Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3072935 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 15, 1963
Filing dateSep 12, 1961
Priority dateSep 12, 1961
Publication numberUS 3072935 A, US 3072935A, US-A-3072935, US3072935 A, US3072935A
InventorsRuby Elmer H
Original AssigneeRuby Elmer H
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Automatic mop and cloth cleaning machine
US 3072935 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

E. H. RUBY AUTOMATIC MOP AND CLOTH CLEANING MACHINE 3 Shee t 1 Jan. 15, 1963 Filed Sept. 12, 1961 M nn INVENTOR wwww ATTORNEYS Jan. 15, 1963 E. H. RUBY 3,072,935

AUTOMATIC MOP AND CLOTH CLEANING MACHINE Filed Sept. 12, 1961 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 ATTORNEYS Jan. 15, 1963 E. H. RUBY 3,072,935

AUTOMATIC MOP AND CLOTH CLEANING MACHINE Filed Sept. 12, 1961 3 Sheets-Sheet 5 ATTORNEYS INVENT OR United States atent free 3,072,935 AUTOMATEC Mi)? AND CLOTH CLEANING MACHINE Elmer H. Ruby, YMCA, 2nd and Market Sta, Hamilton, Ohio Filed Sept. 12, 1961, Ser. No. 137,603 15 Claims. (Cl. 15-4) This invention relates to a machine for cleaning mops, scrub rags, dust cloths, and other j-anitors implements. Machine cleaning of such items has been proposed, and attempted heretofore, but results have been disappointing for many reasons, among which may be mentioned the fact that it has been necessary to disassemble mops from their handles, and subsequently reassemble them, and in particular, in the case of the common, tasseled or fringed mop, the strings almost invariably become knotted and entangled, requiring adjustment prior to continued use. In addition, these machines have not been noteworthy for thorough removal of dirt or dust.

, It is a primary object of the present invention to provide a cleaning machine for mops which does not require dismantling them from their handles.

A further object is to provide a machine which is capable of wet washing, or of scavenging dirt and dust from mops or clothes in the dry state.

More particularly it is an object to effect cleaning through a gyratory movement of the article in an environment which provides fluid currents for eflici-ently ridding the articles of foreign matter, and in which sedimentation is facilitated.

Other objects include the provision of a device which is simple of construction, easy of manufacture, operation and maintenance, and low in bulk and cost.

These and other ends, which will be readily apparent are attained by the present invention, which may be briefly described as comprising a central, storage tank for fluid, flanked by shallow operating tanks, and a crank drive having a clamp for securing the handle of a mop which is immersed in an operating tank, or for securing the handle of an agitating implement known as a dasher. In cooperation with the moving mop, or the dasher, the operating tanks, for a wet process have a perforated, bottom plate arranged to enhance circulation of fluid as well as trap sediment, and in either a wet or dry process, the tank is provided with a spring-suspended, perforated plate which not only provides an upward jet action, but also positively draws dust or dirt downward, thus materially improving over a mere process of sedimentation.

For a more detailed description of the invention, reference is made to the following specification, as illustrated in the drawings, in which:

FIGURE 1 is a side elevational view of the machine, with the wet tank in the foreground, and partly broken away;

FIGURE 2 is a top plan view of the machine of FIG- URE l, with parts of the two side tanks broken away;

FIGURE 3 is a front elevational view of the machine, with the side tanks shown in section along the line 3--3 of FIGURE 2;

FIGURE 4 is a sectional view taken on the line 4-4 of FIGURE 3, showing a detail of the ciamp holder for mop handles;

FIGURE 5 is a sectional view taken on the line S- S of FIGURE 4;

FIGURE 6 is a perspective view of a fragment of the tide plate, carried in the bottom of the wet tank,

FIGURE 7 is a section through the dry tank, taken on the line 7--7 of FIGURE 3;

FIGURE 8 is a fragmentary view, in perspective of a portion of the fluid-supply tank and the wet tank, showing the piping and controls;

FIGURE 9 is a fragmentary view of a wet tank, suchas shown to the left in FIGURE 3, showing cleaning rags in association with a dash plate agitator; and

FIGURE 10 is a schematic diagram showing the wiring associated with the timer.

Referring to the drawings by characters of reference, there is shown a system of three rectangular tanks, comprising a central, high tank 10, and at its sides, in contacting relationship, two relatively shallow tanks 12, 14, somewhat longer than the central tank, and, in the form shown, approximately square in vertical cross section. All three tanks are mounted on legs 16, of equal height, and the bottoms of the tanks are disposed at a common level, although this is not essential.

In its main function, the middle tank 10, serves as a reservoir and sedimentation tank, in a system of circulating cleaning fluid, which includes the tank 12. The middle tank also serves as a support pedestal for the apparatus which imparts mechanical agitation to the tanks, either through a mop handle or the handle of an auxiliary dasher plate. A motor 18, which actuates the agitating mechanism and the re-circulating pump 20, is carried on a plate 22, mounted crosswise on the top of middle tank 10, near one end thereof, and the pulley system, as well as the agitator, or oscillator, are carried by a frame-work atop the tank 10, comprising four vertical corner posts 24, of angle iron, supporting a platform of angle iron with an end piece 26 and two side pieces 28. At the open end of the platform, the respective corner posts 24 carry outwardly extending bearing blocks 29, in which a horizontal countenshaft 30 is journ-alled. Keyed to shaft 30 are three pulleys, one of which, 32, receives rotation from the motor through a belt 34, engaging a pulley 36 on the motor shaft. A second pulley 37 on shaft 30 communicates rotation to a pulley 38 on pump 20 through a belt 40, the pump shaft 42, holding the pulley, being journalled in a bearing block 44 secured to tank 10. A vertical pipe 46 leads from the pump to a fitting 48 in tank 10, and a horizontal pipe 49 leads from a fitting 50 on the pump to a fitting 52 in the wall of the wet tank 12, near the bottom thereof. A third pulley 54 on shaft 30 communicates rotation to the shaker system through a belt 56, engaging a pulley 58-, keyed to a horizontal shaft 60, which is journalled in a pair of bearing blocks 62, carried on side pieces 28 of the top platform.

The agitators are actuated through crank arms 64, located at opposite ends of shaft 60. Since the two agitators are identical in structure ,only one need be described, and the same reference numerals will apply to corresponding parts in each. Crank arm 64 has a bore 66 near one end, which is received on the end of shaft 60, and the arm is keyed to the shaft by a set screw 68. A holding plate 70 for mop handles is pivotally attached, near its upper end, to an outer part of crank arm 64, by means of a pin 72, which passes through a tubular bearing 74 on plate 70, and a bore 76 in the crank arm, the pin having a head 78, and being secured by a washer 79 and a cotter pin 80. As seen in FIGURE 4, the plate 70 is arcuate in lateral cross section, for eflicient gripping of round handles of various diameters. For clamping the handle to the plate, a short length of clamp plate 82, similar in cross section to plate 70 is connected at one edge to an edge of plate 70 by a hinge 84, being so mounted that when closed upon plate 70, the concave sides of the tWo plates are facing. Hinged plate 82 carries a tab 86 with slot 88 opening in its outer edge and plate 70 has a laterally extending tab 90 adjacent the hinge, and having a central bore 92 adapted to receive a locking bolt 94. The slot 88 clears the bolt in the swinging movement on closing the clamp, and the clamp is locked in place by a wing nut 96, engaging bolt 94.

On rotation of shaft 60, and consequent full-circle swing of crank arm 64, an up-and-down movement is imparted to the handle clamp assembly. In order to also give the mop holder a lateral component of motion, rendering its total action similar to that of a manually operated broom, for instance, the clamp plate 70 fixedly carries a headed pivot pin 98 near its lower end, which is slidably mounted in a slot 100, opening through the end edge of the lower section 102 of a strap having a diagonal bend 104 at its middle, and an upper, vertical section 106, secured, as by welding, to one of the side, angle irons 28, and abutting the tank 10. The pivot 98 is threaded to receivee a nut 108 in a manner permitting turning of the pivot and the nut. As the upper pivot 72 on the bar oscillates in a circular path, the lower pivot 98 is constrained to a vertical path, which results in an up-and-down movement as well as a side-wise swing of the lower end of a mop or tool carried by the clamp bar. Alternatively, the sliding pivot could be carried by the strap section 102, and the slot provided in the lower part of clamp plate 70. To improve the frictional hold of the clamp on handles, both the plate 70 and the swinging plate 82 are provided, on their inner surfaces, 'with pads 110, of resilient material, such as rubber, leather, or plastic, secured in any convenient manner, such as by rivets 112.

The agitator above wet tank the handle 114 of an elongate mop 116 with depending cords 118, the working head of the mop being within the tank 12, and near the bottom thereof, substantially immersed in the fluid 120 when at the lowest point of its motion. Supported on the bottom of the wet tank is a tide plate, or surge plate, comprising two corrugated sheets or plates 122, 124, butt-connected by a series of riveted, splint plates 126, bent along the joining line of the plates so that the plates are arranged at an obtuse, dihedral angle. The plates 122, 124 are each provided with a plurality of perforations 128, for through passage of fluid and particles of foreign matter, and these perforations may be arranged in an orderly geometric pattern, or at random. The tide plate is loosely fitted in the tank so that fluid may pass over its side and end edges, and this circumstance, in conjunction with the perforations in the plates, brings about a gyratory current movement within the fluid in response to the rise, dip, and lateral movement of the mop head, the currents, in one phase of movement, passing downward through the perforations, and upward around the outer edges of the plates. However, the turbulence below the plate will be much less in degree than that above the plates, so that sedimentation of all but the finest particles is favored, below the plate, and proceeds at an optimum rate. Most of the particles remaining in suspension, being free of the mop, will settle out after cessation of the agitation.

After the cleaning operation, the cleaning fluid is returned to tank through pipes 49 and 46, by pump 20, and passes through a filter 130, located within the tank, and connected to line 46, whereby the fluid is conditioned for re-use by removal of the sediment. Sedimentation within tank 10 further purifies the fluid. For the rinsing operation, the relatively clean fluid in tank 10 is run by gravity through a pipe line 132 to the tank 12, and the mop again subjected to agitation in the clean fluid. These operations are effected automatically, through a conventional timer and associated mechanism as hereinafter described in general terms.

In the embodiment illustrated, the other, side tank 14 is adaptedfor cleaning or shaking out cloths or mops in the dry state, and therefore no fluid lines are shown connected to this tank. However, it will be understood that both tanks maybe arranged for selective use of either a wet or a dry process. As shown, tank 14 has no tide plate, such as 122, 124, but carries, in resilient suspension, what may be termed a bellows plate 134, which has a plurality of perforations 136, and is suspended from four coiled tension springs 138 near its corners, the latter being anchored on pins 140 carried by the end walls of the tank, near the 12 is shown as holding top edge thereof. The articles to be cleaned, such as dust cloths or scrub rags, indicated by the numeral 142, are loaded on top of the bellows plate 134, and a dasher plate 144 is superposed above the rags, its handle 146 being held in clamp 7082, and properly located so that the height of the dasher plate is such to allow reasonable movement about in the mass of cloths, at least at certain stages of the agitating movement. The gyratory movement of the dasher plate is, of course, the same as that of a mop, as above described, and in the downward phase of this motion the cloths are squeezed against the bellows plate, which yields in a downward, responsive movement, and at the same time the cloths are rubbed together in a lateral, shearing movement. This produces not only a beating action, but also a scrubbing action, as in the wet washing of clothes or other fabrics. During upward movement of the dasher plate the bellows plate is raised by the springs 138. A highly important feature of the dry process resides in the fact that the bellows plate provides a valve action, which yields to the downward movement, by virtue of its perforations, and produces a plurality of impinging blasts of air into the cloths, dislodging dust, and which, in the upward movement, sucks the free dust down through the openings. As in the case of the tide plate, the dust which passes downwardly through the plate is substantially trapped, and settling to the bottom is therefore facilitated. It may be mentioned also, that the upward jets of air are effective to carry much of the finer dust upwardly out of the tank, with ultimate disposal apart from the tank. I

In order to improve the valve action producing the suction eflect, the bellows plate 136 is preferably provided with a depending, peripheral skirt 148, formed from sheet stock or rubbery material, and secured to the outer edges of the plate with cement or suitable fasteners, such as rivets. This edge sealing confines air passage to the perforations, where it is effective to do work, and seals off the edges, where air currents would be wasted.

FIGURE 9 shows the use of the dasher plate 144 in the I wet tank 12, and in this case it will be readily understood that the cleaning action partakes of both the scrubbing action of the dasher plate in the dry process, and the current-inducing, or surge action of the tide plates 122, 124.

The piping and valve layout for the wet tank is shown in skeletonized form in FIGURE 8, wherein the arrows show the direction of fluid flow, and four solenoid valves are indicated. Line 49 to the pump has an outflow valve 150, and return line 132 from tank 10 has an inlet valve 152. For the alternative use of water as a cleaning agent,- a pipe line 154 from a water supply to tank 12 has an inlet valve 156, and a pipe line 158 from the tank to waste disposal has an outlet valve 160.

A timing unit or programmer 162, with ten stations, is shown mounted on tank 10 in FIGURE 8. The program'- mer is conventional, as commonly employed in washing machines, and therefore needs no detailed description, Broadly, the system, as applied to the cleaning operation dealt with herein, is shown in its essentials in the schematic layout in FIGURE 10, wherein the ten stages of the timer are indicated by an aligned series of rectangles, numbered consecutively through 9. The first five stages are for a cycle using water, and the second five for a cycle using cleaning fluid. For simplicity, only one main circuit including th source of E.M.F., 164, has been shown, but it will be understood that the system will be arranged to provide proper voltages to the motor, the pump, and the solenoid valves. The arrow 166 indicates the wiping contact for the ten commutator segments 168, and in their actual form these will comprise a radial arm and dial. At the first stage, valve 156 is cut in, permitting water to enter the tank, the subscripts wi indicating water inlet. At stage 2 the motor is cut in, causing agitating movement of whatever is clamped on either or both of the plates 70. At stage 3, valve 160 is cut in, permitting drainage of water from the tank (u/0 indicating. water outlet).

At stage 4, valve 156 is again cut in, allowing entry of rinse water. At stage 5, the motor is again out in to produce the agitation, and after the set interval of rinsing, all motion ceases. After removal of the cleaned object, the timer may be set manually to drain the tank, or the rinse water may be re-used for the next washing operation.

In stages 6 to 10, the sequence is substantially the same, using cleaning fluid instead of water, with filling at stage 6 through valve 152 (fi meaning fluid in), shaking at stage 7, pumping fluid out (f0) through valve 150 by pump at stage 8, refilling at stage 9, rinsing at the last stage, and stopping.

While a certain preferred embodiment has been shown and described herein, modifications will be apparent, in the light of this disclosure, and the invention should not, therefore, be deemed as limited, except insofar as shall appear from the spirit and scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A cleaning device for mops and other cleaning implements, comprising an associated group of tanks, with a central, fluid-supply tank, a first cleaning tank on one side of said supply tank and a second cleaning tank on the other side of said supply tank, a shaft mounted on top of said supply tank, for rotation on a horizontal axis, a crank arm carried at each end of said shaft, mounting means for an elongate handle associated with each crank arm, each said means comprising a clamp element, with a backing plate pivoted, in its upper portion, to an outer part of said crank arm, a clamp plate hingedly connected to said backing plate, means to lock said plates in clamping position, a strap carried at each side of said supply tank, a vertical sliding, pivotal connection between each said backing plate and one of said straps, a perforated plate in the form of a dihedral angle, nested in the bottom of said first tank, a series of coil springs secured in said second tank, a perforated plate suspended on said springs, a depending skirt of rubbery material mounted on the periphery of said suspended plate, a perforated plate adapted to be received in said tanks and having a handle for attachment in the clamp means, fluid conduit means including valves and a pump for circulating fluid between said supply tank and said first tank, power means carried on said supply tank, transmission means connecting said power means with said shaft and said pump, and a timer controlling said power means, pump, and valves.

2. A device as in claim 1, said backing plate and clamp plate being arcuate in cross section, with concave sides facing in the closed position of the clamp.

3. A cleaning device for mops and other cleaning implements, comprising an associated group of tanks, with a central, fluid-supply tank, a first cleaning tank on one side of said supply tank and a second cleaning tank on the other side of said supply tank, a shaft mounted on top of said supply tank, for rotation on a horizontal axis, a crank arm carried at each end of said shaft, mounting means for an elongate handle associated with each crank arm, each said means comprising a clamp element, with a backing plate pivoted, in its upper portion, to an outer part of said crank arm, a clamp plate hingedly connected to said backing plate, means to lock said plates in clamping position, a strap carried at each side of said supply tank, a vertical sliding, pivotal connection between each said backing plate and one of said straps, a perforated plate in the form of a dihedral angle, nested in the bottom of said first tank, a series of coil springs secured in said second tank, a perforated plate suspended on said springs, a depending skirt of rubbery material mounted on the periphery of said suspended plate, a perforated plate adapted to be received in said tanks and having a handle for attachment in the clamp means, fluid conduit means including valves and a pump for circulating fluid between said supply tank and said first tank, power means carried on said supply tank, and transmission means connecting said power means with said shaft and said pump.

4. A cleaning device for mops and other cleaning implements, comprising an associated group of tanks, with a central, fluid-supply tank, a first cleaning tank on one side of said supply tank and a second cleaning tank on the other side of said supply tank, a shaft mounted on top of said supply tank, for rotation on a horizontal axis, a crank arm carried at each end of said shaft, mounting means for an elongate handle associated with each crank arm, each said means comprising a clamp element, with a backing plate pivoted, in its upper portion, to an outer part of said crank arm, a clamp plate hingedly connected to said backing plate, means to lock said plates in clamping position, a strap carried at each side of said supply tank, a vertical, sliding, pivotal connection between each said backing plate and one of said straps, a perforated plate in the form of a dihedral angle, nested in the bottom of said first tank, a series of coil springs secured in said second tank, a perforated plate suspended on said springs, a depending skirt of rubbery material mounted on the periphery of said suspended plate, a perforated plate adapted to be received in said tank, and having a handle for attachment in the clamp means, power means carried on said supply tank, and transmission means connecting said power means with said shaft.

5. A cleaning device for mops and other cleaning implements, comprising an associated group of tanks, with a central, fluid-supply tank, a first cleaning tank on one side of said supply tank and a second cleaning tank on the other side of said supply tank, a shaft mounted on top of said supply tank, for rotation on a horizontal axis, a crank arm carried at each end of said shaft, mounting means for an elongate handle associated with each crank arm, each said means comprising a clamp element, with a backing plate pivoted, in its upper portion, to an outer part of said crank arm, a clamp plate hingedly connected to said backing plate, a strap carried at each side of said supply tank, a vertical sliding, pivotal connection between each said backing plate and one of said straps, a perforated plate in the form of a dihedral angle, nested in the bottom of said first tank, a series of coil springs secured in said second tank, a perforated plate suspended on said springs, a depending skirt of rubbery material mounted on the periphery of said suspended plate, a perforated plate adapted to be received in said tanks, and having a handle for attachment in the clamp means, power means carried on said supply tank, and transmission means connecting said power means with said shaft.

6. A cleaning device for mops and other cleaning implements, comprising an associated group of tanks, with a central, fluid-supply tank, a first cleaning tank on one side of said supply tank and a second cleaning tank on the other side of said supply tank, a shaft mounted on top of said supply tank, for rotation on a horizontal axis, a crank arm carried at each end of said shaft,'mounting means for an elongate handle associated with each crank arm, each said means comprising a clamp element, with a backing plate pivoted, in its upper portion, to an outer part of said crank arm, a clamp plate hingedly connected to said backing plate, a strap carried at each side of said supply tank, a vertical, sliding, pivotal connection between each said backing plate and one of said straps, a perforated plate in the form of a dihedral angle, nested in the bottom of said first tank, a series of coil springs secured in said second tank, a perforated plate suspended on said springs, a depending skirt of rubbery material mounted on the periphery of said suspended plate, power means carried on said supply tank, and transmission means connecting said power means with said shaft.

7. A cleaning device for mops and other cleaning im-.

plements, comprising an associated group of tanks, with a central, fluid-supply tank, a first cleaning tank on one side of said supply tank and a second cleaning tank on the other side of said supply tank, a shaft mounted on top of said supply tank, for rotation on a horizontal axis, a crank arm carried at each end of said shaft, mount: ing means for an elongate handle associated with each crank arm, each said means comprising a olamp element,

with a backing plate pivoted, in its upper portion, to an outer part of said crank arm, a clamp plate hingedly connected to said backing plate, a strap carried at each side of said supply tank, a vertical, sliding, pivotal connection between each said backing plate and one of said straps, a perforated plate in the form of a dihedral angle, nested in the bottom of said first tank, a series of coil springs secured in said second tank, a perforated plate suspended on said springs, power means carried on said supply tank, and transmission means connecting said power means with said shaft.

8. A cleaning device for mops and other cleaning implements, comprising a pair of tanks, a standard located between said tanks, a shaft mounted on said standard for rotation on a horizontal axis, a crank arm carried at each end of said shaft, power means to rotate said shaft, mounting means for an elongate handle associated with each crank arm, each said means comprising a clamp ele ment, with a backing plate pivoted in its upper portion to said crank arm, a clamp plate hingedly connected to said backing plate, the lower portion of said backing plate having a pivotal connection with said standard, arranged for sliding movement vertically, a perforated plate in the form of a dihedral angle carried in the bottom of one of said tanks, a series of coil springs secured in the other of said tanks, and a perforated plate suspended on said springs.

9. In a device as in claim 8, a perforated plate adapted to be received in said tanks, and having a handle adapted to be received in said clamp element.

10. A cleaning device for mops and other cleaning implements, comprising a tank, a shaft mounted adjacent said tank for rotation on a horizontal axis, a crank arm carried by said shaft, mounting means for an elongate handle comprising a backing plate pivoted to said crank arm and'having a sliding pivotal connection apart from said crank arm, a clamp plate arranged in cooperative relation to said backing plate, and a perforated plate in the form of a dihedral angle carried in the bottom of said tank.

11. A cleaning device for mops and other cleaning implements, comprising a tank, a shaft mounted adjacent said tank for rotation on a horizontal axis, a crank arm carried by said shaft, mounting means for an elongate handle comprising a backing plate pivoted to said crank arm and having a sliding pivotal connection apart from said crank arm, a clamp plate arranged in cooperative relation to said backing plate, and a perforated plate in said tank, with outer edges higher above the tank bottom than its mid portion.

12. A cleaning device for mops and other cleaning implements, comprising a tank, a shaft mounted adjacent said tank for rotation on a horizontal axis, a crank arm carried by said shaft, mounting means for an elongate handle comprising a backing plate pivoted to said crank arm and having a sliding pivotal connection apart from said crank arm, a clamp plate arranged in cooperative relation to said backing plate, and a perforated plate suspended from springs in said tank.

13. A device as in claim 12, said plate having a depending, peripheral skirt of rubbery material.

14. In a device as in claim 10, a reservoir tank with fluid connections to the first-mentioned tank, including a pump, a valve and a filter.

15. A device as in claim 10, said shaft being mounted on a fluid tank, and fluid connections including a pump, valve and filter between said tanks.

No references cited.

. Maui

Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1 *None
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US7475698 *Apr 22, 2005Jan 13, 2009Steelkor, L.L.C.Kitchenware washers and methods of manufacturing the same
US7527062Apr 22, 2005May 5, 2009Steelkor, L.L.C.Kitchenware washers and methods of manufacturing the same
US7578305Jul 28, 2005Aug 25, 2009Steelkor, L.L.C.Kitchenware washers and related methods
US7763119Apr 22, 2005Jul 27, 2010Steelkor, L.L.C.Kitchenware washers and methods of manufacturing the same
US9265400Apr 25, 2012Feb 23, 2016Duke Manufacturing Co.Commercial kitchenware washers and related methods
US20050204503 *Mar 19, 2004Sep 22, 2005Burns Thomas DFiltered wringer
US20050257810 *Jul 28, 2005Nov 24, 2005Bigott James WKitchenware washers and related methods
US20060237045 *Apr 22, 2005Oct 26, 2006Bigott James WKitchenware washers and methods of manufacturing the same
US20060237046 *Apr 22, 2005Oct 26, 2006Bigott James WKitchenware washers and methods of manufacturing the same
US20060237047 *Apr 22, 2005Oct 26, 2006Bigott James WKitchenware washers and methods of manufacturing the same
US20060254619 *Jul 24, 2006Nov 16, 2006Bigott James WCommerical kitchenware washers and related methods
US20100282281 *Jul 23, 2010Nov 11, 2010Steelkor, L.L.C.Kitchenware washers and methods of manufacturing the same
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/4, 15/260, 68/156, 15/264, 134/160
International ClassificationA47L13/50, A47L13/10
Cooperative ClassificationA47L13/50
European ClassificationA47L13/50