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Publication numberUS3075768 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 29, 1963
Filing dateOct 31, 1960
Priority dateOct 31, 1960
Publication numberUS 3075768 A, US 3075768A, US-A-3075768, US3075768 A, US3075768A
InventorsKarns James A
Original AssigneeFawick Flexi Grip Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Weighted golf club and method of weighting same
US 3075768 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 29, 1963 J. A. KARNS 3,075,763

WEIGHTED GOLF CLUB AND METHOD OF WEIGHTING SAME Filed Oct. 31, 1960 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Y i F/G.4'

INVENTOR. JAMES A. KARNS BY an ATTORNEYS Jan. 29, 1963 J. A. KARNS 3,075,768

WEIGHTED GOLF CLUB AND METHOD OF WEIGHTING SAME Filed Oct. 31, 1960 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 8/ F/ 9 INVENTOR,

{N 80 BY JAMES A. KAfiIi/S F/G. l0 ATTORNEY flair tits 3,075,768 WEIGHTED GGLF CLUB AND METHGD 9F WEIGHTING SAME James A. Karns, Akron, Ohio, assignor to Fawick Flexi- Grip Company, Akron, Ohio, a corporation of Ohio Filed Oct. 31, 1960, Ser. No. 66,270 13 Claims. (Cl. 273-81) This invention relates to a golf club weighted at the upper end to provide the proper balance in the club, and the process of weighting the club.

Balance is essential in a golf club. It has been customary to obtain balance by adding weight, as necessary, to the head of the club. According to this invention weight is added to the top end of the club, and it is added after the grip has been put in place on the shaft.

According to this invention, a compartment to hold weighting means, preferably in solid particulate form, is provided within the end of the shaft, and the weighting means is added through a hole in the end of the grip. This compartment may be built into the shaft, or it may be attached to the grip so that it fits into the shaft when the grip is positioned over the end of the shaft, or it may be in separate means held over the end of the shaft by the grip. The compartment may be provided by any suitable means.

Balance is obtained by introducing a larger or smaller amount of either solidifiable liquid or solid weighting means through the hole in the grip after the grip has been assembled on the shaft. If solid particulate material, such as shot is used, cushioning material is preferably added to the compartment to prevent them from making any noise when the position of the club is changed, as when it is swung in hitting a golf ball. This cushioning material is usually a spongy plastic. If the compartment is made of rubber and it is filled so full of the weighting means that there is no possibility of their rattling against one another, no cushioning means is required.

The weighting means may be composed of any material having a sufiiciently high specific gravity. Shot are ordinarily employed, and they are preferably larger in diameter than the hole in the grip through which they are introduced into the compartment so that no special means need be provided to hold them in the compartment.

The compartment is advantageously a small sack, which may be of plastic or cloth or the like, or a small metal container. The compartment is preferably made of rubher. It may be fastened to the shaft or the grip, or its edge may be placed over the end of the shaft and held there by the grip. Alternatively, the grip may include a plug which makes a friction fit in the end of the shaft, and the compartment may be in this. Or the compartment may be formed by blocking off the end of the shaft by suitable means.

The invention is further described in connection with the accompanying drawings which show a longitudinal section through the end of a golf club shaft and grip, with the end of the shaft and grip broken away to show difierent compartments and weighting means. In the draw- 1ngs FIG. 1 shows a sack fastened to a cap located over the end of the shaft;

FIG. 2 shows a sack fastened to the inner surface of the shaft;

FIG. 3 shows a stiff container the outer edge of which is caught over the end of the shaft and held in place by the grip;

FIG. 4 shows a compartment in a plug in the end of the shaft;

FIG. 5 shows a sack fastened to the grip; and

FIG. 6 shows a compartment formed by blocking off the end of the shaft.

aerate Patented Jan. 29, lhfili In FIGURES 1-6, the weighting means is a number of shot, each larger than the hole in the grip through which they are introduced into the compartment, and cushioning material is provided in the compartment to keep them from rattling against one another.

FIG. 7 shows an elastic compartment filled so full of shot that no cushioning means is required;

FIG. 8 shows a compartment similar to that shown in FIGURE 6, with solidified liquid weighting material in it;

FIG. 9 shows a compartment similar to that shown in FIGURE 6 but weighted with small shot; and

FIG. 10 shows a shot covered with plastic.

In FIGURES l-9, the side and end of the hollow metal shaft S are covered by a grip G, except that the grip of FIGURE 4 is composed of a part G which covers the shaft surface and the plug P which is held by friction in the end of the shaft. In FIGURES 1-3, 5 and 6, the cushioning material C prevents the shot from rattling. This may be a piece of stifi polyurethane sponge, or sponge rubber, or the like.

In FIGURE 1, the compartment 5 in the end of the shaft is made of a rubber compound having low elasticity, or it may be of cloth, fine metal mesh, etc. Its edge 6 is flared out and fastened to the metal cap 7 which fits over the end of the shaft S. The hole 8 in the center of the cap is in line with the round opening 9 through the end of the grip. The cushioning material C is put in the sack 5 before it is fastened to the cap. The cap is located over the end of the shaft and the grip is put in place over the shaft and cap. Then with the club in a suitable balancing device, any required number of shot 12, which have a larger diameter than the hole '9, are forced through the opening 9 into the sack. The number of shot may vary. Usually one to eight will be sufficient.

The weighting means of FIGURE 2 is similar, except that the cap has been omitted, and the sack 20 is fastened, as by cement (not shown), directly to the inner surface of the shaft.

The container 25 of FIG. 3 is shown as a thin metal container, but it may be of cloth, plastic or the like. If of plastic, the edge may be rolled to a bead to keep it in place. The edge 26 of the container fits over the end of the shaft and lies flat against its outer surface. The pressure of the grip, holding the edge 26 against the outer surface of the shaft, and also pressing the container against the end of the shaft, is sufficient to maintain the container in position. It may be cemented in place, if desired. Cushioning material is put in the container, and then shot 28 are added through the opening in the grip after the grip has been placed on the shaft.

The plug P of FIGURE 4 may be made of harder or softer rubber or other plastic, etc. Preferably it forms a pressure-fit in the end of the shaft, but it may be cemented in place. It is hollowed out to form the compartment 36 at the end of the neck 31. The club is balanced by introducing the required number of shot through the neck into the compartment 34). The shot may be so large that they must be forced through the neck, or they may be so small that they can be easily introduced through the neck. Since it is diliicult to provide a cushioning material in such a compartment, the shot are preferably held in place by a rubber cement 33 that is vulcanizable at room temperature. The addition of this cement after the shot, adds extra weight. It is desirable to always add the same measured amount of cement, and counterweight the balancing device used to offset this. The cement may be sufficient to at least partially fill the opening 31, but this is not necessary.

Wherever a vulcanizable rubber cement is used, it is preferably compounded to cure at room temperature,

as is known in the art. Low heat may be applied. Instead of a curable cement, it is possible to use a molten resin that solidifies on cooling.

I In FIGURE 5, the edge 35 of the sack 36 is cemented to the inner surface of the end of the grip. This may be facilitated by making the end of the grip as a separate piece, cementing the sack 36 to this, and then cementing this assembly to the balance of the grip. The shot or other Weighting means are added to the sack after the grip has been placed on the shaft.

The shaft of FIGURE 6 is plugged several inches from its end by a piece 40 of rubber or cork or the like which is spherical or egg-shaped or of any desired shape. It preferably forms a tight fit in the shaft, so that the use of adhesive is not necessary. Cushioning material C is placed in the compartment thus formed. Shot 41 are then added through the opening in the end of the grip.

FIGURE 7 shows a club provided with a small sack 50 attached to the grip, much as the sack of FIGURE 1, but the sack is smaller than that of FIGURE 1'. It is filled so full of shot that they are held tight against one another so that they cannot rattle. There is no need for cushioning material in the sack.

In the structures illustrated in FIGURES 8 and 9, the compartment is made by plugs 60 and 70, respectively, which fit tight in the shaft. Plug 60 is like the plug of FIGURE 6; plug 70 is cork-shaped. Such plugs may be of cork, rubber, etc. The club of FIGURE 8 is weighted by pouring through the opening in the grip a required amount of rubber cement 62, weighted by lead oxide or other heavy compounding ingredient. Furthermore, it contains vulcanizer and accelerator such that it cures quickly at room temperature. The cement is added in just the amount to give the desired balance.

FIGURE 9 illustrates the use of fine shot 72-many more than are required of the larger size. These shot are held in the compartment by adding a small amount of readily solidified rubber cement or the like 73. Preferably, the same weight of cement is always used and a counterweight of its exact weight is used in balancing with the shot so that the desired balance will be obtained after adding the cement. The amount of cement used need not be suificient to till the compartment and the hole in the grip, but may be sufficient only to partially fill the compartment. 7

Instead of a cushioning material C, or in addition to such material, the individual shot or other particulate material may be covered by rubber or the like to prevent them from rattling. FIGURE 10 illustrates a shot 80 with resilient covering 81.

The various figures illustrate different specific embodiments of the invention. The different types of compartments and weighting means are interchangeable, with or without cushioning means as required. More or less weighting is utilized, as found necessary. The compartment may be formed in any suitable manner. Modifications in' the specific embodiments which have been described and illustrated in the drawings, will suggest themselves to the man skilled in the art.

The invention is disclosed in the claims which follow.

What I claim is:

1. A golf club which comprises a hollow shaft, 21 compartment in the outer end of the shaft with individual solid'particulate weighting means therein, and a grip at the top end of the shaft with an opening in the end of 4, the grip into the compartment which is just large enough to permit said individual particulate weighting means to be forced therethroug-h, said grip except for said opening closing the end of the shaft.

2. The golf club of claim 1 in which the compartment is a part of the grip and removable from the shaft therewith. a

3. The golf club of claim 1 in which the compartment is attached to the shaft and separable from the grip.

4. The golf club of claim 1 in which the compartment is provided with holding means held between the grip and the shaft and separable from both, with an opening in the holding means in line with the opening in the grip.

5. The golf club of claim 1 in which a sack forms the compartment.'

6. The golf club of claim 1 in which there isa metal cap over the end of the shaft inside of the grip with an opening therein which coincides with the opening in the grip and the compartment is attached to said cap.

7. The golf club of claim 1 in which the grip includes a plug portion which makes a tight fit within the end of the shaft, and the compartment is within the plug.

8. The golf club of claim 1 in which the compartment occupies the entire inner portion of the top end of the shaft.

9. The golf club of claim 8 in which the compartment is formed in the end of the shaft by a plug having a generally cylindrical cross section through one portion thereof, which plug at said cross section makes a tight fit with the inner surface of the shaft.

10. The golf club of claim 1 in which there is cushioning means in the compartment which fills it and keeps the particles of the weighting means from rattling.

11. The golf club of claim 1 in which the weighting means is particulate and there is solidified liquid between the particulate material and the opening.

12. The method of weighting a golf club with solid particulate material, the club comprising a hollow shaft with a, compartment in its outer end with a grip covering the end of the shaft, the grip having an opening through the end thereof just large enough to permit individual particles of said solid material to be forced theret-hrough, which method comprises forcing the particles of the particulate material through the opening.

13. The method of weighting a golf club with solid particulate material, the club comprising a hollow shaft with a compartment in its outer end with a grip covering the end of the shaft, the grip having an opening through the end thereof into the compartment just large enough to permit individual particles of said solid material to be forced therethrough, which method comprises forcing the particles of the particulate material through the opening and maintaining the particles positioned in the same relative position to one another in the end of the shaft adjacent the grip.

References Cited in the tile of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,210,182 Lynch Dec. 26, 1916 1,611,925 Link Dec. 28, 1926 1,622,864 Findlay Mar. 29, 1927 2,782,035 East Feb. 19, 1957 FOREIGN PATENTS 13,337 Great Britain June 2,1911

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Classifications
U.S. Classification473/297, 473/409
International ClassificationA63B53/14
Cooperative ClassificationA63B53/145, A63B59/0033
European ClassificationA63B53/14W