Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS3076455 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 5, 1963
Filing dateDec 19, 1958
Priority dateDec 19, 1958
Publication numberUS 3076455 A, US 3076455A, US-A-3076455, US3076455 A, US3076455A
InventorsMilton J Cohen, Robert K Mcconnaughey
Original AssigneeMilton J Cohen, Robert K Mcconnaughey
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Holder for hypodermic syringe cartridges
US 3076455 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 5, 1963 R. K. MCCONNAUGHEY ETAL 3,076,455

HOLDER FOR HYPODERMIC SYRINGE CARTRIDGES 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed nec. 19, 1958 ATTORNEYS Feb. 5, 1963 R. K. MccoNNAUGHEY ETAL 3,076,455

HOLDER FOR HYPODERMIC SYRINGE CARTRIDGES Filed Deo. 19, 1958 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 go BY fear/@m ATTORNEYS Feb. 5, 1963i R. K. MGCONNAUGHEY ETAL HOLDER FOR HYPODERMIC SYRINGE CARTRIDGES Filed Dec. 19, 1958 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 ATTORNEYS United States Patent O 3,076,455 HOLDER FOR HYPODERMIC SYRINGE CARTRIDGES Robert K. McConnaughey, 5220 Parkway Drive, Chevy Chase 15, Md., and Milton J. Cohen, 7325 16th St.

NW., Washington 12, D.C.

. Filed Dec. 19, 1958, Ser. No. 781,607

8 Claims. (Cl. 128-Z18) This invention relates to hypodermic syringes and more particularly to devices for holding disposable medicament cartridges or the like while they are being prepared and used for making injections.

"The holders for disposable hypodermic syringe cartridges which have been employed prior to the present invention are primarily of two general types. The first type comprises a heavy metal syringe device with a plunger shaft attached, which is used repeatedly with disposable cartridges. The second type is itself disposable and has an opening at the rear through which a cartridge is inserted, the cartridge being held by a lip at the rear, by `threads at the front, `or by other fastening means. It is Ia primary object of the present invention to provide a hypodermic syringe cartridge holding device that is simpler to manufacture and use than any comparable device known heretofore.

A further object of the invention is to provide a holder of the foregoing type which can be made at a sufliciently low cost to permit disposal of the holder along with the cartridge, if desired.

Another object of the invention is to provide a holder of the` foregoing type which uses a minimum of material in its manufacture.

An additional object of the invention is to provide a holder of the foregoing type that is particularly adapted for use with cartridges having `a constricted neck adjacent one end thereof.

HStill another object of the invention is to provide a holder of the foregoing type which can be readily manufactured with an integral gripping means to permit relative movement of the holder and the cartridge plunger.

. A still further object of the invention is to provide a holder of the foregoing type which is capable of manufacture from a wide variety of materials, such as plastic, sheet metal, or wire stock.

Yet another object of the invention is to provide a holder of the foregoing type which may be readily manufactured from a single strip of material.

A still further object of the invention is to provide a holder of the foregoing type that is especially adapted for use with cartridges having an external bead at one end thereof.

An additional object of the invention is to provide a holder of the foregoing type having integral means for mountinga protective cover for the hypodermic needle.

Still another object of the invention is to provide a holder of the foregoing type having integral means for mounting a separate hypodermic needle.

A still further object of the invention is to provide a holder of the foregoing type having means for guiding the plunger shaft of the hypodermic cartridge.

g Another object of the invention is to provide a holder of the last mentioned type in which the plunger shaft may be tilted with respect to the axis of the holder when it withdrawn from the cartridge.

1 An additional object of the invention is to provide a holder of the last mentioned type in which the plunger shaft guide means has means for ejecting the cartridge from the holder when the plunger shaft is tilted.

The foregoing and other objects, advantages, and features of the invention and the manner in which the same are accomplished will become more readily apparent upon consideration of the following detailed description of thev invention when taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, which illustrate preferred and exemplary embodiments of the invention, in which parts common to the various gures are designated by the same reference characters, and wherein:

FIGURE 1 is a perspective view of a rst form of the invention;

FIGURE 2 is an end view of the invention of FIG- URE l shown with the cartridge inserted and as seen from the plunger shaft end of the cartridge;

FIGURE 3 is atop plan view of the invention of FIG- URE l shown with the cartridge inserted;

FIGURE 4 is a partly sectional side elevation view of the invention of FIGURE l shown with the cartridge inserted;

FIGURE 5 is a perspective view of a skeletal form of' the invention;

FIGURE 6 is a side elevation view of the invention of j along line 7-7 of FIGURE 6 in the direction of the ar" rows;

FIGURE 8 is a transverse sectional view taken along line 8--8 of FIGURE 6 in the direction of the arrows;

FIGURE 9 is a perspective view of another form of the invention;

FIGURE l0 is a longitudinal sectional View of the inventionof FIGURE 9 shown with the cartridge inserted;

FIGURE 1l is a transverse sectional view taken along line `11---11 of FIGURE l0 in the direction of the ar? rows;

FIGURE l2 is a plan view of still another form of the invention;

FIGURE 13 is an end view of the invention` of FIG- URE 12 as seen from the plunger shaft end of the carfridge;

i FIGURE 14 is a plan view of a blank from'which a holder of the invention may bev formed;

FIGURE 15 is a plan view illustrating a holder formed from the blank of FIGURE 14;

FIGURE 16 is an end view of the invention of FIG- URE 15 Vas seen from the needle end of the holder;

FIGURE 17 is a partly sectional elevation view of another form of the invention;

FIGURE 18 is an end View of the invention of FIG- URE 17 as seen from the needle end of the holder;

FIGURE 19 is .an elevation view of still another form of the invention;

FIGURE 20 is a truncated longitudinal sectional view of the Vinvention of FIGURE 19;

FIGURE 21 is a truncated plan view of still another form of the invention;

FIGURE 22 is a truncated elevation view of the in` vention of FIGURE 2l;

FIGURE 23 is a truncated elevation view of yet another modilication of the invention; and

FIGURE 24 is a perspective view of a still further embodiment of the invention.

Briefly stated, the invention is concerned with a holder for tubular disposable medicament cartridges, the holder 'being formed as a channel having an opening along one side -thereof through which the cartridge may be snapped into and out of the holder by lateral movement. The width of the opening is less than the maximum width of the cartridge, and the channel is formed -a stiff springy material so that the holder may Ihe distorted momentarily to permit the insertion and removal of the cartridge. Other features of the invention Will be brought out as the description proceeds.

Referring to the drawings, and-initially to FIGURES 1-4 thereof, in an exemplary form the holder of the invention comprises a channel 10 of stiff springy material, the channel being cylindrical in the form shown. The channel has an opening 12 along one side thereof defined by spaced longitudinal edges 14. The holder may be molded, stamped, or otherwise formed to the contours shown from suitable material such as metal or plastic. Adjacent one end of the channel is an internal projection 16, which is an arcuate bead in the form shown. Adjacent the other end of the channel is a gripping means, which is constituted by a pair of laterally extending external wings 18 in the form shown.

The holder thus defined is adapted to receive a tubular cartridge 20 of the type having a constricted neck 22 adjacent one end thereof, as shown in FIGURE 3. Beyond the neck is a fiange 24 and then an extension 26 which receives the hypodermic needle 28. The cartridge has a plunger 30 which may be reciprocated along the cartridge barrel by a plunger shaft (not shown) which in the form shown mates with a stub shaft 32 attached to the plunger piston. If the plunger is to be used merely to eject the contents of the cartridge through the hollow needle 28, the stub shaft 32 may merely serve to guide the end of the plunger shaft, but if the cartridge is to be used for aspiration, then the plunger shaft may be attached to the stub shaft 32 as by suitable threads.

The width of the opening 12, that is, the distance between the edges 14, is made less than the maximum width (the diameter) of the cartridge 20, and the depth of the channel 10 is made greater than the outer radius of the cartridge barrel. Stated differently, the arc length of the cross sectional periphery of the channel 10 is more than 180. The cartridge 20 is snapped into the holder by lateral movement through the opening Y12, and this is accomplished by momenta-rily distorting the holder so as to widen the opening through which the cartridge must move. The inner cross sectional dimensions of the channel are made commensurate with the corresponding outer dimensions of the cartridge, so that when the cartridge has been pushed through the opening 12, it is held firmly within the channel, lateral movement of the cartridge with respect to the holder thereby being prevented. When the cartridge is inserted, the bead 16 embraces and engages the neck 22 of the cartridge. Since the bead is then located between the flange 24 and the adjacent end of the barrel proper of the cartridge, longitudinal movement of the cartridge with respect to the holder (which might occur under the influence of the forces applied to the cartridge in inserting the needle or moving the plunger) is prevented. Use of the hypodermic syringe is facilitated by the wings 18 which provide convenient means for gripping the cartridge holder.

It will be noted that in the form of the invention just described the barrel of the cartridge protrudes from the rear or wing end of the holder. The protruding end of the cartridge provides a convenient surface against which a force may be exerted to snap the cartridge laterally out of the holder. In other forms to be described the holder extends beyond the cartridge.

The thickness of the holder material is determined in accordance with the inherent stiffness and resiliency characteristics'of the material, since the walls must be springy enough to permit the cartridge to bepressed laterally into the holder without Ydifficulty or damage to the car-- tridge and yet must be stiff enough to hold the cartridge firmly in position. Of course, portions of the holder, such as the bead 16 and the wings 18, may bev thicker than the channel body to provide the stiffness necessaryV to the proper operation of the syringe.

FIGURES -'8 illustrate a skeletal form of the invention. In this form the major portion of the body of the channel is omitted so that the holder'comprises essentially a forward arc or rim 34, a rearward arc or rim 36, which may be constituted by the periphery'of a hole in the wings 18, and a pair of parallel bars 38 which connect the corresponding ends of the arcs and which define the opening 12 previously described. The same bead 16 is employed as before. It is apparent from this form of the invention that the term channel as used in the specification and claims is not restricted to a body having solid walls but may be defined by a skeletal body. The stiffness of the material of such a holder may be greater than the stiffness of the material of a solid wall holder to compensate for the loss of wall material, but the use and operation of such a holder is essentially the same as before.

FIGURES 9-11 illustrate a modified form of the holder in which the wing end of the holder extends beyond the cartridge, in which a rear internal projection 40 is provided, and in which the holder is extended beyond the bead 16, as indicated at 42, and is formed with an additional internal projection or bead 44. With this construction the flange 24 of the cartridge is cradled between the beads 16 and `44, and the rear end of the cartridge abuts the bead 40. Thus, while the cartridge is more difficult to grip for removal, it is better protected by the holder against breakage, and the additional beads provide further assurance against longitudinal movement. In the form shown, the needle 28 of the cartridge is also protected by a removable cover 46 (which may also serve as the plunger shaft). This cover comprises an elongated tube having an internally threaded cap 48 at one end thereof which mates with external threads formed on the extension `42 of the holder between the beads 16 and 44. A friction fastener, bayonet fastener or other suitable cap fastener may be used in place of the threads. The cap may also have a short sleeve 52 which enters the opening defined by the bead 44 and which snugly surrounds the extension 26 of the cartridge. The inner surface of the bead 40 may serve as a guide for the plunger shaft to prevent lateral wobble.

FIGURES 17 and 18 illustrate a form of the invention having a provision for the attachment of an external hypodermic needle. In this form the forward end of the holder has an externally threaded extension 54 with a central bore S6. As shown in FIGURE 18 the extension is' split longitudinally so that the holder may be readily distorted to permit the insertion and removal of the cartridge as previously described. A separate hypodermic needle may be attached to the holder by engaging its internally threaded hub with the projection 54. Such a needle may be of the type having an extension which snugly pierces an end cap in the cartridge so as to obtain access to the cartridge contents without leakage. A tapered friction fit of needle and holder, a bayonet type fastener, or other suitable needle attachment may be used in place of the threads. In this form (similar to FIGS. 9-ll) the flange 24 of the cartridge is cradled between projection 16 and a forward projection constituted by member 54.

FIGURES 19-23 illustrate forms of the invention in which the holder is extended rearwardly to provide a guide for a plunger shaft 58, which may be part of the cartridge or part of the holder. As shown, the plunger shaft is the type having an intergral button 60 at one end and an enlarged hollow portion 62 at the other end which receives the stub shaft 32 of the plunger piston 30 previously described. In these forms of the invention the holder has rearward extensions which support a bearing for the plunger shaft 58. While in the forms shown two such extension members are provided, one at each of the respective sides of the holder, the extension could be constituted by a single curved member continuous from side to side around the bottom of the cartridge holder.

The plunger shaft bearing may be a cylindrical sleeve 66 as shown in FIGURES 19 and 20. This sleeve may be formed integrally with the extension 64, and may be split longitudinally to permit insertion of the plunger shaft 58 if the shaft has an enlarged portion 62 as shown. Splitting the bearing may also facilitate distortion of the holder during insertion and removal of the cartridge,

although a continuous bearing sleeve is not objectionable if it is spaced far enough away from the channel proper so as not to impede the distortion of the channel. As will be apparent, the bearing 66 serves to guide the plunger shaft`5=8 and to maintain the shaft yaligned with the axis of the cartridge. It also prevents accidental Withdrawal of the plunger shaft from the holder if the opening in the bearing is of smaller diameter than the enlarged portion 62 ofthe shaft.

In the embodiment illustrated in FIGURES 21 and 22 the shaft bearing 68 is pivotally mounted on extensions 70, as by pins 72 which are snapped into corresponding holes in the extensions 70. Thus when the plunger shaft is withdrawn from the cartridge barrel, the shaft and its bearing 68 may be tilted with respect to the axis of the cartridge and the cartridge holder.

In the embodiment of FIGURE 23 this tilting movement is used to facilitate removal of the cartridge from the holder. In this form the shaft bearing 74 has a projecting finger 76 which extends along one side of the cartridge at the plunger shaft end and which engages the cartridge and exerts a lateral force thereon when the plunger shaft is withdrawn from the cartridge barrel and is tilted in the manner previously described. By such an arrangement the end of the cartridge is forced from the holder and cartridge removal is facilitated.

FIGURE l2 illustrates a simple form of the invention which may be employed in conjunction with cartridges of the type having an external annular bead 78 at one end thereof. In this form of the invention the channel 80 is quite short and has an internal groove or depression 82 to receive the bead 78. The wings 84 may be formed integrally with the channel. To assemble the cartridge in the holder the cartridge is snapped in the side opening of the holder defined by the edges 86 such that the bead 7'8 enters the groove 82. Lateral movement between the cartridge and the holder is prevented by the snug engagement of the inner walls of the channel 80 with the outer Walls of the cartridge, and longitudin-al movement is prevented by the engagement of the bead 78 with the groove 82.

As indicated above, the holders of the invention may be fabricated in several different ways. FIGURE 24 illustrates a unique manner of manufacturing a skeletal for-m of the invention, by suitably bending wire stock. This form of the invention may be conveniently compared with lthe form illustrated in FIGURE 5, corresponding parts being differentiated by the use of the latter 11. It will be observed that in FIGURE 24 the bead 16a also forms the forward rim. The holder may be constituted by a single length of stiif springy wire bent into the shape shown, the wings 18a being soldered or welded to the channel at the ends of the wire and intermediate the Wings.

FIGURES 14-16 illustrate the manner in which a solid channel modification may be fabricated. In FIGUREv 14 a blank 88 is shown as a generally rectangular strip of sheet material, such as stiff springy metal. At one end of the strip is a pair of large projections 90, and at the other end of the strip is a group of small projections 92. 'Ihe projections -90 resemble wings and the projections 92 resemble small trapezoids. To form the cartridge holder the blank 88 is bent into cylindrical formabout an yaxis parallel to its length so that the opposed longitudinal edges `94 are spaced to form the side opening previously described. 'Ihese edges may be bent over as shown in yFIGURE I16` to facilitate the insertion and removal of the cartridge. The projections 9-0` are bent laterally outward to lform the wings previously described and may be curved as shown in FIGURE 15 to complement linger contours. The small projections 92 are bent laterally inward and form the internal bead previously described for engagement with the constricted neck of the cartridge.

It is evident 'from the foregoing description thatthe invention provides unique forms of cartridge holders. While preferred embodiments of the invention have been shown and described, it will be apparent to those skilled in the art that changes can be made in these embodiments without departing from the principles and spirit of the invention, the scope of which is defined in the appended claims. For example, certain features of the various emlfbodiments may be interchanged. The form shown in FIGURE 9 may be :made skeletal; the form shown in FIGURE 1 may be provided with van extension 42 and forward bead 42 or a rear bed 40, as illustrated in FIGURE 9; and the forms shown in FIGURES 19-23 may be made in solid rather than skeletal construction. By suitably varying 'the number and-position of the internal beads or grooves of the holder, cartridges of diverse forms may be accommodated. Accordingly, the foregoing embodiments of the invention are to be Yconsidered illustrative, rather than restrictive of the invention, and those modifications which come within the meaning and range of equivalency of the claims are to -be included therein.

'Ihe invention claimed is:

1. A holder for receiving a conventional tulbular disposable medicament cartridge of .the type having a c011- stricted neck adjacent one end thereof, said holder comprising a channel of stiff -springy material having inner cross sectional dimensions adapted to lit the outer cross sectional dimensions of -said cartridge, said channel havin-g a pair of parallel edges extending the length of said channel and defining an opening along one side thereof, the width of the opening being less than the maximum width of the channel, whereby said cartridge may be snapped into said holder laterally by distorting said springy material to increase the width of said opening, said holder being adapted to grip said cartridge along its sides -to prevent substantial lateral movement of said cartridge, said holder having adjacent one end thereof an internal projection adapted to engage the neck of said cartridge whereby substantial longitudinal movement of said cartridge is prevented and having external hand gripping means.

2. The invention of claim 1, said holder being cylindrical, and said projection being an annular bead.

3. The invention of claim l, said external hand gripping means being adjacent its other end.

4. 'Ihe invention of claim 1, said hand gripping means comprising lateral projections.

5. The invention of claim l, said channel being defined by ya pair of parallel arcs of said springy material and a pair of parallel bars joining the corresponding ends of said arcs.

6. A holder for receiving and holding against substantial lateral or longitudinal movement la conventional tubular disposable medicament cartridge having a constricted neck adjacent one end thereof, said holder comprising a first arcuate member adapted to embrace `snugly and engage the neck of said cartridge, a second arcua-te member adapted to embrace snugly and engage the periphery of the barrel of :said cartridge at Ia location spaced rearward from said neck, and a pair of elongated members joining the corresponding ends of said arcuate members and `adapted to lie at opposite sides of said cartridge, said members being yformed of a stiif springy material the distance between said elongated members being substantially less than the inside diameter of said second arcuate member said holder having external hand gripping means.

7. A holder for receiving Ia conventional tubular disposaible medicament cartridge having a constricted neck adjacent one end thereof, said holder comprising a cylindrical channel of stiff springy material having a pair of parallel edges extending the length of said channel and defining Ian opening along one side thereof, said channel being adapted to extend snugly around said cartridge for more than whereby said cartridge may he rmly held within said holder |but maybe snapped into'and out of said holder through said opening by distorting said springy material, said holder having `an internal projection located to engage the neck of said cartridge and having external hand gripping means.

8. A holder for receiving -a conventional tubular disposable medicament cartridge, said holder comprising la channel of stiff springy material, said channel having a pair of parallel edges extending the length of said channel anddening an opening along one side thereof, said channel having inside dimensions adapted to t the outside dimensions of said cartridge, the width of said opening being less than the maximum width of the channel lbut adapted to permit said cartridge to -be snapped laterally into `and out of isaid holder by distorting said material, said holder having means adapted to engage said cartridge and preventlongitudinal movement thereof with respect to said holder and having means for hand gripping said holder and adapted to permit relative longitudinal movement of said holder and the plunger of said cartridge.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1012700 *Dec 23, 1910Dec 26, 1911Joseph PayneSyringe.
US1279069 *Dec 28, 1917Sep 17, 1918Masazo YoshidaSyringe.
US1320536 *Feb 18, 1919Nov 4, 1919 Saymosto di s aiico ahd johh be
US1728260 *May 12, 1924Sep 17, 1929Cook Lab IncHypodermic instrument
US1852658 *May 28, 1930Apr 5, 1932Clifford S KileLiquid ejecting device
US2745403 *Oct 14, 1954May 15, 1956Samuel D GoldbergDisposable cartridge type syringe
US2859751 *Feb 10, 1956Nov 11, 1958Pfizer & Co CHypodermic syringe
US2865372 *Nov 18, 1957Dec 23, 1958Pfizer & Co CHypodermic syringe
AT132546B * Title not available
AU2264835A * Title not available
DK80756A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3395704 *Nov 19, 1964Aug 6, 1968Frey MaxPower operated syringe
US3535068 *Jul 29, 1968Oct 20, 1970Lincoln Lab IncDisposable injector and holder therefor
US3610241 *Aug 15, 1969Oct 5, 1971Lemarie RomeoSyringe guide and indicator
US3848593 *Dec 7, 1972Nov 19, 1974Affiliated Hospital ProdSide loading disposable carpule syringe
US4540405 *Jul 12, 1983Sep 10, 1985Cilco, Inc.Disposable syringe sleeve
US4643724 *Dec 16, 1985Feb 17, 1987Alcon Laboratories, Inc.Syringe holder
US5061179 *Sep 4, 1990Oct 29, 1991Dragan William BManual extruder and cartridge having interlocking bearing surfaces
US5389083 *Sep 28, 1993Feb 14, 1995Jrm Enterprises, Inc.Guards for hypodermic needle
US5489207 *Nov 4, 1993Feb 6, 1996Centrix, Inc.Dental cartridge extruder with rigid drop-in front end
US5509904 *Aug 23, 1994Apr 23, 1996Kilham; BenjaminRemote drug injection device
US5514099 *Nov 15, 1994May 7, 1996Jrm Enterprises, Inc.Guards for hypodermic needle
US5667495 *Apr 21, 1995Sep 16, 1997Becton Dickinson France S.A.Backstop device for a syringe
US5728076 *Apr 25, 1997Mar 17, 1998Hoechst AktiengesellschaftAmpoule holder and actuator
US5876379 *Jan 22, 1998Mar 2, 1999Alcon Laboratories, Inc.Syringe cannula holder
US5925032 *Feb 17, 1998Jul 20, 1999Alcon Laboratories, Inc.Syringe cannula holder
US6158862 *Dec 4, 1997Dec 12, 2000Alcon Laboratories, Inc.Method of reducing glare associated with multifocal ophthalmic lenses
US6679864Jun 7, 2001Jan 20, 2004Becton Dickinson And CompanySafety shield system for prefilled syringes
US7125394May 29, 2003Oct 24, 2006Syringe, LlcApplicator for dispensing a medicinal substance
US7141036Jun 4, 2002Nov 28, 2006Syringe, LlcMethods of applying a medicinal substance
US7601140Jun 25, 2004Oct 13, 2009Alcon, Inc.Syringe pressure applicator
US8414541 *Feb 28, 2006Apr 9, 2013Leonard Morris SpofforthHypodermic syringe mechanism
US8845596Mar 28, 2011Sep 30, 2014Irwin R. BermanFocused dosimetry device and methods associated therewith
US20080140017 *Feb 28, 2006Jun 12, 2008Leonard Morris SpofforthHypodermic Syringe Mechanism
WO2002098494A2 *Jun 7, 2002Dec 12, 2002Becton Dickinson CoSafety shield system for prefilled syringes
Classifications
U.S. Classification604/232, D24/128
International ClassificationA61M5/24
Cooperative ClassificationA61M2005/2481, A61M2005/2414, A61M5/24
European ClassificationA61M5/24