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Publication numberUS3076358 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 5, 1963
Filing dateSep 12, 1960
Priority dateSep 12, 1960
Publication numberUS 3076358 A, US 3076358A, US-A-3076358, US3076358 A, US3076358A
InventorsPaper Meyer, Donald W Knudtson, George G Olson, Richard F Rouser
Original AssigneePaper
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Hardware marking during rolling
US 3076358 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 5, 1963 1 M. PAPER ETAL HARDWARE MARKING DURING ROLLING 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Sept. 12, 1960 IN V EN TORS FIG. 2

ATTORNEY Feb. 5, 1963 M. PAPER ETAL HARDWARE MARKING DURING ROLLING 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Sept. 12, 1960 F IG. 6

YE TORS 5 3x Y H SER 2g ATTORNEY United States Patent Ofifice 3,076,358 Patented Feb. 5, 1963 This invention relates to marking hardware during a rolling process in the course of making it. Specifically it is a means of marking hardware by placing marking insert dies in a larger die that is performing some other function by rolling the stock between portions of it. The invention further features structures for making such markings indelible by impressing indicia into the metal and yet making sure that the bolt is not hazardous to handle after it has been marked.

Accordingly it is an important object of this invention to provide a means for marking merchandising information on pieces of hardware in an indelible manner.

It is another object of this invention to mark hardware with such indicia during some manufacturing step that is necessarily carried out.

Still another object of this invention is to provide such a marking for hardware that requires no special knowledge or ability beyond reading to use.

Still another object of this invention is to provide such marking that does not increase the time involved in manufacturing the items.

Still a further object of this invention is to impress indicia into the surface of hardware without distorting the hardware beyond reasonable tolerances.

It is a still further object of this invention to provide such a marking method and structure for hardware that does not create hazardous, sharp projections on the hardware so marked.

Yet a further object of this invention is to provide a marking technique which is novel by reason of novel marking dies that can be inserted as and become parts of still other dies normally used in formation of hardware and which by reason of their removability and replaceability can be readily changed or altered with a minimum of stoppage of the manufacturing of equipment.

Still other objects will become apparent from the particular disclosures and from the description herein.

To the accomplishment of the foregoing and related ends, this invention then comprises the features hereinafter fully described and particularly pointed out in the claims, the following description setting forth in detail certain illustrative embodiments of the invention, these being indicative, however, of but a few of the various ways in which the principles of the invention may be employed.

FIGURE 1 is a fragmentary plan view of a roll thread forming machine equipped with the marking structure of this invention; hidden parts are shown in broken lines;

FIGURE 2 is an elevational view of the stationary one of the two roll threading dies showing the marking dies; hidden structure is shown with broken lines;

FIGURE 3 is a plan view of a different form of roll threading die and illustrating the marking inserts partially removed;

FIGURE 4 is a fragmentary elevation of the roll threading die shown in FIGURE 2; 7

FIGURE 5 is an elevational view of a bolt marked on the dies shown in FIGURES 1 and 2; and

FIGURE 6 is an elevational view of a bolt marked with the die of FIGURES 3 and 4.

Referring to the drawing and particularly to FIGURE 1, there is seen the fixed die'holder 10 of a roll threading machine that is supported on the usual frame member 11 and its position located by stop pin 12. Usual clamp 14- which is tightened by means of the washer 15 and cap screw 16 hold, in the die holder lit, the stationary portion of the die. Here shown is a two part roll threading die having the thread forming portion 1'7 and the straightener bar It both held in holder it) by means of clamp 14. The

bolt blank 19 is shown being rolled between the fixed die described and movable die 2b which is held in the sliding 1 jaw 21 of the machine. A clamp similar to that for the fixed die is also provided for the removable die at 22 and is held in place in a similar manner by the washer 24 and the cap screw 25. An end clamp 26 secures the die endwise in movable die holder or jaw 21, and washer 2.7 and cap screw 23 secure clamp 26. As jaw 21 carrying die 28 moves in the direction of the black arrow, at the right thereof in FIGURE 1, bolt 19 is rolled between the dies as shown by the curved arrow nearly circling it.

Referring now to FIGURE 2 the straightener bar 13 above the threading die 17 has a cavity or channel 36 formed in it, and the straightener bar is separable from the threading die 17 at line 29. Channel 30 is formed in the bottom of the straightener bar 13' Within the cavity 3!? are a series of marking blocks such as the ones desig nated 31, 32, 34 and 35. The blocks as seen in FIGURE 1 are of a length exactly equal to the thickness of the straightener bar 13. They abut against the inner portion of the die holder It in the same manner that straightener bar 18 does. These blocks will not yield toward the die holder It? therefor. On the face of the two blocks marked 31 and 32 are shown indicia that might be desirably impressed into a bolt shank. The cent symbol 36 and numeral here iliustratively shown as Number 6 and designated 37 are provided on face of the blocks and extend beyond the face of the straightener bar sufficiently to engage the shank of bolt I9. In this illustration blocks 34 and 35 are blank. They merely come out flush with the face or" the straightener bar 3 and do not engage the bolt shank. As the bolt blank 19' is rolled through the threading machine therefor, it is impressed with a 6 as shown at 38 which indicates the normal unit price for the item of hardware. The checkout clerk may give appropriate discounts on quantities as instructed.

The channel 3& will be seen to be nearer the discharge or right hand end in the figures of the die straightener bar 16 than to the end in which the bolt blank enters at the commencement of the threading operation. At the same time it is not arranged precisely at the end. In fact, it is considered desirable to have the slot 3% spaced from the end of the straightener bar at which the bolt is discharged to leave a flat area designated 39. By so spacing slot 39, at least one full roll of the bolt shank occurs after marking and before discharging it. The purpose of this one additional roll is to flatten out any sharp edges that may have been raised on the bolt shank in the course of forming indicia in it,

Actually channel 30 could be located otherwise in the straightener bar I8, but it is considered most desirable to roll the bolt shank once before discharging it and preferably a little more than that. In fact, most desirably the space 39 represents the circumference the shank of the bolt being rolled plus 4 of an inch with a tolerance of plus or minus of an inch. A single roll of the bolt shank thus provided by the machine is adequate to knock off any sharp corners that may have been raised on impressing the indicia 355 on it and at the same time does not destroy the legibility of the markings. thermore, this final rolling makes sure that the shank of the bolt is within acceptable tolerances for normal use.

In FIGURE 3 and FIGURE 4 is shown another form of roll threading dies in which the straightener bar portion 40 and the threading portion 41 are formed from a single piece of material. There is no division between these two pieces in which to cut a channel. Consequently Fur- I the channel, in this case designated 42, is formed in the top of portion 40 so that the channel is easily formed and marking insert blocks 44, 46, 47 and 43 are accessible for removal as illustrated in FIGURE 3 by sliding themv out of the die block portion 4% When this form of die is used a clamping bar or a shim 48 is usually applied on top of the die. This shim or bar 48 aids in engaging and holding stationary the marking die inserts 44 through 47. The usual die clamp 49 is secured by means of a washer and cap'screw 51 holds the die 451 -41 within the fixed die holder of the press similarly to the clamp 14-46 in FIGURE 1. In FIGURES 3 and 4 a different group of marking dies are shown to illustrate how additional indicia could be placed in the shank of bolt 19. The price of the bolt is shown as 89: rather than 6 and the additional marks XB have been formed thereon which could for example designate that the bolt is made of a special type of steel not usually used for this form of bolt or that it has been especially heat treated or otherwise adapted to a particular purpose.

FIGURE 5 illustrates a bolt that has been marked with the die of FIGURES 1 and 2 wherein the shank 52 of the bolt blank 19 has been marked with the price 6 as at 38 just above thread 54.

In FIGURE 6 a bolt blank 55 on which the threads 56 have been formed has been marked with the indicia 57 at a point substantially spaced from the thread as would occur in the structure shown in FIGURES 3 and 4.

While this application has shown illustratively a hexagonal head bolt as the subject matter on which indicia is printed, this same technique can be employed in any manufacture of hardware in which a rolling operation similar to this roll threading is employed. Similarly a wide variety of different forms of threaded hardware that are threaded on such roll threading machines could be marked in this maner. For example, carriage bolts, lag screws and other forms of threaded hardware of this general type could obviously be marked in this fashion. It is clear, therefore, that this invention provides a means for marking hardware that is manufactured in part at least by a rolling process in a manner that is positive and indelible. No amount of handling or length of time in stock will destroy the markings on the bolts. Furthermore, as this marking is carried out during another normal process of manufacturing, little or no additional cost in manufacturing is entailed. In using the hardware thus marked, it is obvious that hardware dealers can employ part-time or temporary help and not feel handicapped. The bolt will inevitably come from its place of stock with the correct price indicated on it. There is little likelihood of an inaccurate price being charged. Likewise the clerk does not have to remember what the price on each item in the hardware is. The flattening feature by rolling the bolt on the final roll, moreover, is sufficient to assure that the customers or the clerks handling the bolts bare handed will not be injured.

Furthermore, bolts mixed in the wrong bins or stock supply place will nevertheless have the correct price associated with it for easy reference.

In the claims when the word bolt is used for brevity it'should be understood to include any threaded element on which the threads may be formed by roll threading.

It is apparent that many modifications and variations of this invention as hereinbefore set forth may be made without departing from the spirit and scope thereof. The specific embodiments described are given by way of example only and the invention is limited only by the terms of the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

l. A die for a roll threading machine having a threading portion and a straightener bar portion, said straightener bar portion having a cavity therein, inserts slidably engaging and completely filling the cavity in said straightening bar portion, and an indicia forming portion that extends beyond the surface of said straightener 4 bar portion of said roll threading die on at least one of said inserts.

2. The roll thread forming die of claim 1 in which said cavity is in the bottom of a separable straightener bar portion.

3. The roll threading die of claim 1 in which said cavity is in the top of said straightener bar portion, and a clamping bar engaging the top of said straightener bar portion when it is in use.

4. The roll threading die of claim 1 in which said cavity is a whole member multiple of the width of one of said inserts.

5. A roll threading die comprising, a threading portion and a straightener bar portion, said straightener bar portion having a cavity therein, said cavity being rectangular and of a Width substantially equal to the circumference of a bolt shank that is to be formed by said roll threading die, a plurality of insert blocks that slidably engage said cavity and being of a fixed width with respect to said cavity whereby a given number of said insert blocks tightly fill said cavity, at least one of said insert blocks having indicia forming portions that extend beyond the bolt engaging surface of said straightener bar portion, said cavity being arranged with its side nearest to the discharge end of said roll threading die spaced a distance therefrom that is equal to the circumference of the bolt to be threaded said roll threading die plus of an inch plus or minus fa2 of an inch.

6. A die for roll threading machine having a threading portion and a straightener bar portion, said straightener bar portion having a cavity therein, indicia forming marking inserts removably engaged in the cavity of said straightening bar portion, and means for holding said indicia forming marking inserts stationary in said cavity with the indicia forming portions thereof extending beyond the surface of said straightener bar portion of said roll threading die.

7. The die of claim 6 in which said die has a discharge end and said cavity has its portion nearest the discharge end of said die spaced therefrom slightly more than the circumference of a bolt to be threaded by said die.

8. The die of claim 7 in which said cavity is of a width substantially equal to the circumference of a bolt being threaded by said die.

9. The die of claim 6 in which said cavity is of a width substantially equal to the circumference of a bolt being threaded by said die.

10. A rolling die comprising a forming portion and a straightener bar portion, said straightener bar portion having a cavity therein, said cavity being rectangular and of a width substantially the circumference of an item to be roll formed, a plurality of insert blocks that slidably engage said cavity and being of a width with respect to said cavity whereby a given number of said insert blocks tightly fill said cavity, said cavity being arranged with its end nearest to the discharge end of roll threading die spaced a distance therefrom that is equal to the circumference of a bolt to be threaded said roll threading die plus V of an inch plus or minus ,13 of an inch.

11. A die for roll forming having a forming portion and a straightener bar portion, said straightener bar portion having a cavity therein, an indicia forming marking insert removably engaged in the cavity of said straightening bar portion, and means for holding said indicia forming marking insert stationary in said straightener bar portion cavity with the indicia forming portion thereof extending beyond the surface of said straightening bar portion.

12. The die of claim ll in which said die has a discharge end and said cavity has its portions nearest to the discharge end of said die spaced therefrom slightly more than the circumference of a unit to be formed by said die.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,649,929 Senior NOV. 22, 1927 Hedgpeth June 6, 1939 Boggild June 6, 1939 Stine Sept. 2, 1941 Colwell Apr. 21, 1942 Richards Dec. 7, 1943 I-Ianneman Dec. 18, 1945 Friedly et a1. Sept. 4, 1956

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1649929 *Nov 16, 1923Nov 22, 1927Scovill Manufacturing CoMethod of and apparatus for producing cap screws and the like
US2161163 *Mar 27, 1937Jun 6, 1939Theron L HedgpethTool having identification insignia
US2161610 *Apr 24, 1934Jun 6, 1939Gen ElectricMethod and apparatus for making self-tapping screws
US2254629 *Sep 26, 1939Sep 2, 1941Westinghouse Electric & Mfg CoMethod of manufacturing turbine blades
US2280686 *Apr 6, 1938Apr 21, 1942Thompson Prod IncMethod of making engine poppet valves
US2336190 *Aug 30, 1940Dec 7, 1943Groov Pin CorpScrew rolling die
US2391308 *May 17, 1941Dec 18, 1945Illinois Tool WorksFastener unit
US2761229 *Aug 13, 1954Sep 4, 1956Gregory Ind IncBillet identification
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4798070 *Jul 1, 1983Jan 17, 1989Colt Industries Operating CorporationCombined thread rolling dies
US5375955 *Mar 24, 1992Dec 27, 1994Leslie; William O.Fastener component identification
US5664921 *Jul 12, 1994Sep 9, 1997Leslie; William O.Fastener component identification
DE3802438C1 *Jan 28, 1988May 3, 1989Guenther 8561 Reichenschwand De HoellfritschHand embossing device
Classifications
U.S. Classification72/90, 72/184, 40/629, 40/913
International ClassificationB44B5/00, B21H3/02
Cooperative ClassificationB21H3/022, Y10S40/913, B44B5/0028
European ClassificationB44B5/00A4B, B21H3/02C