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Publication numberUS3076329 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 5, 1963
Filing dateAug 2, 1960
Priority dateAug 2, 1960
Publication numberUS 3076329 A, US 3076329A, US-A-3076329, US3076329 A, US3076329A
InventorsMaynard Robert W
Original AssigneeMosler Safe Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Time lock
US 3076329 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 5, 1963 R. w. MAYNARD 3,076,329

TIME Loox Filed Apg. 2, 1960 4 sneebsheet 1 rllllllllllllllllllunl,

` S4 #E :F. A IVENTOR 4 Feb. 5, 1963 R. w. MAYNARD TIME LOCK 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed Aug. 2, 1960 B NV EN TOR.

ATTORNEY-5.

Feb. 5, 1963 Filed Aug. 2, 196

R. w. MAYNARD 3,076,329

4 Sheets-Sheet 4 INVEN TOR.

ATTEA/Ey United States Patent @dice 3,076,329 TIME LOCK Robert W. Maynard, Cincinnati, Ohio, assignor to The Mosler Safe Company, Hamilton, Ohio, a corporation of New York Filed Aug. 2, 1960, Ser. No. 47,061 19 Claims. (Cl. 70-272) This invention relates to a time lock which can beopened only'after the elapse of a predetermined interval of time following its activation and which, subsequent tothat interval, can thereafter be opened only during a second` predetermined interval of time.

Locks of the type to which the present invention is directed are particularly suitable for use in merchandising establishments, markets, stores and other places of business where, during the business` day, cash is kept in a lock to be drawn in only after a iixed, predetermined period of time. This conditioning period is, so to speak, built into the lock mechanism; it cannot be avoided or shortened without modilication of the lock mechanism itself, which of course, cannot be done without irst opening the safe. The conditioning period may be as long or as short as desired, and typically is of the order of 3 to` minutes duration. Once-this period has elaped, following activation of the timing mechanism, the lock is then able Vto be opened. ri'he lock, however, does not open automatically or of its own accord, but rather must be opened by turning a dial or knob; if it is not opened within a second lixed and predetermined interval of time immediately following the conditioning period, then the lock-ceases to be openable, remains locked, and must again be conditioned to be opened before it can be opened. This second period, which is referred to as the permissively open or relock period, may be of the same or different duration than the preceding conditioning period. Typically, it is from 3 to 15 minutes long.

A would-be robber confronted by a locked safe equipped with the lock of the present invention faces a considerble problem in carryingout his plans. Unless by chance the timing mechanism of the lock happensto have earlier been set going so that the lock is then in itsk permissively open period, he is faced with arsafe which cannot be unlockedwithout waiting through a. conditioning period of, say, 15 minutes: this state of affairs is made indisputably clear to him by a sign to that effect on the safe. Obviously, the probability of successfully carrying out a robbery which perforce extends over, say, minutes, the lirst l5 minutes of which are spent in waiting for the lockto be conditioned to be opened, is considerabl'y less than that of one which is accomplished in only five minutes.

Aparty from the foregoing mode of operation, locks embodying the principles of' this invention provide fur-` ther protection to safes by reason of the fixed duration of the permissively open period. Following the conditioning period, the lock can be opened only during a definite interval, after which it remains locked and cany opened; it cannot through either inadvertence or in-V In other words, if the lock is not openedV tent be left unopened but able to be opened indefi-VA nitely. Thus, while time locks have been known which permit a lock to be opened only after a predeterminedv interval of time, the present lock is further characterized;

in thatit relocks` the lock if the lock is not opened within a second xed period of time.

The lock preferably incorporates a generally conventional spring wound clock movement as its motive source;V This mechanism is wound and set in motion by turning;

a handle or knob on the front of the lock, thereby initiating the lock conditioning period. The movement drivesV a4 timing disk which is effective to permit a connection to` be made between a winding disk and the bolt of the lockt after the conditioning period has expired, such that the bolt may be drawn in by turning the winding disk: this:

connection is not actually made, but rather is only permitted to be made. the bolt, the winding disk must be turnedbyturning the lock knob within the permissively open period. If thel lock is not opened with that period, the movement con-` tinues to run and positions a relooker between the windingl disk and the bolt dog whereby the dog is rendered unable to be engaged with the winding disk to withdraw thebolt.,

This event terminates the permissively open. period, ande the clock movement is automatically stopped. The lock remains passive in this locked condition until the winding; disk is turned to begin another conditioning period, re-- AtnoA time except during the permissively open period can the,

leasing the relooker and starting the clock drive.

bolt be drawn in without rst causing the timing mecha@4 nism to go through the conditioning interval.

The invention may best be further described in rela tion to the accompanying drawings, in which: 1

FIGURE l is a front elevation of a portion of a safe.:

having alock in accordance with the principles of this'in-v vention mounted on it, showing the bolt of the lock in locking position;

FIGURE 2 is a transverse vertical section taken on line; 2-2 of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 3 is a vertical section taken on line 3 3 ofA FIGURE 2, showing the relationship of the various elements comprising the lock mechanism during thepermissively open period; e

FIGURE 4 is a transverse verti-cal section .taken on line.

4-4 of FIGURE 3;

FIGURE 5 is a vertical section taken on line 5-45 of' FIGURE 4, particularly showing the attitude of the timingl disk and relooker during the permissively open period;

FIGURE 6 is a horizon-tal `section taken onA line 6 6r shaft, and the method in which the lock actuating knobis,

coupled to the drive shaft of the clock movement;

FIGURE 9 is a ldiagrammatic vertical section through the lock showing the relationship of the Winding disk to the timing disk during the permissively open period as.. the winding disk is being turned to engage it with the bolt, dog preparatory to drawing in the bolt;

FIGUREv l0 is a diagrammatic vertical section similar to FIGURE 9 show-ingthe relationship of the parts when, the Winding disk has Ibeen turned to that position at which, itis actually in engagement with the bolt dog;

FIGURE 11 is a diagrammatic vertical section similar to FIGURES 9 and 10 sho-wing the relationship of the parts as theknob and winding disk are turned beyond the. position shown inFIGURE 1() thereby drawing inv the, bolt;

FIGURE 12 is a diagrammatic vertical section similar Patented Febr 5, 1963.

To make the connection and withdrawl- 3 to FIGURES 9, and 11, showing the relationship of the parts just after the clock movement has been initially started in motion to begin the conditioning period;

FIGURE 13 is a diagrammatic vertical section showing the relationship of the parts near the end of the permissively open period, as the relocker is about to be positioned to prevent the bolt dog from being engageable with the winding disk;

FIGURE 14 is a diagrammatic vertical section showing the relationship of the parts after the termination of the permissively open period, showing the manner in which the relocker prevents the bolt dog from engagement with the winding disk;

FIGURE is a diagrammatic vertical section showing the relationship of the parts after the lock has been opened, prior to the initiation of a subsequent conditioning period; and

FIGURE 16 is a diagrammatic vertical section showing the relationship of the winding disk and the timing disk when both have been turned to their extreme clockwise positions.

A time lock 1 embodying the principles of the invention is `shown mounted on the door 2 0f a safe or money chest. The safe illustrated has a frame 3 having an inturned flange 4 provided with an opening 5 for receiving the bolt 6 of the .lock 1, as is shown in FIGURE 6. The safe or money chest itself -is not a part of the present invention and is shown only for purposes of illustration.

The lock 1 comprises a lock mechanism designated generally lby numeral 7 which is housed within a case 8 mounted on the inside surface of door 2 by suitable means such as mounting bolts 9. The case 8 may be rectangular in shape, having a rear wall 10, a top 11, a bottom 12, a left side 13 and a right side 14, the safe door 2 constituting a closure yfor the open front side of the lock case 8.

Operation of the lock is controlled by a rotatable knob or handle 15 located on the outside of the safe door 2 which is connected, in a -manner to be described, to the lock mechanism 7 located within case 8 through a shaft 16 extending through the safe door 2. The lock mechanism 7 is driven by a clock movement 17 which may be mounted from the rear wall 10 of the case 8 by means of screws 18, as shown in FIGURE 4. This clock mechanism, when running, rotates a drive shaft 20 which in turn supplies angular movement to the various parts of the lock mechanism itself; in the preferred embodiment shown in the drawings and described herein, the clock mechanism turns shaft 20 in a counterclockwise direction, although it should be noted that the direction of rotation of shaft 20 and the other rotating parts of the timing mechanism might be reversed, upon slight modication of the lock, without departing from the principles of the invention. The clock mechanism 17 is wound from knob 15 by turning shaft 20 in a clockwise direction. The clock movement 17 is generally conventional in design and for that reason is not shown in full detail in the drawings.

i Clock mechanism 17 includes as one element a conventional escapement wheel 21, the rotation of which can be stopped, as by the application of frictional pressure, to stop the motion of the clock movement 17 itself. In the drawings, the escapement wheel 21 is disposed to the right of the drive shaft 20, in such position that it may be frictionally engaged by a brake spring 22, as is most clearly shown in FIGURES 3, 5, and 15. Brake spring 22 is secured at one end to a ange 23 on a timer brake 24 which is rotatable in a vertical plane about a pivot 25 secured in the upper right corner of the lock case. The timer brake 24 has an elongated arm 26 at the outer (left) end of which is provided a timer brake pin 27. A torsion spring 28 encircles pivot 25 and has one end portion 29 bearing upon the inside surface of the top 11 of the case 8, and its other end portion 30 bearing downwardly upon the timer brake pin 27, so that spring 28 urgesV the brake 24 in a counterclockwise direction around pivot 25 and thus urges the timer brake pin 27 in a direction generally towards drive shaft 20 and a position in which, as will be explained, the pin 27 is engaged by, or is in contact with, the timing disk or the winding disk.

As is best shown in FIGURE 8, a generally cylindrical timing disk shaft 32 is immovably connected to drive shaft 20, as -by means of a pin 33, for 4rotation therewith. At the rear end of the timing disk shaft 32, i.e., adjacent clock mechanism 17, the shaft 32 is provided with a neck 34 of smaller diameter onto which is secured the timing disk 35, which is described in detail hereinafter. A cylindrical winding disk shaft 36 is rotatably journalled on the timing disk 32 forwardly of the timing disk 35. At its outer or forward end the winding disk shaft 36 is provided with a transverse slot 37 for connection to knob shaft 16. A neck 38 of small diameter is provided at the inner end of winding disk shaft 36 around which is rotatably journalled the relocker 40. Forwardly of the relocker 40, against shoulder 41 at the forward end of neck 38, the winding disk 42 is secured to the winding disk shaft 36. Thus, winding disk 42 rotates with the winding disk shaft 36, while relocker 40, positioned between the winding disk 42 and timing disk 35, is freely rotatable around the winding disk shaft 36. The timing disk 35 is positively connected to the timing disk shaft 32 for rotation with drive shaft 20. The knob 15 is connected to shaft 16, which is provided at its inner end with a key 43 (see FIGURE 6) engageable in slot 37 at the outer end of the winding disk shaft 36. A washer 44 is provided between the knob 15 and the safe door 2, and a retainer ring 45 ts in a groove around shaft 16 on the inside of the safe door 2, as shown in FIGURE 8, so that the shaft 16 cannot be disengaged from the winding disk shaft 36.

The winding disk 42 is rotatable with knob 15 through shaft 16 by reason of the interconnection of winding disk Shaft 36 with shaft 16. The function of the winding disk 42 is to wind the clock mechanism 17 through a lost motion coupling (to be described) with the timing disk 35, and to provide a connection with the bolt 6, at the appropriate time, for withdrawing the bolt from the safe frame. The function of relocker 40, in combination with the winding disk 42 and timing disk 35, is to establish and control the permissively open period, while the function of the timing disk 35 is to operate the brake spring 22 which controls the running of the clock movement 17, to establish the conditioning period and the permissively open period, and to provide a lost motion coupling between the winding disk 42 and drive shaft 20.

A front view of the timing disk 35 is shown in FIGURE 5, which is a vertical section taken on a plane between the relocker 40 and the winding disk 42. The timing disk 35 comprises a generally fiat member which is centrally connected to the timing disk shaft 32 as previously explained. Around its periphery the timing disk 35 is provided, in clockwise order, with a tooth 46 extending outwardly, a cam edge leading `to a shoulder 47 which terminates in a second tooth 48 located in a clockwise direction from tooth 46, a drive tooth 49, a `bolt dog pin cutout 50, a timing disk retainer spring notch 51, and a stop shoulder 52. The `timing disk 35 is also provided with a relocker drive stud or pin 53 which extends forwardly from the surface of the disk inwardly of its edge between the stop shoulder 52 and tooth 46.

The relocker 40, which is best seen in FIGURE 5, comprises a ilat member rotatably journalled on the winding disk shaft 36. The relocker is elongated in shape, having a tooth or edge 54 on its left side for abutment with the relocker drive stud 53 presented by the timing disk 35, and has an outwardly extending tip 55 at its lower edge, on the right side of which is a shoulder 56 for engaging the bolt dog, as will be explained.

The Winding disk 42 comprises a at generally circular member centrally secured to the winding disk shaft 36. As is perhaps most clearly shown in FIGURE 15, on its periphery 60 the winding disk 42 is provided with a timer brake pin notch 57, the clockwise facing side of which is coniigurated to provide a cam shoulder 58 extending angularly toward the periphery 60` of the winding disk. The winding4 disk is also provided with a bolt dog notch 61 located in the clockwise direction from the brake pin notch 57. A timing disk drive pin 62 extends rearwardly,

that is, toward the rear of the case `from the windingV disk 42, and is positioned adjacent the periphery of the disk between notches 57 and 61 in radial position to abut driven tooth 49 of the timing disk for driving the latter in clockwise direction, as shown in FIGURE 16.

A timing disk stop 63 is provided on the left side 13 of the lock case S in position to abut the timing disk stop shoulder 52, and thereby limit the clockwise rotation of the timing disk 35 and clock Imovement 17. Stop 63 may be formed, for example, simply by punching it from the case wall 13 itself. Also fastened to the left side 13 of the case, below stop 63, is a timing disk retainer spring 64. This spring 64 preferably comprises a leaf spring fastened to the case wall 13 as by means ofv rivets 65 at one end, .as shown in FIGURES 3 and 16, for example, and has a detent 66 at its upper end which is frictionally engageable in notch S1 of the timing disk 35. The purpose of this spring, as will be explained more fully, is to frictionally restrict counterclockwise motion of the stop shoulder 52 away from the stop 63, and thereby to retain the timing disk and drive shaft 20k in their extreme clockwise positions, wherein the clock movement is fully wound.

Below the timing disk retainer spring 64 and fastened to the left side 13 of the case, is a relocker retainer spring 67 (see FIGURE 3). This spring is a leaf spring preferably fastened to the case 8 by rivets `68, and has a detent 70 at its outer, or right, end which frictionally restricts Imovement of the relocker tip 55 past it in either direction.

The Vlock mechanism is adapted for use with either a dead bolt, that is, a bolt which must be both manually engaged and manually disengaged vfrom bolt opening 5 iu the safe frame, or with a spring bolt having an angulated or cam edge such that it is self-engaging with opening 5. For purposes of description, a spring bolt is shown in the drawings. The bolt 6 comprises an elongated rectangular bar extending through an opening 71 in the lower portion of the right side wall 14 of the case. A bore 72 (see FIGURE 7) extends inwardly toward the right end of the bolt from its left end for slidably receiving a boltV guide 73. The bolt guide 73 is a cylindrical rod or shaft mounted to the left side 13 ofthe case by a mounting collar 74, and restricts the bolt 6 to a linear motion so that it cannot cock or twist with respect to the case. A coil compression spring 75 disposed around the bolt guide 73 between collar 74 and the left end of the bolt 6 urges thebolt outwardly from the case. As shown inFIGURE 3, a bolt dog 76 is pivotally secured to the bolt 6 by means of a shoulder screw 77. This element 76 comprises and L-shaped lever which has an elongated arm 78 at theleft end of which a forwardly extending bolt dog pin S0 is provided. The bolt dog 76 also has a short arm 81 at the lower end of which is provided a bolt dog spring mount 82. A coil tension spring 83v connected from the bolt dog spring mount 82 toy a pin or screw 84 adjacent the left end of the Ibolt 6 urges the bolt dog 76 clockwise about` shoulder screw 77 so that the bolt dog pin 80 is urged toward/the periphery 60 of the winding disk, as shown in FIGURES Sand 4.

The manner in which the respective elements ofthe lock operate during the timing cycle is. best describedby iirst considering the mechanism as it is after the lock has been opened, prior to the initiation of a subsequent conditioning period. The position of the various components of. the lock under these circumstances is shown in FIGURE l5. The timing disk stop shoulder 52 abuts stop 63, and the timing disk retainer spring 64 isengaged toward the relock retainer spring detent 70.

6'. with notch 51 of the timing is positioned to the left of the-relocker spring detent 70, and the timer brake pin 27 rests on the periphery 60 of the winding disk 42 causing the brake spring 22 to frictionally engage escapement wheel 21 and thereby prevent the clock mechanism from operating. The clock mechanism is fully wound, its drive shaft 20 having been rotated clockwise as far as it can be rotated, but the movement cannot run until the `brake spring 22 is swung away from, i.e., out of engagement with, the escapement wheel 21. The bolt 6 cannot be drawn in, because the bolt dog pin cannot engage the bolt dog notch 61 of the winding disk by reason of the fact that timing disk driven tooth 49 blocks the notch 61, as shown in FIGURE l5. Under the influence of bolt dog spring 83, the bolt dog pin 80 rests on the edge of driventooth 49.

With the lock in this attitude, the conditioning period is initiated by turning the knob 15 counterclockwise. As the knob is so turned, the winding disk 42 rotates counterclockwise with it, the brake pin 27 riding on the periphery 60 of the winding disk under the influence of the brake torsion spring 23. During most of this counterclockwise rotation of the winding disk 42 the timing disk 35y does not turn with it, since drive pin 62 is moving between timing disk driventooth 49 and tooth 48 (see FIGURE 15), but when the winding disk has been rotated to such a position that drive pin 62 does come to bear upon timing disk tooth 48 (see FIGURE 12), it drives the timing disk 35 counterclockwise with it, forcibly disengaging the timing disk retainer spring detent 66 from notch 51.

When the winding disk timer brake pin notch 57 is posi-` tionedy adjacent timer brake pin 27, torsion spring 28 urges the pin into the notch. Engagement of pin 27` in notch 57 prevents further rotation of the winding disk 42 in either direction. As the spring 28 urges the brake pin 27 into notch 57 of the winding disk 42, the timer brake 24 itself rotates counterclockwise about its pivot 25 so that the brake spring 22 is moved away from the escapementY wheel 21, toward the right side 14 of the case. The clock mechanism 17 having been previously wound, the consecutive disengagement of the timing disk retainer spring notch 51 from spring detent 66 and the release of the escapement wheel from brake spring 22 permits the movement to turn drive shaft 20, and consequently timing disk 35, in a counterclockwise direction; (Position of the elements when the clock starts to run is best shown in FIGURE 12.) So long as the brake pin 27 is engaged in the winding disk notch 57, the winding disk is locked against movement in either direction, and the lock cannot be opened.

As the timing disk 35 is turned in counterclockwise direction by the clock movement 17, the timing disk shoulder 47 gradually approaches timer brake pin` 27, and the relocker drive stud 53 urges the relocker tip 55 When the cam edge 85 of shoulder 47 contacts the brake pin 27, it cams the brake pin outwardly, past the intersection of cam shoulder 58 with the side of the timer brake pin notch 57 to the positionshown in FIGURE 13, but does.

not cam it so lfar outwardly that the timer brake spring 22 isbrought to bear on the clock escapement wheel 21.

I-t is important to note that the `brake pin 27 is thus: cammed outwardly by cam edge 85 before relocker drive stud 53 drives the relock tip 55 past, that is, to the right of, the retainer spring detent 70. This attitude of the timing mechanism is also shown in full detail in FIGURES 3' and 5.

The outward camming of brake pin 2'7 by cam edge disk. The relocker tip 55' shoulder `58 cams the brake pin 27 outwardly out of engagement with notch 57. As the pin 27 is thus moved, the brake 24 rotates about its pivot 25 to a position in which the brake spring 22 bears on the escapement wheel 21 and stops the clock mechanism 17; the brake pin 27 is held by torsion spring 28 against the periphery 60 of the winding disk. Release of the brake pin 27 from notch 57 permits the winding disk to be further rotated, as shown in FIGURE 9. The bolt dog pin 80 is engaged by turning the knob 15, and consequently the winding disk 42, clockwise past the position shown in FIGURE 9 to that position shown in FIGURE 10. As the winding disk is so rotated, the timing disk drive pin 62 bears against driven tooth 49 of the timing disk 35 (see FIG- URE 9), causing the timing disk 35 to rota-te with the winding disk 42, and thereby rewinding the clock mechanism by turning shaft 26 in clockwise direction. The bolt dog pin cutout 50 in the timing disk is so positioned with respect to tooth 49 that when 4drive pin 62 of the winding disk 42 abuts tooth 49 of the timing disk, the bolt dog notch 61 of the winding disk and bolt dog pin cutout 50 of the timing disk are aligned, -as shown in FIGURE 10. When the timing disk and winding disk have been -rotated to this position, the bolt dog spring S3 urges the bolt dog pin 80 into notch 61 of the winding disk. Once this interconnection of the bolt dog 76 and the winding disk 42 has occurred, further clockwise rotation of the winding disk moves the bolt dog pin 8), and consequently the bolt 6 itself, to the left, as shown in FIGURE 11, so that the bolt is withdrawn from the safe frame and the safe door 2 may be swung open.

As lthe winding disk is rotated clockwise to draw the bolt 6 in, drive pin 62 bears on timing disk -driven tooth 49 (see FIGURE 1l), thereby rotating the timing disk back to the initial position shown in FIGURE 15 in which the timing disk stop shoulder 52 abuts stop 63 and in which the timing disk retainer spring detent 66 is engaged in notch 51 of the timing disk. When the bolt has once been withdrawn it cannot again be withdrawn, since the bolt dog pin cutout 50 of the timing disk and notch 61 of the winding disk are then out of alignment by reason of the fact that the timing disk 35 is held by the retainer spring detent 66 at its extreme clockwise position, in which it is in contact with stop 63, while the winding disk l42 has been moved counterclockwise with the bolt dog pin 80 as spring 75 pushes the bolt to the right upon release of the knob. As shown in FIGURE 15, the tooth 49 blocks notch 61 and prevents the bolt dog pin 80 from further engagement in notch 61.

In that embodiment of the invention in which the bolt comprises a spring bolt which is constantly urged toward locking position, the bolt is normally in the extended position shown in FIGURE 15. Once the door 2 has been opened, the door may be closed at any time without turning the knob 15, since the frame ange 4 will cam the angulated edge of the bolt to the left, against the action of spring 75, until the bolt is aligned with opening 5 and snaps into locking position. To open the lock at a later time, after the bolt has once been drawn in, the knob 15 must again be turned coun-terclockwise to engage the timer brake pin 27 in notch 57 of the winding disk and start the conditioning period, as in FIG- URE 12.

In the foregoing explanation of the operation of the invention, it 'was assumed -that the lock was in fact opened during the permissively open period. As previously mentioned, a primary advantage of the invention is that if, for any reason, the lock is not opened during the permissively open period, then after the end of that period it cannot be opened without first going through another conditioning period. The sequence of events occurring at the end of the permissively open period when the lock is not opened is shown in FIGURES 13 and 14. During the permissively open period, the timer brake pin 27 rides on timing disk shoulder 47 while the relocker drive stud 53 gradually drives the tip 55 of relocker 40 to the right, toward the detent 70 of relocker retainer spring 67, as in FIGURE 13. As the timing disk is further rotated by the clock mechanism 17, relocker tip 55 is eventually snapped to the right side of the relock retainer spring detent 70. Occurrence of this event signifies the end of the permissively open period, and is shown in FIGURE 14. The clock movement 17 continues to run for a short time longer until the locker drive stud 53 abuts relocker shoulder 54; the relocker is then immovably positioned between the bolt dog pin and the drive stud 53, which positively prevents the movement from further rotation.

Once the relocker tip 55 has been snapped to the right of the relocker retainer spring detent '76 so that it is in the position shown in FIGURE 14, the bolt dog pin 80 is positively held radially outwardly by the relocker shoulder 56, and therefore cannot be engaged with the bolt dog notch 61 of the winding disk. When this has occurred, the lock cannot be opened without going through another conditioning period.

Once Ithe permissively open period has thus been allowed to expire without opening the lock, the relocker tip 55 must be snapped to the left of detent 70A before the bolt dog can be engaged in winding disk notch 61. This movement of the relocker can be achieved only by initiating another conditioning period. Since the timer brake pin 27 is positioned on timing disk shoulder 47 (see FIGURE 14), in position to be engaged by winding disk cam shoulder v58, the winding disk 42 may be rotated clockwise to start the conditioning period. As it is turned past that position at which the timing disk drive pin 62 comes to bear on timing disk driven tooth 49, the winding disk 42 drives the timing disk 35 clockwise. As the winding disk is further rotated clockwise, drive pin 62 then comes into contact with the right edge of the relocker 40 and positively drives it also to the left, snapping tip 55 past the relock retainer spring detent 70. Reloeker shoulder 56 is thereby moved away from bolt dog pin 80. To move the relocker past detent 70, the winding disk 42 and timing disk 35 must be rotated to their extreme clockwise positions, in which the timing disk stop shoulder 52 bears against stop 63, as shown in FIGURE 16. As this occurs, timing disk driven tooth 49 is positioned adjacent bolt dog pin 80, preventing the bolt dog pin from upward movement such as is necessary for it to engage the winding disk notch 61. Since tooth 49 blocks the movement of the bolt dog pin, no matter which way the Winding disk 42 is turned after the permissively open period the lock cannot be opened without the necessity of rst going through a conditioning period.

With the timing disk in its extreme clockwise position the clock mechanism is fully wound, and the lock appears as shown in FIGURE 15. To start the conditioning period, the Winding disk is simply turned counterclockwise until the timer brake pin 27 is engaged in notch 57 of the winding disk, as shown in FIGURE 12, so that the brake spring 22 is moved away from the escapement 21.

From the foregoing it will be evident that the duration of the conditioning period depends upon the rate of rotation of drive shaft 20 as established by the clock movement 17, on the position of the leading edge of shoulder 47 of the timing disk with respect to stop shoulder 52, and on the configuration of the cam surface 58 of notch 57 of the winding disk. It will also be apparent that the length of the relock or permissively open period is primarily determined by the rate of rotation of the clock movement, the position of the relocker drive stud 53, as well as by the shape of the relocker edge 54.

By varying the rate of rotation of the clock movement, `the shape of the timing disk, and/or the shape of the relocker, a great many combinations of conditioning periods and permissively open periods may be obtained, as will be apparent to those skilled in the art from the foregoing description. It will be appreciated, therefore, that the presagevo-,329"

specific length, but ratherthat it encompasses all of those variations'embodying its operative principles.

Having describedmy invention, IV claim:

l. A time lock comprising, a clock movement effective upon actuationY to establish timed rotational movement of a shaft, a` timing member rotatable with said shaft, aV

meansifrom said winding member at the end of a first preestablished` period of time beginning upon actuation ofsaidfmovement and thereby permitting said winding member then to be turned lto dog-engaging position, relocker meansV preventing engagement ofsaid dog and said winding'member after the expiration of a second preestablished period oftime `which Ibegins immediately followinggsaid-first preestablished period of time whereby after said secondperiod said bolt cannot be'moved to unlock position, andmeans mountingsaid elements -in operative-relationship. Y

2; A time lock in accordance with claim l wherein said clock movement is spring operated.

3. A time lock in accordance with claim 2` including means effective to wind said movement upon rotation of said winding member to a given position.

4.y -A -timelock in accordance -with claim 2 including means effective to wind said movement when said winding member is turned to withdraw said bolt.

5. Atime lockV in accordance with claim 2 including lost motion means effective to interconnect said winding member to said movement through said timing member whereby said movement is wound by turning said winding member to a certain angular position with said grippable means.

6. A time lock in accordance with claim 1 wherein said clock movement is spring wound, said lock including means effective to wind said movement when said winding member is turned to withdraw said bolt, and including means to prevent said movement from running unless said releasable means are engaged with said winding member.

7. A time lock in accordance with claim 2 wherein said movement has an escapement wheel and wherein said lock includes brake spring means frictionally bearing upon said escapement wheel and preventing said movement from operating except when said releasable means are engaged with said winding member.

8. A time lock in accordance with claim 1 wherein said winding member is provided with a peripheral notch for engaging said dog in bolt-withdrawing relation and wherein said dog is spring urged toward notch-engaging position.

9. A time lock in accordance with claim 1 wherein said winding member is provided with a notch formed in its periphery for engaging said releasable means and wherein said releasable means comprise a pin, said pin being spring urged into notch engaging position.

10. A time lock comprising, a spring operated clock movement effective upon actuation to establish timed rotational movement of a shaft, said movement including an escapement, a timing member rotatable with said shaft, a Winding member journalled on said shaft, grippable means for turning said winding member about said shaft, a bolt having a dog, said winding member having means for engaging said dog in bolt-withdrawing relationV when said Winding member is turned to a given angular position on said shaft, said winding member having a peripheral not'ch, releaseableA means normally engaging said-notch andJ thereby'preventing said winding member from being; rotated to` dog-engaging position, said releasable" means' comprising a pin swingable about a pivot, spring means urging said pin toward notch engaging position', means'- presented by said timing member for camming saidV pin out of saidf notch at theend of `a first preestablished period` of time beginning upon actuation of said' movement and thereby permitting; said windingmember'then to be turned to dog-engaging position, relocker means preventing-'engagement' ofy said dog and said winding member after the expiration' of a second preestablished period of time which begins immediately following said firstpreestablished period of time whereby after said second period said" bolt cannot be moved to unlock position, and meansmounting` said elements in operative relationship.

l1. A time lock comprising, a springoperated'4 clock' movement'effective upon actuation to establish timed rotationalmovemcnt'of` a shaft, a timing disk rotatable with said shaft,` a relocker journalled on said shaft, a winding disk journalled on `said shaft, manually graspable means for turning said winding disk about said shaft, abolt hav= ing'a dog, said dog being engageable with said windingV disk in bolt-withdrawing relation therewith when Said winding-disk is turned by said manually graspable means to a given angular position, releasable means normally restricting-said winding disk from rotation about said shaft thereby normally' preventing said winding disk from being turned by said manually graspable means to dogengaging position, Isaid timing disk having cam` means effectiveA to release said releasable means from said winding disk at the end of a first preestablishedk period of time beginning when said movement is set in motion whereby said winding disk may then be turned to dog-engaging position t-o` withdraw said bolt, said timing disk having relooker drive means elfective after the expiration of a second preestablished period of time which begins immediately following said first preestablished period ofV time to turn said relocker about said shaft into such position that said relocker blocks engagement of said dog with said winding disk, and means mounting said elements in operative relationship. e

12. A time lock in accordance with claim 11, wherein said winding disk is provided with a peripheral notch for engaging said dog, said dog being spring urged into notchengaging position, and wherein said relocker is positioned after the expiration of said second period of time to block said dog from engaging said notch.

13. A time lock in accordance with claim 11, wherein said winding disk is provided with a peripheral notch for engaging said dog, said dog being spring urged into notchengaging position, and wherein said relocker is positioned after said second period of time to block said notch so that said dog cannot engage said winding disk.

14. A time lock is accordance with claim 13, wherein said lock includes detent means frictionally restricting said relocker from moving to position blocking said notch prior to the expiration of said second period of time.

15. A time lock in accordance with claim 11, wherein said Winding disk is provided with means for moving said relocker away from dog-engagement blocking position when said clock mechanism is Wound.

16. A time lock comprising, a spring operated clock movement effective upon actuation to establish timed rotational movement of a shaft, a timing disk rotatable with said shaft, a relocker journalled on said shaft, a winding disk journalled on said shaft, manually graspable means for turning said winding disk about said shaft, a bolt having a dog, said dog being engage'able with said winding disk in bolt-withdrawing relation therewith when said winding disk is turned by said manually graspable means to a given angular position, said winding disk having a peripheral notch, movable pinning means normally engaging said notch to restrict said winding disk from rotation about said shaft thereby normally preventing said winding disk from being turned by said manually graspable means to dog-engaging position, said timing disk having a peripheral camming edge effective to cam pinning means out of said notch at the end of a first preestablished period of time beginning when said movement is set in motion, whereby said winding disk may then be turned to dog-engaging position to withdraw said bolt, said timing disk having relocker drive means effective after the expiration of a second preestablished period of time which begins immediately following said rst preestablished period of time to turn said relocker about said shaft into such position that said relocker blocks engagement of said dog with said winding disk, and means mounting said elements in operative relationship.

17. A time lock in accordance with claim 16 wherein said clock movement includes as one element thereof a movable member the application of frictional drag to which is effective to stop said clock movement from operating, and wherein said pinning means includes a brake spring effective to apply frictional pressure to said movable member to stop said movement from operating when said pinning means are disengaged from said notch.

18. A time lock in accordance with claim 16 wherein said movement includes as one element thereof an escapement wheel and wherein said pinning means includes a brake spring frictionally bearing upon said escapement wheel with a pressure sucient to stop said clock movement from operating when said pinning means are disengaged from said notch.

19. A time lock comprising, a spring operated clock movement effective upon actuation to establish timed rotational movement of a shaft, said movement including an escapement, a timing disk rotatable with said shaft, a relocker journalled on said shaft, a winding disk journalled on said shaft, manually graspable means for turning said winding disk about said shaft, a bolt having a dog, said dog including a dog pin, said winding disk having a rst peripheral notch for engaging said dog pin in boltwithdrawing relation therewith when said winding disk is turned by said manually graspable means to a give angular position, spring means urging said dog pin toward notchengaging position, said winding disk having a second peripheral notch spaced from said rst notch, movable pinning means normally engaging said second notch to restrict said winding disk from rotation about said shaft thereby normally preventing said winding disk from being turned by said manually graspable means to dog pinengaging position, said timing disk having a peripheral cam edge effective to cam said pinning means out of Said second notch at the end of a rst preestablished period of time beginning when said movement is set in motion, whereby said winding disk may then be turned to dog pinengaging position to withdraw said bolt, said timing disk having relocker drive means effective after the expiration of a second preestablished period of time which begins immediately following said rst preestablished period of time to turn said relocker about said shaft into such position that said relocker blocks said dog pin from engaging said first notch, detent means frictionally restricting said relocker from moving to position blocking said first notch prior to the expiration of said second period of time, means effective to wind said clock mechanism when said winding disk is turned to withdraw said bolt, said pinning means including a brake spring effective to frictionally bear upon said escapement wheel to stop said movement from running when said pinning means are disengaged from said second notch and means to mount said elements.

References Cited in the le of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 833,094 Stockwell Oct. 9, 1906 1,813,441 Diesel July 7, 1931 2,303,614 Claus Dec. 1, 1942 2,681,560 Shuttleworth et al June 22, 1954

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US833094 *Aug 7, 1905Oct 9, 1906Herbert C StockwellTime-lock.
US1813441 *Jan 7, 1928Jul 7, 1931Sargent & GreenleafLocking mechanism
US2303614 *Apr 3, 1941Dec 1, 1942Claus George FTime control lock
US2681560 *Jan 16, 1951Jun 22, 1954Shuttleworth IncCigarette case having a timecontrolled locking means
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4843850 *Oct 28, 1987Jul 4, 1989Mcgregor Jon D CTime release lock
Classifications
U.S. Classification70/272
International ClassificationE05B43/00
Cooperative ClassificationE05B43/00
European ClassificationE05B43/00