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Publication numberUS3073325 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 15, 1963
Filing dateFeb 23, 1960
Priority dateFeb 23, 1960
Publication numberUS 3073325 A, US 3073325A, US-A-3073325, US3073325 A, US3073325A
InventorsRebizzo Edward P, Victor Rebizzo
Original AssigneeRebizzo Edward P, Victor Rebizzo
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Drum washer
US 3073325 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 15,- 1963 v. Rssxzzo ETAL 3,

DRUM WASHER Filed Feb. 25. 1960 INVENTORS V/ area 255 lzza BY [0 wAep P 2ca/zzo a/W/W United States; Patent 3,073,325 DRUM WASHER Victor Rebizzo, 3627 Divisidero St., and Edward P. Rebizzo, 1906 17th Ave, both of San Francisco, Calif. Filed Feb. 23, 1960, Ser. No. 10,250 5 Claims. (Cl. 134-148) This invention relates to improvements in a drum washer, and more particularly to self-contained apparatus adapted for cleaning and re-conditioning used steel drums or barrels.

Many commodities, such as foodstuffs, beverages, greases, oils, paints, etc. are stored and shipped in metal drums. Because of the high initial cost of these drums, they are designed for reuse in connection with the same or different commodities.

To make such resuse practicable, the drums must be thoroughly cleaned of any remains of the former contents. 1

Such cleaning has heretofore been accomplished primarily by manual operation involving hosing and scrubbing the inside and outside of the drums until they are completely clean. 4

The present invention contemplates an apparatus which will thoroughly clean metal drums and similar containers in a rapid andcontinuous operation not dependent upon manual manipulation. This apparatus will take advantage of the remarkable cleaning powers of detergents and other cleaning fluids now available on the market.

All the operator need do is place the drum in the machine and turn on the appropriate control. The drum 'washer will then thoroughly clean both theinside and outside of the drum simultaneously with a consequent saving of time and labor.

Accordingly, it is a principal object of the present invention to provide a drum washer which will thoroughly clean metal drums and similar containers inside and outside in a rapid, safe and economical manner.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a drum washer of the character described which will recycle and reuse the cleaning fluid so as to effect significant saving in the cost of the cleaning material. A further object of the present invention is to provide a drum washer which will rotate the drum through even ourtains of cleaning fluid arranged to forcibly impinge on all surfaces of the drum so as to loosen and wash free all residue of materials previously contained in the drum.

A still further object of my invention is to provide a drum washer utilizing a nozzle having a novel configuration adapted to project a fan-shaped curtain of cleaning fluid through a full 180 of are, so that a single nozzle can clean all of the inside surfaces of the drum.

It is further proposed to provide an apparatus of the character described which will securely retain the drum in the desired position during the washing operation and which will quickly release the cleaned drum for removal and replacement by another drum to be cleaned.

Further objects and advantages of our invention will appear as the specification proceeds and the new and useful features of the same will be fully defined in the claims hereto attached.

The preferred form of our invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawing, forming part of this application, in which:

FIGURE 1 shows a side elevational view of a drum washer constructed in accordance with the present invention, portions of the structure being broken away to show internal details;

FIGURE 2, a longitudinal cross-sectional view of a ram forming part of the drum washer of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 3, a fragmentary cross-sectional View of-a turn-table and associated structure forming part of the drum washer of FIGURE 1;

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FIGURE 4, a cross-sectional view of a nozzle; and

FIGURE 5, a fragmentary view taken substantially on the plane of line 5--5 of FIGURE 4.

While we have shown only the preferred form of our invention, it should be understood that various changes or modifications may be made within the scope of the claims hereto attached, without departing from the spirit of the invention.

Referring to the drawing in detail, it will be seen that the drum washer of the present invention includes a turn-table 11 formed for supporting a cylindrical drum 12 in inverted position and with its open end down, .pump means 13 supplying a cleaning fluid under pressure, and nozzle means 14 connected to the pump means and formed to project the cleaning fluid in a curtain which will impinge against the drum along a line defined by the intersection of the drum surface and a plane radial to the axis of the drum, whereby the entire drum surface will be contacted by the curtain as the drum rotates.

The drum 12 and nozzle means '14 are contained within a cabinet 16, which serves to confine the spray and direct it downwardly into a reservoir 17 over which the cabinet is mounted. Suitable doors (not shown) are provided in one or more sides of the cabinet to facilitate the insertion and removal of the drum.

The turn-table 11 may best be seen in FIGURE 3 of the drawings, and as here shown, is of generally disk shapehaving a diameter slightly larger than that ofthe largest drum to be accommodated. A hollow shaft 18 depends from the center of the turn-table 11 and is journaled in a bushing 19 carried by a bearing member 21 secured to a portion of the reservoir 17.

The weight of the turn-table and drum are supported upon a bronze slip-ring 22 mounted between the turntable 11 and bearing member 21. Lubrication is sup plied through an oil conduit 23 communicating with annular oil-distributing grooves 24.

Rotation of the turn-table is effected by a motor 25 mounted on top of the cabinet 16 and driving a shaft 26 which extends downwardly through the cabinet. The rim of the turn-table is formed with gear teeth 27 which are interengaged with a spur gear 28 on the shaft 26, see FIGURE 3.

The pump means 13 is connected through an intake conduit 29 to the reservoir 17, and is provided with a discharge conduit 31 communicating with the nozzle means 14 through a control valve 32, a header 33 providing cleaning fluid to the exterior nozzle, while a conduit 34 leads to the interior nozzle.

As may be seen from FIGURE 1, a plurality of nozzles are positioned in the cabinet to spray against the exter' nal surface of the drum 12. Each of these nozzles is of flattened form and projects a fan-shaped curtain of cleaning fluid forcibly against the drum. The nozzles are soarranged that the spray from each overlaps with the spray from the adjacent nozzle, so as to form a continuous curtain which will impinge against the drum along a line 36 lying on the intersection of the drum surface and a plane radial to the axis of the drum.

The exterior nozzles are stationary, so as to provide a stationary curtain through which the drum will pass every portion of its external surface as it rotates upon the turntable 11. The force of the spray and the detergent action of the cleaning fluid are suflicient to clean all unwanted Waste material from the drum surface.

The interior of the drum is cleaned in a similar man'- ner. A stationary curtain of cleaning fluid is forcibly projected to impinge against all parts of the interior surface of the drums as its rotates.

In accordance with the present invention, and as an important feature thereof, the interior nozzle means 14 consists of a single nozzle 37 projecting upwardly the cena ter of the turn-table 11. The nozzle 37 consists of a standard pipe cap threaded upon the end of the conduit 34 which passes coaxially upwardly through the hollow shaft 18. In this manner the nozzle 37 may remain stationary while the turn-table 11 rotates the drum 12.

In order for a single nozzle in this position to be effective, it is necessary that it project the curtain of cleaning fluid through a full 180 of arc, so that the cleaning fluid will impinge against the entire inner surface of the drum. This is here accomplished by the novel configuration of the nozzle 37.

As may best be seen from FIGURES 3, 4 and 5, a slot 38 is cut diametrically across the top of the cap 37. This, of course, will tend to spray the cleaning fluid in a sheet or curtain. However, the portion of the curtain impinging on the lower areas of the drum will be nonexistent or will be so weak as not to clean the drum effectively.

It has been found, that, by providing enlargements of the slots on opposite ends, the curtain can be made substantially even throughout the full 180 of arc. These enlargements may best be seen in FIGURES 4 and of the drawings, and as these shown consist of bores 39 of approximately two and one-half to three times the width of the slot. The bores 39 are formed so that their axes extend upwardly and outwardly at an angle of approximately 45 to the axis of the nozzle.

Additionally, it will be seen that the bores are somewhat tapered so that their walls converge outwardly.

This configuration of the nozzle has been found to project more of the cleaning fluid to the sides than has been possible with nozzles of conventional design. Because of the high pressure with which the cleaning fluid is propelled against the internal surface of the drum, it has a strong tendency to lift the drum from the turn-table 11. If the drum loses contact with the turn-table, it will, of course, not rotate and may bounce around within the enclosure 16 causing considerable damage.

Means is here provided for holding the drum 12 down in positive engagement with the turn-table 11 during the washing operation, this means being adapted for quickly releasing the drum for removal and replacement by the next drum to be cleaned. As here shown, this means includes a hydraulic ram 41 projecting downwardly through the top of the cabinet 16 in coaxial relation to the turn-table 11.

As may best be seen from FIGURE 2 of the drawings, the ram 41 includes concentrically spaced tubes 42 and 43, with the inner tube 42 serving as a hydraulic cylinder, while the outer tube 43 provides a shield for the inner tube.

Mounted for axial reciprocation in tube 42 is a piston 44 having a rod 46 extending therefrom downwardly through the end of the tube. Water under pressure is supplied to the ram through hoses 47 and 48 connected through a standard two-way valve 49 to a suitable source (not shown).

In accordance with the present invention, the lower end of the rod 46 is provided with a drum-engaging member 51 having a convex lower surface 52 adapted to bear against the end of the drum with the rod 46 extended from the ram. The convex shape of the member 51 provides a substantially point contact with the drum so as to reduce the frictional drag thereon, while still providing firm engagement with the drum.

In operation:

The reservoir 17 is filled with a suitable cleaning fluid. This fluid may consist of detergent or soap solutions, or liquids having desired acidity or alkaline characteristics. The fluid chosen will, of course, be dependent upon the character of the residue desired to he removed from the drum. It has been found that edible oils, greases and the like can be readily removed from the drum by the present machine employing very strong solutions of readily available ommercial detergents.

It may be desired to rinse out such drums with plain clean water, and this can be easily done by connecting a source of fresh water into the discharge conduit 31.

When the reservoir has been filled, the drum 12 may be placed upon the turn-table with its open end down in the manner illustrated in the drawings.

The pump means 13 is then activated to supply the cleaning fluid under pressure through the nozzle means 14.

The nozzles throw out stationary curtains of the cleaning fluid through which the drum 12 is rotated, the drum being held against the turn-table by the ram 41.

When the drum is thoroughly cleaned, the pump means is turned off, the ram is activated to retract the member 51 from contact with the drum, and the drum is removed from the machine.

We claim:

1. A drum washer, comprising a turntable formed for supporting a cylindrical drum in inverted position and with its open end down, means for rotating said turntable and drum about the axis of the drum, pump means supplying a cleaning fluid under pressure, a stationary nozzle connected to said pump means and extending upwardly through the center of said turntable, said nozzle being formed to project said cleaning fluid in a curtain impinging against the inner surface of the drum along the intersection of said inner surface and a plane radial to the axis of the drum whereby said curtain will contact the entire inner surface of the drum as it rotates, and a ram mounted in coaxial relation above said drum and having a depending member movable into contact with the upper closed end of the drum for holding the latter down on the turntable against the upward force of said curtain of cleaning fluid, said depending member having a lower face of convex form providing substantially point contact with the closed drum end so as to reduce frictional drag of said member on said drum.

2. A drum washer, comprising an open reservoir, a perforated turntable mounted above said reservoir for rotation about a vertical axis and formed for supporting a drum in inverted position and with its open end down for coaxial rotation therewith, motor means mounted above said drum and having a drive connection with said turntable for effecting said rotation, pump means communicating with said reservoir and having a discharge conduit for delivering cleaning fluid under pressure, a plurality of nozzles connected to said discharge conduit and mounted in spaced relation to a side of the drum, said nozzles being formed to direct a substantially continuous stationary vertical curtain of cleaning fluid against the external periphery of the drum as it rotates, a nozzle overlying the drum and connected to said discharge con duit and formed for directing a substantially continuous vertical curtain of cleaning fluid against the upper end of the drum in a plane radial to the axis of the last named drum, a stationary nozzle connected to said pump means and extending upwardly through the center of said turntable, said nozzle being formed to project said cleaning fluid in a curtain impinging against the inner surface of the drum along the intersection of said inner surface and a plane radial to the axis of the drum whereby said curtain will contact the entire inner surface of the drum as it rotates, said last named nozzle including a vertical conduit and a cap thereon formed with a diametrical slot across the cap, the slot being enlarged at its ends whereby said curtain will be projected substantially evenly therefrom through a full of arc, and a ram mounted in coaxial relation above said drum and having a depending member movable into contact with the upper closed end of the drum for holding the latter down on the turntable against the upward force of said curtain of cleaning fluid, said depending member having a lower face of conex form providing substantially point contact with the drum end so as to reduce frictional drag of said member on said drum.

3. A drum washer, comprising a perforated turntable mounted for revolving movement on a vertical axis and adapted to receive an open-ended drum thereon with the open end presented downwardly and the drum disposed in axial alignment with the turntable, a fixed vertical conduit mounted co-axially below the turntable and having a short threaded end projecting above the turntable and having means for discharging a fluid therethrough into the drum under pressure, said means incruding a cap for the discharge end of the conduit having a slot formed to discharge the fluid against the inner surface of the drum in a diametrical plane and at a substantially uniform striking force throughout said plane said slot extending diametrically across the top of the cap for directing the discharge upwardly against the top of the drum and extending into opposite portions of the side wall of the cap for horizontal discharge against the lower said walls of the drum.

4. A drum washer, comprising a perforated turntable mounted for revolving movement on a vertical axis and adapted to receive an open-ended drum thereon with the open end presented downwardly and the drum disposed in axial alignment with the turntable, a fixed vertical conduit mounted co-axially below the turntable and having a short threaded end projecting above the turntable and having means for discharging a fluid therethrough into the drum under pressure, said means including a cap for the discharge end of the conduit having a slot formed to discharge the fluid against the inner surface of the drum in a diametrical plane and at a substantially uniform striking-force throughout said plane, the slot extending diametrically across the top of the cap for directing the discharge upwardly against the top of the drum and extending into opposite portions of the side Wall of the cap for horizontal discharge against the lower side wall of the drum and having enlarged sections at the edge of the cap to direct a proportional amount of the discharge toward the upper side wall of the drum.

5. A drum washer, comprising a perforated turntable til) mounted for revolving movement on a vertical axis and adapted to receive an open-ended drum thereon with the open end presented downwardly and the drum disposed in axial alignment with the turntable, a fixed vertical conduit mounted co-axially below the turntable and having a short threaded end projecting above the turntable and having means for discharging a fluid therethrough into the drum under pressure, said means including a cap for the discharge end of the conduit having a slot formed to discharge the fluid against the inner surface of the drum in a diametrical plane and at a substantially uniform striking force throughout said plane, said cap having a flat top and an annular apron depending therefrom formed for threading onto the upper end of said conduit, said slot being formed through said flat top and apron and extending diametrically across the flat top of the cap and downwardly into opposite sides or" said apron, said cap being formed with bores wider than said slot at the locations where said slot intersects the junction between said flat top and depending apron, said bores having their axes positioned at an angle of approximately relative to the axis of said conduit and being of tapered form widening out toward the interior of the cap whereby the fluid under pressure supplied to said cap will be directed therefrom in a substantially rectangular curtain adapted to intersect the inner surface of the drum at a substantially uniform striking force.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,644,384 Kendall Oct. 4, 1927 2,228,684 Barnum Jan. 14, 1941 2,725,064 Tamminga Nov. 29, 1955 2,764,171 Nolte Sept. 25, 1956 FOREIGN PATENTS 549,465 Italy Oct. 13, 1956 566,968 Canada Dec. 2, 1958 572,854 Great Britain Oct. 26, 1945

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1644384 *Apr 11, 1922Oct 4, 1927Ira H KendallApparatus for cleansing milk cans and other receptacles
US2228684 *Dec 8, 1938Jan 14, 1941Barnum William WCan washing machine
US2725064 *Mar 16, 1950Nov 29, 1955Tamminga William JCan washer
US2764171 *Oct 20, 1953Sep 25, 1956Metalwash Machinery CompanyCan washer
CA566968A *Dec 2, 1958Gen ElectricMachine for cleaning and spraying rotating cathode ray tube bulbs
GB572854A * Title not available
IT549465B * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4299245 *Apr 21, 1980Nov 10, 1981Clapper Millard FFilter cleaning system
US4708152 *Aug 26, 1986Nov 24, 1987Hibberd Carl GPaint roller cleaner apparatus
US4941491 *Apr 7, 1989Jul 17, 1990Automated Cleaning Systems, Inc.Method and apparatus for cleaning containers
US5106428 *May 3, 1990Apr 21, 1992Automated Cleaning Systems, Inc.Method for cleaning containers
US5186195 *Jun 13, 1991Feb 16, 1993Wall Bernard WApparatus for rinsing chemical containers
US5329951 *May 10, 1993Jul 19, 1994Jones Colin HCylinder head cleaning machine
US5384045 *May 16, 1994Jan 24, 1995Chmielewski; JerryFilter cleaner
US5456167 *Oct 19, 1993Oct 10, 1995George; Brent C.Apparatus for cleaning and crushing drums
US5531129 *Sep 5, 1995Jul 2, 1996Synectic Technology, Inc.Apparatus for extracting wear particles from used oil filters
US6926017Jun 18, 2001Aug 9, 2005Entegris, Inc.Wafer container washing apparatus
US7086408 *Nov 11, 2004Aug 8, 2006Alpex Pharma S.A.Multipurpose system for the automatic washing and drying of industrial containers and appliances in controlled environmental conditions
US7216655Oct 29, 2002May 15, 2007Entegris, Inc.Wafer container washing apparatus
WO2002005316A2 *Jul 9, 2001Jan 17, 2002Fluoroware IncWafer container washing apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification134/148, 134/152, 134/170, 134/153, 239/601
International ClassificationB08B9/08
Cooperative ClassificationB08B9/0813
European ClassificationB08B9/08D4