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Publication numberUS3076904 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 5, 1963
Filing dateAug 29, 1958
Priority dateAug 29, 1958
Publication numberUS 3076904 A, US 3076904A, US-A-3076904, US3076904 A, US3076904A
InventorsKlesattel Claus, Balamuth Lewis, Kuris Arthur
Original AssigneeCavitron Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Acoustically vibrated material cutting and removing devices
US 3076904 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

EXNHNER CROSS REFEEECE C. KLEESATTEL. EI'AL ACOUSTICALLY VIBRATED MATERIAL CUTTING AND RENOVING DEVICES Filed Aug. 29.A 1958 Feb. 5, 1963 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 L H mms mmm am n A K 5 R u u H T uw. CLA

m L m Feb. 5, 1963 c. KLEEsATrl-:L Erm. 3,076,904

ACOUSTICALLY VIBRATED MATERIAL CUTTING AND REMOVING DEVICES Filed Aug. 29. 1958 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 CLA U S KLEESATTEL IN VEN TORS LEWIS BALAMUTH ARTHU R KU R\5 Arron/v5 Y ACOUSTICALLY VIBRATED MATERIAL CUTTING AND REMOVING DEVICES Filed Aug. 29. 1958 Feb. 5, 1963 c. KLEESATTEL Erm.

4 fraz/Vey.

4 Sheets-Sheet 4 c. KLEgsTTEL Erm.

AUOUSTICALLY VIBRATED MATERIAL CUTTING AND REMOVING DEVICES Feb. 5, 1963 Filed Aug. 29. 1958 CLAUS nessun.:

Laws BALAMUTH ARTHUR KURS INVENTOILS` BY uw J Arran. #4 Y United States Patent O 3,076,904 ACOUSTICALLY VIBRATED MATERIAL CUTTING AND REMOVING DEVICES Claus Klcesattel, Forest Hills, Lewis Balamuth, Woodside, and Arthur Kuris, Riverdale, N.Y., assignors t Cavitron Corporation, Long Island City, N.Y., a corporation of New York Filed Aug. 29, 1958, Ser. No. 758,069 25 Claims. (Cl. S10-26) This invention relates to acoustically vibrated material cutting and removing devices and more particularly to devices and instrumen-ts powered by electromechanical vibrators to which a selected work tool is secured.

Acoustically vibrated material cutting and removing devices made in accordance with this invention essentially comprise a vibrator having an electromechanical part or section which is induced to vibrate at relatively high frequency and small amplitude by the presence of a surrounding alternating electromagnetic field as produced by an alternating current source. The electromechanical section or part may be any one of several types such as electrodynamic, piezo-electric, or magnetostrictive, with an operating frequency range in the order of 5,000 to 40,000 cycles per second and a preferred frequency range in the order of 20,000 to about 30,000 cycles per second.

Where the electromechanical section or part is magnetostrictive, one end thereof is l'ixed to a connecting body whose other end rigidly supports a selected work tool. The connecting body serves as an acoustic impedance transformer and is so shaped and formed as to either enlarge or reduce the amplitude of vibrations produced by the electromechancal part or section as delivered to the work tool through the connecting body. The vibrator above described, essentially composed of an electromechanical part or section, a connecting body and a work tool, are rigidly joined end to end as a unit, and supported by a suitable housing or casing.

An important feature of this invention is the provision of an insert assembly which incorporates a vibrator as an assembled part thereof, and which is so constructed as -to permit ready separation and withdrawal of the insert assembly from the housing, and convenient re-assembly of the insert assembly and housing in operative combination. To permit convenient and unobstructed attachment and detachment of the insert assembly to and from the housing, the housing itself preferably comprises a tubular casing having a smooth and unobstructed bore of nonmagnetic and electrically insulating material, such as a tough, strong and wear-resistant plastic composition. In this construction, the enamel coated excitation coil can be wound around the body of the casing without impediment to the establishment of an alternating electromagnetic field within the casing when a biased alternating current is applied to the winding. The winding as thus mounted may be protected by a nonmagnetic jacket formed of suitable plastic composition in surrounding relation to the winding and tubular supporting body of the casing.

The biased alternating current lead wires which are connected to the excitation winding are contained in a flexible conduit which terminates in a tubular adapter designed to be detachably connected to one end of the casing. This flexible conduit and adapter also contains one or more capillary tubes through which a gas, liquid, abrasive slurry or other fluids may be conducted to or from the device or instrument. At least one of these capillary tubes is designed to supply a coolant to the inner chamber of the casing to thereby cool the electromechanical part of the vibrator during operation.

Another feature of this invention is the provision of means for supporting the vibrator from the housing or housing casing in a manner to transmit minimum vibration from the vibrator to the housing, with minimum vibration dampening of the vibrator, and also to provide a fluid tight seal between the vibra-tor and the housing so that the coolant in the casing chamber can be properly controlled and contained without undesired leakage.

In one form of this invention, the vibrator is equipped with a tubular retainer having a neck section designed to snugly telescope into the open end of the casing, with the space therebetween sealed by a resilient ring or gasket. The tubular retainer has an axial bore through which a section of the connecting body of the vibrator loosely extends, with a second resilient or compliant sealing ring interposed therebetween to provide a leak proof seal and to also provide substantially the sole support for the vibrator. This second compliant sealing ring is preferably positioned in the approximate area of a node of motion of the vibrator so that the compliant ring and the tubular retainer will not materially dampen the vibrations to which the vibrator is subjected. The body section of the tubular retainer as thus constructed, as well as the housing as a whole, can be held by the hand or lingers without discomfort or material vibration dampening cect.

In this form of the invention, a section of the connecting body which extends beyond the tubular retainer, is protected by a semi-tubular guard member supported by a tubular sleeve connected to the adjacent end of the tubular retainer. The coolant which is introduced into the casing chamber through the lcapillary Atube which is connected to the other end thereof, may be withdrawn from the casing chamber, upon serving its cooling purpose, by a capillary duct connected to and supported by the tubular retainer and which terminates adjacent the tool tip. In this form of the invention, the vibrator, the tubular retainer, guard member, connecting sleeve and capillary duct, together provide an insert assembly which can be handled as a unit, with the electromagnetic part and adjacent section of the connecting body of the vibra# tor, as well as the neck section of the tubular retainer, readily telescoped into and withdrawn from the open end of the housing.

In another form of this invention, the housing includes a tubular casing of nonmagnetic and electrically insulating material whose body section supports the excitation winding and whose casing features an integral end extension which supports the vibrator. In this form of the invention, the removable insert assembly comprises the vibrator as above described, and an abutment collar which telescopes over the connecting body of the vibrator, and against which a resilient or compliant ring abuts. The compliant ring is designed to seal off the space between the connecting body of the vibrator and the casing extension and provide a support for the vibrator. This compliant ring is preferably positioned in the approximate area of a node of motion of the vibrator, so that minimum vibration dampening of the vibrator and a minimum of vibration transmission to the housing and casing results.

A guard member loosely telescopes over the projecting end of the connecting body of the vibrator, and its inner end may be pushed into abutment against the adjacent side of the compliant supporting ring. The protective guard has an end section which telescopes into the tubular bore of the casing extension and may be additionally supported by a tubular sleeve which telescopes over the guard member and the end extension of the casing. In this form of the invention, the insert assembly comprises the vibrator, abutment collar, compliant ring and guard member, which can be readily telescoped into and withdrawn from the bore of the casing and casing extension.

In this form of the invention, the exible conduit as removably connected to one end of the casing by the detachable adapter, contains va plurality of capillary tubes.

One of these capillary tubes is used to supply a coolant and emerges exteriorly of the tubular adapter and extends exteriorly of the housing jacket in the form of a duct. The terminal end of this duct is closed, and is connected to a manifold ring which surrounds a plurality of radial holes in the casing wall. In this construction, a coolant may flow from the coolant supply capillary through the external duct, into the ring manifold, through the radial holes in the casing and thence into the casing chamber to cool the electromagnetic part of the vibrator contained therein. The warmed coolant may be withdrawn through an axial bore at the conduit attaching end of the casing and conducted away through a second capillary tube extending through the flexible conduit and leading from the casing chamber.

This modification of the invention also features the provision of one or more capillary ducts extending along the outer surface of the housing and supported thereby. These capillary ducts enter the tubular adapter and are connected to additional capillary tubes in the flexible conduit. These last mentioned capillary ducts are designed to be connected to nozzles xed to and supported by the tubular sleeve which supports the guard member at the other end of the casing, and which lead to the work area of the work tool. By this additional tube and duct system, treating materials such as air, water, abrasive slurry and other liquids and fluids, may be conveniently supplied in the work area of the work tool.

Acoustically vibrated material cutting and removing devices of this invention may be dimensionally constructed to provide dental and surgical instruments which can be readily held in the hand. Acoustically vibrated instruments have been made in accordance with this invention whose housings have an exterior diameter of approximately only 3/s to 1/2 inch, and an overall length as measured from tool tip to conduit connecting adapter of only approximately 8 inches. It will be appreciated, however, that devices and instruments made in accordance with this invention may be made powerful in size, with a housing diameterof several inches, for numerous industrial uses, with the housing thereof connected to a suitable supporting bracket.

By making the virbator as an assembled part of a readily attachable and detachable insert assembly, it is evident that the operator or technician can interchangeably use a number of inserts, each equipped with a dite'ent type of work tool, and thus perform his work more eciently and rapidly and with minimum of interruption, as compared to the time and effort requ'red to remove and solidly attach a work tool to the connecting body of the vibrator by use of wrenches and the like. It will be appreciated, however. that this invention does not preclude the use of work tools which are attachrble to and detachable from the connecting body of the vibrator, as when the removable insert assembly is not in use.

Acoustically vibrated insert assemblies made in accordance with this invention may include as a xed or detachable part thereof almost Yanyhform of work tool, suclLas cutting blades, knie'and scalpelsydrilling, boring or puncturing tools; chipping, slicing or shaving tools; tamping, compressing and Yshapingtools; cleaning, reaming, lapping, polishing and iilingtools; andnumerous other tool forms designed for treating hard materials.

Other objects and advantages of this invention will become apparent as the disclosure proceeds.

Although the characteristic features of this invention will be particularly pointed out in the claims, the invention itself and the manner in which it may be carried out, may be better understood by referring to the following description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings forming a part hereof, in which:

FIG. I is a pictorial illustration of an acoustically vibrated material removing device, made in accordance with this invention in the form of a handpiece, and connected to a flexible conduit which contains the current supply lines and one or more uid supply ducts;

FIG. II is a pictorial illustration of the multi-pronged and multi purpose plug which is fixed to the terminal end of the conduit and designed for connection to a biased alternating current generator and iluid supply;

FIG. III is a longitudinal section of the plug shown in FIG. II;

FIG. IV is an end view of the plug shown in FIG. III;

FIG. V is a pictorial illustration of the housing, forming part of the handpiece as it appears when the tool supporting insert is removed therefrom, certain parts being shown in section to illustrate structural details;

FIG. VI is a pictorial illustration of the tool supporting insert assembly designed for partial insertion into the housing shown in FIG. V;

FIG. VIA is an end view of the insert;

FIG. VII is a fragmentary longitudinal section of the handpiece which illustrates in further detail the insert, hous ng and conduit connection in operative comb'nation;

FIG. VIII is a side view, partly in section, of the tubular adapter which connects the conduit to the nipple end of the housing;

FIG. IX is a transverse section of the adapter and nipple section of the housing as viewed along line IX-IX ,of FIG. VII;

FIG. X is a fragmentary side view, partly in section, of the insert receiving end of the housing;

FIG. XI is a transverse section of the housing as the same would appear when viewed along line XI-XI of FIG. X;

FIG. XII is another transverse section of the housing and associated insert assembly as the same would appear when viewed along line XII-XII of FIG. VII;

FIG. XIII is a further transverse section of the housing and astociated insert assembly as the same wouldappear when viewed along line XIII-XIII of FIG. VII;

FIG. XIV is a sde view of the housing as it would appear when the insert assembly and conduit connection are removed therefrom;

FIG. XV is a side view of the housing shown in FIG. XIV as it would appear when the outer jacket is removed therefrom and revealing the wire wind`ng thereon;

FIG. XVI is a side view of the tubu'ar retainer which forms a part of the insert and which connects the insert to the housing;

FIG. XVII is a longitudinal section of the tubular retainer rs viewed along line XVII-XVII of FIG. XVI;

FIG. XVIII is a s'd: view of the guard member associated with the insert which is positioned adjacent the tool end thereof; and

FIG. XIX is an end view of the guard member shown in FIG. XVIII.

FIG. XX is a pictorial illustration of a modified form of acoustically vibrated material cutting and treating device made in accordance with this invention and which features a plurality of capl'ary tubes and ducts for circulating a coolant and supplying various fluids to the operative tool;

FIG. XXI is an enlarged fragmentary longitudinal section of the device shown in FIG. XX which illustrates structural details thecrof;

FIG. XXII is an enlarged fragmentary view ofthe tubular casing and its winding;

FIG. XXIII is an enlarged fragmentary longitudinal section of the casing shown in FIG. XXII;

FIG. XXIV is a transverse section of the device as the same would appear when viewed along line XXIV- XXIV of FIG. XXI;

FIG. XXV is another transverse section of the device as the same would appear when viewed along line XXV- XXV of FIG. XXI;

FIG. XXVI is a longitudinal section of the tip guard;

FIG. XXVII is an outer end view of the tip guard shown in FIG. XXVI;

FIG. XXVIII is a side view, partly in section, of the outer tubular sleeve which partly telescopes over the front end of the casing and receives the tip guard;

FIG. XXIX is a side view, partly in section, of the spacer washer which abuts the neck section of the vibrator;

FIG. XXX is a side view, partly in section, of the end cap or tubular adapter which partially telescopes over the inlet end of the casing and provides a connection between the casing and the conduit which contains the electrical lines and capillary tubes;

FIG. XXXI is a side view, partly in section, of the tubular prong which provides the connection between the nipple section of the' casing and one of the capillary tubes;

FIG. XXXII is a face view of the retainer disc positioned within the tubular adapter and showing the holes therein for supporting the current wires and capillary tubes;

FIG. XXXIII is a longitudinal section of the retainer disc as the same would appear when viewed alongV line XXXIII-XXXIII of FIG. XXXII;

FIG. XXXIV is a top plan view of the manifold ring and capillary ducts affixed thereto;

FIG. XXXV is a transverse section of the manifold ring and capillary ducts affixed thereto as the same would appear when viewed along line XXXV-XXXV of FIG. XXXIV; and

FIG. XXXV is a side view, partly in section, of the manifold ring and the capillary duct whose terminal end is closed and which is designed to supply iiuid to or return uid from the manifold ring.

Similar reference characters refer to similar parts throughout the several views of the drawings and speciiication.

Acoustically vibrated material cutting and treating devices made in accordance with this invention, may assume numerous forms depending upon the form, shape and composition of the work piece and the work to be performed. To illustrate one embodiment of this invention, FIG. I discloses an acoustically vibrated material cutting and treating tool in the form of a handpiece and particularly adapted for dental and medical work and the like. The handpiece comprises a tubular housing 1 into which a tool supporting insert assembly may be artially telescoped. The housing 1 contains a winding 1t) to which biased alternating current is supplied to establish an alternating electromagnetic eld which produces mechanical vibrations at the tool end of the insert assembly 20. Current lead lines 11-11 to the winding are contained within an insulating conduit connected to one end of the housing 1 and having a multi-pronged.

and multi-purpose plug connected to the other end thereof. The flexible conduit 4) is also designed to contain one or more fluid capillaries or ducts 41 for supplying air, water, abrasive slurry or other uids and liquids to the handpiccc.

The housing l includes a tubular casing 2, preferably i formed of molded plastic such as nylon or the like, which has an elongated tubular body section 3 whose inner facing wall is relatively smooth and of uniform diameter throughout. The head end of the tubular casing 2 presents an exterior circumferential shoulder portion 4 and an end extension 5 through which the insert assembly 20 is partially telescoped. The tail end of the tubular casing 2 terminates in a nipple section 6 having an axially extending bore 7 which leads into the interior chamber 8 of the body section 3 (FIGURE 7).

As shown more particularly in FIG. XV, the body section 3 of the tubular casing 2 supports a winding 10 of current conducting wire such as copper or the like, which is protected by an enamel coating. The head end of the wire is looped around a raised projection 9 at the head end of the body section 3, and the terminal wires 11-11 from the winding 10 extend through spaced longitudinal slots 12 formed in the nipple section 6 of the tubular casing 2. The winding 10 is enclosed and protected by a tubular jacket 13 which may be composed of a plastic composition such as Hyiiex plastic. One end of the jacket 13 abuts against the raised shoulder portion 4 of the tubular casing 2 and the other end extends over a portion of the nipple section 6. The tubular casing 2 may be formed of a plastic material which does not irnpede the establishment of an alternating electromagnetic field within the tubular casing 2 as produced by the exterior winding 10.

The tiexible tubular conduitv preferably made. from tough andstrong natural yor synthetic rubber composition ofinsulating quality having an internal bore sufficiently large to containatle'st one fluid capillary or tube 41 and the lead wires 11-11 from the winding 10. The casing attaching end of the conduit 40 may be additionally reinforced by an overlying exible sheathing 42 as shown in FIGS. I and VII.

The conduit 40 is connected to the nipple section 6 of the casing by a tubular adapter 45 which may be made of metal as shown in FIGS. I, V, VII and VIII. The tubular adapter 45 has a reduced diameter body section 46 into which the lead end of the liexible conduit 40 and its sheathing 42 are inserted and held in position by a tubular metal ferrule 43 which is inserted through the open end of the adapter 45 and driven into the inserted end of the tubular conduit 40 to thereby wedge the inserted end against an internal shoulder 47 of the adapter. The adapter 45 also presents an enlarged body section 48 whose exible wall terminates in an inwardly extending lip portion 49, which can be snapped into a groove 14 extending circumferentially around the nipple section 6 of the casing. The adapter 45 may be further secured to the nipple section 6 by a set screw 49 as shown in FIG. IX.

Prior to attachment of the adapter 45 to the nipple section 6 of the casing, the fluid capillary 41 is drawn into the bore 7 of the nipple section 6 and locked in position against the internal shoulder 7 of the bore 7 by a tubular ferrule insert 44. The lead wires 11-11 from the winding 10 are also drawn through the conduit 40 and the adapter 45 before application of the adapter 45 to the nipple section 6. Any desired fluid such as a gas, liquid or other uid, may be injected by means of the capillary 41 into the interior chamber 8 of the tubular casing 2 for cooling that section of the vibrator inserted therein.

The insert assembly 29 as shown more particularly in FIGS. VI and VII, includes the vibrator 21 which comprises a transducer 22 designed to be telescoped within the body section 3 of the housing 1 with the winding 10 in surrounding relation thereto. One end of the transducer 22 may be rigidly fixed as by brazing solder to a connecting body 25 which operates as an acoustic impedance transformer. The connecting body 25 presents a head section 26 contained within the body section 3 of the casing 2 and is rigidly xed to the adjacent end of the transducer 22; and a stem section 27 which merges into the adjacent end cf the head section 26 through a tapered neck section 28. A portion of the stem section 27 may extend beyond the end of the housing 1 and has a work tool 29 rigidly xed to the outer end thereof as by brazing or threaded stud.

The transducer 22 may be any one of a number of electromechanical types, such as electrodynamic, piezo-electric, or magnetostrictive. However, at the preferred operating range frequency of 10,000 to 40,000 cycles per second, the transducer 22 is preferably of the magnetostrictive type. The magnetostrictive transducer 22 is preferably formed of a metal, such as permanickel, nickel, permendur or other metals which have high tensile strength and are highly magnetostrictive in character, so that it will vibrate to a maximum degree when subjected to the inuence of the alternating electromagnetic field as established by the biased alternating current supplied to the winding 10.

In the form shown in FIGS. VI and VII, the transducer 22 comprises a stack formed from a plurality of metal strips of selected metal whose adjacent head ends are secured together by an inset slug 22', inserted into a slot cut transversely across the stacked plates and brazed within the slot as with silver solder as shown in FIG. VIA. The inset slug 22 as brazed to the free end of the stack gives the stack the necessary rigidity so that the plates which compose the stack will not separate during handling of the insert assembly.

The magnetostrictive transducer 22 may also be formed from a bundle of metal wires or rods, preferably of rectangular cross-section so that they can be compactly assembled together; or a roll of metal foil; or in the form of a split hollow metal tube. The length of the magnetostrictive transducer 22 is made to conform to a half wave length of sound or integral multiples thereof traveling longitudinally through the transducer, at the frequency of vibration of the surrounding alternating electromagnetic field as established by the winding 10.

The acoustic impedance transformer 25 provides the connecting body between the transducer 22 and the work tool 29. The transformer 25 may be made of a strong metal such as steel or Monel metal, although titanium, Phosphor bronze, or beryllium copper are suitable. The transducer 22 and transformer 25 may also be integrally formed of the same metal by making the transducer 22 in the form of a split metal tube of selected metal, and by making the head section 26 of the transformer 25 as a hollow cylinder with the stern section 27 thereof as a hollow tube or solid rod. The longitudinal slot in such a split tube transducer, serves to eliminate or reduce eddy currents therein.

The transformer 25, whether formed as an integral part of the transducer 22 or separately formed from the same or different metal and brazed to the end of the transducer 22, should have a length corresponding to one-half wave length of sound or integral multiples thereof traveling longitudinally through the transformer, at the vibration frequency of the transducer, and the node of motion of the transformer 25 should be in the area adjacent to the supporting resilient ring 36.

The transformer 25 may be designed and proportioned to magnify the velocity amplitude delivered thereto by the attaching end of the transducer 22, thereby increasing the velocity amplitude of the work tool 29 to a larger value. However, it is also to be appreciated that the transformer 25 may be so shaped and formed as to decrease the velocity amplitude of the work tool 29 to a value lower than the velocity amplitude of the attaching end of the transducer 22. When the transformer is so made that its transducer attached end is of larger crosssectional area than the tool attached end thereof, the velocity amplitude delivered to the work tool 29 will be of correspondingly higher value than the velocity amplitude of the transducer 22; and when the transducer attached end of the transformer 25 has a smaller cross-sectional area than the tool attached end thereof, the velocity amplitude of the work tool 29 will be of correspondingly smaller value than the velocity amplitude of the transducer 22. By a proper proportioning of the cross-sectional areas of the vibration receiving end and vibration delivery end of the transformer 25, the attached work tool may be given a wide range of velocity amplitudes, at the frequency of vibration of the transducer 22.

The mechanical impedance transformer 25 is advantageously made in the form of a double cylinder comprising a head section 26 and a stem section 27 of smaller diameter and connected thereto by a tapered neck section 28, with overall minimal length and efficient operating characteristics. For example, at an operating frequency in the order of 28 kc. per sec. and a given magnification ratio, there are theoretically an infinite number of double cylinders whose enlarged input or head section is smaller in length than its output or stem section. But of all the possibilities there is one transformer 25 whose overall length is shorter than all the others. This is advantageous when it is desirable to make the vibrator as short as possible without sacrificing efficient operating characteristics. The formula for a minimal length transformer 25, defined as a function of the operation frequency f, and the magnification ratio M, is as follows:

stern section 27e-:L2: (C/21rf) (-1/\/li-M2). C=Speed of sound in the transformer material. D1=Diameter of the input end of the head section. D2=Diameter of the output end of the stem section. L1=Length of head section. L2=Length of stern section.

In practice, a transformer made of Monel metal is satisfactory, but a transformer made of beryllium copper is superior since it can be made as a shorter unit with a superior endurance limit in vibration. A beryllium copper transformer can be made shorter in length because of the speed of sound, C, is substantially less in beryllium copper than in Monel. Optimum results are obtained in using a beryllium copper transformer due to its high fatigue limit in vibration and its sensitive response to high acoustical vibration impulses.

The work tool 29 as shown in FIGS. VI and VII may be given any desired shape depending upon the work to be performed. If the work tool 29 is substantially straight, with its axis in substantial alignment with the axis of the transformer 25, a vibrational stroke will be established at the tip end of the work tool whose direction is substantially is alignment with the axis of the transformer. If the work tool 29 has a bent tip portion as illustrated in FIGS. VI and VII, the tip end of the tool will have both longitudinal and transverse vibration stroke components. If the tool tip has two or more bends therein, generally referred to as a tool with a skewed tip, the end of the tool tip may be given a combination of longitudinal, transverse and orbital stroke components. Since in practice the work tool 29 forms an extension of the transformer 25, the length and cross-sectional area of the work tool 29 should be taken into consideration in determining the wave length of the transformer.

The vibrator 21 which comprises the transducer 22, transformer 25 and work tool 29, is supported in the form of the invention shown in FIGS. I, VI and VII, by a tubular retainer 30 which has a neck section 31 which snugly telescopes into the end extension 5 of the casing 2. The neck section 31 has a cup-shaped end portion 31' which telescopes over a portion of the tapered neck section 28 of the transformer 25, and presents a rim edge which abuts against the head section 26 of the transformer. Notches 31" may be cut in the rim to permit ow of fiuid therethrough as shown in FIG. XVI. The tubular retainer 30 has a bore through which the stem section 27 of the transformer 25 loosely telescopes. A resilient O-rin g 32 set within a groove extending around the neck section 31 of the retainer 30, provides a liquid seal between the neck section 31 and the end extension 5 of the housing 1. The retainer 30, as telescoped into the end extension 5 of the housing 1, is rigidly supported by the end extension 5 and the O-ring 32 and provides a leak-proof connection.

The tubular retainer 30, as shown in FIGS. VII, XVI and XVII, is also provided with an enlarged body portion 33 whose outside diameter is approximately equal to the outside diameter of the adjacent end extension 5. The body portion 33 of the retainer 30 presents a shoulder 33' designed to abut against the end extension 5 of the casing 2 to provide a relatively smooth joint. The outer surface of the body portion 33 of the retainer may be knurled or roughencd to provide a convenient finger grip. The body section 33 is also provided with an inclined passage 33 as shown in FIGS. VII, XVI and XVII which extends to the inner bore of the neck section 31; and into which one end of a beat capillary tube 39 may be inserted. The capillary tube 39 serves to conduct the selected uid, bleeding from the casing chamber 8 into the space between the retainer neck section 31 and the transformer stem section 27, to a point adjacent the work tool 29 as shown in FIG. VII.

The stem section 27 of the transformer 25' which extends beyond the retainer 30 may be protected by a guard member 34 constructed as shown in FIGS. VII, XVIII and XIX. The guard member 34 has a reduced diameter throat section 34' designed to snugly telescope into the enlarged bore portion of the retainer 39, and thus supported thereby. The protective guard 34 presents an enlarged diameter end extension 34" which extends beyond the retainer 30 and presents a shoulder 34" designed to substantially abut against the adjacent free end of the retainer 30. The capillary tube 39 is designed to pass through a slot 35 extending longitudinally of the semicircular guard member 34.

The bore of the tubular retainer 30 and the bore of the guard member 34 are enlarged in internal diameter so that the stern section 27 of the transformer 25 does not have bearing contact therewith and so that the longitudinal vibrations injected into the stem section 27 are not dampened thereby. Howevena resilient O-ring 36 snugly telescopes over the stem section 27 of the transformer as shown in FIG. VII, and is driven into abutment against an internal shoulder 36 of the retainer bore, by a metal ring 36 which is also telescoped over the transformer stem section 27. When the throat prtion 34' of the guard member 34 is snugly telescoped into the enlarged bore of the retainer 30, the retainer ring 36' is pressed by the end of the guard member 34 against the resilient O-ring 36 so that the O-ring 36 provides a uid seal between the transformer stem section 27 and the bore of the retainer 30, and additionally provides support for the entire vibrator 21 at approximately a nodal area thereof.

It will thus be seen that the entire vibrator 21, comprising the transducer 22 and the transformer 25 and the work tool 29, is supported at its approximate nodal area by the resilient O-ring 36 only, so that the longitudinal vibrations of high frequency and low amplitude produced by the vibrator 21 are not dampened. It will also be noted that when the retainer neck section 3l and associated O-ring 32 is snugly inserted into the end extension 5 of the casing 2, the retainer 30 is rigidly supported by the casing extension 5.

The protective guard member 34 is also supported by and connected to the tubular retainer 30 by a tubular sleeve 37 as shown in FIGS. I, VI and VII. The exterior diameter of the sleeve 37 may be substantially the same as the external diameter of the retainer body section 33, and may also present a knurled exterior surface to provide a convenient finger grip. The sleeve 37 includes an inner end extension 37 which is internally threaded to engage the external threads on the adjacent end extension 38 of the retainer 30. The external shoulder 34" of the guard member 34 is designed to abut against a corresponding internal shoulder formed in the sleeve 37. When the sleeve 37 is threaded into engagement with the end extension 38 of the retainer 30, the terminal end of the throat portion 34' of of the guard member 34 is driven into pressure engagement with the internal retainer ring 36' which applies compression to the vibrator supporting O-ring 36.

The entire insert assembly, comprising the vibrator 21 and its associated retainer 30, guard member 34, sleeve 37 and capillary tube 39, may be disconnected as a unit from the housing 1 by exerting an outward pull thereon suilicient to withdraw the neck section 31 and associated O-ring 32 of the retainer 30 from the end extension 5 of the housing. The entire insert assembly may likewise be attached to the housing 1 in a leak-proof manner by telescoping the neck section 31 and its associated O-ring 32 into the end extension of the housing. Inter-changeable insert assemblies as thus constructed, equipped with work tools 29 of diierent shapes for different types of work, can be quickly applied and removed from the housing 1 as desired. By the use of such inter-changeable inserts, a different work tool 29 may be permanently xed to the transformer of each insert. The use of a series of such quickly attachable and detachable inserts is particularly convenient when the instrument as a whole is in use by a dentist, surgeon or other technician who desires minimum interruption to his work in making tool changes. However, it will be appreciated that the attaching ends of the work tool 29 and transformer stem section 27 may be provided with a threaded stud and corresponding threaded socket, so that tool changes can be made when the insert assembly is not in operative use.

The capillary tube 39 is preferably formed from bend` able metal so that its discharge end can be bent in a manner to most effectively apply the selected Huid, such as a gas, liquid or slurry, to the area operated upon by the tool tip. It is within the contemplation of this invention to provide one or more capillary tubes 39, each formed and mounted as above described, so that only one uid or a.-

selected number of fluids may be simultaneously or alternatively applied to the work area. may be provided with a suitable pushbutton ow control valve positioned adjacent the outer surface of the retainer body section 33.

rIhe generator-connected terminal end of the conduit 40 is connected to a multi-purpose plug 50 as shown in FIGS. II, III and IV, which comprises a cap member 51 having an axial bore into which the terminal end of the conduit 40 is inserted. To relieve the conduit 40 of liexure strains, a helical wire shield 52 may be telescoped over the terminal end of the conduit, and the shielded conduit lixed to the cap member 5l as by set screw 51. The cap member is provided with an expanded cavity through which the wire leads 11-11' and the capillary duct 41 extend. The wire leads 11--11 are respectively connected as by soldering to plug terminals 53-53 and the capillary duct 41 is similarly connected to a plug-in sleeve S4.

The plug-in terminals 53--53' and plug-in sleeve S4 project into a tubular extension 55 and are supported therein by partition-forming disc 56 of non-conductive material through which plug-in terminals 53-53' and plug-in sleeve S4 extend. The partition-forming disc 56 may be suitably fixed within the tubular sleeve extension 55 as by an expansible ring 56'.

The cap member 51 is separably connected to the tubular sleeve extension 55 by an internally threaded conne ing sleeve 57 which presents an internal shoulder 57 designed to abut against an outwardly aired lip extending laterally from the terminal end of the cap member 51. The internal threads of the connecting sleeve 57 are designed to be threaded into engagement with external threads formed in the adjacent end portion of the tubularsleeve extension 55. By a turning manipulation of the connecting sleeve 57, the sleeve extension 55 may be connected or disconnected from the cap member 51 as desired.

The multi-purpose plug 59 is designed for insertion into a female receiver provided on a convenient wall of a power generator (not shown). The power generator is designed to produce a biased alternating current of predetermined high frequency and low amplitude for which the vibrator 21 is designed. The female receiver into which the multi-purpose plug is inserted, is also desirably equipped with one or more huid outlets, corresponding to the one or more plug-in sleeves 54 with which the plug 50 is provided, and each designed to supply a different uid to the corresponding capiliaries extending through the conduit 40.

The ultrasonic material removing device of this invention receives its biased alternating current from the generator and this current is conducted through the plug-in terminals 53-53' and through the wire leads Each capillary tube 11-11' to the winding 10 of the housing 1. The winding establishes an alternating electromagnetic field within the tubular body section 3 of the housing which serves to vibrate the transducer 22 at the corresponding frequency and amplitude. These vibrations are transmitted from the transducer 22 through the transformer 25 and thc work tool 29. The work tool 29 is given a higher or lower amplitude of vibration than that transmitted by the transducer 22., in accordance with the designed and predetermined shape, form and composition of the transformer which serves as the connecting body therebetween.

Since the transducer 22 is subjected to heating after prolonged operation, and most effectively serves its purpose when maintained in relatively cool condition, the capillary duct 41 may be employed to provide a flow of cooling fluid, such as water or cold air, into the internal chamber 8 of the housing 1. The coolant as thus supplied maintains the transducer 22 relatively cool for etlicient operation, and also maintains the housing jacket 13 at approximate room temperature so that it can be comfortably grasped by the hand.

The coolant supplied to the housing chamber 8 is permitted to bleed into the bore of the neck section 31 of the retainer 30, and thence permitted to flow through the capillary tube 39 for discharge adjacent the work area to which the work tool 29 is applied. The coolant may be injected into the housing chamber 8 under pressure to insure a steady how of the coolant through the capillary tube 39.

It will be appreciated that one capillary tube 39, or two or more similar capillary tubes, may extend through the interior chamber 8 of the housing and connected to corresponding capillary ducts contained in the conduit 40 whose terminal end is xed to the other end of the housing. As a further moditication, one or more capillary ducts such as 39, may be run along the outside of the housing 1 and connected to a suitable tluid supply.

The material removing device or instrument of this invention may be dimensioned to provide a handpiece whose external dimensions may range from approximately :Vs inch to one inch or more, and thus adapted to be readily held in the hand. When the housing 1 and its associated insert 20 are thus proportioned, the instrument is admirably adapted for use by dentists in cutting and ling teeth, cleaning teeth, periodontal work, including gum treatments. A hand instrument as thus dimensioned also inds use in surgical work, as when a scalpcl shaped tool is attached to the operative end of the vibrator. Such small size instruments also find application in the gem stone cutting art and other industrial fields where hard materials are to be cut or removed. This device may also be sized and dimensioned for bracket support to provide a heavy-duty work tool for many industrial uses.

If the working tool 29 is to operate dry and without the presence of water or other liquid at the tcol tip, the capillary tube 39 may be provided with a suitable push button control valve or can be shortened and connected to a ilexible tube to by-pass the bled-off uid into a suitable drain or vessel. For example, this is done when the insert is used by the dentist for packing amalgams into a tooth cavity, where amalgam packing must be done in the total absence of moisture.

There is shown in FIGS. XX and XXI a modified form of acoustically vibrated material cutting and treating device which can be made of any size and form and equipped with a work tool designed to cut, sever, pierce, bore, chip. slice, polish, remove or otherwise treat reiatively hard and solid materials. The device shown in FIGS. XX and XXI for purposes of illustration is sized and formed to be conveniently held in the hand and may be equipped with dental or surgical work tools. This device or instrument may be equipped with one or more capillary tubes designed to supply a gas, liquid, abrasive slurry or other fluid to the work arca of the work tool as well as means for the circulation or a coolant to and from the housing of the device or instrument.

In the invention shown in FIGS. XX and XXI, the insert comprises a vibrator 21 which may be similar to the vibrator heretofore described, and which preferably in-` cludes a magnetostrictive transducer 22 which may be formed of a stack of metal strips secured together at the free end thereof by a metal slug 22 inserted through the transverse slot cut in the free end of stack-forming plates and bonded with silver solder. This vibrator also includes a connecting body 25 in the form of an acoustic impedance transformer having a head section 26 and a stem section 27 connected by a tapered neck section 2S as heretofore described.

The work tool 29 may have a tip end shaped in the form of a blade or scalpel for cutting or severing esh and bone or other materials, or a tip end designed for piercing, boring, shaping, chipping, filing, slicing or otherwise treating the work piece. The work tool 29 may be permanently bonded to the outer end of the transformer 25, or may be otherwise rigidly secured thereto as by a threaded stud and socket connection. A collar 29' of larger external diameter than the base end of the work tool 29 may be formed integral with the base end of the Work tool, as shown in FIG. XX, to thereby provide a nger grip by means of which the insert may be withdrawn from the housing 1'.

In the device or instrument shown in FIGS. XX and XXI, the housing 1 contains a tubular casing 60 presenting a tubular body section 61 having an end extension 62 at the head end thereof and a nipple section 63 at the tail end thereof, as shown in FIGS. XXII and XXIII. The nipple section 63 has an axial bore 63' which leads into the interior chamber 64 of the casing 60. A pair of longitudinally extending and outwardly inclined radially spaced slots 65 as shown in FIGS. XXII and XXIV are channeled into the nipple section 63. The spaced slots 65 receive the terminal connectors 65 which detachably connect the terminal ends of the lead wires 11-11' leading from the excitation winding 1G, to the terminal ends of the current wires 81-81 projecting from flexible conduit 80. The nipple section 63 is also provided with a relatively wide inclined slot 66 which receive a series of capillary ducts 96, 96 and 93 connected to the capillary tubes 82, 82' and 83 which emerge from the exible conduit S0.

The winding 10 of enamel coating conducting wire is snugly wound around the body section 61 of the casing with the terminal wires 11-11 thereof threaded into the inclined slots 65 of the casing nipple section 63 where they are joined as by the terminal connectors 65' to the corresponding lead wires 81-81' extending through the flexible conduit 80. The loop end of the winding 10 is wrapped around a projection 67 adjacent the other end of the tubular body section 61 of the casing 60 as shown in FIG. XXII. The winding 10 is enclosed within a tubular jacket 68 embracing the body section 61 of the casing with one end of the tubular jacket overlapping the cylindrical body of the nipple section 63 and the other end abutting against an abutment collar 69 extending circumferentially around the other end of the body section as shown in FIG. XXI.

The tubular body section 61 and end extension 62 of the casing present a smooth and unobstructed bore into which the transducer 22 and a substantial part of the connecting body 2S of the vibrator may be easily telescoped. The insert assembly, of which the vibrator 21 forms a part, includes means for supporting the vibrator within the casing 60 and a tip guard 72 for protecting the projecting end of the connecting body of the vibrator. The vibrator supporting means includes an abutment collar 70 as shown in FIGS. XXI and XXIX which is shaped to snugly abut the tapered neck section 28 of the vibrator. An O-ring 71 of resilient or compliant material, such as rubber, snugly telescopes over the stem section 27 of the vibrator and preferably has a leak-proof t with the bore of the end extension 62 of the tubular casing. 60 The abutment collar 70 is of such length as to locate the compliant O-ring 71 at approximately a node of motion of the vibrator, so that the longitudinal vibrations as induced into the vibrator are not materially transferred to the end extension 62 of the casing. The compliant O-ring 71 provides substantially the sole support for the vibrator.

The insert also includes a tip guard 72 which may be made semi-circular in cross section as shown in FIGS. XXI, XXVI, and XXVII. The tip guard presents a reduced diameter neck section 73 which has a bore through which the stern section 27 of the vibrator loosely extends. The neck section 73 of the tip guard 72 can also have a circumferentially extending groove in which a resilient sealing ring 73 is pocketed and which has bear` ing contact with the inner surface of the end extension 62 of the tubular casing to thereby further prevent leakage of uid from the casing chamber 64 through the outer end of the casing extension 62. The tip guard 72 also presents a semi-tubular body section 74 of increased external diameter through which the stem section 27 of the vibrator loosely extends. The tubular body section 74 of the tip guard terminates in an enlarged end portion 74' whose outer surface may be knurled so that the tip guard can be readily grasped and withdrawn. By grasping the grip collar 29' positioned at the exposed base end of the tool 29 which is fixed to the stem section 27 of the vibrator, as shown in FIG. XX, the entire insert may be withdrawn from the tubular casing 60 and housing 1', and as readily inserted therein. The insert in this form of the invention comprises the vibrator which includes the transducer 22, connecting body 25, and work tool 29, and also the abutment collar 70,. the compliant O-ring 71 and 'the tip guard 72 with its associated resilient sealing ring 73.

To further support the tubular body section 74 of the tip guard and also provide a mounting for the tubular nozzles 94-94' as hereinafter described, an outer tubular sleeve 75 may be provided as shown in FIGS. XXI and XXVIII. 'I'he outer tubular sleeve 75 presents a reduced diameter outer section 76 through which the tubular body section 74 of the tip guard 72 may be snugly telescoped, with the enlarged end portion 74 thereof in abutment against the terminal end of the reduced diameter outer section 76 of the supporting sleeve 75. The reduced diameter outer section 76 of the supporting sleeve is joined as by an outwardly ared hip portion 76 to the body section 77 of the supporting sleeve which is designed to snugly telescope over an outer end portion of the end extension 62 of the casing 60. The body section 77 of the supporting sleeve is joined by a second outwardly llared hip portion 77' to the enlarged diameter inner section 78 thereof. A resilient sealing ring 79, seated within a circumferential groove formed in the outer surface of the end extension 62 of the casing, is designed to snugly abut the interior surface of the inner section 78 of the supporting sleeve, to thereby frictionally retain the supporting sleeve in telescoped position over the end extension 62 of the casing and to additionally provide a uid tight seal therebetween. While the tubular supporting sleeve 75 may be separated from and applied to the end extension 62 of the casing to facilitate assembly and repair of the instrument,rthe supporting sleeve 75 is normally not withdrawn with the insert.

The instrument attaching end of the conduit 80 which contains the current wires 81-81 and the capillary tubes 82-82' and 83 is strengthened and reinforced by a exible wire coil 84 as shown in FIGS. XX and XXI. The terminal end of the conduit 80 and the wire coil 84 is inserted into the conical end section 86 of the adapter 85 and held in place -as by a tubular ferrule. The adapter 85 as shown in FIG. XXX has a tubular body section 87 of uniform diameter which terminates in an end portion 87' having an internal shoulder designed to abut against the adjacent end of the tubular jacket 68.

The body section 87 of the adapter 85 contains and supports a partition disc 88 made from fibrous or nonconducting material which abuts against an internal shoulder 88' formed within the tubular body section 87 of the adapter. The partition-forming disc 88 as shown in FIGS. XXI, XXV, XXXII and XXXIII has transverse holes therein which receive the lead wires 81-81 and capillary tubes 82-82 and 83. The partition forming disc 88 also contains an axial hole of enlarged dameter in which a tubular ampule 89 is positioned. The tubular ampule 89, as shown in FIGS. XXI and XXXI, extends into the axial bore 63 of the nipple section 63 to provide a connector for the capillary drain tube 83 which is also contained in the exible conduit 80.

The, tr ducer section 22 of the vibrator as contained in the ina'if'lrbes 64 of the casing 60, becomes mildly heated when vibrated under the influence of an electromagnetic eld. It is therefore desirable to cool the transducer by means of a suitable coolant such as water or air introduced into the interior chamber 64 of the casing. To insure controlled cooling, the coolant should be circulated within the chamber 64 which requires a coolant supply line and a coolant withdrawal line, and in this connection, the axial extending capillary tube 83' may serve as either a coolant supply or withdrawal line as desired.

To provide for a companion coolant supply or withdrawal passage, a plurality of radially extending holes 90 are bored through the body of the casing 60 and th-rough which the coolant may be supplied to or withdrawn from the interior chamber 64 thereofl The radial holes 90 are enclosed by a manifold ring 91 as shown in FIGS. XX, XXI, XXXIV and XXXV which is supported in spaced relation to the holes 90 by the abutment rib 69 and a companion abutment rib 69 extending circumferentially around the casing 6G and formed integral therewith. A pair of resilient sealing rings or gaskets 92 set into spaced circumferential grooves in t casing 60 and positioned on each si e of the fluid oles 90, but between the abutment ribs 69, serve to prevent leakage of coolant from the ends` of the manifold ring 91. One end Yof the manifold ringI l1 may be provided with a lip portion 91 to abut againstthe companion rib portion 69' to retain the manifo ring in proper position.

The manifold ring 91 has uid aperture in the wall thereof which leads to a capillary duct 93 whose adjacent end 93 is closed as shown in FIG. XXXVI and whose other end is open. The other end of the capillary duct 93 is inserted through an aperture at the inner end of the adapter and thence connected to the capillary tube 83. The tube 83 may serve as a coolant supply or a coolant return line, with the complementary axial capillary tube 83' serving as a coolant return or supply line.

It will also be appreciated that the capillary duct 93 may extend in the opposite direction to withdraw warmed coolant from the chamber 64 and discharge the coolant at the tip area of the work tool 29, in which case the axial capillary tube 83' would serve as a fluid supply line for the casing chamber 64. If the coolant is not used to cool the working area of the tool tip, the capillary tube 83 may be connected to and used to supply coolant to the capillary duct 93 which then flows through the radial holes of the casing 60 and into the interior chamber thereof, the axial capillary tube 83' as connected by the ampule 89 to the nipple section 63 of the casing then serving as a coolant withdrawal line. The capillary duct 93 is made to closely hug the exterior surface of the housing 1 and can be made finger compressible or otherwise provided with a finger control valve for controlling coolant flow.

The capillary tubes 82-82' extending through the conduit S0 and into the adapter 85 may be used to supply abrasive slurry, air, water or other uids to the work area of the work tool. To provide for such supply, two or more tubular nozzles 94-94' as shown in FIGS. XX, XXI, XXXIV and XXXV are fixed to a grip clamp or sleeve 9S which snugly embraces and clamps to the reduced diameter outer section 76 of the tubular supporting sleeve 75. These tubular nozzles 94-94 as welded to or otherwise secured t-o the grip clamp 95, are removable with the tubular supporting sleeve 75. The tubular nozzles 94-94 are joined to the capillary tubes 82-82 at the other end of the instrument by a pair of flexible capillary ducts 96--96' which may be made of plastic and designed to closely hug the exterior surface of the instrument housing 1'. The capillary ducts 96-96 may extend through an aperture formed in the wall of the adapter 85 and pass through the wide longitudinal slot 66 Vin the nipple section 63 of the casing, and so made as to telescope over the terminal ends of the capillary tubes 82--82 within the adapter as shown in FIG. XXI.

The conduit 40 associated with the acoustically vibrated device or instrument shown in FIGS. XX and XXI, may be connected at the other end thereof to a multi-purpose plug designed for insertion into a female receptacle associated with a generator designed to generate a biased alternating current of the desired frequency. The multipurpose plug may be formed as generally shown in FIGS. Il, III and IV, and equipped with plug-in inserts 53-53' at the terminal ends of the current wires 81-81'. The supporting partition S6 in this plug is also designed to support the necessary plurality of plug-in sleeves 54 connected to the capillary tubes 82-82 and 83-83'.

Current supplied by the generator is delivered to the plug-in terminals 53-53 of the multi-purpose plug and thence conducted by current wires 81--81 through the terminal connectors 65' and lead wires 11--11 to the winding 10. Upon energization of the winding 10 with the current source, such as a biased alternating current of the desired operating frequency, an alternating electromagnetic field is established within the tubular body section 61 of the casing 60 to thereby longitudinally vibrate the transducer section 22 of the insert at a corresponding frequency. These vibrations are either magnified or reduced in amplitude by the connecting body 25 as determined by its shape, form and metal composition, and these vibrations are in turn delivered to the work tool 29 and the tip end thereof.

A suitable coolant is circulated in either direction from the generator connections and plug-in sleeves 54, through the capillary tubes 83-83 and thence through the external capillary duct 93 and the casing chamber 64. As an alternative, the warm coolant may be withdrawn from the casing chamber 64 through the manifold ring 91, and conducted by the capillary duct 93 to one of the tubular nozzles 94, to thereby supply the warmed coolant to the work area of the tool tip.

Various other fluids, such as abrasive slurry, a gas or a liquid, may be supplied from generator connections to the capillary tubes 82-82 and thence conducted to the capillary ducts 96--96' emerging externally of the housing and connected to the tubular nozzles 94--94. Where the casing chamber 64 is of relatively large diameter as compared with the cross-section of the vibrator contained therein, the capillary ducts 96-96 may be run without interference through the casing chamber 64 and thence connected to appropriate radial outlet holes 90 in the casing wall by a partitioned manifold ring 91, and thence conducted through an appropriate series of tubular nozzles 94-94' to the working end of the tool tip. It is thus seen that any desired number and type of fluid may be supplied to the casing chamber, as well as the work tool, within the contemplation of this invention.

The work tool 29 as above described preferably has an enlarged base section in axial alignment with the connecting body 25 and a reduced diameter tip section which tapers into the enlarged base. Where the tip section is made relatively straight, cutting, piercing, puncturing and boring operations may be effected. When the tip section of the work tool has an appropriate bend therein, lateral and longitudinal cutting, shaping, tiling and boring operations may be effected. Where the tip section of the work tool has two bends therein which extend at different angles, a circular or elliptical cutting movement of the tool tip is achieved.

The working tips of the work tools 29 may be in the shape and form of a cutting knife or scalpel, or may be shaped in the form of a chisel, point, prong or flat ended tamper to perform selected variety of work. Thus, the inserts of this invention may be designed to support, vibrate and operate numerous types of work tools for cutting, severing, or sawing; drilling, boring and puncturing; chipping, slicing and shaving; compressing, shaping and compacting; and cleaning, reaming, lapping, polishing and filing; as well as numerous other treating operations applied to relatively hard and solid materials.

The devices and instruments shown in FIGS. I and XX may be sized to be conveniently held in the hand, and thus used as dental and surgical instruments, and for various industrial uses where fine work is required. FIG. I substantially accurately portrays the true length and diameter dimensions of an instrument made in accordance with this invention and now being used for dental, surgical and industrial work. The instrument shown in FIG. XX may have an external diameter which is no larger than the instrument shown in FIG. I, and likewise used to perform dental, surgical and industrial work. It will be appreciated, however, that devices and instruments made in accordance with this invention may be several inches in diameter and several feet in length to meet particular industrial requirements.

The instruments and devices of this invention are composed of relatively few seperately fabricated parts, which may be readily assembled to provide operative units, and

can be readily dis-assembled and reassembled for inspection, repair or replacement of parts. While the work tool may be rigidly connected to the Output end of the connecting body of the vibrator, as by screw stud and threaded socket connection, and without removing the insert from the housing, it is highly convenient and advantageous, especially in performing dental and surgical work, to provide quickly removable and relaceable inserts which the assisting technician can sterilize and have conveniently at hand for the use of the surgeon or dentist, as his work on the patient may from time to time require, so that his time and attention is detracted to a minimum degree from his work on the patient.

While certain novel features of this invention have been disclosed herein and are pointed out in the claims, it will be understood that various omissions, substitutions and changes may be made by those skilled in the art without departing from the spirit of this invention.

What we claim is:

1. An acoustically vibrated material treating device including in combination; a tubular casing having an energizing coil supported by said casing; and a removable insert which includes an electromechanical transducer designed to telescope into said casing and to vibrate at high frequency and low amplitude when the surrounding coil is energized, a connecting body fixed to one end of said transducer and designed to rigidly support a work tool at the outer end thereof, a tubular retainer having an axial bore through which the connecting body loosely extends, said tubular retainer having a neck section de signed to telescope into one end of said casing, a sealing ring positioned between the neck section of said retainer and the adjacent inner surface of said tubular casing, a second sealing ring of compliant material snugly embracing said connecting body at approximately the node of motion thereof and designed to have snug bearing contact with the inner surface of the retainer bore, said second ring as supported by said retainer providing substantially the sole direct contact support for said transducer and connecting body, and a guard member loosely telescoping over the outer end portion of said connecting body and having the inner end portion thereof telescoping into the opposite end of said tubular retainer; said insert being attachable and detachable as a unit from said casing by inserting and withdrawing the neck section of said retainer from the end of said tubular casing.

2. An acoustically vibrated material treating device including in combination a tubular casing having an energizing coil supported by said casing; and a removable insert which includes an electromechanical transducer designed to telescope into said casing and to vibrate at high frequency and low amplitude when the surrounding coil is energized, a connecting body fixed to one end of said transducer and designed to rigidly support a work tool at the outer end thereof, a tubular retainer having an axial bore through which the connecting body exends, said tubular retainer having a necksection designed to telescope into one end of said casing, an enlarged body section designed to substantially abut the adjacent free end of said tubular casing, and an end extension projecting from said body section, a first sealing ring positioned between the neck section of said retainer and the adjacent inner surface of said tubular casing, a second sealing ring snugly embracing said connecting body and designed to have snug bearing contact with the inner surface of the retainer bore, said second ring as supported by said retainer providing substantially the sole direct contact support for said transducer and connecting body, a tubular sleeve member having an end portion thereof telescoped over the end extension of said retainer, and a guard member loosely telescoping over the outer end portion of said connecting body and having the inner end portion thereof telescoping into the tubular end extension of said retainer; said insert being attachable and detachable as a unit from said casing by inserting and withdrawing the neck section of said retainer from the end of said tubular casing.

3. A vibratory insert designed to be inserted into one end of' a tubular casing having an energizing coil supported by the casing to provide when assembled an acoustically vibrated material treating device; said vibratory insert including a magnetostrictive transducer adapted to be telescopcd into such casing and to vibrate at high frequency and low amplitude when the surrounding coil is energized by biased alternating current, a connecting body fixed to one end of said transducer and designed to rigidly support a work tool at the outer end thereof, a tubular retainer having an axial bore through which the connecting body loosely extends, said tubular retainer having a neck section designed to telescope into one end of such casing, an enlarged body section designed to substantially abut the adjacent free end of such tubular casing and an end extension projecting therefrom, a sealing ring of compliant material snugly embracing said connecting body at approximately the node of motion thereof and designed to have snug bearing contact with the inner surface of the retainer bore, a guard member loosely telescoping over the outer end portion of said connecting body and having the inner end portion thereof telescoping into said retainer, a fluid conducting passage extending from the bore of said retainer to a point adjacent the outer end of said connecting body, and a tubular sleeve telescoping over said protective guard and the end extension of said retainer.

4. An acoustically vibrated material treating device including in combination; a casing presenting a tubular body section and a tubular extension at one end thereof, an energizing coil embracing the body section of said casing, a tubular jacket enclosing said energizing coil, and a conduit fixed to one end of said casing and containing lead wires connected to said energizing coil and a iluid capillary tube leading into the adjacent end of said casing; a mechanical vibrator which includes, a magnetostrictive transducer adapted to be removably telescoped into the other end of the tubular body section of said casing and designed to vibrate at high frequency and low amplitude when said surrounding coil is energized by biased alternating current, a connecting body xed to one end of said transducer and designed to rigidly support a work tool at the other end thereof, and a sealing ring of compliant material snugly embracing said connecting body at the approximate node of motion thereof and designed to have snug bearing contact with the inner surface of said tubular extension, said sealing ring as supported by said sleeve extension providing substantially the sole direct contact support for said vibrator and providing a fluid seal therebetween.

5. An acoustically vibrated material treating device including in combination; a casing presenting a tubular body section and a tubular extension at one end thereof, an energizing coil embracing the body section of said casing, a tubular jacket enclosing said energizing coil, and a conduit iixed to one end of said casing and containing lead wires connected to said energizing coil and a fluid capillary tube leading into the adjacent end of said casing; a mechanical vibrator which includes, an electromechanical transducer adapted to be removably telescoped into the other end of the tubular body section of said casing and designed to vibrate at high frequency and low amplitude when the surrounding coil is energized, a connecting body lixed to one end of said transducer and designed to rigidly support a work tool at the other end thereof, a sealing ring of compliant material snugly embracing said connecting body at the approximate node of motion thereof and designed to have snug bearing contact with the inner surface of said tubular extension; and a fluid conducting passage extending from a point adjacent to but in advance of said sealing ring and through said end extension to a point adjacent the outer end of said connecting body.

6. An acoustically vibrated dental or surgical instrument includingl in combination; an integralV casing presenting a tubular body section having a nipple section at one end thereof and a tubular extension at the other end thereof, an energizing coil embracing the body section of said casing, a tubular jacket enclosing said energizing coil, and a conduit connected to said nipple section and containing lead wires connected to said energizing coil and a uid return tube leading from the adjacent end of said tubular body section and a uid supply tube emerging exteriorly of said tubular jacket; a mechanical vibrator which includes an electromechanical transducer loosely telescoping through the tubular extension of said casing and into the tubular body section thereof and designed to vibrate at high frequency and low amplitude when said surrounding coil is energized, a connecting body fixed to one end of said transducer and having a section thereof loosely telescoping into the tubular extension of said casing and a section projecting beyond the end of said tubular extension and designed to rigidly support a work tool at the outer end thereof, and a sealing ring of compliant material snugly embracing said connecting body and designed to have snug bearing contact with the inner surface of said tubular extension; a fluid inlet passage in the wall of said tubular extension positioned in advance of said sealing ring, and a supply duct connected to said fluid inlet passage and said fluid supply tube to provide for fluid circulation within said casing.

7. An acoustically vibrated dental and surgical instrument including in combination; an integral casing presenting a tubular body section having a nipple section at one end thereof and a tubular extension at the other end thereof, an energizing coil embracing the body section of said casing, a tubular jacket enclosing said energizing coil, and a conduit connected to said nipple section and containing lead wires connected to said energizing coil and a uid return tube leading from the adjacent end of said tubular body section and a uid supply tube emerging exteriorly of said tubular jacket; a removable mechanical vibrator which includes an electromechanical transducer loosely telescoping through the tubular extension of said casing and into the tubular body section thereof and designed to vibrate at high frequency and low amplitude when said surrounding coil is energized, a connecting body fixed to one end of said transducer and having a section thereof loosely telescoping into the tubular extension of said casing and a section projecting beyond the end of said tubular extension and designed to rigidly support a work tool at the outer end thereof, and a sealing ring of compliant material snugly embracing said connecting body and supported by said tubular extension, said sealing ring as supported by said tubular extension providing substantially the sole direct Contact support for said vibrator and providing a fluid seal therebetween; a fluid supply passage in the wall of said tubular extension positioned in advance of said sealing ring, a sealing sleeve telescoping over said tubular extension in surrounding relation to the uid supply passage therein, and a supply duct connected to said sealing sleeve and said fluid supply tube and positioned exteriorly of said jacket to provide for uid circulation in said casing.

8. An acoustically vibrated material treating device including in combination; a casing presenting a tubular body section having a nipple section at one end thereof and a tubular extension at the other end thereof, an energizing coil embracing the tubular body section of said casing, a tubular jacket enclosing said energizing coil, and a conduit connected to said nipple section and containing lead wires connected to said energizing coil and a duid supply tube emerging exteriorly of said tubular jacket; a mechanical vibrator which includes an electromechanical transducer loosely telescoping through the tubular extension of said casing and into the tubular body section thereof and designed to vibrate at high frequency and low amplitude when said surrounding coil is energized, a connecting body fixed to one end of said transducer and having a section thereof loosely telescoping into the tubular extension of said casing and a section projecting beyond the end of said tubular extension and designed to rigidly support a work tool at the outer end thereof, and a sealing ring of compliant material embracing said connecting body and supported by said tubular extension; a supporting sleeve having an end section thereof telescoping over the adjacent end of the tubular extension of said casing and a section loosely surrounding the projecting end portion of the connecting body of said vibrator, a nozzle-shaped tube fixed to said sleeve and terminating at a point adjacent the outer end of said connecting body, and a connecting duct positioned exteriorly of said casing and jacket and connecting said nozzle tube to said uid supply tube.

9. An acoustically vibrated material treating device including in combination; a casing presenting a tubular body section having a nipple section at one end thereof and a tubular extension at the other end thereof, an energizing coil embracing the tubular body section of said casing, a tubular jacket enclosing said energizing coil, and a conduit connected to said nipple section and containing lead wires connected to said energizing coil and a plurality of fluid supply tubes emerging exteriorly of said tubular jacket; a removable mechanical vibrator which includes an electro-mechanical transducer loosely telescoping through the tubular extension of said casing and into the tubular body section thereof and designed to vibrate at high frequency and low amplitude when said surrounding coil is energized, a connecting body fixed to one end of said transducer and having a section thereof loosely telescoping into the tubular extension of said casing and a section projecting beyond the end of said tubular extension and designed to rigidly support a work tool at the outer end thereof, and a sealing ring of compliant material snugly embracing said connecting body and supported by said tubular extension, said sealing ring as supported by said tubular extension providing substantially the sole direct contact support for said vibrator and providing a fluid seal therebetween; a supporting sleeve having an end section thereof telescoping over the adjacent end of the tubular extension of said casing and a section loosely surrounding the projecting end portion of the connecting body of said vibrator, a plurality of nozzle-shaped tubes fixed to said sleeve and terminating at a point adjacent the outer end of said connecting body, and connecting ducts positioned exteriorly of said casing and jacket and connecting said nozzle tubes to said fluid supply tubes.

l0. An acoustically vibrated material treating device including in combination; a casing presenting a tubular body section having a nipple section at one end thereof and a tubular extension at the other end thereof, an energizing coil embracing the body section of said casing; a tubular jacket enclosing said energizing coil, and a conduit connected to said nipple section and containing lead wires connected to said energizing coil, a uid return tube leading from the adjacent end of said tubular body section, and a plurality of iiuid supply tubes emerging exteriorly of said tubular jacket; a mechanical vibrator which includes an electromechanical transducer loosely telescoping through the tubular extension of said casing and into the tubular body section thereof and designed to vibrate at high frequency and low amplitude when said surrounding coil is energized, a connecting body fixed to one end of said transducer and having a section, thereof loosely telescoping into the tubular extension of said casing and a section projecting beyond the end of said tubular extension and designed to rigidly support a work tool at the outer end thereof, and a sealing ring of compliant material snugly embracing said connecting body and supported by said tubular extension, said sealing ring as supported by said tubular extension providing substantially the sole direct contact support for said vibrator and providing a fiuid seal therebetween; a fluid passage in the wall of said tubular extension positioned in advance of said sealing ring, a duct connected to said fluid passage and one of said tluid supply tubes and positioned exteriorly of said jacket to provide for fluid circulation within said casing, a supporting sleeve having an end section thereof telescoping over the adjacent end of the tubular extension of said casing and a section loosely surrounding the projecting end portion of the connecting body of said vibrator, a nozzle-shaped tube fixed to said sleeve and terminating at a point adjacent the outer end of said connecting body, and a connecting duct positioned exteriorly of said casing and jacket and connecting said nozzle tube and another of said uid supply tubes.

11. An acoustically vibrated material treating device including in combination; an integral casing presenting a tubular body section, a nipple section at one end thereof and a tubular extension at the other end thereof, an anergizing coil embracing the body section of said casing, and a tubular jacket enclosing said energizing coil; a conduit connected to said nipple section and containing lead wires connected to said energizing coil, a fluid tube leading into the adjacent end of said tubular body section, and a plurality of fluid supply tubes emerging exteriorly of said tubular jacket; a removable mechanical vibrator which includes an electromechanical transducer loosely telescoping through the tubular extension of said casing and into the tubular body section thereof and desgned to vibrate at high frequency and low amplitude when said surrounding coil is energized, a connecting body fixed to one end of said transducer and having a section thereof loosely telescoping into the tubular extension of said casing and a section projecting beyond the end of said tubular extension and designed to rigidly support a work tool at the outer end thereof, a sealing ring of compliant material snugly embracing said connecting body and supported by said tubular extension, said sealing ring as supported by said tubular extension providing substantially the sole direct contact support for said vibrator and providing a uid seal therebetween; a liuid passage in the wall of said tubular extension positioned in advance of said sealing ring, a sealing sleeve embracing said tubular extension in surrounding relation to the fiuid passage therein, a duct connected to said sealing sleeve and one of said fluid supply tubes and positioned exteriorly of said jacket to provide for fluid circulation within said casing, a supporting sleeve having an end section thereof telescoping over the adjacent end of the tubular extension of said casing and a section loosely surrounding the projecting end portion of the connecting body of said vibrator, a plurality of nozzles fixed to said sleeve and terminating at a point adjacent the outer end of said connecting body, and connecting ducts positioned exteriorly of said casing and jacket and connecting said nozzles to certain of said fluid supply tubes.

12. An acoustically vibrated material treating device including in combination; a casing presenting a tubular body section having a nipple section at one end thereof and a tubular extension at the other end thereof, and an energizing coil supported by the tubular body section of said casing; a mechanical vibrator which includes an electromechanical transducer loosely telescoping through the tubular extension of said casing and into the tubular body section thereof and designed to vibrate at high frequency and low amplitude when said surrounding coil is energized, a connecting body fixed to one end of said transducer and having a section thereof loosely telescoping into the tubular extension of said casing and a section projecting beyond the end of said tubular extension and designed to rigidly support a work tool at the outer end thereof, a sealing ring of compliant material snugly ernbracing said connecting body and supported by said tubular extension, a supporting sleeve having an end section thereof telescoping over the adjacent end of the tubular extension of said casing and a section loosely surrounding the projecting end portion of the connecting body of said vibrator, and a guard member having at least a section thereof telescoping into said supporting sleeve in spaced relation to the outer end portion of the connecting body.

13. An acoustically vibrated material treating device including in combination; a casing presenting a tubular body section having a nipple section at one end thereof and a tubular extension at the other end thereof, an energizing coil embracing the tubular body section of said casing, and a tubular jacket enclosing said energizing coil; a removable mechanical vibrator which includes an electromechanical transducer loosely telescoping through the tubular extension of said casing and into the tubular body section thereof and designed to vibrate at high frequency and low amplitude when said surrounding coil is energized, a connecting body fixed to one end of said transducer and having a section thereof loosely telescoping into the tubular extension of said casing and a section projecting beyond the end of said tubular extension and designed to rigidly support a work tool at the outer end thereof, a sealing ring of compliant material snugly embracing said connecting body at the approximate node of motion thereof and designed to have snug bearing contact with the inner surface of said tubular extension, said sealing ring as supported by said tubular extension providing substantially the sole direct contact support for said vibrator and providing a fluid seal therebetween, a supporting sleeve having an end section thereof tele-scoping over the adjacent end of the tubular extension of said casing and a section loosely surrounding the projecting end portion of the connecting body of said vibrator, and a guard member having at least a section thereof telescoping into said supporting sleeve in spaced relation to the outer end portion of the connecting body.

14. An acoustical vibrator including a magnetostrictive transducer designed to vibrate at high frequency and low amplitude when energized by a high frequency alternating magnetic field, and a solid connecting body formed from a metal of high vibration transmission capabilities and designed to operate as an amplitude increasing acoustical impedance transformer, said connecting body having a longitudinal length substantially corresponding to onehalf wavelength of sound traveling longitudinally through the material of the connecting body at the operating frequency, said connecting body presenting a head section rigidly joined to one end of said transducer and a stem section joined to the head section by a tapered neck section, said head section and stem section each having a substantially uniform cross-sectional area throughout the respective major lengths thereof with the cross-sectional area of said head section substantially greater than the cross-sectional area of said stern section, said connecting body having a minimal length, defined as a function of the operating frequency f, and an amplitude magnification ratio M, as follows:

where, I

C is the speed of sound in connecting body material D1 is the diameter of the input end of the head section D2 is the diameter of the output end of the stern section L1 is the length of head section L2 is the length of stem section.

15. An acoustically vibrated material treating device including in combination; a tubular casing, means for generating ya high frequency alternating magnetic field within said casing, and a removable insert designed to be detachably connected to said casing, said insert including; an electromechanical transducer composed of a stack of magnetostrictive laminates designed to telescope into said casing and to vibrate at high frequency and low amplitude when energized by the high frequency alternating magnetic field in said casing, a connecting body designed to operate as an amplitude modifying acoustical impedance transformer rigidly fixed to one end of said transducer and designed to rigidly support a work tool at the outer end thereof, a tubular retainer having an axial bore through which the connecting body loosely extends and a neck section designed to be detachably connected to one end of said casing, and a sealing ring of compliant material snugly embracing said connecting body at approximately a node of longitudinal motion thereof and designed to have snug bearing contact with the inner surface of the retainer bore, said insert being attachable and detachable as a unit from said casing by inserting and withdrawing the neck section of said retainer from the end of said tubular casing.

16. An acoustically vibrated material treating device including in combination; a tubular casing, means for generating a high frequency alternating magnetic field within said casing, and a removable insert designed to be detachably connected to said casing, said insert including; an electromechanical transducer composed of a stack of magnetostrictive laminates designed to telescope into said casing and to vibrate at high frequency and low amplitude when energized by the high frequency alternating magnetic field in said casing, a connecting body designed to operate as an amplitude modifying acoustical impedance transformer rigidly fixed to one end of said transducer and designed to rigidly support a work tool at the outer end thereof, a tubular retainer having an axial bore through which the connecting body loosely extends and a neck section designed to telescope into one end of said casing, a sealing ring positioned between the neck section of said retainer and the adjacent inner surface of said tubular casing, and a second sealing ring of compliant material snugly embracing said connecting body at approximately a node of longitudinal motion thereof and designed to have snug bearing contact with the inner surface of the retainer bore, said insert being attachable and detachable as a unit from said casing by inserting and withdrawing the neck section of said retainer from the end of said tubular casing.

17. An acoustically vibrated material treating device including in combination; a tubular casing, means for generating a high frequency alternating magnetic field within said casing, and a removable insert designed to be detachably connected to said casing, said insert including; an electromechanical transduced designed to telescope into said casing and to vibrate at high frequency and low amplitude when energized by the high frequency alternating magnetic field in said casing, a connecting body designed to operate as an amplitude modifying acoustical impedance transformer rigidly fixed to one end of said transducer and designed to rigidly support a work tool at the outer end thereof, a tubular retainer having an axial bore through which the connecting body loosely extends and a neck section designed to telescope into one end of said casing, a sealing ring of compliant material snugly embracing said connecting body at approximately a node of longitudinal motion thereof and designed to have snug bearing contact with the inner surface of the retainer bore, and a protective guard extending substantially around a portion of said connecting body and in spaced relation thereto and having an inner end portion thereof telescoping into said tubular retainer, said insert being attachable and detachable as a unit from said casing by inserting and withdrawing the neck section of said retainer from the end of said tubular casing.

18. An acoustically vibrated material treating device including in combination; a tubular casing, means for generating a high frequency alternating magnetic field within said casing, and a removable insert designed to be detachably connected to said casing, said insert including; an electromechanical transducer designed to telescope into said casing and to vibrate at high frequency and low amplitude when energized by the high frequency alternating magnetic field in said casing, a connecting body designed to operate as an amplitude modifying acoustical impedance transformer rigidly fixed to one end of said transducer and designed to rigidly support a work tool at the outer end thereof, a tubular retainer having an axial bore through which the connecting body loosely extends and a neck section designed to telescope into one end of said casing, a sealing ring of compliant material snugly embracing said connecting body at approximately a node of longitudinal motion thereof and designed to have snug bearing contact with the inner surface of the retainer bore, a protective guard extending substantially around a portion of said connecting body and in spaced relation thereto, a connecting sleeve for supporting said protective guard and detachably connected to said retainer, said insert being attachable and detachable as a unit from said casing by inserting and withdrawing the neck section of said retainer from the end of said tubular casing.

19. An acoustically vibrated material treating device including in combination; a tubular casing, means for generating a high frequency alternating magnetic field within said casing, and a removable insert designed to be detachably connected to said casing, said insert including; an electromechanical transducer designed to telescope into said casing and to vibrate at high frequency and low amplitude when energized by the high frequency alternating magnetic field in said casing, a connecting body designed to operate as an amplitude modifying acoustical impedance transformer rigidly fixed to one end of said transducer and designed to rigidly support a work tool at the outer end thereof, a tubular retainer having an axial bore through which the connecting body loosely extends, means for detachably connecting the tubular retainer to one end of said casing, a sealing ring of compliant material snugly embracing said connecting body at approximately a node of longitudinal motion thereof and designed to have snug bearing contact with the inner surface of the retainer bore, a bleederpassage leading from the inner surface of said tubular retainer to the outer surface thereof, and a capillary tube extending from said retainer passage to a point adjacent the outer end of said connecting body and the tool supported thereby, said insert being attachable and detachable as a unit from the end of said tubular casing.

20. An acoustically vibrated material treating device including in combination; a tubular casing, means for generating a high frequency alternating magnetic field within said casing, and a removable insert designed to be detachably connected to said casing, said insert including; an electromechanical transducer designed to telescope into said casing and to vibrate at high frequency and low amplitude when energized by the high frequency alternating magnetic field in said casing, a connecting body designed to operate as an amplitude modifying acoustical impedance transformer rigidly fixed to one end of said transducer and designed to rigidly support a work tool at the outer end thereof, a tubular retainer having an axial bore through which the connecting body loosely extends, means for detachably connecting the tubular retainer to one end of said casing, a sealing ring of compliant material snugly embracing said connecting body at approximately a node of longitudinal motion thereof and designed to have snug bearing contact with the inner surface of the retainer bore, a protective guard extending substantially around the outer portion of said connecting body and in spaced relation thereto and supported by said tubular retainer, a bleeder passage leading from the inner surface of said tubular retainer to the outer surface thereof, and a capillary tube extending from said retainer passage to a point adjacent the outer end of said connecting body and the tool supported thereby, said insert being attachable and detachable as a unit from the end of said tubular casing.

2l. An acoustically vibrated material treating device including in combination; a tubular casing, means for generating a high frequency alternating magnetic field within said casing, and a removable insert designed to be detachably connected to said casing, said insert including; an electromechanical transducer designed to telescope into said casing and to vibrate at high frequency and low amplitude when energized by the high frequency alternating magnetic field in said casing, a connecting body designed to operate as an amplitude modifying acoustical impedance transformer rigidly fixed to one end of said transducer and designed to rigidly support a work tool at the outer end thereof, a tubular retainer having an axial bore through which the connecting body loosely extends, means for detachably connecting the tubular retainer to said casing, a sealing ring of compliant material snugly embracing said connecting body at approximately a node of longitudinal motion thereof and designed to have snug bearing contact with the inner surface of the retainer bore, a protective guard extending substantially around the outer portion of said connecting body and in spaced relation thereto, a connecting sleeve detachably connected to said retainer for supporting said guard member, a bleeder passage leading from the inner surface of said tubular retainer to the outer surface thereof, and a capillary tube extending from said retainer passage to a point adjacent the outer end of said connecting body and the tool supported thereby, said insert being attachable and detachable as a unit from the end of said tubular casing.

22. An acoustically vibrated material treating device including in combination; a tubular casing, means for generating a high frequency alternating magnetic field within said casing, and a removable insert designed to be detachably connected to said casing, said insert including; an electromechanical transducer composed of a stack of magnetostrictive laminates designed to telescope into said casing and to vibrate at high frequency and low amplitude when energized by the high frequency alternating magnetic field in said casing, a connecting body designed to operate as an amplitude modifying acoustical impedance transformer rigidly fixed to one end of said transducer and designed to rigidly support a work tool at the other end thereof, a tubular extension having an axial bore through which the Connecting body loosely extends and which presents a neck section designed to telescope into one end of said casing and a guard section extending substantially around the outer portion of said connecting body and in spaced relation thereto, a sealing ring positioned between the neck section of said tubular extension and the adjacent inner surface of said tubular casing, and means providing substantially the sole direct contact support for said connecting body and transducer which includes a second sealing ring of compliant material snugly embracing said connecting body and sealing the space between said connecting body and tubular extension, said insert being attachable and detachable as a unit from said casing by inserting and withdrawing the neck section of said tubular extension from the end of said tubular casing.

23. A vibratory work member which includes; a relatively solid and unslotted transducer designed to be energized by a high frequency alternating magnetic field, said transducer being formed from a multiplicity of relatively thin magneto-strictive metal laminates of substantially equal length and arranged in compactly stacked relation, said transducer having a longitudinal length substantially corresponding to one-half wavelength of sound traveling longitudinally through the material of the transducer at the frequency of the energizing alternating magnetic field applied in surrounding relation to the transducer, an amplitude increasing acoustical impedance transformer composed of a solid piece of vibration transmitting metal which presents a head section and a stem section joined to the head section by a tapered neck section, said head section and stem section each having a substantially uniform cross-sectional area throughout the respective major lengths thereof with the cross-sectional area of said head section substantially greater than the cross-sectional area of said stem section, the head section of said transformer being rigidly bonded to one end of said transducer stack and whereby longitudinal vibrations produced at the transformer-connected end of the energized transducer are injected into the head section of the transformer and thence travel longitudinally through the transformer, and a work tool having a neck section and a tool section extending from said neck section with the base end of said neck section rigidly bonded to the end of the stem section of the transformer, said transformer and work tool having a combined length substantially corresponding to onehalf wavelength of sound traveling longitudinally through the material of said transformer and work tool at the frequency of vibration of said transducer.

24. A vibratory work member which includes; a relatively solid and unslotted transducer designed to be energized by a high frequency alternating magnetic field, said transducer being formed from a multiplicity of relatively thin magneto-strictive metal laminates of substantially equal length and arranged in compactly stacked relation, said transducer having a longitudinal length substantially corresponding to one-half wavelength of sound traveling longitudinally through the material of the transducer at the frequency of the energizing alternating mag netic eld applied in surrounding relation to the transducer, an amplitude increasing acoustical impedance transformer composed of a solid piece of beryllium copper which presents a head section and a stem section joined to the head section by a tapered neck section, said head section and stern section each having a substantially uniform cross-sectional area throughout the respective major lengths thereof with the cross-sectional area of said head section substantially greater than the cross-sectional area of said stem section, the head section of said transformer being rigidly bonded to one end of said transducer stack and whereby longitudinal vibrations produced at the transformer-connected end of the energized transducer are injected into the head section of the transformer and thence travel longitudinally through the transformer, and a work tool having a neck section and a tool section extending from said neck section with the base end of said neck section rigidly bonded to the end of the stern section of the transformer, said transformer and work tool having a combined length substantially corresponding to one-half wave-length of sound traveling longitudinally through the material of said transformer and work tool at the frequency of vibration of said transducer.

25. A vibratory work member which includes; a relatively solid and unslotted transducer designed to be energized by a high frequency alternating magnetic eld, said transducer being formed from a multiplicity of relatively thin magnetostrictive metal laminates of substantially equal length and arranged in compactly stacked relation, means adjacent one end of said transducer stack for maintaining said laminates in compactly stacked relation, said transducer having a longitudinal length substantially corresponding to one-half wavelength of sound traveling longitudinally through the material of the transducer at the frequency of the energizing alternating magnetic field applied in surrounding relation to the transducer, an amplitude increasing acoustical impedance transformer composed of a solid piece of vibration transmitting metal which presents a head section and a stem section joined to the head section by a tapered neck section, said head section and stem section each having a substantially uniform cross-sectional area throughout the respective major lengths thereof with the cross-sectional area of said head section substantially greater than the cross-sectional area of said stem section, the head section of said transformer being rigidly bonded to the other end of said transducer stack and whereby longitudinal vibrations produced at the transformer-connected end of the energized transducer are injected into the head section of the transformer and thence travel longitudinally through the transformer, and a work tool having a neck sectlon and a tool section extending from said neck section with the base end of said neck section rigidly bonded to the end of the stem section of the transformer, said transformer and Work tool having a combined length substantially corresponding to one-half wavelength of sound traveling longitudinally through the material of said transformer and work tool at the frequency of vibration of said transducer, the node of longitudinal vibration of said transformer and work tool occurring a-t a point along the stem section of the transformer.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,632,858 Calosi Mar. 24, 1953 2,831,132 Jackson Apr. 15, 1958 2,874,470 Richards Feb. 24, 1959 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATEv OF CORRECTION Patent Noo 3O76,904 February 5, 1963 Claus Kleesattel et alo It is hereby certified that error appears in the above numbered patent requiring correction and that the said Letters Patent should read as corrected below.

n In the grantY lines 3 and I3, and in the heading to the printed specification, line Y for "Cavitron Corporation" read Cavitron UltrasoniesY Ineu na Signed and sealed this 3rd day of September 1963,

(SEAL) Attest:

IEalwasfr w. SWIDER DAVID L LADD Attesting Officer Commissioner of Patents

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Classifications
U.S. Classification310/26, 433/118, 83/956, 318/118, 433/82, 601/2, 366/117
International ClassificationA61B17/32, A61C17/18, H01R13/00, A61C1/10, A61B17/00, A61C17/20, A61C1/00, A61C1/05, A61B18/00, A61B17/16, H01L41/12, A61C1/07
Cooperative ClassificationA61C1/10, H01L41/12, A61B17/3203, A61C1/052, H01R13/005, A61B2018/00035, A61B17/1644, Y10S83/956, A61C17/20, A61B17/320068, A61C1/07, A61B2018/00011, A61B2017/1651, A61B2017/00464, A61C1/0007
European ClassificationH01R13/00C, A61C1/05B, A61B17/16L, A61C1/07, H01L41/12, A61C1/00C, A61B17/32U, A61C1/10, A61C17/20