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Publication numberUS3072022 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 8, 1963
Filing dateOct 30, 1961
Priority dateOct 30, 1961
Publication numberUS 3072022 A, US 3072022A, US-A-3072022, US3072022 A, US3072022A
InventorsEcker Charles W, Holte Erik B, Wood Davis M
Original AssigneeEcker Charles W, Holte Erik B, Wood Davis M
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Missile container suspension system
US 3072022 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

I D. M. WOOD ET AL MISSILE CONTAINER SUSPENSION SYSTEM Jan. 8, 1963 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Oct. 50, 1961 mvszvrons Davis M. Wood Erik B Ho/fe Char/es W. Ecker WCOW ATTORNEY 6 Jan. 8, 1963 D. M. WOOD ETAL MISSILE CONTAINER SUSPENSION SYSTEM 5 SheetsSheet 2 Filed Oct. 30, 1961 Jan. 8, 1963 D. M. WOOD ET AL MISSILE CONTAINER SUSPENSION SYSTEM 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed Oct. 30, 1961 Jan. 8, 1963 D. M. WOOD ETAL 3,072,022

MISSILE M Jan. 8, 1963 D. M. WOOD ET AL MISSILE CONTAINER SUSPENSION SYSTEM 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed Oct. 50, 1961 0 a p JIIIQIFQ A E v x 3 7 6 B C S 0 6 7 4 9 9 0 5 5 5 5 5 5 4 4 0 0 0 -Q--- N 0 0 1/ 0 I 0 00 I 0 0 00 l 00! l|||l|l||l aataazz Patented Jan. 8, 19%3 3,072,022 MKSLE QQNTAINER SUSPENSHUN SYSTEM Davis M. Wood, loos Altos, Erik B. Holte, Campbell, and

Charles W. Eclrer, Aptos, Califi, assignors, by mesne assignments, to the United States of America as represented by the Secretary of the Navy Filed Oct. fall, 1961, Ser. No. 148,769 7 Claims. (til. 89ll.'7)

This invention relates to containers and more particularly to a missile package consisting of a suspension system and an outer container capsule. The combining of these two components aflord shock and environmental protection to a missile during handling, transportation and field and shipboard stowage phases.

The missile package consists primarily of an outer container or capsule and an inner tube or shell capable of withstanding launching pressure and also heat encountered during hot launching. The inner tube is composed of a non-corrosive aluminum alloy and surrounds the missile and is maintained out of direct contact with the missile by suitable guides and seal. The missile-base end of the inner tube is closed and provided with a centrally disposed swivel-gland aperture in which is disposed a swivel gland, the nose end of the inner tube being provided with a removable cover. The segment or portion of the tube which encloses the missile re-entry body is also removable, thereby to allow the re-entry body to be mated to the missile in the tube in the event it should be necessary to store re-entry bodies separately. A plurality of padtype transversely disposed air springs are attached to the outer surface of theinner liner and are provided with nylon sheeting on the outer surface thereof to prevent sculling and to permit sliding of the inner liner into the outer container or the submarine launching tube, as the case may be. A toroidal axial air spring is disposed between each end of the inner liner and the end caps or covers of the outer container and secured thereto in any conventional manner. The capsule or outer container provides environmental conditioning and adds physical protection to the missile disposed in the inner container during transportation and storage. It is hermetically sealed to maintain pressure and humidity and structurally designed to withstand handling and transportation loadings. The inner container supporting the missile may contain access ports and provisions for system checkout of the missile through umbilical plugs and for control of the internal pressure and temperature.

An object of the present invention is to provide a new and improved transportation and storage container for heavy objects.

Another object of the invention is to provide a new and improved container capable of protecting a delicate object container therein from severe shock and vibrations during handling, transportation and field and shipboard stowage phases.

Another object of the invention is to provide a missile package wherein the missile is always protected by a suspension system up to the time of firing and is never handled in its bare condition.

Still another object of the invention is to provide a missile package consisting of an outer container capsule and an inner shell containing the missile and a suspension system between the outer container and the inner shell.

A further object of the invention is to provide a missile package wherein the inner missile container of the package may be readily transferred into the launching tube of a submarine.

A still further object of the invention is to provide a missile package wherein internal pressurization of the missile contained therein may be maintained through permanent connections during handling, transportation, storage and shipboard stowage.

Other objects and many of the attendant advantages of this invention will be readily appreciated as the same ecomes better understood by reference to the following detailed description when considered in connection with the accompanying drawings wherein:

FIG. 1 is a side elevational View of the missile container constructed in accordance with the present invention;

FIGS. 2 and 2A are enlarged longitudinal sectional views taken substantially on the line 22 of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is an enlarged transverse sectional View taken substantially on the line 3-3 of FIG. 2;

FIG. 4 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view of one of the air spring arrangements;

FIG. 5 is a schematic view illustrating the container in a position so that the inner container and missile may be lowered into the launching tube of the submarine;

FIG. 6 is a view similar to FIG. 5 illustrating the inner container and missile being lowered into the launching tube, portions of thelaunching tube and outer container being broken away and in section;

FIG. 7 is a view partially in elevation and partially in section illustrating the inner missile container in firing position within the conventional submarine launching tube;

FIG. 8 is an enlarged sectional view illustrating the mating of the eject-air tube and the end cover of the missile containers; and

PEG. 9 is an enlarged fragmentary sectional view illustrating the missile support ring, seals and hold-down devices.

Referring now to the drawings and more paritcularly to FIGS. 1, 2 and 2A thereof, the missile container suspension device, constructed in accordance with the present invention, is indicated generally by the numeral 16 The device 10 comprises an elongated outer capsule or container 11 having a forward section 12 and an after sec tion 13, the forward section being detachably secured to the after section as by mating flanges and bolts 15, or the like. The section 12 is provided with a cap or cover 16 detachably secured thereto as by bolts 17, the cap 16 eing provided with a centrally disposed access port 18 sealed by a disc or cover 19. The section 13 is provided with a similar cap or cover 21 detachably secured thereto as by bolts 22, and having a centrally disposed access port 23 sealed by a disc or plate 2 The sections 12 and 13 are provided with a plurality of mutually spaced reinforcing bands or annuluses 25 which are of any desired configuration such, for example, as channel shape. The sections 12 and 13 are further provided with longitudinally extending reinforcing elements 26 and a pair of oppositely disposed pivotally mounted clevis devices or eyes 30 mounted on the section 12 near the cover 16, as best shown on FIGS. 1 and 5, to facilitate handling of the missile package.

An inner liner or shell generally indicated by the numeral 27 is disposed within the outer container or capsule 11 and comprises a forward tubular section 28 and-after tubular section 29, the forward section 23 being detachably secured to the after section 29 by flanges 31 and bolts 32. The section 28 is closed and sealed by a cover 33, the cover being detachably secured thereto, as by bolts 34 and provided with a centrally disposed eye 35 to facilitate handling of the inner container 27. The after section 29 is closed by a cover 36 detachably secured thereto, as by bolts 37, the cover having a flanged portion 38 integrally formed therewith and forming a centrally disposed opening 39 in the cover normally sealed by a plate 35 A. A support, FIGS. 7 and 8, generally indicated by the numeral 41 is attached to the cover 36 to the cover 36 in any suitable manner such, for example,

as by bolts or the like 45. Rotatably mounted by reason of the aforesaid flared portion 42 and flanges 33 is a member 40 having an CB ring 40 carried thereby midway between the terminal ends thereof as best shown on FIG. 8, the purpose of which will be hereinafter more fully described.

As more clearly shown on FIGS. 2A and 9 a sealing and hold-down arrangement 46 is carried by and disposed with the after end of the inner container. The aforesaid structure is provided with an annular member 47 attached to the inner container in any conventional manner the member 47 carrying sealing gaskets or rings 4?,- and E9 in sealing engagement with the tail end of the missile, as best shown in FlG. 2A and 9. A plurality of hold-down elements 49A are carried by the member 47 and are provided with pressure operated detents or hold-down devices 4913 normally disposed within an annular groove G found in the tail end of the missile M, whereupon the missile M is normally locked to the inner container 27. The section 29 of the inner container has disposed therein a plurality of mutually spaced guides 50 composed of any ma terial suitable for the purpose such, for example, as rubher or the like. By this arrangement together with the structure 46 direct contact of the missile M with the inner container is prevented and a sealed chamber 51 is provided at the tail end of the missile.

The sections 12 and 13 of the capsule 11 are provided with normally sealed access ports 77, as best shown in FIG. 1, which provide for system checkout of the missile through the umbilical plug 64 and for control of the internal pressure and temperature. Access to the missile is available through scalable ports 78 in the inner container 27 which match the access ports 77 of the outer container or capsule 11. It will be further understood that the section 12 of the capsule 11 is removable and the section 28 of the inner container 27 is also removable. This feature allows the re-entry body R of the missile M to be mated to the missile M in the inner container if it should be necessary to store the re-entry body separately.

It will be noted on FIGS. 2, 2A and 4 that a plurality of pad-type air springs 53 and 54 are circumferentially disposed about the section 29 of the inner container, the air spring having the inner surface thereof attached to the section 25 and the outer surface thereof provided with a sheeting 55, composed of any synthetic material such, for example, as nylon, whereby the inner liner may readily slide into the outer container or the submarine launching tube, as the case may be. It will be understood that the air springs 53 and 54 are normally charged and disposed between the outer surface of section 29 of the inner container and the inner surface of section 13 of the outer container. Each of the aforesaid air springs 53 and 54 are provided with a surge tank 56 carried by the section 29 of the inner container and connected in fluid communication with their respective air spring by a pipe or conduit 57.

The cap 16 carries a toroidal air spring 58 connected to a surge tank 59, as by a pipe or conduit 61. A similar toroidal air spring 62 is carried by the cap 21 and connected to a surge tank 63, as by a pipe or conduit similar to the pipe 61. By the aforesaid air spring arrangement the missile is protected against vibration and shock loads encountered during shipping, handling and shipboard stowage, it being understood that the pad-type air springs provide transverse support to the inner liner and the toroidal air spring at each end of the container provides axial support thereof.

The inner container or shell may be provided with conventional umbilical plug 64 to provide for system checkout and for control of the internal pressure and temperature, umbilical and servicing connections being made in the submarine through the launching tube in the conventional manner.

The dockside operation of transferring the missile from the container 10 to the storage or launching tube of the submarine is shown on FIGS. 5 through 7. A sling 65, FiG. 5, is attached from a suitable hoist (not shown) to the eyes 35-9 carried by the outer container 11 and the container or capsule 11 is th n upended and hoisted to a position over the submarine storage or launching tube T. However, prior to attaching the sling 65 to the container and hoisting the capsule 11 into the position as shown in FIG. 5, the forward inspection cover 19 is removed from cap 16 and in place thereof a conventional Winch 66 is attached thereto. Thereafter the section 12 is detached from section 13 of the capsule 11 and a cable 67 carried by winch 66 is attached to eye 35' on closure 33, it being understood that after the cable 67 has been attached in the aforesaid manner, the section 12 is attached to the section 13 of the capsule and the end cap 21 is removed from section 12. When this has been done the capsule is hoisted and moved to the position shown on FIG. 5 in the aforesaid manner. It will be noted, FIG. 5, that a detachable guard rail 68 is employed to protect and guide the capsule as the capsule 11 is moved into alignment with the storage or launching tube T and that a plurality of guy wires '69 support the capsule in this position.

It will be noted in PEG. 6 that when the package 10 is in a missile transfer position, the after end of the capsule or outer container 11 is seated on the upper end of the tube T and thus the outer and inner missile containers are in axial alignment with the tube T and thus the inner missile container may be lowered into the tube T. During the lowering operation, if desired, the transverse air springs 53 and 54-, may be partially deflated so that the inner missile container may readily be lowered down through the outer container and into the tube T by the winch 66 and cable 67, as the winch is operated, as best shown in FIG. 6. It will be understood that during the aforesaid lowering operation of the toroidal air spring 58 carried by cap 16 remains with the capsule.

With reference to FIG. 7, it will be noted that as the missile container reaches the bottom of the tube T, conventional eject-air tube 71 automatically enters the swivel gland 41 carried by end closure plate 36, and is sealed therein by the O ring 449'. In this position the cover or closure 36 of the inner container rests on a toroidal air spring 72 disposed in the lower end of tube T and controlled by a surge tank 73 connected thereto in a manner similar to the connection between air springs 53, 54, 58 and 62. By the aforesaid arrangement the missile container 27 is provided with transverse protection by the air springs 53 and 54 and axial protection by the toroidal air springs 62 and 58.

When the inner liner or missile container has been lowered into tube T in the aforesaid manner the capsule 11 is removed from the launching tube by the sling 65 and hoist (not shown) the cover 33 is detached from section 28 of the inner liner 27 and is replaced with a sealing diaphragm 74 disposed between the tube T and the section 28 and a large frangible diaphragm 75 disposed at the upper terminal end of the section 28 in sealing engagement therewith, as best shown in FIG. 7. After the diaphragms 74 and 75 have been attached to the tube end section, the conventional launcher tube cover 76 having suitable sealing means is moved into engagement with the tube T thereby further sealing the end of the section 28 and tube T, it being understood that during a launching operation the cover 76 is moved to unseal the tube T and missile container 27.

When the inner container has been installed into the tube T the aforesaid hold-down detents 49B releasably hold the missile until the missile is fired and suitable r latches 49C or the like, carried by tube T, hold the inner container in place as the missile is fired.

From the foregoing it will be apparent that the missile package consists of an inner missile container, an outer container capsule and a suspension system disposed between the inner missile container and the outer container capsule. Together these components afford shock and environmental protection to the missile during handling, transportation and field and shipboard stowage phases. For example, transverse protection is provided by the two groups of pad-type air springs 53 and 54 and surge tanks 56 carried by the inner missile container 27, and axial protection is provided by toroidal air springs 65 and 62 carried by covers 1 621 and surge tanks 5963 and/or by toroidal air spring 72 and surge tank 73 carried in the lower end of tube T. Moreover, the axial system provides enough deflection to permit all specified loads to be absorbed on a linear suspension basis. Friction force between the transverse pad-type air spring and the outer container or tube T, as the case may be, supplies damping. This force will have a value of about 0.8 g's or 25,000 pounds (.8 of the total spring weight of about 32,000 pounds). With the relatively large'longitudinal excursion possible, this will provide adequate damping for the axial system. In the transverse system the excursion is limited by the inside diameter of the tube T. A certain amount of damping is also available in the transverse direction due to the friction between the air springs and the outer container and/ or the tube T, as the case may be. But in the transverse case, the total contact area consists only of areas of the pad segments which are at 90 from the direction of the impact load. This amounts to a damping force of about 0.2 gs in opposition to the relative motion.

Obviosuly, many modifications and variations of the present invention are possible in the light of the above teaching. It is, therefore, to be understood that Within the scope of the appended claims the invention may be practiced otherwise than specifically described.

What is claimed is:

1. A shock absorbing package for delicate objects comprising a normally sealed outer container, a normally sealed inner container disposed within the outer container in spaced relation with respect thereto, a missile disposed and sealed within said inner container and releasably locked thereto, an annular groove formed at one end of the missile, pressure actuated detent means normally disposed within said groove for releasably locking the missile to the inner container, spring means in engagement with the pressure actuated means for maintaining the detent means in the groove until the pressure actuated detent means are operated to a release position, means for establishing an external pressure connection with the pressure actuated detent means, a first group of mutually spaced pad type air springs carried by and circumferentially disposed about the inner container in engagement with the outer container, a second group of mutually spaced pad type air springs carried by and circumferentially disposed about the inner container in engagement with the outer container, a first group of surge tanks connected individually to said first group of pad type air springs, a second group of surge tanks connected individually to said second group of pad type air springs, a first toroidal air spring carried at one end of the outer container in engagement with one end of the inner container and having surge tank connected thereto, and a second toroidal air spring carried at the other end of the outer container in engagement with the other end of the inner container.

2. A shock absorbing package for a missile comprising a normally sealed capsule, a normally sealed inner container disposed within said capsule in spaced relation with respect to said capsule and having a missile supported therein and releasably locked thereto, means including amazes sealing elements disposed within the capsule for supporting the missile in spaced relation with respect thereto, an annular groove formed in the missile, a plurality of pressure operated detents carried on the inner container and disposed within said groove for releasably locking the missile to the inner container, spring means in engagement with each pressure operated detent of said plurality of detents for maintaining the detents in the groove until the detents are operated, means for establishing a pressure connection to each pressure operated detent of said plurality of detents, normally sealed access ports disposed at opposite ends of the capsule, pad type air springs including surge tanks disposed within the capsule between the capsule and inner container for providing transverse support for the inner container, and toroidal air springs including surge tanks disposed within the capsule between the terminal ends of the capsule and terminal ends of the inner container for providing axial support for the inner container.

3. A shock absorbing missile package comprising a. normally sealed capsule, a normally sealed inner container disposed within said capsule in spaced relation with respect to said capsule and having a missile supported therein, pad type air springs including surge tanks carried by said capsule and disposed between the capsule and the inner container for providing transverse support for the inner container, toroidal air springs including surge tanks carried by said capsule and disposed within the capsule between the terminal ends of the capsule and inner container for providing axial support for the inner container, means carried by and disposed within the inner container in sealing engagement therewith and with the missile for providing a sealing connection therebetween, hold-down means carried by the inner container in engagement with the missile for releasably maintaning the missile within the inner container, said hold-down means including pressure operated means carried by the inner container and normally in locking engagement with said missile, spring means in engagement with said pressure operated means for maintaining the pressure operated means in locking engagement with the missile until the pressure operated means are actuated to a release position by the pressure, and means for establishing an eX- ternal pressure connection to the pressure operated means.

4. A. shock absorbing missile package according to claim 3 wherein said sealing means includes an annular member carried by the inner container at the lower end thereof and a pair of sealing elements carried by the annular member in sealing engagement with the missile.

5. In combination with a missile launching tube, a container disposed within said launching tube in spaced relation with respect thereto, a missile disposed within said container, a plurality of shock absorbing pad type air springs carried by and circumferentially disposed about said container in engagement with said tube, a plurality of surge tanks carried by the container and connected to one of each of said plurality of pad type air springs, a shock absorbing toroidal air spring carried by the tube in engagement with said container at one end thereof, means carried by the container for sealing the container at the other end thereof, hold-down means carried by the tube in engagement with the container, additional hold-down means carried by the container, said additional hold-down means including pressure operated means normally in locking engagement with the missile, spring means for maintaining the pressure operated means in locking engagement with the missile until the pressure operated means are actuated to a release position as pressure is applied thereto, and means for establishing an external pressure connection to the pressure operated means.

6. In combination with a missile launching tube, a container disposed within said launching tube and having a closure plate at one end of the container and a frangible diaphragm at the other end thereof, a missile disposed gland in sealing engagement with the ejector-air tube for providing a sealing connection therebetween and the pressure chamber means including a plurality of air springs for yieldably supporting the missile within the launching tube, fluid pressure actuated detents carried by the container in locking engagement with the missile for releasably locking the missile to the container and for releasing the missile as fluid pressure is applied thereto, resilient means for maintaining the detents in locking engagement with the missile, and means for establishing an external fluid pressure connection to the pressure actuated detents.

7. In combination with a missile launching tube, a container disposed within said launching tube and having a closure plate at one end and sealing diaphragrns at the other end thereof, a missile disposed within said container, sealing gaskets carried by said container in sealing engagement with said missile and forming a pressure chamber between said closure plate and the sealing means, an ejector-air devicedisposed within the launching tube and extending into said pressure chamber, a swivel gland carried by said closure plate for receiving said ejector-air tube, a plurality of mutually spaced pad type air spring shock absorbers disposed between said container and the tube, a toroidal shock absorber supported within the tube in engagement with said closure plate, hold-down means carried by the tube in engagement with the container, a plurality of casings carried by said container, a pressure operated detent disposed in each casing of said plurality of casings, a spring disposed within each casing in engagement with the detent therein for normally maintaining the detent in locking engagement with the missile, and means in communication with each casing for establishing an external pressure connection thereto.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS

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Classifications
U.S. Classification89/1.806, 206/522, 206/3, 89/1.818, 89/1.81
International ClassificationF41F3/00, F41F3/042
Cooperative ClassificationF41F3/042
European ClassificationF41F3/042