the opening 36 and the standpipe 2% at a point lower than that shown in FIG. 4.

The numeral 37 shows a second pipe interconnecting the area inside the flange 38 and the standpipe 20 at a point lower than that shown.

In operation, water is pumped from the pumping device 33 through the hose 45 into the Window 1.2 of the drill tower 11: the water sprayed into the window 11 is deflected by the funnel l3 through the cylindrical open end 16 thereof and into the reservoir 21 Where by the force of gravity and water pressure, the water flows through the opening 24 in the closed end of the reservoir 21 into the standpipe 29 from where it flows into the sump 31 from where it is sucked into the pumping device 33 and again made to repeat the cycle. As pointed out above, the water can be made to by-pass the sump 31 by use of the hose 34 connecting the reservoir 21 and the pumping device 33.

In operation of the alternative structure shown in FIG. 4, water is pumped into the funnel 35 and is captured in the reservoir 43 from where it flows by gravity through the pipe 29 to the standpipe 20. As the water enters the compartment 47, turbulence thereof is substantially reduced by the screen 39. The overflow pipe 49 serves to prevent water filling 1n the reservoir from flowing back through the funnel 35 to the outside. The flange 38 prevents water from washing down the lower wall to the outside, such water is captured and conveyed by gravity to the standpipe 2% by the pipe 37.

Having thus described my invention, I claim:

1. A fire training apparatus which comprises: a structure having an opening therein; a receptacle having an opening therein through one side thereof adjacent its top, said top being sloped in a declining angle away from said side with the opening therein, said receptacle being connected to the internal Wall of said structure so that said structure opening and said receptacle opening are in alignment; a baflle extending internally in said receptacle at an inclining angle from the base of said receptacle opening; a

flange fastened at the base of said receptacle opening and protruding into said receptacle opening; an opening through said baflle at a point adjacent said flange; water pumping means; water conduit means interconnecting the base of said receptacle and said Water pumping means, said water conduit means entering the base of said receptacle at a point below said baflle; a second water conduit means interconnecting the base of said receptacle and the first water conduit means, said second water conduit means entering the base of said receptacle at a point distant from the area below said baflle; a screen fastened in said receptacle so as to extend between the innermost edge of said bafile and the base of said receptacle; a hose extending from said water pumping means capable of directing water into the said structure opening.

2. A fire training apparatus which comprises: a structure having an opening therein; a funnel connected to the internal wall of said structure, one open end of said funnel being aligned with said structure opening; a reservoir having an open and a closed end being interconnected with the interior of said funnel through the open end of said reservoir; an opening extending through the closed end of said reservoir; screening means traversing the interior of said reservoir at a point distant from its said closed end; water pumping means; water conduit means aligned with said opening in the closed end of said reservoir and interconnecting said reservoir with said water pumping means; a hose extending from said water pumping means capable of directing water into the said structure opening.

3. A fire training apparatus which comprises: a structure having an opening therein; a funnel connected to the internal wall of said structure, one open end of said funnel being aligned with said structure opening; an elongated curved reservoir having an open end and a closed end with an opening extending through said closed end, the open end of said reservoir being connected to the reduced open end of said funnel so that the closed end of said reservoir, is positioned at a point below the open end thereof, said reservoir being curved so that the intersecting angle between the longitudinal axis extending through the open end thereof and the longitudinal axis extending through the closed end thereof is in the range of from 100 to 130; screening means traversing said reservoir at a point distant from its said closed end; a sump; a standpipe interconnecting said reservoir, through its closed end; with said sump; a hose capable of directing water into said structure opening; pumping means interconnecting said sump and said hose.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1640417 *May 8, 1926Aug 30, 1927Keystone Mfg CoPumping-engine truck
US1747428 *Jun 15, 1929Feb 18, 1930Francis Crawford WilburDisplay device
US1833726 *Apr 26, 1929Nov 24, 1931Conover CompanyDemonstrator sink
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AT152015B * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4001949 *May 9, 1975Jan 11, 1977The Ansul CompanyDynamic fire simulator and trainer
US4526548 *Nov 1, 1984Jul 2, 1985Tifa LimitedMobile firefighter training equipment
US4861270 *Aug 30, 1988Aug 29, 1989Symtron Systems, Inc.Fire fighting trainer
US4983124 *Jul 31, 1989Jan 8, 1991Symtron Systems, Inc.Fire fighting trainer
US5335559 *May 11, 1993Aug 9, 1994Symtron Systems, Inc.Fire fighting trainer and apparatus
US5345830 *Jun 18, 1993Sep 13, 1994Symtron Systems, Inc.Fire fighting trainer and apparatus including a temperature sensor
US20030124496 *Mar 1, 2001Jul 3, 2003Hough Stephen JohnFire-fighter training
Classifications
U.S. Classification434/226
International ClassificationG09B19/00, G09B9/00, A62C99/00
Cooperative ClassificationG09B9/00, A62C99/009, G09B19/00
European ClassificationG09B9/00, G09B19/00, A62C99/00F